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Fraud GoFundMe Page Taken Down ‘#PrayForHumboldt’

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Rcmp Charge Man With Fraud After ‘#Prayforhumboldt’ Gofundme Page Taken Down
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Saskatoon RCMP claim a 32- the year-old male is encountering scams costs after a GoFundMe web page for “#PrayForHumboldt” was removed.

The feasible scams was reported to the basic examination area (GIS) on Oct. 3.

More proof uncovered the GoFundMe web page had actually created approximately $3,800, with 35 individuals adding to the project. There were 21 benefactors from Canada as well as 14 from the USA.

The crowdfunding web page has actually because been removed as well as the benefactors have actually been informed.

An accident in between the Humboldt Broncos’ bus as well as a semi-trailer occurred on April 6, declaring the lives of 16 gamers as well as personnel on their method to an SJHL championship game. Thirteen others were wounded.

From the disaster generated a reputable GoFundMe web page, Funds for Humboldt Broncos, which elevated over $15 million for the targets of the accident.

The GIS additionally found out about supposed financier scams when gotten in touch with in October. Both fraudulences presumably happened in between March 9, 2017, as well as June 20, 2018.

With aid from the protections department of Financial as well as Customer Matters Authority, it was recommended the supposed financier scams was running under the name Aero Funding Inc.

Andrij Olesiuk, 32, was detained on Nov. 20.

He is encountering costs of scams over $5,000, scams under $5,000, belongings of residential property gotten by criminal activity over $5,000, belongings of residential property gotten by criminal activity under $5,000, as well as laundering profits of criminal activity.

Olesiuk is arranged to make his following look in Saskatoon rural court on Dec. 12.

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Who will play center field for the Chicago Cubs in 2023? An internal option such as Christopher Morel could be the path they take.

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Ravens Q&Amp;A: Olb Daelin Hayes On Learning From A Frustrating Rookie Season, Reuniting With Kyle Hamilton, The Importance Of Community Service And More
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Of all the possible routes the Chicago Cubs could take in the offseason to upgrade the roster, the outfield features some of the least positional flexibility.

Barring the Cubs looking to move left fielder Ian Happ, 28, ahead of his final year of team control, the corner spots are locked in with the switch-hitting Happ and right fielder Seiya Suzuki, who is completing Year 1 of his five-year contract.

Center field, however, remains unsettled heading into the offseason.

Entering Wednesday’s season finale against the Cincinnati Reds, Christopher Morel leads the Cubs with 49 starts in center, one of five players to start at least 19 games there this season. The others are Rafael Ortega (47 starts), Jason Heyward (23), Nelson Velázquez (21) and Michael Hermosillo (19).

Happ and Narisco Crook each made a lone start in center. Patrick Wisdom also logged seven innings there in two appearances after in-game defensive changes, cleanly handling all three putout chances.

Heyward will be released after the season. Hermosillo was designated for assignment Sept. 27, outrighted to Triple-A Iowa and is an impending free agent. And Ortega, who is out of options, ended the year on the injured list because of a fractured left ring finger.

“I wouldn’t mark anybody off on that list (of returners),” manager David Ross said this week. “Everybody has a chance, and that just goes into you don’t hand anybody jobs at this level.”

Deciding how to allocate payroll for 2023 and beyond will have an impact on the direction the Cubs go in center field. Signing one of the top free-agent shortstops should be a priority, and though the Cubs have improved their pitching depth, they lack a top-tier starter. Both would be expensive additions.

“It just goes into what players you’re able to find and spend money on, what that cost is and how you delegate that,” Ross said. “If you get an unbelievable first baseman and an unbelievable third baseman and you spend $100 million on that, maybe there’s no room for that in center. It’s the cost of things and how much that goes into budgeting and all that.”

The 40-man roster gives the Cubs options to weigh during the offseason and spring training. Triple-A outfielder Alexander Canario logged 63 starts in center field between High-A South Bend, Double-A Tennessee and Iowa in 2022.

Canario, ranked the Cubs’ No. 10 prospect by Baseball America, recorded two errors and four outfield assists in 546 innings in center, where he played more than any other position. His prolific power production — 37 home runs, 26 doubles and 97 RBIs this year — creates an enticing element to consider for the lineup.

No. 2 prospect Brennen Davis, currently playing in the Arizona Fall League, will need to be added to the 40-man roster by early November to protect him from the Rule 5 draft. Back surgery cost Davis most of the minor-league season, but the 22-year-old outfielder possesses the upside to be an impactful player in center field at some point in 2023.

“The strength that he built up he lost, and with the back stuff, he’d taken such a far step back that just getting back on the field was a win for him this year,” Ross said of Davis. “So going into this offseason continuing to work toward that, and going into next year putting himself on the map with his performance at Triple A or wherever he may be. It’s hard to go into spring training giving somebody a job with the adversity he’s been through.”

Among the current center-field mix, Morel stands out. His athleticism, range and arm make him a good fit for the position as he continues to acclimate to the outfield. Morel’s 96.1 mph average on his throws from center this year is easily tops among the 71 big-leaguers at the position (minimum 100 throws), according to Statcast.

“The one thing he did was put himself on the map really early with his performance, and it’s hard to take them out of the lineup when they do that,” Ross said. “He’s had some ups and downs and growth. He continues to grow. A lot of his inexperience and the youth and being at Double A has shown at times in the field and he’s had a lot of growing moments.

“But then he’s also come out of those a better baseball player. He’s got a lot of skills that we believe in.”

A ball hit over Morel’s head in center gave the Reds a walk-off 3-2 victory Tuesday that positions them to sweep the season-ending series.

