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FDA warns concerning pet dog foods, which could bring heart problem

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FDA warns concerning pet dog foods, which could bring heart problem

The FDA advised animal proprietors of specific sorts of pet dog food that can place pets in danger of creating heart problem. The instances were especially distressing due to the fact that they were pet dog types that did not genetically have the tendency to create the illness.
The United States Fda has actually advised versus specific sorts of pet dog food related to dilated cardiomyopathy or DCM.

On July 12, the FDA released a declaration educating all pet dog proprietors concerning a feasible web link in between canine heart problem and also specific pet dog foods which contain peas, lentils, various other vegetable seeds or potatoes as their cornerstone.

The instances were observed in Golden and also Labrador retrievers, a whippet, a shih tzu, a bulldog, and also mini schnauzers and also various other blended types. The instances were especially stressing as these races are not genetically vulnerable to DCM. Heart problem is additionally much less typical in tiny and also medium-sized pets, with the exemption of American and also English cocker spaniels.

FDA alerts pet owners

In its news, the FDA stated that it had actually gotten records from the vet neighborhood of cardiologists on the expanding varieties of pets that would certainly have established DCM, also if they had no threat for the illness. It was located that the pets observed described the pointed out sorts of pet dog food as their major nutrient resource from months to years.

” The FDA is checking out the feasible web link in between DCM and also these foods and also motivating animal proprietors and also vets to report DCM instances in pets that are not inclined to the illness,” stated Martine Hartogensis, Replacement Supervisor of the FDA’s Vet Security and also Surveillance Facility Awareness.

The FDA encouraged animal proprietors to still talk to certified vets if they make a decision to transform the diet regimen of their pets.

The board stated it is currently collaborating with the animal food producers and also the vet neighborhood on the examinations. In the meanwhile, any individual presumed of having DCM in their pets and also having a possible connect to their animal food will certainly be urged to call the FDA.

Pet Dogs DCM

The problem generally brings about cardiac arrest. Nonetheless, instances in pets that are not genetically endangered could boost with prompt clinical treatment.

The major signs and symptoms of DCM are sleepiness, anorexia nervosa, fast and also extreme breathing, lack of breath, coughing, unwanted gas, and also short-term loss of awareness. The pets impacted by the illness could additionally have actually stifled or crackling breathing noises as a result of the build-up of water in their lungs.

The root cause of DCM is greatly unidentified. In specific types, the reasons are lack of nutrition of taurine or carnitine.

In regards to susceptability, male pet dog types are much more vulnerable to the illness.

DCM is defined by a bigger heart that does not function correctly. Specifically, both the top and also reduced heart chambers are bigger. One side could be much more afflicted compared to the various other. When the reduced chamber is bigger, it could no more pump blood right into the lungs. When that occurs, fluid collects in the lungs of the pets. Quickly the heart comes to be overloaded and also coronary infarction follows.

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Coral Moons on the rise as indie rock band to watch

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Coral Moons on the rise as indie rock band to watch

Coral Moons singer Carly Kraft says goodbye to her childhood home on the title track of her new LP “Fieldcrest.” Kraft opens the tender track indulging in nostalgia — ruminations about raiding her parents’ liquor cabinet, campfires with friends. But midway through the track, the narrative falls away as the singer howls over and over again, “We got old.” Around her voice, the band whips up in a mighty crest of volume.

“Fieldcrest is the name of the street that I grew up on in upstate New York,” Kraft said. “It’s about me coping with my parents moving, but also about me coping with feeling like I’m late to the game as a musician in my mid-20s.”

“The ending gets a little emotional,” she continued. “I’m screaming, ‘We got old,’ and it’s pretty much a live take of the band building and building. When we listened back to it we were all just crying because it felt so real and special.”

A typical route for musicians involves graduating from hairbrushes and tennis rackets to microphones and guitars in high school or college then bars and clubs after that. Instead, Kraft went to Rochester Institute of Technology and found a programming job in Boston after college.

So how did Kraft go from writing code to fronting one of the area’s hottest bands? Like every success, skill and luck played a role. But so did boredom.

“Boredom is a great word, that describes a lot of it,” she said with a laugh. “I never pictured being at a 9-5 job. The gender inequalities that exist in the workplace were really hard on me as a female developer. It felt like I was meant for something more.”

