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Philippe Reines Advisor to Hillary Clinton Strips Down To Underwear; Threatens Trump Staffer

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Philippe Reines, a former senior adviser to Hillary Clinton, stripped down to his underwear and went on an "unhinged" rampage at Fox News on Tuesday night, abusing a Trump campaign advisor while "screaming like a maniac", according to shocked onlookers who captured cellphone footage of the disturbing incident.

Philippe Reines, a previous elderly consultant to Hillary Clinton, disrobed to his underclothing as well as took place an “unhitched” rampage at Fox Information on Tuesday evening, abusing a Trump project expert while “howling like a lunatic”, according to surprised observers that caught cellular phone video of the troubling case.

Harlan Hillside, a participant of the Trump 2020 board of advisers, signed up with Reines for an argument on Fox Company Network regarding boundary wall surface financing as well as the General Motors discharges.

Maybe as an outcome of being extensively beat in the dispute, Hillside declared the previous Hillary Clinton expert faced him in the Fox bureau later “howling like a lunatic” as well as ruining for a battle– after having actually eliminated his pants.


Everyday Customer records:

Hillside informed The Daily Customer that Reines claimed, “You’re equally as much of a jackass on TELEVISION as you are on the internet” which Hillside requires to “quit concealing behind [FBN anchor Trish Regan’s] skirt.”

” We tweeted to and fro, as well as he claimed, ‘You’re not half the debater you believe you are.’ To which I claimed, ‘That’s most likely the lamest, most D.C. diss I have actually ever before listened to,'” Hillside informed TheDC.

Reines purportedly adhered to Hillside via the newsroom howling, as well as Hillside began breaking images of Reines’ pants-less match.

Yeah, I understand just how I look. Exactly how around you clean the pubic hair off your face?” Reines purportedly informed Hillside in reaction to his image being taken.

Reines obstructed a number of Daily Customer press reporters on Twitter after they retweeted Hillside’s account of the case. According to a confidential eyewitness, Reines did not put on trousers throughout a current look on Tucker Carlson’s Fox Information program either.

The Daily Customer was not able to get to Reines for remark.

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California to mail every voter a ballot in future elections

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California to mail every voter a ballot in future elections

In this Aug. 30, 2021, file photo, mail-in ballots run through a sorting machine at the Sacramento County Registrar of Voters office in Sacramento, Calif. Every registered California voter will get a ballot mailed to them in future elections under a bill signed Monday, Sept. 27, 2021, by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom. The nation’s most populous state mailed everyone a ballot in the two most recent elections due to concerns about voting during the pandemic. Newsom’s signature makes that change permanent. Even prior to the pandemic, most Californians were receiving ballots in the mail. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Every registered California voter will get a ballot mailed to them in future elections under a bill signed Monday, Sept. 27 by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom.

The law makes permanent a change adopted during the pandemic for the 2020 election and the recent recall against Newsom. California, the nation’s most populous state, joins several other Western states in mailing all voters a ballot, including Utah, Colorado, Washington and Oregon. Republicans who hold a minority in the state Legislature opposed the expansion of voting by mail.

Under the new law, ballots in California must go out at least 29 days before an election. Voters still have the option to drop off their ballot or vote in person. Prior to the pandemic, many Californians were already voting by mail.

1632859502 941 California to mail every voter a ballot in future elections
FILE – In this Sept. 14, 2021, file photo, people wait in line outside a voting center to cast their recall ballots in Huntington Beach, Calif.(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

“Voters like having options for returning their ballot whether by mail, at a secure drop box, a voting center or at a traditional polling station. And the more people who participate in elections, the stronger our democracy and the more we have assurance that elections reflect the will of the people of California,” California Secretary of State Shirley Weber, a Democrat, said in a statement.

Newsom signed 10 other voting-related bills Monday, crafting them as part of an effort to expand voting rights and access.

Voting rights have become a major political flashpoint nationally. Democrat-led states are pushing legislation aimed at expanding voting access while many Republican-led states are trying to tighten it amid baseless accusations of widespread voter fraud by former President Donald Trump and other GOP leaders.

“As states across our country continue to enact undemocratic voter suppression laws, California is increasing voter access, expanding voting options and bolstering elections integrity and transparency,” Newsom, a Democrat, said in a statement.