With nobody out in the bottom of the ninth, the Reds’ Spencer Steer drove a ball off Brandon Hughes over Morel’s head to the center-field wall, scoring Stuart Fairchild from first base. Morel was playing abnormally shallow before the pitch; he stood 28 feet closer to home plate than his season average with a runner at first, per Statcast.

Morel said he positioned himself where third base/outfield coach Willie Harris signaled him to be for that hitter.

Morel’s comfort in center field is focused on keeping things simple and always giving his best effort. While he’s aware of the opportunity that could exist in center next year, Morel is willing to play wherever the Cubs want him.

“I don’t try to overthink things or have too many things in my head, just try to make the play,” Morel said through an interpreter. “If it’s center field, then I would gladly take it.”

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Chicago Bears Q&A: Why does OC Luke Getsy have a conservative approach? Why didn’t GM Ryan Poles get another receiver?

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Chicago Bears Q&Amp;A: Why Does Oc Luke Getsy Have A Conservative Approach? Why Didn’t Gm Ryan Poles Get Another Receiver?
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The Chicago Bears take a 2-2 record to Minnesota for Sunday’s NFC North battle with the Vikings. The Tribune’s Brad Biggs answers questions about the conservative offense, the porous run defense, the still-developing offensive line and more in his weekly Bears mailbag.

Luke Getsy has severely underwhelmed so far as offensive coordinator. Is this level of conservative play-calling what we’re in for during his tenure or are we going to see an evolution of a playbook that eventually leads to more explosive plays? — @hockeyfrank26

There was a handful of questions about that this week, and it was a fair question after the first three games. It was Air Getsy on Sunday at MetLife Stadium, and anyone suggesting the Bears were too conservative against the New York Giants probably wasn’t tracking the play distribution.

Quarterback Justin Fields attempted 22 passes, ran the ball seven times and was sacked six times. One of the seven rushing attempts might have come on a run-pass option, although it was designated as a “scramble” in the game book. Let’s call it a designed run play off an RPO. In that case, there were 34 called passing plays and 26 runs (19 handoffs to Khalil Herbert, six to Trestan Ebner and the Fields RPO run). The way the offensive line has been run blocking, that seems like a fairly aggressive game plan.

The issue is the Bears are not executing offensively. The passing game has struggled when Fields has been pressured and when he has had time. He has been very inconsistent operating in the pocket, and until that improves, it will be bumpy. You’re correct that this offense has had a critical lack of explosive plays. But it wasn’t because the Bears were hesitant to use pass plays on the call sheet.

It’s tough for Getsy to expand the playbook, too, when the Bears are struggling to sustain drives. Fields is completing less than 51% of his passes, and I’m not sure the “Let Justin cook” crowd would be real pleased with the results if the Bears started chucking it a lot more. They need to devise game plans that put them in the best position to compete and then execute them. Against the Giants, that led to throwing the ball and the Bears had a couple of nice plays and probably more missed opportunities.

Much has been said about the defense being in need of more playmakers and quality depth. That aside, the most immediate fixes may be in the schemes and individual matchups set up by the defensive coordinator. The Packers and the Giants beat them both physically and with well-designed and executed plays. Now that there are four weeks of film for opponents to study, do you think opposing offensive coordinators have found the weak spots and are exploiting them schematically? Or is it a matter of their guys beating our guys or our linebackers not setting up the alignments correctly, or all of the above? — Chris R., Midlothian

When a defense is being consistently trampled — and that is where the Bears are, allowing a league-high 183.3 rushing yards per game — it is everything. It’s scheme, personnel and execution. The scheme makes the Bears susceptible to the run as they ask the defensive linemen to penetrate first. But the Bears made adjustments against the Giants and were not just sitting in a Tampa-2 shell against an offense that wasn’t going to throw much.

The Bears need to overhaul their personnel on the defensive line, and that’s a point I tried to make after the game. You can’t look at this roster and say the Bears just need to fix the offensive line and get better wide receivers for the quarterback. They need to improve their front seven and get some difference makers. They will have a tough time defending the run all season, and when they encounter teams with good running backs and good passing games, they will be in conflict.

Look at the Minnesota Vikings this week. They have Dalvin Cook in the backfield and arguably the best wide receiver in the league in Justin Jefferson. The defense needs to be better at the point of attack and the linebackers need to play with better eye discipline so they’re not gashed on quarterback bootlegs.

What makes the “play action” part of a play-action passing game so difficult for some QBs? Aaron Rodgers and Daniel Jones (at least on Sunday) did a great job with a fake handoff to freeze the linebackers. Others are awful. Justin Fields’ fake handoff typically is nowhere near the running back and therefore has little to no impact on the D. Thoughts? — Jim A., Plymouth, Minn.

For play action to work at its best, the running game and passing game have to match each other. The beginning of the play needs to look like a run in terms of formation, alignment, down and distance. Play-action passing becomes particularly effective when an offense can break its tendencies. In other words, it gets aggressive throwing the ball on downs that it typically runs. It flips the script and takes a shot when the defense has data and information that suggest a run is coming.

The best play-action throwers, and Rodgers is certainly one of those, are able to anticipate and see windows and throw with location — not accuracy. Accuracy is when you are talking about the pass being completed. Location is ball placement. That’s when a quarterback hits a receiver in stride and a 12-yard dig route can turn into a 25-yard gain because the receiver is immediately in position to get upfield. When Rodgers hits his back foot, the ball is coming out. Timing and rhythm are there.

Jones isn’t a polished play-action thrower, but he’s good with sleight of hand and hiding the ball, and with Saquon Barkley in the backfield, he grabs the eyes of defenders. Linebackers are taking two steps downhill and now they have to backtrack when the quarterback keeps the ball. The problem the Bears had is their edge or force defenders did not play with good eye discipline, and that left them vulnerable to Jones escaping on the edge and really gashing them.