At the time, Kraft met a ton of locals in the music scene. She also connected with bassist Manuel Camacho at the day job and the two started doing covers on instruments their boss brought to the office — guitarist Justin Bartlett and drummer Kevin O’Connell round out the band. She learned a few guitar chords, started to write and sing, and suddenly she and Coral Moons found themselves up on stage. A rock band in the most expansive sense (the quartet can do atmospheric indie, retro soul and heavy rock), Coral Moons created a buzz at a few small city clubs

Momentum built and then stalled. After just two years together, Coral Moons nabbed 2020 Boston Music Award nominations for alt/indie artist of the year and video of the year for their single “Winnebago” — the band plays a free BMA party Friday at the Green at 401 Park in Boston. But the pandemic crushed the music scene.

“We then thought, ‘Well, if we can’t play shows, let’s make a record,’” Kraft said. “It all came together in the studio and it was kind of a great moment for us. We were neglected of human connection. We were just in our spaces on our own. Coming together, we were so inspired to see each other and play music again.”

Maybe relief and joy elicited some of those studio tears. But honestly, it’s hard not to get choked up at how great “Fieldcrest” sounds. Produced by Sam Kassirer at his studio Great North Sound Society in rural Maine, the record has the dynamic and earthy feel of many of Kassirer’s past projects (see records by Lake Street Dive, David Wax Museum, Kingsley Flood).

Now, with gigs on the calendar and an armful of new songs ready for LP No. 2, Coral Moons feel it’s time to pick up where they left off.

“The album feels so big and special but we also just did a three week tour of it and we just want time to celebrate but there’s no time because we got to record our next project,” Kraft said with a laugh.


For music and details, go to coralmoons.com.

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State Supreme Court Justice declares ‘Ruthie’s Law’ unenforceable

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State Supreme Court Justice declares ‘Ruthie’s Law’ unenforceable

BUFFALO, N.Y. (WIVB) — State Supreme Court Justice Donna Siwek has ruled Ruthie’s Law “unlawful, unconstitutional and unenforceable.”

The law, which also bears the name “Erie County Local Law 2-2017,” was approved by Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz in July 2017. It was enacted to deliver protections for residents of nursing homes who may be the victims of abuse.

It was named after Ruth Murray — an 82-year-old woman with Alzheimer’s disease who, in 2016, died following a fight with another resident of Emerald South Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center.

According to Erie County’s information on compliance with the law, “the Erie County Ruthie’s Law is intended to ensure nursing homes notify the families of its residents quickly after a reportable event and to increase transparency and accountability via semi-annual reporting.”

Reportable events were defined as “an altercation between patients and or staff of a Nursing Home that results in an injury to one or more patients, or any incident in which a patient is injured so severely that an emergency call to 911 and/or treatment outside the Nursing Home is required, or the death of a patient is found to have been connected, even in part, to a negligent act or omission on the part of a Nursing Home.”

According to Justice Siwek’s Tuesday decision, the New York State Health Facilities Association (NYSHFA) previously told Erie County that the law, as proposed, was unlawful and unconstitutional for various reasons.

They say it was “at odds with New York law and would duplicate and conflict with current state and federal requirements.” Additionally, they say it violated the New York Public Health Law, which prohibits local governments from enacting laws that regulate hospitals, which in this case, includes nursing homes.

“[N]otwithstanding the provisions of any general, special or local law, or in any city charter or administrative code to the contrary, no county, town, village or city shall enact and enforce regulations and standards for hospitals.”

New York Public Health Law §2812

“Despite whatever good intentions the Erie County Legislature and County Executive may have had regarding nursing home patient care when Ruthie’s Law was enacted for the reasons set forth herein, Plaintiffs are correct in that Ruthie’s Law is unlawful, unconstitutional and unenforceable,” Justice Siwek says.

Read the decision in its entirety here.

Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz says the county may appeal the decision.

“The court’s decision to strike Ruthie’s Law is disappointing and will remove a much-needed layer of oversight from nursing home operations. Nursing home residents are among our most vulnerable populations, deserving of as much support and protection as possible.  As we have seen in the past year, locally and on a statewide level, this population is also extremely vulnerable to COVID-19, although the virus’s high lethality for nursing home residents was unjustifiably underreported by the state and only came to light months later. Tragedies like these, as well as the need to ensure safe, secure and healthy living spaces, underscore the need for county oversight and monitoring of these facilities. Erie County will now review potential next steps including a possible appeal.”

Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz

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Lerman: Definition of antisemitism adapts to new political strategies

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Lerman: Definition of antisemitism adapts to new political strategies

The U.N. will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the World Conference on Racism at Durban, South Africa, on Sept. 22. Far from scoring a victory against racism, however, the 2001 conference is remembered for a spate of virulent attacks against Jews and Israel — indeed, the United States and at least nine other countries have declined to attend this year’s meeting. The venomous attacks in 2001 spurred governments and scholars to draft a definition of antisemitism that is now embodied in the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition, which recognizes that antisemitism may include attacks on Israel that demonize or delegitimize the Jewish State.

Like other definitions of antisemitism, IHRA defines antisemitism as hatred of Jews, directed at individuals or community facilities, including synagogues. Unlike other definitions, however, IHRA recognizes that, while “criticism of Israel similar to that leveled against any other country cannot be regarded as antisemitic,” “targeting … the state of Israel, conceived as a Jewish collectivity” may well be.

This is not to say that all Jews identify with Israel. They do not. By the same token, not all Jews wear kippot or keep kosher. No one denies that attacks on these practices would be antisemitic. Yet attachment to Israel as the Jewish homeland is just as fundamental to the identity of many Jews. Anyone who picks up a Jewish prayer book will see the word Israel and Jerusalem on practically every page. And anyone who has been to a Passover seder has ended the service by saying, “Next year in Jerusalem!” Asking Jews to check their devotion to Israel before they may join an academic circle, or a student council, or a parade celebrating LGBQT pride, is asking them to renounce their Judaism. That is unquestionably antisemitic.

Criminalization of the Jewish state and calls to obliterate it are also undeniably antisemitic.

The antisemitic violence that erupted during the recent conflict in Gaza proves the point; Jews were attacked on the streets of New York, Los Angeles and other major U.S. cities, as well as across social media, not because of any personal connection between the victims and the State of Israel, but simply because they were Jews. Jews may dispute among themselves the importance of Israel to their Jewish identity, but antisemites outside the fold do not stop to quibble before striking out.

Critics of the IHRA definition, however, remarkably continue to deny that anti-Zionism is a contemporary form of antisemitism. For example, the Nexus definition asserts that holding Israel to a “double standard,” or “paying disproportionate attention to Israel and treating Israel differently than other countries,” “is not prima facie proof of antisemitism.” The Jerusalem Declaration, which continues to hold sway in some academic circles, likewise maintains that a “double standard” is not, in and of itself, antisemitic. It goes even further, asserting categorically that proposing to eliminate Israel as the Jewish State, labeling Israel “apartheid” or “settler-colonial(ist),” or supporting the “(b)oycott, divestment and sanction” movement cannot be considered antisemitic.

Sympathy for the plight of Palestinians is not, of course, antisemitic. When the Palestinian cause is immutably linked to the elimination of the Jewish State, however, that is another story. Unfortunately, the Jerusalem Declaration tries to accommodate movements that promote that narrative. It also suggests that Israel is racist, apartheid and settler-colonialist, based on “evidence” it fails to identify. And it condones boycotts against Israel, while utterly ignoring BDS’ self-proclaimed goal of annihilating Israel. Omar Barghouti, the founder of the  Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel, makes no bones about it: He and his followers would never accept a Jewish state in the land he calls Palestine.

The elimination of the Jewish State cannot in good faith be characterized as “politics” or mere criticism of the Israeli government. Make no mistake, the BDS goal means Jews would once again be exiled from the land of Israel or allowed to stay in their ancestral homeland only if they surrender their independence, sovereignty and (as history shows) their physical security.

As a member of the Brandeis Center’s legal team, I encounter examples of antisemitism daily. These incidents make crystal clear that only the IHRA definition succeeds in addressing the full panoply of antisemitic threats that Jews confront today — threats on display in Durban 2001 and in the 20 years since. The competing “definitions” turn a blind eye to reality, endangering the people they purport to protect, while protecting their authors from political fire.


L. Rachel Lerman is vice-chair of the Louis D. Brandeis Center for Human Rights Under Law, a non-profit that conducts research, education and advocacy to combat the resurgence of antisemitism on college and university campuses.