Mail-in voting put California Republicans in a tricky spot during the recent recall election against Newsom, which he handily defeated. Many Republicans didn’t trust the process, leaving party leaders to both encourage their voters to cast ballots while promising they were closely monitoring claims of fraud. There has been no evidence of widespread fraud in the recall.

California Republican Party Chairwoman Jessica Millan Patterson didn’t state a clear position on the bill.

“The California Republican Party is committed to ensuring elections are safe, fair and secure, giving voters the confidence they need to cast a ballot,” she said in a statement.

Another proposal Newsom signed relaxes the rules around ballot signatures, giving officials more leeway to accept ballots if the signature doesn’t exactly match what’s on file. The legislation by Democratic Sen. Josh Becker bars election officials from taking a voter’s party preference into account when evaluating their signature. Republicans in the state Legislature opposed that bill, as well.

In order to reject a signature, two other election officials must also determine that the signature differs in obvious ways from the signature in the person’s registration record.

1632859502 217 California to mail every voter a ballot in future elections
FILE – In this Sept. 14, 2021, file photo, two voters cast their ballots at a vote center, in Huntington Beach, Calif. Every registered California voter will get a ballot mailed to them in future elections under a bill signed Monday, Sept. 27, 2021, by Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom. The nation’s most populous state mailed everyone a ballot in the two most recent elections due to concerns about voting during the pandemic. Newsom’s signature makes that change permanent. Even prior to the pandemic, most Californians were receiving ballots in the mail. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

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Court: NYC can impose vaccine mandate on teachers; will begin Oct. 4, city says

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Court: NYC can impose vaccine mandate on teachers; will begin Oct. 4, city says

A girl passes a “Welcome Back to School” sign as she arrives for the first day of class at Brooklyn’s PS 245 elementary school, Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, in New York. Classroom doors are swinging open for about a million New York City public school students in the nation’s largest experiment of in-person learning during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation’s largest school district can immediately impose a vaccine mandate on its teachers and other workers, after all, a federal appeals panel decided Monday, Sept. 27 leading lawyers for teachers to say they’ll ask the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene.

The city’s Department of Education said the mandate would now go into effect at the end of Friday, so that all teachers and staff would be vaccinated by Oct. 4, the following Monday, Sept. 27.

The three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued a brief order late in the day that lifted a block of the mandate that a single appeals judge had put in place on Friday.

After an adverse ruling from a Brooklyn judge, a group of teachers had brought the case to the appeals court, which assigned a three-judge panel to hear oral arguments Wednesday, Sept. 29. But the appeals panel issued its order Monday after written arguments were submitted by both sides.

Attorney Mark Fonte, who brought the lawsuit on behalf of teachers and others, said in a statement that he and attorney Louis Gelormino were immediately petitioning the Supreme Court to intervene.

“As of this moment the mandate is in place,” he said, adding that he and Gelormino were “dismayed and disappointed by this turn of events.”

Fonte added: “With thousands of teachers not vaccinated the City may regret what it wished for. Our children will be left with no teachers and no security in schools.”

The city’s Department of Education said in its statement, “Vaccinations are our strongest tool in the fight against COVID – this ruling is on the right side of the law and will protect our students and staff.”

Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in August that about 148,000 school employees would have to get at least a first dose of the COVID vaccination by Sept. 27. The policy covers teachers, along with other staffers, such as custodians and cafeteria workers.

The practical effect of the mandate was that teachers and other employees would have been unable to work, beginning Tuesday, if they had failed to get vaccinated.

As of Monday, 87% of all Department of Education employees have been vaccinated, including 90% of teachers, de Blasio said.

But United Federation of Teachers President Michael Mulgrew said a survey of some of its members found that only a third thought their schools could open without disruption.

“The city has a lot of work before it to ensure that enough vaccinated staff will be available by the new deadline,” he said in a statement.

Lawyers for teachers argued Monday, Sept. 27 in papers submitted to the 2nd Circuit that teachers who are placed on unpaid leave because they have not complied with the order will be irreparably harmed if the appeals court failed to block the mandate.

The lawyers wrote that the city’s order will “leave teachers and paraprofessionals without the resources to pay rent, utilities, and other essentials. The harm is imminent.”