The Bears don’t have great timing and rhythm in their play-action game, and when Fields throws it, too often he’s late in letting the ball rip.

Justin Fields must feel like instead of being drafted in the NFL, he transferred to a Division II school. Is there any offense in the NFL with less proven, less high-profile offensive players than the Bears? Whether you look at O-line (with Cody Whitehair injured), WR, TE or RB, the Bears have to be near the bottom in aggregate starting salary by position group. Fields needs to make lemonade out of lemons in this offense. — Bob B., Chicago

Did you get a good luck at the Giants depth chart on offense Sunday? With the injuries they have at wide receiver, I would take the Bears group. That isn’t saying a whole lot, but you’re not exactly breaking new ground here. The Bears need a lot of new personnel on offense. We knew that when training camp opened, we saw it in the preseason and it’s even more glaring now during the regular season.

It’s well-documented that Justin Fields hangs on to the ball too long. Is this a symptom of the limited offensive skill players and their inability to get open (we don’t get the downfield view on TV) or his ineffectiveness with reads and progressions? — John P.

It’s a function of a lot of things. Fields is still inexperienced with only 14 career starts. The Bears have talent issues at wide receiver and on the offensive line. In a timing-based system — and all passing offenses require excellent timing — it can be problematic when the ball doesn’t come out with rhythm.

Sometimes, though, when Fields holds the ball too long, it leads to big plays. Those are the off-schedule plays that can turn into huge gains. We’ve seen more of those turn into runs, but there was the long touchdown pass to Dante Pettis against the San Francisco 49ers in Week 1 that was the result of a broken play.

I think we will start to see more explosive plays in the passing game that are a result of Fields holding on to the ball and waiting for something to come open downfield. He needs to keep his eyes up and climb the pocket better. When that happens, the Bears should see improved results.

I like the realistic route Ryan Poles and Matt Eberflus have taken in inheriting the Ryan Pace roster and financial situation. That said, I struggle to understand how they could’ve taken such an inactive approach to improving the wide receiver position in Year 1. I get that Justin Fields isn’t their guy in that they didn’t draft him. But if you’re kicking the tires on his rookie deal, don’t you get a few people around him who can make plays to see what you’ve walked into? They let Allen Robinson go, fine. But Byron Pringle is just a guy and Velus Jones Jr. was a stretch. Darnell Mooney isn’t a true game-changer. Why wouldn’t the Bears have at least tried to bring in a guy like Christian Kirk or JuJu Smith-Schuster to help Fields develop? It seems like with a few weapons this team could be playoff-caliber. — Jeff G., Palmetto Bay, Fla.

Fair question. The first thing I would say is the list of available free-agent wide receivers back in March wasn’t great. Robinson, who clearly wanted to head elsewhere, was one of the top options. Kirk, whom you referenced, signed a huge deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars that was roundly criticized. Just as you submit that Mooney isn’t a game-changer, I don’t think Kirk is either, and $72 million over four years is a huge payday. Kirk has been productive for the Jaguars with 20 receptions for 327 yards and three touchdowns, so maybe that contract doesn’t look quite as bad as some thought at the time.

I would put Smith-Schuster in a similar category as Pringle. I’m not sure they are very different, and Smith-Schuster has been banged up a little in recent years. He’s definitely not a difference-maker. Chris Godwin was destined to re-sign with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the Los Angeles Chargers moved to re-sign Mike Williams. The Dallas Cowboys re-signed Michael Gallup, who was injured, and after that you were looking at guys like D.J. Chark. The big wide receiver moves of the offseason were made in the trade market, and I can understand Poles wanting to have his top draft picks in 2023.

You raise a valid point and it’s a fair criticism of the team’s approach to this season, but you have to consider the reality that there simply wasn’t a big supply of receivers in free agency and definitely not guys I would look at and say, “You sign him and you’re getting a legitimate No. 1.” The Bears have to completely remake this position in the offseason, and it will be interesting to see what moves they make.

What is your opinion on the handling of Teven Jenkins this season? He has appeared to be the best lineman, but this coaching staff seems to treat him more as a stopgap rather than a long-term piece. I’d like to hear your thoughts. — @danheinz3

We are four games into a rebuilding season with a new coaching staff and front office, and while I know people want immediate answers, it’s unusual when you get those in evaluating football players. Jenkins has looked good and has got a chance to get significantly better. I was skeptical if the move to right guard would work, especially considering the time he missed during training camp. I was wrong.

It’s still a new position for Jenkins, and the coaches are setting a standard for practice and games. Matt Eberflus told us Lucas Patrick was moved into the starting role because Jenkins had a poor Wednesday practice, but they didn’t push him to the side. He continued to rotate in every two series with Patrick. Let’s see how last year’s second-round draft pick performs over an entire season. Then we will have a much better idea if he’s part of the future on the line or just a guy who is in there until an upgrade can be acquired.

What wide receiver do you think the Bears will aggressively pursue before the trade deadline? — @chi_773ale

Do you really think a wide receiver who can be a difference-maker for the Bears beyond the second half of this season would be available in a trade? Unless the Bears are in the race for a playoff spot near the end of October, what would be the point of being an aggressive buyer in the trade market? To what end? The Bears would have to spend 2023 draft picks to make a move, and then I would be answering mailbag questions from January through March about why they used draft capital on a position at which they might be better off drafting talent. This is not the season to be an aggressive buyer when it comes to trades. I could see the Bears being an aggressive seller, but I’m not sure who they have to deal. It’s something to keep an eye on the next few weeks.

