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MUST READ: Potential Cure For HIV Found In Britain

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MUST READ: Potential Cure For HIV Found In Britain

A??44- year-old British male may be the very first individual that can be quickly treated from HIV?? by a?? brand-new kind of therapy.

He is presently the among 50 individuals?? that are going through the brand-new therapy as well as the very first one that’s body is reacting really favorably to it.

Researchers from 5?? UK colleges such as?? Cambridge College, Oxford College, ?? College University London,?? Imperial University London as well as ?? King’s University London are all associated with this test therapy.

The HIV infection is ?? really tough to deal with due to the fact that it is targeting the core of the body immune system, splicing itself right into the DNA of T-cells, to make sure that they can not find the infection as well as begin overlooking the condition. The T-cells likewise transformed into viral manufacturing facilities that are duplicating as well as aiding the infection to establish.

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Present drugs ?? for dealing with the infection are called?? anti-retroviral treatments (Art) however they can not find the contaminated inactive T-cells as well as can not cleanse the body of the infection.

This brand-new treatment is operating in 2 phases. The injection is aiding the body to identify the HIV contaminated cells as well as to remove them out as well as the brand-new medicine ?? Vorinostat?? is turning on the?? inactive T-cells so the body immune system could find them.

HIV In The Bloodstream

HIV In The Blood Stream

Taking care of supervisor of the National Institute for Health And Wellness Study Workplace for Medical Study Facilities Mark Samuels informed The Sunday Times:

Also Read: Jodie Whittaker gives “Female Doctor Who” the female hand

” This is just one of the very first significant efforts at a complete treatment for HIV.?? We ?? are checking out the genuine opportunity of healing HIV. This is a big difficulty as well as it’s still very early days however the development has actually been exceptional.”

It was likewise reported on?? current examinations that the infection is totally undetected in this 44- year-old male’s blood. It can perhaps be the outcome of basic HIV therapy however if the inactive cells wind up being gotten rid of also– after that this can be the very first main?? treatment. Nevertheless, the results of the test will not be ?? released in 2018.

At?? completion of 2015, there were around ??367 million individuals contaminated with HIV/AIDS. There are around 100,000 individuals in the UK with the infection, where 17 percent are not conscious that they have it.

Also Read: Stories of Vesperia: Conclusive Edition Video Game Anime Exposition Trailer Streamed

This test is really encouraging as well as can be a significant innovation in the area of medication, not just for Britain however, for the entire globe.

” This treatment is particularly created to remove the body of all HIV infections, consisting of inactive ones. ?? It has actually operated in the lab as well as there excels proof it will certainly operate in people also, however we need to emphasize we are still a lengthy means from any kind of real treatment.”

” We will certainly proceed with clinical examinations for the following 5 years as well as currently we are not suggesting quiting Art however in the future?? depending upon the examination results we might discover this.”

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Potential legal claims from New York’s health care worker vaccine mandate

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Potential legal claims from New York’s health care worker vaccine mandate

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ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — Monday marks the first day of the COVID vaccine mandate for health care workers in hospitals and nursing homes. The mandate offers limited exceptions for medical reasons, while a religious exception remains contested legally.

Staff who work in home care, hospice, and adult care facilities are required to be vaccinated by October 7. In preparation for staffing shortages, Gov. Kathy Hochul released a plan that includes signing a state of emergency declaration if needed.

Josh Roberts, a workers compensation attorney at Vincent J Criscuolo and Associates, says that, in the future, there likely will be claims from individuals who receive the COVID vaccine for work—just like he has seen with the flu vaccine.

“I’ve had clients who have actually developed orthopedic injuries as a result of getting a flu vaccine,” Roberts says. “They were encouraged by their employer to get the vaccine and they ended up having that orthopedic injury covered by workers’ compensation.”

Although these instances are very rare, Roberts says that claims may arise from the vaccine itself, or how it was administered. Since the start of the pandemic, he says has seen claims from workers who have proved they contracted serious COVID cases from work. 