They said the mandate would leave thousands of New York City children in the nation’s largest school district without their teachers and other school workers.

“Imminent and irreparable harm exists,” the lawyers insisted.

On Sunday, Sept. 26 the city submitted written arguments to the appeals court, saying the preference by some teachers “to remain unvaccinated while teaching vulnerable schoolchildren is dwarfed by the public’s interest in safely resuming full school operations for a million public school students and ensuring that caregivers citywide can send their children to school secure in the knowledge that sound safety protocols are in place.”

City lawyers said courts have long recognized that vaccination mandates do not spoil the constitutional rights to due process that workers enjoy and have rejected similar challenges for over a century.

“Put bluntly, plaintiffs do not have a substantive due process right to teach children without being vaccinated against a dangerous infectious disease,” they wrote. “The vaccination mandate is not just a rational public health measure, but a crucial one.”

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Police: 17-year-old arrested in Amsterdam after burglary and stolen car

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Albany man arrested for drugs, stolen handgun

AMSTERDAM, N.Y. (NEWS10) – According to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, on Monday, September 27, a 17-year-old was arrested after an investigation into a burglary complaint at a business in Amsterdam. During the incident, the 17-year-old reportedly broke into the building, stole property, then left in a stolen car. The stolen property and vehicle were all recovered.

Charges:

  • Burglary 3rd Degree (Felony)
  • Grand Larceny 4th Degree (Felony)

The 17-year-old male was processed and arraigned in Montgomery County Youth Part Court on the above charges.

The suspect was then released to the custody of his guardian and is scheduled to appear in court at a later date.

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Gloversville Police Department, the Montgomery County District Attorney’s Office and District Attorney Lorraine Diamond.

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Homicides up nearly 30% in 2020, biggest 1-year jump ever, FBI says

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Homicides up nearly 30% in 2020, biggest 1-year jump ever, FBI says

A customer shops for a pistol at Freddie Bear Sports sporting goods store on December 17, 2012 in Tinley Park, Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Homicides in the U.S. in 2020 increased nearly 30% over the previous year, the largest one-year jump since the FBI began keeping records, according to figures released Monday, September 27 by the agency.

Homicides and non-negligent manslaughters climbed an estimated 29.4% to 21,570, an increase of 4,901 over 2019, FBI data showed. It is the highest estimated total since the early 1990s, when homicides stayed above 23,000 a year as drug wars played out in many places in the U.S.

Violent crimes in 2020 went up by a more moderate 5.6% over the previous year while property crimes continued a nearly two-decade decline, falling 7.8%. Robbery and rape dropped 9.3% and 12% respectively.

James Alan Fox, a criminologist at Northeastern University in Boston, said he considered 2020 a “unique situation” and not part of any sort of long-term trend. He attributed the dramatic uptick to a confluence of factors, including the coronavirus pandemic, conflicts over politics and race and people just generally having too much free time.

“I don’t want to minimize what’s happened. I just don’t want people to believe that the sky is falling and that this is a permanent” trend, Fox added. Even with the huge homicide rise, he noted, the number is still far lower than what the country endured during the crack cocaine epidemic 30 years ago.

While the drops in other crime categories are positive news, homicides were the stunning trend — one that has continued this year. A number of communities, rural and metropolitan, have experienced continued increases in homicides. The rising violence has become a political battleground in the year after protests over policing erupted in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. Several candidates with law enforcement backgrounds are running or plan to run for various offices around the country.

Gun control groups noted that firearms were the primary driver of the violence.

“This jump in murders is just the latest proof that we are experiencing a gun violence epidemic within the COVID pandemic,” John Feinblatt, president of Everytown for Gun Safety, said in a statement. “This death spiral will continue until we stem the flow of illegal guns and invest in proven intervention programs.”

The Uniform Crime Report program is run by the FBI and collects data annually from law enforcement agencies in a number of categories, among them violent crimes, rape, robbery and aggravated assault as well as property crimes. The data is estimated because not all agencies submit information. The FBI said about 85% of the 18,619 law enforcement agencies eligible submitted data in 2020. As a result, the FBI cautions against using its report to rank cities.

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Pandemic shortages return: Costco limiting purchases

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Pandemic shortages return: Costco limiting purchases

CHICAGO (NewsNation Now) — Remember the bad old days of 2020, when toilet paper was selling for $5 a roll-on eBay and grocery store shelves seemed permanently bare of essentials … and baking flour?