When will they figure out the O-line? They can’t keep rotating guys in and out, playing different positions. Set the best players in their spots and let’s go. — @jht728

The offensive line had an especially rough game against a Giants defense that can be unpredictable with unscouted looks and different pressures, something defensive coordinator Wink Martindale is known for. I thought the offensive line, relative to how it played last season and the skepticism about the unit during training camp and the preseason, was OK through the first three games. Did the line play great? No. Was it terrible? No. It was improved over last season and better than I expected. Any critique of the offensive line has to point out the team is third in the league in rushing, averaging 177.3 yards per game, and fourth with 5.2 yards per carry.

Just like the Bears are evaluating quarterback Justin Fields to determine how he figures into their future, they are going through the same process with the offensive line. Sure, they would love to feel great about five starters right now, or even four, but you have to understand where they are coming from in installing a new offense. I believe line coach Chris Morgan has done a pretty good job to this point, and there’s reason to believe this unit can get better as the season unfolds.

Will there be more rocky weeks the rest of the way? Probably. It’s unrealistic to think the Bears won’t have issues against some of the top front sevens. Fields was sacked 10 times through the first three games, more than the Bears would like but not an alarming total. Go back and watch those plays, and there was a chance for him to avoid the sack on at least four of them and to do so with a check-down completion on a couple.

The broken right thumb Lucas Patrick suffered at the start of training camp forced the Bears to adjust. That happens. He has rotated with Teven Jenkins at right guard, and with Cody Whitehair likely out for at least a few weeks — Whitehair could land on injured reserve this week — the rotation is done for the time being. I think you will see Patrick at left guard and Jenkins at right guard Sunday in Minnesota. Center Sam Mustipher had a rough game against the Giants. Based on how he played the first three weeks, he should bounce back against the Vikings.

Other than PR/KR, how much do you think Velus Jones Jr. will play next week? — @topofthemorrow

We’ll have to see. Jones didn’t play on offense against the Giants. I imagine he could get a little time against the Vikings, and the Bears would be wise to seek ways to get him the ball in space. I don’t think we will see him play a ton of snaps, though. He has missed a lot of practice time since mid-August with his hamstring injury. But finding packages to use him should be a priority.

The pass rush has been lackluster or nonexistent throughout four games. What’s the problem? Miss Khalil Mack? — @just_acy

The problem is pretty evident. The Bears are not stopping the run. When you don’t defend the run well — the Bears rank last in the NFL — you don’t earn the opportunity to rush the passer. You can complain about the pass rush in the loss to the Giants, but how many legitimate chances were there to get after Daniel Jones or Tyrod Taylor? Five? Six?

The Bears actually rank 13th in the league in sacks per pass attempt at 6.93%. So it’s not nearly as bad as you think. It’s just that they hardly are getting any chances to pin their ears back and get after the quarterback — and they won’t until they do a better job of stopping the run and forcing opponents into second- or third-and-long situations. Of course the Bears would be better with Mack, but this isn’t a woulda, coulda, shoulda world.

I get that it was the preseason, but I don’t even see any whiffs of the type of offense we saw in the first half against Cleveland. Where did that game plan go? Were things really that different in the preseason game to throw all that out the window once the games counted? — @mosconml

You also didn’t see any of the Browns’ best defensive players on the field in that first half. Justin Fields and the Bears offense might look like that if teams would sit five of their best defensive players like the Browns did in that game. It was basically a first-team offense against a second-team defense.

If the over/under is 130 on Dalvin Cook’s running yards this week, are you thinking over or under? — @mike__chicago

That’s a really high figure, even against a porous run defense. The Bears have done a nice job against Cook in seven career games. That was under a different scheme with some different personnel. Cook has 130 carries for 480 yards (3.7 per attempt) with two touchdowns against the Bears. He did run for 132 yards on 24 carries on Dec. 20, 2020, at U.S. Bank Stadium, a game the Bears won 33-27.

Cook has not gone over 100 rushing yards this season and has topped 130 only once in his last 13 starts with a 205-yard effort in a Week 14 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers last season. The challenge is keeping Cook from running loose while also not allowing wide receiver Justin Jefferson to beat them over the top. Cook will get his yards, but the Bears need to eliminate explosive runs. I’d go under just because that’s a pretty big number.

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Aaron Judge timeline: From Baby Bomber to Yankees super slugger

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Aaron Judge Timeline: From Baby Bomber To Yankees Super Slugger
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April 26, 1992: Born in Linden, Calif.

June 6, 2013: Drafted by Yankees in first round of MLB Draft (No. 32 overall)

Aug. 13, 2016: Hits first career home run in first MLB at-bat against Rays starter Matt Andriese and goes 2-for-4 on the day.

Sept. 14, 2016: Ruled out for the remainder of the 2016 season due to an oblique injury.

April 2, 2017: Starts in right field on Opening Day against the Rays after winning the job in spring training. Bats eighth and goes 1-for-4 with a double.

May 22, 2017: Yankees debut “Judge’s Chambers” in right field stands at Yankee Stadium against the Kansas City Royals.

July 11, 2017: Named an All-Star starter after hitting .329 with 30 homers and 75 RBI during breakout rookie season. Bats third for the American League.

Sept. 25, 2017: Breaks all-time rookie home run record with No. 50 off of Trevor Cahill in multi-homer game vs. Royals. Ends the season with 52.

Oct. 3, 2017: Hits first career postseason home run off of Jose Berrios in AL Wild Card game against Twins. Judge and his fellow Baby Bombers go on to reach ALCS, losing to Astros in seven games.