“Successful payment would be entitled, to have their medical bills paid by workers compensation, and some portion of their lost wages if those lost wages are related to the injury—in this case contracting COVID,” he says.

Paul Keneally, a labor and employment attorney at Underberg and Kessler, said religious exemptions are one of the most common, but they must be legitimate. “It has to be a sincerely held religious belief. It does not need to be a mainstream or well-known religion,” he says. “It just needs to be a sincerely held religious belief.” This means it can be vetted for by something like a religious leader.

Keneally says there will also likely be lawsuits from unvaccinated individuals who have been fired. “Let’s say there’s someone who doesn’t have a religious or medical exemption. I don’t think those are likely to be successful, but we may see some of those.”

Within the mandate, some perceive discrepancies about who is included, like contractors working in hospitals. “There is some debate over who’s covered by it, because there is language in the FAQs that state construction contractors are not subject to the mandate. But, others disagree,” says Keneally.

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Illinois man wins marathon after 2 leaders take wrong route

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Illinois man wins marathon after 2 leaders take wrong route

Tyler Pence of Springfield, Ill., finishes first in the TBK Bank Quad Cities Marathon on Sunday, Sept. 26, 2021, in Moline, Ill. An Illinois man unexpectedly won the Quad Cities Marathon this weekend when the two Kenyan runners who had far outpaced him were disqualified after being diverted off the course by a race volunteer bicyclist. Tyler Pence crossed the finish line in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 6 seconds to become the first U.S. runner since 2001 to win the race. (Gary L. Krambeck/Quad City Times via AP)

MOLINE, Ill. (AP) — An Illinois man unexpectedly won the Quad Cities Marathon this weekend when the two Kenyan runners who had far outpaced him were disqualified after being diverted off the course by a race volunteer bicyclist.

Tyler Pence crossed the finish line in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 6 seconds to become the first U.S. runner since 2001 to win the race through the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River in Illinois and Iowa. Pence, the head track and cross-country coach at the University of Illinois-Springfield, logged his fastest time ever with the win and took the first prize of $3,000.

Pence’s win came after Elijah Mwangangi Saolo and Luke Kibet diverted from the course a little more than halfway to the finish line when the bicycle rider leading them mistakenly went straight when he should have turned, the Quad-City Times reported.

Race director Joe Moreno confirmed that the bicyclist went the wrong way but said the two runners also should have known not to follow him.

“At that intersection where that incident happened, the course was well-marked,” Moreno said. “The signage is well-displayed. The volunteers are there. And the fourth element is those elite runners have a meeting the day before to get familiar with the course.”

Saolo — the grandson of Kenya running great Joseph Nzau — was on a near-record pace before the mishap. He has been training in New Mexico and trying to scrape together enough money to stay in the U.S. with his wife and two children.

Moreno said the race was planning to find a way to compensate Saolo and Kibet.

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Winning Powerball numbers: Check your tickets

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Winning Powerball numbers: Check your tickets

ST. LOUIS – More than half a billion dollars are at stake for Monday night’s Powerball drawing.

The winning numbers for the Sept. 27 drawing are 21-22-39-44-60, with the Powerball number 12.

The drawing is worth an estimated $545 million. If the winner opts for the lump-sum payout, they will receive $392 million after taxes. Should the winner ask for the annuity payments, they’ll receive 30 payouts over the next 29 years.

If you were to stack $100 bills equal to tonight’s massive jackpot, the stack would be taller than the One World Trade Center in New York City, which is 1,776 feet.

The odds of winning the jackpot are 1 in 292.2 million.

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Several arrests made for felony drug sales in Greene County

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Ithaca man arrested for reportedly stealing credit cards, going on shopping spree in Saratoga County

COXSACKIE, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Greene County Sheriff’s Office has made several arrests for felony drug sales in the area. The Sheriff’s Office says these arrests come after an investigation lasting several months.

