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300lb Woman Killed Her Boyfriend With Stomach Fat by Sleeping on Top of Him

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A 300 pound Pennsylvania woman has admitted she murdered her boyfriend by laying on top of him and "smothering him with her stomach fat" during a heated argument.

A 300 extra pound Pennsylvania female has actually confessed she killed her sweetheart by laying on top of him and also “surrounding him with her tummy fat” throughout a warmed disagreement.

Windi Thomas begged guilty to the third-degree murder of her sweetheart Keeno Butler, that passed away from suffocation.

Thomas, 44, likewise struck Mr Butler with a table leg throughout the battle, a court in Pennsylvania was informed.

She after that lay on top of her sweetheart, that considered about 9 rock, and also utilized her tummy to stop him from breathing, the he Erie Times-News records.

Thomas entered her appeal in Erie Region court on Monday, consenting to a preferred sentence of in between 18 and also 36 years, relying on habits.

Windi Thomas (visualized) stabbed her sweetheart in the hand and also head and also defeat him with a table leg prior to laying on top of him and also stifling him.

Thomas, evaluating over 300 extra pounds, at first struck her 120 extra pound sweetheart with a blade, stabbing him in the hand, prior to bludgeoning him with a table leg. It was after that she surrounded her sufferer by remaining on his breast.

Butler’s fatality was ruled a murder ’cause d by breathing lack additional to blunt pressure injury to the neck and also thoracic compression, intensified by candid pressure injury to the head,’ according to the testimony.

Keeno Butler passed away as an outcome of being defeated after that asphyxiated by tummy fat

‘ I seem like she ought to have 40 or extra,’ the sufferer’s sis, Sandra Jean Butler claimed in differing with the offer. ‘She should have life.’

It was a struggling partnership, according to Sandra, in both years that Windi and also Keeno had actually been seeing each various other.

‘ It was something that was mosting likely to occur,’ the sufferer’s sis informed Erie Information Currently. ‘They also remained at my residence and also I asked her, ‘do not eliminate my sibling’.’

Keeno Butler is made it through by a little girl, Adele Brown, 2 grandchildren, his mommy and also 9 brother or sisters consisting of Sandra, according to his obituary in the Meadville Tribune.

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

Peter Rabbit, a missing puppy named Spot and a cookie-loving mouse are among the stories in a new exhibit opening Sept. 25 at Minnesota Children’s Museum.

“Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites” is described as an immersive exhibit for children 8 and younger. It was originally created by MCM.

“Storyland” features seven beloved and award-winning picture books: “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” by Beatrix Potter, “The Snowy Day” by Ezra Jack Keats, “Where’s Spot?” by Eric Hill, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” by Laura Numeroff, “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, “Abuela” by Arthur Dorros and “Tuesday” by David Wiesner.

According to MCM, each story is transformed into a three-dimensional play space where children walk into and interact with the story and its characters. Here are some highlights:

Seven favorite children’s books are featured in “Storyland.” (MCM/Bruce Silcox)

Children explore Peter Rabbit‘s world while searching for the rabbit’s lost belongings, harvesting vegetables and playing in Peter’s burrow.

“The Snowy Day” is a wintry world after a fresh snowfall.

“Where’s Spot?” is a board book about the search for Spot the dog. This exhibit features sounds and images through busy wall interactives.

In “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom,” children sort and match letters and send them up the coconut tree, dip a paintbrush into a water-filled well to write letters and beat out rhythms with steel drums while singing along with the story.

The exhibit will run through Jan. 2. Tickets are $14.95, available at mcm.org/tickets. Masks are required for all visitors 5 and older. Check the website for more COVID-19 restrictions.

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Albany Police Department reports arresting Corey Foster, 29, of Albany on Thursday. They say he was carrying cocaine and a loaded handgun on Sherman Street.

At about 10:45 a.m., detectives stopped Foster on Sherman Street between Robin Street and North Lake Avenue. They say it was part of an ongoing investigation.

Police say Foster was holding cocaine in both hands. They also say that he was carrying a bag with a 9mm handgun. He’s charged with:

  • Second- and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon
  • Seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance

Police say they also arrested Foster on the strength of an April bench warrant issued from Albany City Criminal Court for failure to appear on previous arrests.

More from NEWS10

  • Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul drone strike an error
  • Albany County coronavirus update, September 18
  • 9/18/2021: One last cloudy, humid day
  • Brian Laundrie missing as search for his fiancé Gabby Petito continues
  • Shenendehowa defense brings the juice in revenge win over Guilderland

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

Associated Press

NORTH PORT, Fla. (AP) — Police in Florida on Saturday searched a vast wildlife reserve near the Gulf Coast for 23-year-old Brian Laundrie, a person of interest in the disappearance of his girlfriend, Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.

Dozens of North Port police officers, FBI agents and members of other law enforcement agencies searched the 24,000-acre (9,712-hectare) Carlton Reserve in the Sarasota, Florida area.

“His family says they believe he entered the area earlier this week,” North Port Police tweeted Saturday.