Scarcity days are here again, but this time the cause isn’t millions of people suddenly having to flush, eat, cook and amuse themselves at home while on lockdown. The problem is a serious lack of everything from cargo ships to tractor-trailers in the supply chain that brings everything to local stores.

The labor shortage caused by the pandemic hit everywhere, and that includes truckers, ship crews, dockworkers and freight handlers.

Retail giant Costco is limiting customer purchases of toilet paper, bottled water and cleaning supplies to try to forestall the kind of bare shelves it and just about every other major retailer saw during the initial phase of the pandemic.

Costco Chief Financial Officer Richard Galanti didn’t give specifics during an earnings call Thursday but made clear that limits would be placed.

Prices for overseas shipping containers have skyrocketed, and even things like Christmas decor are running in short supply. Toy industry experts are advising that you get the kids’ holiday gifts now because what you see in stores today might be all there will be between now and December.

As with every industry, the shipping industry is hiring as fast as it can. However, it takes a good deal longer to train a tractor-trailer driver than a pizza cook, and crane operators on cargo ships need much more practice than servers at your local Irish bar. Wage offerings are up, and hiring bonuses are swelling the ranks of applicants, but it will take time to get relief to U.S. store shelves.

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Power cuts in China may lead to Christmas shopping shortages in the US

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Power cuts in China may lead to Christmas shopping shortages in the US

BEIJING (AP) — Global shoppers face possible shortages of smartphones and other goods ahead of Christmas after power cuts to meet official energy use targets forced Chinese factories to shut down and left some households in the dark.

In the northeastern city of Liaoyang, 23 people were hospitalized with gas poisoning after ventilation in a metal casting factory was shut off following a power outage, according to state broadcaster CCTV. No deaths were reported.

Factories were idled to avoid exceeding limits on energy use imposed by Beijing to promote efficiency. Economists and an environmental group say manufacturers used up this year’s quota faster than planned as export demand rebounded from the coronavirus pandemic.

A components supplier for Apple Inc.’s iPhones said it suspended production at a factory west of Shanghai under orders from local authorities.

The disruption to China’s vast manufacturing industries during one of their busiest seasons reflects the ruling Communist Party’s struggle to balance economic growth with efforts to rein in pollution and emissions of climate-changing gases.

“Beijing’s unprecedented resolve in enforcing energy consumption limits could result in long-term benefits, but the short-term economic costs are substantial,” Nomura economists Ting Lu, Lisheng Wang and Jing Wang said in a report Monday, September 27.

They said the impact might be so severe that they cut their economic growth forecast for China to 4.7% from 5.1% over a year earlier in the current quarter. They cut their outlook for annual growth to 7.7% from 8.2%.

Global financial markets already were on edge about the possible collapse of one of China’s biggest real estate developers, Evergrande Group, which is struggling to avoid a default on billions of dollars of debt.

Manufacturers already face shortages of processor chips, disruptions in shipping and other lingering effects of the global shutdown of travel and trade to fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Residents of China’s northeast, where autumn temperatures are falling, report power cuts and appealed on social media for the government to restore supplies.

The crunch comes as global leaders prepare to attend a U.N. environmental conference by video link on Oct. 12-13 in the southwestern city of Kunming. That increases pressure on President Xi Jinping’s government, as the meeting’s host, to show it is sticking to emissions and energy efficiency targets.

China is one of the world’s biggest emitters of climate-changing industrial gases and consumes more energy per unit of economic output than developed countries.

The ruling party also is preparing for the Winter Olympics in the Chinese capital, Beijing, and the nearby city of Shijiazhuang in February, a period when it will want clear blue skies.

Scores of companies have announced power rationing could force them to delay filling orders and might hurt them financially.

Apple components supplier Eson Precision Engineering Co. Ltd. said Sunday it would halt production at its factory in Kunshan, west of Shanghai, through Thursday “in line with the local government’s power restriction policy.”

Eson said the suspension shouldn’t have a “significant impact” on operations.

Apple didn’t immediately respond to a question about the possible impact on iPhone supplies.

China’s energy consumption and industrial emissions have surged as manufacturers rush to fill foreign demand at a time when competitors elsewhere still are hampered by anti-coronavirus controls.