Nov. 16, 2017: Finishes second in AL MVP voting behind Houston Astros’ Jose Altuve.

July 17, 2018: Starts second-straight All-Star game. Hits a home run off of Max Scherzer in Nationals Park.

Aug. 28, 2019: Hits 100th career home run against Mariners off of Yusei Kikuchi. Third-fastest player in MLB history to reach 100 home runs.

Sept. 29, 2019: Hits 27th and final home run of the season off of Lance Lynn. Plays just 102 games due to another oblique injury (suffered vs. Royals in April).

2020 Season: Hits just nine home runs in COVID-19 shortened 60-game season. Plays in 28 regular season games due to a calf injury.

July 13, 2021: Named to third career MLB All-Star game, first since 2018. Starts in right field and bats fourth.

Sept. 30, 2021: Hits two homers off of Blue Jays’ Robbie Ray to reach 39 homers for the season. Slashes .287/.373/.544.

April 7, 2022: Judge turns down seven-year, $213.5 million contract extension from Yankees. Set to become a free agent after 2022 season.

June 24, 2022: Judge and the Yankees finally settle on ‘22 contract to avoid arbitration hearing. Judge gets $19 million.

July 19, 2022: Named All-Star starter for the fourth time in his career after slashing .284/.364/.618 and hitting 33 home runs.

July 30, 2022: Hits 200th career home run in 671st career game. Second-fastest player in MLB history to reach 200 home runs.

Sept. 7, 2022: Hits 55th home run of the season breaking Yankees’ all-time home run record for a right-handed hitter.

Sept. 21, 2022: Hits 60th home run of the year tying Babe Ruth for second on the Yankees’ single-season all-time home run list.

Sept. 28, 2022: Hits 61st home run of the season tying Roger Maris for first on the Yankees’ single-season all-time home run list.

Oct. 4, 2022: Hits 62nd home run of the season to set the new Yankees and American League single-season record.

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4 takeaways from the Chicago Bulls’ loss in their preseason opener, including Dalen Terry’s spark and Patrick Williams’ question mark

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4 Takeaways From The Chicago Bulls’ Loss In Their Preseason Opener, Including Dalen Terry’s Spark And Patrick Williams’ Question Mark
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Dalen Terry provided a spark of optimism for the Chicago Bulls in their first game of the preseason, but there’s still plenty to fix as they prepare to start the season without point guard Lonzo Ball.

The bench unit led a thunderous second-half comeback, but the Bulls fell 129-125 in their preseason opener against the New Orleans Pelicans Tuesday night at the united Center. The opening half of the game painted a stark picture of ongoing flaws the Bulls still haven’t fixed after the offseason.

Here are four takeaways from the first Bulls outing of the season.

1. Dalen Terry makes an impression.

The rookie quickly won over Bulls fans in his preseason debut. Terry came off the bench in the second half, scoring 11 points to lead the Bulls to a 23-point comeback to regain the lead with four minutes to spare.

The Bulls ultimately fumbled the lead, but Terry proved his ability to change a game, finishing with seven rebounds, two assists and two steals.

Terry sparked the Bulls in transition through his defensive pressure, stealing the ball and slamming down a dunk in a full-court breakaway in the fourth quarter to push the Bulls ahead by four points.

2. Defense flounders in first outing.

The Bulls defense disintegrated under pressure, allowing the Pelicans to score 40 points in the first quarter and a total of 70 points in the first half.

The Pelicans carved through the Bulls’ nonexistent interior defense, scoring 62 points in the paint despite a strong performance from Nikola Vučević, who registered four blocks.

Zion Williamson overwhelmed the Bulls defense, scoring 13 points before sitting out most of the second half. The Bulls remain an undersized team even with the signing of Andre Drummond in the offseason. As a result, the defense struggled to switch in the pick and roll against Williamson, allowing the center to wreak havoc around the rim.

“We’ve got a long way to go defensively, there’s no question about that,” coach Billy Donovan said after the loss.

3. Starting point guard position remains wide open.

Tuesday’s game didn’t help provide answers to the Bulls’ wide-open race for a starting point guard to replace Ball at the start of the season.

Poor ball security plagued the team throughout the game — the Bulls turned the ball over 26 times while registering 27 assists, stalling in half-court offense throughout the first half.

Zach LaVine contributed four of those turnovers and Goran Dragić provided three more. Alex Caruso provided the most consistent hand bringing up the ball with no turnovers and one assist, but still went 0-for-2 from 3-point range.

Coby White suffered a left thigh contusion less than three minutes into his entrance to the game and remained sidelined for the rest of the night despite requesting to return in the second half.

Donovan still hasn’t committed to a starting point guard for the regular season and before the game, he emphasized the fluidity of the role for the Bulls while Ball remains sidelined.

“I’m not that wrapped up in who’s starting or not,” Donovan said. “The combination of players and how those guys all gel and mesh and function together would be more important with where we are at that spot.”

4. Jury out on Patrick Williams.

Williams knew the challenge when he entered the preseason — prove he can compete with the aggression required of an NBA starter.

But Williams remained timid against the Pelicans, getting outmuscled repeatedly at the rim by Williamson and only collecting five rebounds. The forward pulled the trigger with slightly more confidence than last season, but his finishing wasn’t clean enough to make an impact.

Williamson finished 2-for-7 shooting, making a lone 3-pointer in the third quarter.

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Chicago Bears Q&A: What’s with Luke Getsy’s conservative approach? Why didn’t Ryan Poles get a receiver in free agency?