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‘Does the blood type of a person make a difference in fighting Covid?’ Dr. Murphy answers COVID related questions

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‘Does the blood type of a person make a difference in fighting Covid?’ Dr. Murphy answers COVID related questions

CHICAGO (WGNTV) – On Friday, September 17, Dr. Robert Murphy, a professor of infectious disease at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, answers questions about the blood types of a person in fighting COVID makes a difference.

Dr. Murphy is the executive director for the Institute for Global Health and will be on WGN Morning News on Mondays and Fridays.

You can also submit questions via email at [email protected] 

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Dear Abby: From married pals to divorced pals to new couple

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Dear Abby: Social skills are ‘rusty’ after pandemic lockdown

Dear Abby: My wife and I hope you can answer a question for us. Two couples we were extremely close with for more than 10 years were divorced two and three years ago. We have just been told that Husband A has been secretly dating Wife B for six months. Wife A and Wife B were “besties.” The men were good friends, but not best friends like the women. Both couples were married for more than 25 years. They are all in their mid- to late 50s. My question is, is there a code where you don’t date one of your friend’s exes?

— Taken Aback in California

Dear Taken Aback: While divorce among long-married older adults (“gray divorces”) may seem shocking to you, it has become more common. Many women are more economically independent than they were in decades past. In the wake of the long COVID lockdowns, people have been re-evaluating not only their relationships, but also their career paths — and deciding to try something they feel might be more rewarding. The situation you have described is regrettable, but it is no longer shocking. Be smart. Remain on the sidelines and don’t judge.

Dear Abby: I lost my husband six months ago. He was my world, and I miss him terribly. We were together for 42 years and raised five beautiful children. I want to go back to school and get recertification as an EMT. My goal is to reach paramedic level. I’ll be 62 on my next birthday and have a few health problems. (Don’t we all?) Is my goal realistic? I plan to use these skills by volunteering in my community. I was a nationally certified EMT and hospital corpsman in my younger days. I just want to feel useful again.

— Next Phase in North Carolina

Dear Next Phase: Please accept my condolences for the loss of your husband. If you can meet the physical qualifications, and since you already have the training, go for it! If you do, the payoff could be the emotional satisfaction you are seeking. I wish you the best of luck.

Dear Abby: Why do former classmates still send Facebook friend requests 16 years after we have graduated? These are people I barely had contact with or none at all while we were in school. I knew of them because of the yearbook, but other than that — nothing. Is this common? Was it because they came across the “people you may know” feature and saw what I look like today and think I’m cute and what they missed out on?

— Mystified in Washington

Dear Mystified: It’s possible because of the miracle of the internet. However, not everyone falls into that category. Some former classmates may be reaching out because they are lonely, curious about what life has dealt their peers or trying to reconnect to a more carefree time than they are experiencing today. If you don’t wish to be contacted, you are free to delete the messages.


Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com. 

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Magnitude 4.3 earthquake shakes Southern California

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Magnitude 4.3 earthquake shakes Southern California

(KTLA) – A magnitude 4.3 earthquake struck Southern California at 7:58 p.m. Friday, according to the United States Geological Survey.

The quake’s epicenter was located in Carson, in Los Angeles County.

As of about 8:30 p.m., the city of Carson received no reports of earthquake-caused damage, though some residents expressed concern about flaring at a nearby Marathon Petroleum refinery.

A spokesperson for Marathon confirmed the flares, which are “safety devices,” were “functioning as intended,” the Los Angeles Times reported.

Though there were no major injuries or damage reported, those who felt the earthquake was still shaken.

Carson resident Deshon Harris said the quake shook his car “like crazy.”

“If you can shake a 4,000-pound car, it’s a problem,” Harris said.

Hundreds of reactions poured in after news of the quake was posted to KTLA’s Facebook page, with one person calling the temblor “a scary one.”

“I literally heard it coming,” the Facebook user wrote. “The house was rumbling for a good 10 seconds.”

Another user doubted that even a preliminary magnitude of 4.4 was high enough, saying they believed the quake “was way bigger than that.”

A magnitude 3.0 aftershock struck near Carson at 11:06 p.m., according to the USGS.

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Revolution battled to a 1-1 tie with the Columbus Crew at Gillette Stadium

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Revolution battled to a 1-1 tie with the Columbus Crew at Gillette Stadium

The Revolution failed to secure a team-record 18th win but got a point closer to the club’s first Supporters Shield.