Laundrie’s family earlier told officers that they haven’t seen him since Tuesday. Police said the conversation Friday evening was the first time they’d spoken with the Laundries in detail about the case, and that the meeting came at the family’s request. An attorney for the family called FBI investigators and said they wanted to talk about Laundrie’s disappearance, police said.

Laundrie and Petito, 22, left in July on a cross-country trek in a converted van to visit national parks in the U.S. West. Police said Laundrie was alone when he drove the van back to his parents’ home in North Port, Florida, on Sept. 1. Petito’s family filed a missing persons report Sept. 11 with police in Suffolk County, New York.

Laundrie has been identified as a person of interest in the case.

“It is important to note that while Brian is a person of interest in Gabby’s disappearance, he is not wanted for a crime,” North Port police said in Friday’s statement. It added that the investigation is now a “multiple missing person” case.

An attorney for Brian Laundrie, Steven Bertolino, did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press on Friday night.

Attorneys for the Petito family released a statement saying that Laundrie was not “missing.”

“All of Gabby’s family want the world to know that Brian is not missing, he is hiding. Gabby is missing,” the statement from the law office of Richard B. Stafford said.

Earlier in the week, Petito’s family pleaded for the Laundrie family to tell them where their son last saw her. Petito and Laundrie were childhood sweethearts who met while growing up on Long Island, New York. His parents later moved to North Port, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Sarasota.

Police video released by the Moab Police Department in Utah showed that an officer pulled the van over on Aug. 12 after it was seen speeding and hitting a curb near the entrance to Arches National Park. The body cam video showed an emotional Petito, who sat inside a police cruiser while officers also questioned Laundrie.

Laundrie says on the video the couple got into a minor scuffle that began when he climbed into the van with dirty feet, and said he didn’t want to pursue a domestic violence charge against Petito, who officers decided was the aggressor.

Ultimately Moab police decided not file any charges and instead separated the couple for the night, with Laundrie checking into a motel and Petito remaining with the converted sleeper van.

The official conversation with the family Friday came shortly after the North Port Chief Todd Garrison had publicly vented frustration over Brian Laundrie’s lack of help on Wednesday, pleading for Laundrie’s lawyer to arrange a conversation. “Two people left on a trip and one person returned!” an earlier tweet by the police chief had said.

Their trek in the Fort Transit van began in July from Long Island. They intended to reach Oregon by Halloween according to their social media accounts, but Petito vanished after her last known contact with family in late August from Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, authorities said.

In other developments, a sheriff in Utah said Friday that detectives have determined there is no connection between Petito’s disappearance on the trip and a still-unsolved slaying of two women who were fatally shot at a campsite near Moab, Utah. The bodies of the two women, Kylen Schulte, 24, and Crystal Turner, 38, were found six days after the traffic stop involving Laundrie and Petito.

Utah’s Grand County Sheriff Steven White said without elaboration in a news release the two cases were unrelated.

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

While Mac Jones looked good in his debut, 16 points isn’t going to cut it.

In the big picture, Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels can only take a conservative game plan so far, especially in a passing league.

At some point, he really has to loosen the reins on Jones and open up the playbook. Sunday against the Jets figures to be the day for that with Jones dueling fellow 2021 first-round pick Zach Wilson.

The Jets’ soft secondary sets up as an ideal opponent should McDaniels decide to get a little more creative with his play-calling.

Though Jones only scored one touchdown, he still impressed with his ability to handle a variety of blitzes, along with his accuracy, decision-making and toughness in the wake of getting popped while delivering passes.

He went 29 for 39 for 281 yards and a touchdown with no interceptions in the Miami loss.

Still, there’s progress to be made.

“I think we’re moving in the right direction,” Jones said Wednesday. “We just got to focus on what we need to get better at. That’s kind of, for me, just fundamentally, what can I do each day extra, or whatever, just to improve so that when I get to the game, we play fast, and we play better than we did last week.”

Here’s how Jones can earn his first win against the Jets:

1. Exploit corners

Unlike Miami the week before, the Jets don’t boast a couple of Pro Bowl corners out on the boundary.

Brandin Echols and Bryce Hall aren’t exactly household names. Echols is a rookie out of Kentucky, and Hall is a second-year player. During Week 1, Sam Darnold burned them for two touchdowns, including a 57-yard-bomb to Robby Anderson.

While Jones put the ball up 39 times last week, many were check-downs. He should be able to air it out a little more, and test the Jets’ young cornerbacks.

With the Jets employing a Cover-3 zone defense, Jones might also be able to utilize his tight ends more on seam routes, or with deeper routes. Whatever the case, the makeup of the Jets defense allows for Jones to take more chances, especially targeting the corners.

Said McDaniels: “There’s certain things he could do and there’s certain things that he’s not ready to do and hopefully we make the right choices each week based on what the opponent does, how they play and what we need to be able to do at the line of scrimmage as well.”

2. Convert in the red zone

Jones had no problem sustaining drives, converting 11 of 16 third-down chances against the Dolphins, which sported the NFL’s best third-down defense last year.

He authored three drives of 14 plays or more. The issue was converting those red-zone possessions into touchdowns, as the Patriots were just 1-for-4 in the money area.