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Chicago Bears Q&Amp;A: What’s With Luke Getsy’s Conservative Approach? Why Didn’t Ryan Poles Get A Receiver In Free Agency?
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The Chicago Bears take a 2-2 record to Minnesota for Sunday’s NFC North battle with the Vikings. The Tribune’s Brad Biggs answers questions about the conservative offense, the porous run defense, the still-developing offensive line and more in his weekly Bears mailbag.

Luke Getsy has severely underwhelmed so far as offensive coordinator. Is this level of conservative play-calling what we’re in for during his tenure or are we going to see an evolution of a playbook that eventually leads to more explosive plays? — @hockeyfrank26

There was a handful of questions about that this week, and it was a fair question after the first three games. It was Air Getsy on Sunday at MetLife Stadium, and anyone suggesting the Bears were too conservative against the New York Giants probably wasn’t tracking the play distribution.

Quarterback Justin Fields attempted 22 passes, ran the ball seven times and was sacked six times. One of the seven rushing attempts might have come on a run-pass option, although it was designated as a “scramble” in the game book. Let’s call it a designed run play off an RPO. In that case, there were 34 called passing plays and 26 runs (19 handoffs to Khalil Herbert, six to Trestan Ebner and the Fields RPO run). The way the offensive line has been run blocking, that seems like a fairly aggressive game plan.

The issue is the Bears are not executing offensively. The passing game has struggled when Fields has been pressured and when he has had time. He has been very inconsistent operating in the pocket, and until that improves, it will be bumpy. You’re correct that this offense has had a critical lack of explosive plays. But it wasn’t because the Bears were hesitant to use pass plays on the call sheet.

It’s tough for Getsy to expand the playbook, too, when the Bears are struggling to sustain drives. Fields is completing less than 51% of his passes, and I’m not sure the “Let Justin cook” crowd would be real pleased with the results if the Bears started chucking it a lot more. They need to devise game plans that put them in the best position to compete and then execute them. Against the Giants, that led to throwing the ball and the Bears had a couple of nice plays and probably more missed opportunities.

Much has been said about the defense being in need of more playmakers and quality depth. That aside, the most immediate fixes may be in the schemes and individual matchups set up by the defensive coordinator. The Packers and the Giants beat them both physically and with well-designed and executed plays. Now that there are four weeks of film for opponents to study, do you think opposing offensive coordinators have found the weak spots and are exploiting them schematically? Or is it a matter of their guys beating our guys or our linebackers not setting up the alignments correctly, or all of the above? — Chris R., Midlothian

When a defense is being consistently trampled — and that is where the Bears are, allowing a league-high 183.3 rushing yards per game — it is everything. It’s scheme, personnel and execution. The scheme makes the Bears susceptible to the run as they ask the defensive linemen to penetrate first. But the Bears made adjustments against the Giants and were not just sitting in a Tampa-2 shell against an offense that wasn’t going to throw much.

The Bears need to overhaul their personnel on the defensive line, and that’s a point I tried to make after the game. You can’t look at this roster and say the Bears just need to fix the offensive line and get better wide receivers for the quarterback. They need to improve their front seven and get some difference makers. They will have a tough time defending the run all season, and when they encounter teams with good running backs and good passing games, they will be in conflict.

Look at the Minnesota Vikings this week. They have Dalvin Cook in the backfield and arguably the best wide receiver in the league in Justin Jefferson. The defense needs to be better at the point of attack and the linebackers need to play with better eye discipline so they’re not gashed on quarterback bootlegs.

What makes the “play action” part of a play-action passing game so difficult for some QBs? Aaron Rodgers and Daniel Jones (at least on Sunday) did a great job with a fake handoff to freeze the linebackers. Others are awful. Justin Fields’ fake handoff typically is nowhere near the running back and therefore has little to no impact on the D. Thoughts? — Jim A., Plymouth, Minn.

For play action to work at its best, the running game and passing game have to match each other. The beginning of the play needs to look like a run in terms of formation, alignment, down and distance. Play-action passing becomes particularly effective when an offense can break its tendencies. In other words, it gets aggressive throwing the ball on downs that it typically runs. It flips the script and takes a shot when the defense has data and information that suggest a run is coming.

The best play-action throwers, and Rodgers is certainly one of those, are able to anticipate and see windows and throw with location — not accuracy. Accuracy is when you are talking about the pass being completed. Location is ball placement. That’s when a quarterback hits a receiver in stride and a 12-yard dig route can turn into a 25-yard gain because the receiver is immediately in position to get upfield. When Rodgers hits his back foot, the ball is coming out. Timing and rhythm are there.

Jones isn’t a polished play-action thrower, but he’s good with sleight of hand and hiding the ball, and with Saquon Barkley in the backfield, he grabs the eyes of defenders. Linebackers are taking two steps downhill and now they have to backtrack when the quarterback keeps the ball. The problem the Bears had is their edge or force defenders did not play with good eye discipline, and that left them vulnerable to Jones escaping on the edge and really gashing them.

The Bears don’t have great timing and rhythm in their play-action game, and when Fields throws it, too often he’s late in letting the ball rip.

Justin Fields must feel like instead of being drafted in the NFL, he transferred to a Division II school. Is there any offense in the NFL with less proven, less high-profile offensive players than the Bears? Whether you look at O-line (with Cody Whitehair injured), WR, TE or RB, the Bears have to be near the bottom in aggregate starting salary by position group. Fields needs to make lemonade out of lemons in this offense. — Bob B., Chicago

Did you get a good luck at the Giants depth chart on offense Sunday? With the injuries they have at wide receiver, I would take the Bears group. That isn’t saying a whole lot, but you’re not exactly breaking new ground here. The Bears need a lot of new personnel on offense. We knew that when training camp opened, we saw it in the preseason and it’s even more glaring now during the regular season.