“A lot of long hours and teamwork involving multiple agencies went into these investigations,
culminating in the indictments on sale and possession charges,” said Sheriff Peter Kusminsky. “It is imperative that we get these drug dealers off the street so we can focus on continuing to make a positive impact on the opioid crisis in our county.”

Police say, Allison Aguiar, 40, of Cairo was arrested on September 17 and indicted by a grand jury. Corey Collins, 33, of Catskill was arrested on September 15 on an indictment warrant. Marshall Tucker, 39, of Coxsackie was also arrested on September 15 on an indictment warrant.

All three are charged with criminal sale of narcotic drugs and possession of narcotic drugs. These charges are all felonies.

Aguiar was released on her own recognizance to appear in Greene County Court at a later date. Collins and Tucker were both remanded to the Greene County Jail to appear in Greene County Court at a later date.

“Thank you to all involved in these arrests for their dedication and I want our citizens to know that
we are not even close to done yet – the investigations are ongoing and the fight to heal our communities
will continue” said Kusminsky.

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Eureka mayor, some businesses push back against county mask order

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Eureka mayor, some businesses push back against county mask order

EUREKA, Mo. – St. Louis County Executive Sam Page issued a new order requiring masks indoors in the county starting Monday. While some businesses have been requiring masks and say this order does not change how they operate, there are some pushing back.

That includes Eureka Mayor Sean Flower.

“I think it’s time we turn people’s personal medical decisions back over to them,” Flower said.

He took to Facebook after Page announced the order Monday to share his thoughts.

Only St. Louis County Health Department can enforce the masking by taking action against businesses, but Flower said even if he had the ability, he wouldn’t enforce it.

“The word that comes up all the time is ‘enough.’ And I think after two years there are more and more people, regardless of party, that are starting to say ‘there’s enough,’” he said. “We just want to get back to normal the best we can given the constraints that are out there, and that’s what this community will be doing is working on getting our lives back.”

Some St. Louis County businesses feel the same as Flower.

“If you want to mandate something, you come up here, the bug guy, and say put your mask on,” Amer Abouwardah, the owner of Oceano Bistro in Clayton, said.

He said all of his employees are vaccinated and requires them to wear a mask at work. But, not for his customers.

“I’m not going to tell you to wear it,” Abouwardah said. “You’re entitled to your own life I’m not going to tell you how to live your life, I’m going to ask you nicely and politely to wear a mask, if you say no, come on in, I don’t have any power to tell this gentleman to wear this mask or leave my restaurant.”

On the other side, there are some restauranteurs who said this new order does not change how they operate. Herbie’s in Clayton has required customers to wear a mask when they walk inside and anytime, they are not at their table.

“When you walk in our front doors you are required to wear a mask, when you go to your table and eating and drinking you don’t have to wear a mask,” Ben Burris, the reservations manager at Herbie’s, said. “We just want everyone to be safe so having everyone wear a mask is just one step for that.”

At Satchmo’s in Chesterfield, owner Ben Brown said he will not be implementing the mask order.

“It’s difficult from the perspective of a business owner because you don’t really know how much credibility it has,” Brown said.

In 2020, the county health department shut down Brown’s restaurant Satchmo’s in Chesterfield. He said he doesn’t believe this new order will stand up legally.

“I don’t think there is anything to implement, it’s no different than the other half dozen times he came out saying there’s a mandate and we just find out it isn’t true,” Brown said.

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Why coffee could soon be even more expensive

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Why coffee could soon be even more expensive

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — As if a cup of coffee wasn’t expensive enough, a confluence of factors is driving up farmers’ costs to grow the beans and it could begin filtering down to your local cafe before the end of the year.

After hovering for years near $1 per pound, coffee futures — the price large-volume buyers agree to pay for coffee upon delivery months down the road — doubled in late July, reaching heights not seen since 2014. Though prices have eased a bit, they remain elevated at about $1.90 per pound.

Coffee lovers already paying $8 or more for a bag in the supermarket or up to $5 for a cup may despair over even-higher prices, but a spike in coffee prices on the international futures market doesn’t always trickle down to the consumer.