China’s economy is “more driven by exports than any time in the past decade,” but official energy use targets fail to take that into account, economists Larry Hu and Xinyu Ji of Macquarie Group said in a report.

Some provinces used up most of their quotas for energy consumption in the first half of the year and are cutting back to stay under their limits, according to Li Shuo, a climate policy expert at Greenpeace in Beijing.

Utility companies, meanwhile, are being squeezed by soaring coal and gas prices. That discourages them from increasing output because the government limits their ability to pass on costs to customers, said Li.

Prices have risen “past the range of what China’s electricity industry can bear,” Li said.

China has launched repeated campaigns to make its energy-hungry economy more efficient and clean up smog-choked cities.

City skies are visibly clearer, but the abrupt way the campaigns are carried out disrupts supplies of power, coal and gas, leaving families shivering in unheated homes and forcing factories to shut down.

Shopping malls in the northeastern city of Harbin have announced they will close stores earlier than usual to save power.

In Guangdong province in the south, the government told the public to set thermostats on air conditioners higher even as temperatures rose above 34 degrees C (93 degrees F).

State Grid Corp., the world’s biggest power distributor, issued a pledge to ensure adequate supplies.

Meanwhile, state media say local governments have signed long-term coal contracts to ensure adequate suppliers.

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Couple killed in Aurora traffic crash were married for 25 years

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Couple killed in Aurora traffic crash were married for 25 years

A Montbello couple, married for 25 years, died in an early morning two-vehicle crash in Aurora.

The couple were identified Monday by the Adams County Coroner’s Office as Rosalino Gonzalez-Salinas, 56, and 55-year-old Sandra Tapia-Cisneros.

The crash happened at about 12:35 a.m. Sept. 19 near East 38th Avenue and North Windsor Drive, according to police. They died at the scene.

Gonzalez-Salinas, a metal worker, had picked up his wife, Tapia-Cisneros, from her janitorial job and they were driving home when the crash happened, said Ben Rhoton, a friend of the couple who is dating their middle daughter, 22-year-old Aitza.

“They were the kindest people in the world,” Rhoton said. “They worked hard and did everything they could for their daughters and the community.”

The couple is also survived by daughters Karen, 23, and 16-year-old Adamaris.

Tapia-Cisneros was known in her community for organizing toy drives for children and a turkey drive for families around Thanksgiving, Rhoton said. Gonzalez-Salinas loaned neighbors and friends tools as a way to help out.

“They always had smiles on their faces and were doing everything for everyone,” Rhoton said. “Their daughters were really distraught, it hit them really hard.”

A GoFundMe page has been organized by Rhoton to help the survivors with funeral and memorial expenses. The GFM goal is $50,000. As of Tuesday afternoon about 423 donors had raised just under over $43,000.

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‘It just went south real fast’: bodycam video shows deputies survive ambush

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'It just went south real fast': bodycam video shows deputies survive ambush

BREVARD COUNTY, Fla. (NewsNation Now) — Two Florida deputies credit their training with surviving a violent ambush during a traffic stop in late August. Brevard County deputies Brian Potters and Tyler Thoman had pulled over a car that had three adults and a 2-month-old baby inside.

Potters was talking to an adult who was sitting in the back seat, and said he’d watch the infant while that adult got out to speak with Thoman. When the adult got out, he had a gun and began firing. Potters had just finished telling the shooter that he, too, had kids, when the shooting began.

“We all always call routine traffic stops routine, but obviously, that’s not the case,” Potters said on “Dan Abrams Live” on Monday. “You always try to make small talk with folks, try to get the their opinion on things and what’s going on right there at that point in time, and it just went south real fast.”

Brevard County Sheriff Wayne Ivey said there were 61 shots fired in the next minute. Potters was hit in the leg, but so was the gunman. Thoman, Potters and the shooter then circled a sheriff’s office vehicle. The attacker hit Potters with the butt of his firearm.

Potters and the shooter wrestled each other to the ground, when Thoman opened fire, killing the shooter.

“I heard Deputy Potters respond verbally to the firearm, which got my attention,” Thoman said. “And at that point, we reverted to our training and that was just to kind of get off the ax and get to cover — respond to the threat.”