It’s well-documented that Justin Fields hangs on to the ball too long. Is this a symptom of the limited offensive skill players and their inability to get open (we don’t get the downfield view on TV) or his ineffectiveness with reads and progressions? — John P.

It’s a function of a lot of things. Fields is still inexperienced with only 14 career starts. The Bears have talent issues at wide receiver and on the offensive line. In a timing-based system — and all passing offenses require excellent timing — it can be problematic when the ball doesn’t come out with rhythm.

Sometimes, though, when Fields holds the ball too long, it leads to big plays. Those are the off-schedule plays that can turn into huge gains. We’ve seen more of those turn into runs, but there was the long touchdown pass to Dante Pettis against the San Francisco 49ers in Week 1 that was the result of a broken play.

I think we will start to see more explosive plays in the passing game that are a result of Fields holding on to the ball and waiting for something to come open downfield. He needs to keep his eyes up and climb the pocket better. When that happens, the Bears should see improved results.

I like the realistic route Ryan Poles and Matt Eberflus have taken in inheriting the Ryan Pace roster and financial situation. That said, I struggle to understand how they could’ve taken such an inactive approach to improving the wide receiver position in Year 1. I get that Justin Fields isn’t their guy in that they didn’t draft him. But if you’re kicking the tires on his rookie deal, don’t you get a few people around him who can make plays to see what you’ve walked into? They let Allen Robinson go, fine. But Byron Pringle is just a guy and Velus Jones Jr. was a stretch. Darnell Mooney isn’t a true game-changer. Why wouldn’t the Bears have at least tried to bring in a guy like Christian Kirk or JuJu Smith-Schuster to help Fields develop? It seems like with a few weapons this team could be playoff-caliber. — Jeff G., Palmetto Bay, Fla.

Fair question. The first thing I would say is the list of available free-agent wide receivers back in March wasn’t great. Robinson, who clearly wanted to head elsewhere, was one of the top options. Kirk, whom you referenced, signed a huge deal with the Jacksonville Jaguars that was roundly criticized. Just as you submit that Mooney isn’t a game-changer, I don’t think Kirk is either, and $72 million over four years is a huge payday. Kirk has been productive for the Jaguars with 20 receptions for 327 yards and three touchdowns, so maybe that contract doesn’t look quite as bad as some thought at the time.

I would put Smith-Schuster in a similar category as Pringle. I’m not sure they are very different, and Smith-Schuster has been banged up a little in recent years. He’s definitely not a difference-maker. Chris Godwin was destined to re-sign with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and the Los Angeles Chargers moved to re-sign Mike Williams. The Dallas Cowboys re-signed Michael Gallup, who was injured, and after that you were looking at guys like D.J. Chark. The big wide receiver moves of the offseason were made in the trade market, and I can understand Poles wanting to have his top draft picks in 2023.

You raise a valid point and it’s a fair criticism of the team’s approach to this season, but you have to consider the reality that there simply wasn’t a big supply of receivers in free agency and definitely not guys I would look at and say, “You sign him and you’re getting a legitimate No. 1.” The Bears have to completely remake this position in the offseason, and it will be interesting to see what moves they make.

What is your opinion on the handling of Teven Jenkins this season? He has appeared to be the best lineman, but this coaching staff seems to treat him more as a stopgap rather than a long-term piece. I’d like to hear your thoughts. — @danheinz3

We are four games into a rebuilding season with a new coaching staff and front office, and while I know people want immediate answers, it’s unusual when you get those in evaluating football players. Jenkins has looked good and has got a chance to get significantly better. I was skeptical if the move to right guard would work, especially considering the time he missed during training camp. I was wrong.

It’s still a new position for Jenkins, and the coaches are setting a standard for practice and games. Matt Eberflus told us Lucas Patrick was moved into the starting role because Jenkins had a poor Wednesday practice, but they didn’t push him to the side. He continued to rotate in every two series with Patrick. Let’s see how last year’s second-round draft pick performs over an entire season. Then we will have a much better idea if he’s part of the future on the line or just a guy who is in there until an upgrade can be acquired.

What wide receiver do you think the Bears will aggressively pursue before the trade deadline? — @chi_773ale

Do you really think a wide receiver who can be a difference-maker for the Bears beyond the second half of this season would be available in a trade? Unless the Bears are in the race for a playoff spot near the end of October, what would be the point of being an aggressive buyer in the trade market? To what end? The Bears would have to spend 2023 draft picks to make a move, and then I would be answering mailbag questions from January through March about why they used draft capital on a position at which they might be better off drafting talent. This is not the season to be an aggressive buyer when it comes to trades. I could see the Bears being an aggressive seller, but I’m not sure who they have to deal. It’s something to keep an eye on the next few weeks.

When will they figure out the O-line? They can’t keep rotating guys in and out, playing different positions. Set the best players in their spots and let’s go. — @jht728

The offensive line had an especially rough game against a Giants defense that can be unpredictable with unscouted looks and different pressures, something defensive coordinator Wink Martindale is known for. I thought the offensive line, relative to how it played last season and the skepticism about the unit during training camp and the preseason, was OK through the first three games. Did the line play great? No. Was it terrible? No. It was improved over last season and better than I expected. Any critique of the offensive line has to point out the team is third in the league in rushing, averaging 177.3 yards per game, and fourth with 5.2 yards per carry.

Just like the Bears are evaluating quarterback Justin Fields to determine how he figures into their future, they are going through the same process with the offensive line. Sure, they would love to feel great about five starters right now, or even four, but you have to understand where they are coming from in installing a new offense. I believe line coach Chris Morgan has done a pretty good job to this point, and there’s reason to believe this unit can get better as the season unfolds.