Here’s a look at some factors that could determine whether Americans will be paying more for their morning jolt in the near future.

WHAT HAPPENED?

A sustained drought followed by two July frosts blew a hole in Brazil’s coffee output, immediately sending wholesale prices for the popular Arabica bean to more than $2 per pound. The frost will significantly affect the 2022-23 harvest, said Carlos Mera, who analyzes the coffee markets at Rabobank.

The Brazil frosts followed COVID-related supply chain snarls, a dearth of shipping containers, labor shortages and other production hiccups. Add in rising costs for virtually everything and you have a bitter cup brewing for coffee drinkers.

“This is unprecedented,” said Alexis Rubinstein, the managing editor of Coffee & Cocoa for commodities brokerage StoneX Group. “It’s never been this perfect storm before. It’s usually just been a supply-and-demand scenario.

“We’ve never been dealing with a supply and demand issue on top of a logistics issue, on top of labor issues, on top of a global pandemic.”

WHY MIGHT RETAIL PRICES RISE?

While it’s difficult to determine the size of the crop loss in Brazil, Mera said estimates vary between 2 million and 6 million fewer bags of coffee. That’s about 12% of the output from the world’s largest producer of Arabica, the bean used for most coffee sold around the world. Lower supplies almost always mean higher prices.

Grace Wood, an industry analyst for market research firm IBISWorld, said if consumers don’t see coffee prices rise by the end of this year, they almost certainly will in 2022, as per capita demand is expected to increase.

“That is just going to contribute to more demand that is going to further disrupt operations and make it more difficult for operators who are already experiencing supply issues,” Wood said.

Mera said people who buy coffee beans in the grocery store will likely see a more noticeable increase in prices because about half the cost of that bag on the shelf comes solely from the bean itself. However, in large coffee shops, he added, the cost of the bean only represents about 5% of your cup of hot coffee, so roasters “may not need to carry over the increases right away.”

IS IT A CERTAINTY THAT RETAIL PRICES WILL RISE?

It seems likely, although higher coffee prices on the international future market is not a guarantee that prices at your favorite roaster will go up. The damaged crop in Brazil is still more than a year from harvest, plenty of time for many factors to reverse course.

Rubinstein said higher prices on the international market can often stimulate production — farmers will have more money to invest in their crop — and if there’s more coffee on the market, prices will retreat. But that will also depend on whether the big roasters have enough beans hoarded to get them through however long prices remain elevated.

Starbucks, the world’s biggest coffee retailer, suggested that it won’t need to raise its prices because of Brazil’s lower output. On a call with investors at the height of the Arabica price spike, the Seattle-based coffee chain’s President and CEO Kevin Johnson said his company has 14 months of supply, which he says will get it through 2021 and most of fiscal 2022.

WHAT ABOUT MY LOCAL ROASTER?

Even smaller, independent specialty roasters sign contracts to buy their beans well in advance, enough so that when shortages like the ones in Brazil happen, it doesn’t paralyze them. They also source from countries all around the world, so gaps from one place can often be filled by another.

Chris Vigilante, co-owner of Vigilante Coffee with stores in the Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., said most specialty roasters don’t buy beans on the same international commodities market with the big players like Nestle and Keurig Dr. Pepper. “So we’re not as impacted by (Brazil), but we will feel the pressure of it,” Vigilante said.

Vigilante said he pays between $3.50 and $5.50 per pound for most of his beans, which are higher quality and produced by smaller farms. He has no plans to raise prices, but if other small shops raise theirs, he said it’s likely because the cost for other essentials have risen.

“I’ve seen other specialty coffee roasters talking about raising their prices, but I think that’s more not because of the cost of coffee, but maybe because the cost of some of our other supplies, like cups and equipment,” Vigilante said.

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Ptarmigan fire forces evacuations in Summit County

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Ptarmigan fire forces evacuations in Summit County

A wildfire burning outside Silverthorne has prompted evacuations Monday evening, emergency management officials said.