The Revs misfired on multiple quality scoring chances in the second half and stoppage time and settled for a 1-1 draw with the reigning MLS champion Columbus Crew on Saturday night at Gillette Stadium.

“I was a very frustrating night not coming away with three points,” said midfielder Tommy McNamara. “We played well up to the final moment but we weren’t quite sharp enough and it is what it is.

“But it’s better that it happens now than in the playoffs but we want to be the best version of ourselves.”

Arena made four lineup changes from the starting 11 that topped New York City FC 2-1 on Sept. 11. Arena will be extra liberal with his lineup changes and substitutions going forward because the Revs (17-4-5) started a stretch of four games in 11 days. The Revolution play at Chicago on Wednesday night, return home to tackle Orlando City FC on Saturday and visit CF Montreal on the 29th.

The divergent styles of play were evident from the onset. The Revolution employed a patient possession game controlled by Carles Gil to set up crosses from the flanks. The Crew  aggressively attacked down the middle of the field with striker Gyasi Zardes on point. Both teams created quality scoring chances but the first half ended in a scoreless tie.

Matt Turner maintained the deadlock with his best save of the game in the 48th minute. Zardes gained control deep in the penalty, drew a crowd and dropped it back to Miguel Berry in the middle of the box. Berry wheeled and fired but was denied by Turner with a diving stop.

Columbus (8-11-7) went up 1-0 in the 58th minute on surge up the middle of the field. Midfielder Marlon Hairston broke through midfield and launched a long pass to Zardes, who got behind center back Henry Kessler. Zardes got under the ball and headed it by Turner.

“We only gave them two chances and they scored on one of them,” said McNamara.

The Revolution tied the game in the 62nd minute on a gift goal by Adam Buksa. Crew defender Jonathan Mensah inexpiably crossed the ball through the Columbus penalty area that Buksa intercepted. Buksa walked in alone and beat Crew keeper Eloy Room to the far post for his career high 11th tally of the season.

The Revs played hard, created opportunities from set pieces and made good use of their substitutes down the stretch and in stoppage time but couldn’t score the go-ahead goal. Room, who was competing with an injured left leg, made a remarkable save on Buksa in the 90th minute. He made a better one on Brandon Bye’s header at the end of stoppage time.

“We need to be prepared to be ruthless because in these games, in this final end of the season, teams are desperate for points,” said McNamara. “When you get chances, you need to take them and put the game away when you have them.”

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COVID-19 death rates are quickly rising in these states

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COVID-19 death rates are quickly rising in these states

In this Aug. 31, 2021 file photo, medical professionals surround a 39-year-old unvaccinated COVID-19 patient in the Medical Intensive care unit (MICU) at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. (AP Photo/Kyle Green, File)

(NEXSTAR) — The latest COVID-19 data showed some positive trends in the U.S. over the past two weeks, with new cases and hospitalizations falling slightly. Not all the data is trending in the right direction, however. In fact, the nation saw a 40% rise in COVID deaths in that same time frame.

An average of more than 1,900 people, per day, died from the virus in the U.S. over the last two weeks, based on data from Johns Hopkins analyzed by the New York Times. The majority of deaths were reported to be among the unvaccinated.

Maine only averaged around four deaths per day over the past two weeks; however, that amounted to a 275% increase from the previous two-week average.

Idaho saw a 144% increase in deaths. The state is one of the least-vaccinated in the country, with only about 40% of its residents fully vaccinated against COVID-19. Only Wyoming and West Virginia have lower vaccination rates.

Arizona on Tuesday reported 117 deaths, the most in a single day since last February. For the past two weeks, Arizona has averaged 36 deaths per day.

Not all states are seeing a drop in infections. In fact, Alaska this week reported its highest number of new coronavirus cases one day after the state’s largest hospital announced it had entered crisis protocol and started rationing care because of a flood of COVID-19 cases.