Will there be more rocky weeks the rest of the way? Probably. It’s unrealistic to think the Bears won’t have issues against some of the top front sevens. Fields was sacked 10 times through the first three games, more than the Bears would like but not an alarming total. Go back and watch those plays, and there was a chance for him to avoid the sack on at least four of them and to do so with a check-down completion on a couple.

The broken right thumb Lucas Patrick suffered at the start of training camp forced the Bears to adjust. That happens. He has rotated with Teven Jenkins at right guard, and with Cody Whitehair likely out for at least a few weeks — Whitehair could land on injured reserve this week — the rotation is done for the time being. I think you will see Patrick at left guard and Jenkins at right guard Sunday in Minnesota. Center Sam Mustipher had a rough game against the Giants. Based on how he played the first three weeks, he should bounce back against the Vikings.

Other than PR/KR, how much do you think Velus Jones Jr. will play next week? — @topofthemorrow

We’ll have to see. Jones didn’t play on offense against the Giants. I imagine he could get a little time against the Vikings, and the Bears would be wise to seek ways to get him the ball in space. I don’t think we will see him play a ton of snaps, though. He has missed a lot of practice time since mid-August with his hamstring injury. But finding packages to use him should be a priority.

The pass rush has been lackluster or nonexistent throughout four games. What’s the problem? Miss Khalil Mack? — @just_acy

The problem is pretty evident. The Bears are not stopping the run. When you don’t defend the run well — the Bears rank last in the NFL — you don’t earn the opportunity to rush the passer. You can complain about the pass rush in the loss to the Giants, but how many legitimate chances were there to get after Daniel Jones or Tyrod Taylor? Five? Six?

The Bears actually rank 13th in the league in sacks per pass attempt at 6.93%. So it’s not nearly as bad as you think. It’s just that they hardly are getting any chances to pin their ears back and get after the quarterback — and they won’t until they do a better job of stopping the run and forcing opponents into second- or third-and-long situations. Of course the Bears would be better with Mack, but this isn’t a woulda, coulda, shoulda world.

I get that it was the preseason, but I don’t even see any whiffs of the type of offense we saw in the first half against Cleveland. Where did that game plan go? Were things really that different in the preseason game to throw all that out the window once the games counted? — @mosconml

You also didn’t see any of the Browns’ best defensive players on the field in that first half. Justin Fields and the Bears offense might look like that if teams would sit five of their best defensive players like the Browns did in that game. It was basically a first-team offense against a second-team defense.

If the over/under is 130 on Dalvin Cook’s running yards this week, are you thinking over or under? — @mike__chicago

That’s a really high figure, even against a porous run defense. The Bears have done a nice job against Cook in seven career games. That was under a different scheme with some different personnel. Cook has 130 carries for 480 yards (3.7 per attempt) with two touchdowns against the Bears. He did run for 132 yards on 24 carries on Dec. 20, 2020, at U.S. Bank Stadium, a game the Bears won 33-27.

Cook has not gone over 100 rushing yards this season and has topped 130 only once in his last 13 starts with a 205-yard effort in a Week 14 victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers last season. The challenge is keeping Cook from running loose while also not allowing wide receiver Justin Jefferson to beat them over the top. Cook will get his yards, but the Bears need to eliminate explosive runs. I’d go under just because that’s a pretty big number.

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ASK IRA: Do Heat have any wiggle room in competitive NBA East?

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Ask Ira: Do Heat Have Any Wiggle Room In Competitive Nba East?
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Q: Last season the Celtics were 16-19 in December and ended up in the NBA Finals. The Heat have the vets that have been to the Finals. Why not experiment during the first three months of the season? – Stuart.

A: Because with so much quality at the top of the Eastern Conference, I’m not sure that even the slightest blip during the season can be overcome in time to avoid traveling for the first round of the playoffs Look at last season’s standings, with the Heat finishing atop the East by two games, and the Celtics, 76ers and Bucks all tied for second. Now factor in what the Nets might be with Kyrie Irving available for the full season and Ben Simmons injected into the mix with his defense, and it is possible that a solid record still leaves you on the road for a daunting No. 4-vs.-No. 5 opening-round series. Last season, Heat-Celtics came in the East finals. This season, there is potential for such a series in the first round. Such tests are best avoided. And that means experimentation might be best avoided, as well. Getting a top-three seed could prove worth the effort of such a chase.

Q: Always enjoy reading your take. Here’s my question, now that the Heat have extended Tyler Herro and locked what looks like a core of Jimmy Butler, Bam Adebayo and Herro, why not go all in even into the tax and bring in a power forward to make this team a monster? You would have a heck of a bench with Victor Olidapo and Caleb Martin coming in to spell the starters. P.J. Tucker was a nice complimentary piece, but was almost like a Lego piece where it’s plug and play. Kelly Olynyk or Jae Crowder look like they could provide a serviceable two years until Nikola Jovic is ready for his role. Taxes be darned. – Mike, Pembroke Pines.

A: Of course, it’s easy to spend someone else’s money. Foremost, the Heat seemingly do not have the matching salaries to work a deal, at the moment, for Jae Crowder or Kelly Olynyk. But, yes, those would be worthwhile expenditures. The Tyler Herro extension did not upgrade the current roster, but merely protected the future. There still has yet to be a win-now upgrade this offseason.

Q: Every year is the same story, never picked as favorite to win the conference or NBA championship, but end up proving them wrong, again and again. – Ernesto.

A: Which is why I’m sure the Heat’s executive offices and coaching suite hardly are upset about the league’s annual survey of general managers forecasting them for a fifth-place finish this season. The Heat seemingly love nothing more than carrying a chip on their shoulders.

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