Ivey called the shooter a “career criminal” and said he’d faced 40 charges over the years, including convictions on guns and drug charges.

Ivey presented the dashcam footage in a YouTube video. He said he was fine with the number of shots the deputies took at the shooter because “evil can never be dead enough.”

Abrams, whose show premiered Monday on NewsNation Now, said he will regularly highlight police work and some of the incredible — and dangerous — situations officers deal with every day.

Watch “Dan Abrams Live” weeknights at 8/7c on NewsNation.

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Surveillance images released to find suspects in shooting at downtown vigil

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Surveillance images released to find suspects in shooting at downtown vigil

ST. LOUIS– St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department released video and images connected to a downtown shooting that killed one person and injured three others last week. The group was gathered for a candlelight vigil for Demetrise Thomas who was shot and killed in the area hours earlier.

Police released the images and video and say they need help identifying the vehicles and the people riding in them.

Police Chief John Hayden said a few dozen people were gathered for the vigil when a dark-colored SUV drove past and someone in the vehicle opened fire at the crowd. Children at the vigil fled at the sound of gunfire and ran to Union Station for safety.

Thirty-four-year-old Cedric Owens died following the shooting. Three other women were injured.

Loved ones say Owens was a dedicated family man who worked hard and lived life ‘the way a man should.’ he worked at ups and was recently given a promotion.  

Anyone with information is urged to call the Homicide Division directly at 314-444-5371. Also, anyone with a tip who wants to remain anonymous and is interested in a reward can contact CrimeStoppers at 866-371-TIPS (8477). 

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Pressed into duty, Broncos rookie safety Caden Sterns proves to be quick study

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Pressed into duty, Broncos rookie safety Caden Sterns proves to be quick study

Broncos rookie safety Caden Sterns was presented with a new assignment before the regular season: Learn the “dime” position.

Good contingency planning by the coaches.

Sterns didn’t play a defensive snap in the Week 1 win over the New York Giants, but cornerback Ronald Darby’s hamstring injury forced a shuffling of personnel.

Darby was placed on injured reserve. Dime back Pat Surtain II moved to Darby’s starting spot. And Sterns replaced Surtain as the dime player (six-defensive back personnel).

In wins over Jacksonville and the New York Jets, Sterns played 28 snaps (primarily as the dime), making two tackles and intercepting a pass.

“I’m playing with obviously some really good guys who have helped me around,” Sterns said. “I’m still kind of getting used to dime — I started learning it only 2 1/2-3 weeks ago.”

Sterns will play dime for at least one more game (Sunday vs. Baltimore). Darby is eligible to play at Pittsburgh in Week 5, but the way Surtain is playing, the Broncos need to find a way to keep him on the field full-time.

Sterns allowed a third-down completion to the Jets on Sunday in man coverage, but in the final minute, after starting safeties Justin Simmons and Kareem Jackson were done for the day, he intercepted quarterback Zach Wilson’s pass after it went through the hands of receiver Braxton Berrios.

Sterns’ takeaways about playing dime? He is lining up closer to the line of scrimmage and things move quicker … a lot quicker.

“Your head has to be on a swivel,” he said. “You need to understand where your help is if you’re playing zone and know how the puzzle pieces fit together so you can react off that.”

Sterns, a fifth-round pick (No. 152 overall), is used to being a quick study.

A five-star high school recruit from Cibolo, Texas, located 25 miles northeast of San Antonio, he originally committed to LSU before changing to Texas.

“It took our entire staff to get him flipped and make him a Longhorn,” said Craig Naivar, who was Texas’ safeties coach during Sterns’ career and now holds the same title at USC.

Sterns was an early enrollee and earned a starting spot as a true freshman in 2018.

“He kept showing up and making plays,” Naivar said in a phone interview this summer. “When he saw something and read something, he would react immediately. He played fast because of his instincts and eye discipline.

“We felt he was a guy that was mature for his age and the moment wasn’t too big for him.”

Sterns was a freshman star for the Longhorns, starting 13 games and totaling 62 tackles and four interceptions. The way Sterns was deployed by defensive coordinator Todd Orlando — safeties were interchangeable — would end up helping him with the Broncos. On some plays, he would line up at free safety, but rotate down to cover the slot receiver, much as he could be asked to do against Baltimore.

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