With deaths on the rise across the nation, here is a look at the daily averages of each state:

  • Maine – Average of 4 deaths per day, an increase of 275% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Idaho – Average of 19 deaths per day, an increase of 144% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Pennsylvania – Average of 36 deaths per day, an increase of 140% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Rhode Island – Average of 4 deaths per day, an increase of 125% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Dakota – Average of 2 deaths per day, an increase of 117% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kansas – Average of 14 deaths per day, an increase of 106% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Utah – Average of 10 deaths per day, an increase of 103% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Georgia – Average of 118 deaths per day, an increase of 82% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • West Virginia – Average of 18 deaths per day, an increase of 81% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Ohio– Average of 35 deaths per day, an increase of 79% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Mexico – Average of 10 deaths per day, an increase of 76% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Hampshire – Average of 3 deaths per day, an increase of 75% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Washington – Average of 41 deaths per day, an increase of 74% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wyoming – Average of 6 deaths per day, an increase of 70% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Indiana – Average of 43 deaths per day, an increase of 68% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Minnesota – Average of 8 deaths per day, an increase of 67% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Vermont – Average of 1 deaths per day, an increase of 67% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Iowa – Average of 9 deaths per day, an increase of 64% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Massachusetts – Average of 13 deaths per day, an increase of 62% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Dakota – Average of 2 deaths per day, an increase of 60% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Kentucky – Average of 32 deaths per day, an increase of 55% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Hawaii – Average of 6 deaths per day, an increase of 55% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • North Carolina – Average of 71 deaths per day, an increase of 54% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • California – Average of 132 deaths per day, an increase of 49% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • South Carolina– Average of 70 deaths per day, an increase of 49% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Tennessee – Average of 59 deaths per day, an increase of 49% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Illinois – Average of 42 deaths per day, an increase of 46% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Maryland – Average of 15 deaths per day, an increase of 43% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New York – Average of 37 deaths per day, an increase of 42% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Colorado – Average of 14 deaths per day, an increase of 41% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Connecticut – Average of 5 deaths per day, an increase of 39% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Wisconsin – Average of 16 deaths per day, an increase of 36% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Texas – Average of 302 deaths per day, an increase of 35% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Virginia – Average of 28 deaths per day, an increase of 32% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nebraska – Average of 3 deaths per day, an increase of 27% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Florida – Average of 326 deaths per day, an increase of 24% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oklahoma – Average of 33 deaths per day, an increase of 23% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Oregon – Average of 22 deaths per day, an increase of 20% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alaska – Average of 2 deaths per day, an increase of 20% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Louisiana – Average of 58 deaths per day, an increase of 13% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arkansas – Average of 31 deaths per day, an increase of 13% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • New Jersey – Average of 16 deaths per day, an increase of 8% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Alabama – Average of 42 deaths per day, an increase of 2% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Mississippi – Average of 45 deaths per day, an increase of 1% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Arizona – Average of 36 deaths per day, an increase of 1% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Montana – Average of 4 deaths per day, no change from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Michigan – Average of 23 deaths per day, a decrease of 4% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Delaware – Average of 2 deaths per day, a decrease of 6% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Nevada – Average of 22 deaths per day, a decrease of 7% from the average two weeks earlier.
  • Missouri – Average of 30 deaths per day, a decrease of 14% from the average two weeks earlier.

The Associated Press contributed to this article. Latest case numbers from The New York Times.

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Eastern Massachusetts high school scores and highlights from Saturday

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Eastern Massachusetts high school scores and highlights from Saturday