The Summit County Sheriff’s Office issued mandatory evacuations for the Hamilton Creek neighborhood, which contains roughly 291 homes, while Angler Mountain Ranch is under pre-evacuation notice.

The Ptarmigan fire is burning between 25 and 30 acres, Sheriff Jaime FitzSimons said during a Monday evening news conference. Evacuees are unlikely to be able to return to their homes Monday night, the sheriff said.

The Red Cross is setting up a shelter for evacuees at Summit Middle School, 158 School Road in Frisco.

Fire officials expressed optimism during Monday evening that favorable weather will prevent the fire from growing rapidly.

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St. Louis County Council members explain why they changed votes on mask mandate

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St. Louis County Council members explain why they changed votes on mask mandate

CLAYTON, Mo. – FOX 2 sits down with two St. Louis County Councilwomen who recently switched sides in the COVID mask mandate issue.

Last time around, Council Chair Rita Days and Councilwoman Shalonda Webb joined with Republicans on the council to overturn County Executive Sam Page’s mask mandate.

Their main reason for switching sides was the input they were getting from the Black community that was in favor of the masks.

At one point, a group of north county political leaders even went so far as to put out a flyer criticizing Days and Webb.

The Page administration’s mask mandate requires masks to be worn indoors, just like the mandate in the City of St. Louis.

Council Chairwoman Days says Page didn’t follow procedures last time around and didn’t properly notify the council of the impending order.

Both councilwomen say, this time, Page and the county health department did reach out to them and explained why the mandate was needed.

Chairwoman Days says she doesn’t think the council has to hold a vote to support the order. She says that would only be necessary if there was an effort to overturn it. And with Days and Webb switching sides, the votes are not there for that.

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Fairview Heights man killed in Amtrak train derailment

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Fairview Heights man killed in Amtrak train derailment

FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS, Ill. – A Fairview Heights man was one of three people killed when an Amtrak train derailed in Montana. Dozens more were injured.

Investigators with Amtrak and the National Transportation Safety Board are preparing to go through the rubble and piece together what caused the 10-car train to leave the tracks in Montana on Saturday. The Empire Builder derailed while in the small, north-central Montana town of Joplin. Several cars toppled to their sides.

Zach Schneider of Fairview Heights was killed in the crash, leaving his family and friends heartbroken. He was 28.

Amtrak says there were about 141 passengers and 16 crew members on board. Three passengers died and more than 50 others were injured.

“At this time, there are three confirmed fatalities; injured were transported to many local hospitals,” said Sarah Robbin, Emergency Services Coordinator for Liberty County, Montana.

Family and friends said was traveling on the train with his wife. She survived the crash.

The other two killed a married couple from St. Simons Island, Georgia.

Schneider’s neighbors are in shock.

A GoFundMe fundraiser was created to help Schneider’s family with funeral expenses.

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The effort to protect residents, tourists in Downtown St. Louis

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The effort to protect residents, tourists in Downtown St. Louis

ST. LOUIS – The Rolling Stones concert Sunday brought in $4 million and 60,000 people to The Dome at America’s Center. A St. Louis Blues game tonight at Enterprise Center. And the Cardinals returning to Busch Stadium this week for action means there’s a number of people coming downtown.

On Monday, city officials sought to reassure the public that more officers on patrol and engagement in the community are helping after a violent year of shootings, assaults, and speeding drivers on city streets.

The city’s new downtown engagement and public safety initiative deploys more police patrols on weekends, an additional 30 officers on city streets.

“It’s a continuing process. We’re always collecting intelligence and looking at data and trying to move our people around in the right place,” says Dr. Daniel Isom, Interim City of St. Louis Public Safety Director. “But I also think the things we’re doing in terms of investing in youth and addressing the trauma of victims is also important as well. It is a multi-prong approach.”

Isom says officials are reassessing and reassigning ranks in the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. Isom says he’s content with the current number of officers—some 1,200—on city streets.

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