SATURDAY’S RESULTS

BOYS CROSS COUNTRY

Belmont Hill 25, Thayer Academy 34

Brooks 23, BB&N 33

Roxbury Latin 21, St. George’s 38

GIRLS CROSS COUNTRY

BB&N 27, Brooks 31

FIELD HOCKEY

Austin Prep 0, Bishop Stang 0

Brooks 10, Worcester 1

Falmouth 3, Nauset 0

Manchester Essex 2, Danvers 0

Milton Academy 3, Phillips Exeter 2

Tabor 4, Loomis Chaffee 1

BOYS SOCCER

Austin Prep 0, Malden Catholic 0

Bishop Stang 5, Matignon 2

Boston Latin Academy 1, Burke 0

Chelmsford 1, Groton-Dunstable 0

Danvers 2, Manchester Essex 0

Dover-Sherborn 4, Nipmuc 0

East Bridgewater 4, Stoughton 0

Lexington 2, Watertown 0

Methuen 3, Haverhill 1

Newton North 7, Andover 0

Reading 4, Burlington 2

St. John’s (Shrewsbury) 2, Shrewsbury 1

Westford Academy 3, Lowell 0

GIRLS SOCCER

Arlington 6, Wakefield 1

Arlington Catholic 5, St. Joseph 0

Belmont 4, Melrose 2

Beverly 3, East Bridgewater 2

Billerica 3, Manchester Essex 0

Canton 2, Milford 2

Dedham 1 Natick 1

Lexington 3, Watertown 0

Nauset 4, Sturgis West 1

Notre Dame Academy (Hingham) 7, Brockton 0

Reading 3, Burlington 1

Westwood 2, Ursuline 0

Winchester 1, Wilmington 0

Woburn 2, Stoneham 1

VOLLEYBALL

Burlington 3, Wilmington 0

Melrose 3, Stoneham 0

Nantucket 3, Falmouth 0

Newton North 3, Newton South 1

Notre Dame Academy (Hingham) 3, Wellesley 0

Woburn 3, Arlington 1

 

SATURDAY’S HIGHLIGHTS

BOYS SOCCER

Shoaib Housni scored the lone goal of the game as Boston Latin Academy (2-0-2) topped Burke, 1-0, in a Boston City League matchup.

Anthony Patete stopped 19 shots, including a penalty, and Mathias Floeck scored a pair of goals as East Bridgewater blanked Stoughton, 4-0, in nonleague play. … Adrian Sobczek and Chris Hamilton scored as St. John’s (S) edged Shrewsbury, 2-1.

GIRLS SOCCER

Ava Barry scored twice as Arlington rolled to a 6-1 victory over Wakefield in Middlesex League play. … Cyndea Labissiere scored both goals as Woburn (1-0-2) defeated Stoneham, 2-1.

Izzy Marques had two goals and senior Meaghan Simmons had two assists as Arlington Catholic (2-2) defeated St. Joseph, 5-0, in the Catholic Central League.

In a nonleague game, Emma Easley scored a pair of goals while Olivia Avellar added two goals and two assists to lead Nauset (4-0) past Sturgis West, 4-1. … Sydney Comeau scored a hat trick and Olivia Mucci added another two to give Notre Dame Academy (Hingham) a 7-0 win over Brockton.

VOLLEYBALL

Chloe Marrero earned nine kills and Bianca Santos added 15 assists as Nantucket defeated Falmouth, 3-0, in the Cape and Islands League.

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‘Brian is not missing, he’s hiding’: Search continues for fiancé of Gabby Petito

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‘Brian is not missing, he’s hiding’: Search continues for fiancé of Gabby Petito

NORTH PORT, Fla. (WFLA) — The fiancé of Gabby Petitio, the woman last seen on a cross country trip with her fiancé three weeks ago, is now missing himself.

Police named Brian Laundrie a person of interest in Gabby’s disappearance earlier this week. Now he’s gone and his family’s attorney said they don’t know where he is.

Attorney Rick Stafford released a statement that said, “All of Gabby’s family want the world to know that Brian is not missing, he is hiding. Gabby is missing.”

In a tweet, Gabby Petito’s father, Joseph Petito, said “It took a bit, but the jobs not done. Don’t lose focus.” He added the hashtags “Find Gabby” and “Bring Gabby Home”.

It was quiet at the Laundrie’s house Saturday morning, but there was a lot of activity Friday night.

“Gabby’s parents want answers …. they deserve answers!” screamed dozens of protestors holding signs outside the Laundrie family home.

North Port Police said Brian’s family attorney contacted them Friday night wanting to speak for the first time.

They said the family is concerned because he hasn’t been seen since Tuesday. We’re told he was last seen wearing a hiking bag with a waist strap.

But those who were at the house late Friday aren’t as worried about where he is as they are about where Gabby is.

One protestor we spoke with, Jen Nascimento, said she lives in North Port and while she didn’t know Gabby personally, she said that fact that Brian hasn’t spoken up to help find Gabby is unacceptable.

“I feel like he’s a coward,” Nascimento said. “Even if it was an accident or anything, he knows something. For him not to say anything is heart-wrenching for me.”

While Brian is a person of interest in Gabby’s disappearance, police said he is not wanted for a crime.

North Port Police said if they do find out where Brian is, they will simply return him to his parents’ house. The police spokesperson said they will try to question him and talk to him more about where Gabby might be, but they acknowledged his right not to talk.

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