Part of that was due to untimely penalties, fumbles, and poor execution.

Field goals are no longer going to cut it against most opponents. The Patriots can’t think the Jets will be the exception. Field goals will allow them to hang around in the game. Touchdowns should bury them early.

“It’s something we’ve been working at, and something we’ll continue to work at,” said wide receivers coach Troy Brown, asked this week about the red-zone woes. “We have to get better at that part of the game. We’ve all gotta fix things that we didn’t do great in the game and obviously, continue to get better.

“I think it’s just an issue across the entire unit,” he went on. “It’s just about scoring points, and putting points on the board. And, obviously, when you’re in the red area, you’d prefer to have touchdowns and not field goals. We’re 1-for-4. It’s below our expectations.”

3. Eliminate turnovers

The Patriots fumbled too many times, and had too many costly penalties during the loss to the Dolphins last week. So it behooves them to clean it up against the Jets, particularly on offense.

Rhamondre Stevenson and Damien Harris fumbled. Left tackle Isaiah Wynn was called for an offensive holding penalty with the Pats facing a 2nd-and-10 from the Miami 14. That triggered settling for a field goal during that red-zone try. Shaq Mason’s illegal blindside block in the third quarter negated a 17-yard completion to Kendrick Bourne.

“One thing we used to take pride in was not giving the game away. And we gave the game away. We took away our chance to win the game, and we can’t do that,” said running backs coach Ivan Fears. “There’s no way you feel good about that. We gotta play again. That’s the only good thing we got going here, we get to play again, and again and again, and hopefully we get to put this one behind us with some doggone solid play and dependable play.”

Running back James White said, with the Patriots putting the ball on the ground four times, with two charged fumbles, teams will be looking to further test them by punching the ball out. He’s right.

That’s why the team spent considerable time with the backs, receivers and tight ends on ball security in preparation of the Jets.

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Readers and Writers: Wolves, war and words in a notebook — a look at three new novels

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Readers and Writers: Wolves, war and words in a notebook — a look at three new novels

Today’s novels range from wolf poaching to a notebook that draws people together to a war between Mother Nature and the Gods.

“Wolfman” by Stanley Trollip (White Sun Books, $13.95)

She wondered whether she was interpreting the gift properly. Whether it was from LUPUS or someone different calling himself Wolfman, it seemed she was being encouraged to shoot poachers. No matter how she twisted her mind, she couldn’t come up with any other possibility. He wanted her to take the hunt-the-hunter idea to the next level. — From “Wolfman”

Crystal Nguyen is dressed in all-white ski clothing as she flattens herself against the snow and watches the wolf poachers. When they leave their snowmobiles, she quickly throws the keys far into the snow and skies away.

Meet the protagonist of Stanley Trollip’s first solo novel and second in the series featuring Vietnamese refugee Crystal Nguyen, a woman who takes too many chances when her heart leads her somewhere.

Trollip and his friend Michael Sears, writing as Michael Stanley, wrote four Botswana-set police procedurals featuring Detective Kubu. Then they wrote a thriller about rhino poaching, “Shoot the Bastards,” that introduced Nguyen. Her background: her father kicked her out of their house after seeing her holding hands with a young man, because he wanted her to stay home and learn to be a wife and mother. Her hobby, for which she’s training in “Wolfman,” is participating in biathlons, a Nordic skiing event in which competitors combine cross-country skiing and rifle shooting.

1631980672 4 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebook
Stanley Trollip (Courtesy photo)

In “Wolfman,” a prequel to “Shoot the Bastards,” Crystal is a reporter at a Duluth television station. She loves wolves and ecology in general, and she’s furious when two poachers are found not guilty and leave the courthouse smiling.

When Crystal gets untraceable messages from someone called LUPUS, she realizes she can harass the poachers because LUPUS gives her the places where they will be and the times. Although she knows she’s endangering her career, she harasses the poachers by disabling their snowmobiles and, later, setting fire to the cabin where they keep their snowmobiles and wolf pelts.

Reporting on these incidents, Crystal keeps her involvement a secret, speculating on-air that the perpetrators might be part of the hunt-the-hunter movement, or someone working alone whom she calls Wolfman.

Crystal’s Wolfman reporting goes viral and the station’s ratings skyrocket. But it also bitterly divides residents of Northern Minnesota, where hunting is a religion. She is physically threatened in a bar and she realizes she has put herself in danger. Then two poachers are shot by someone calling himself Wolfman. Now Crystal has to backtrack and urge this mysterious copycat to stop killing in the name of animals.

With help from DNA conservation officer Chuck Gustafson, to whom she’s sort-of attracted, Crystal tries to stay ahead of the men who blame her reporting for creating anti-hunter sentiment in the community.

Can she stay safe, save wolves and learn the identity of Wolfman? Before any of this happens, she becomes Wolfman’s kidnapping target.

Trollip keeps the tension high, with Crystal in almost constant danger. The chapters about her biathlon training nicely fit into the plot when she skis through the woods after the poachers.

Trollip will virtually launch “Wolfman” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21, presented by Once Upon a Crime. To register: crowdcast.io/e/stanley-trollip-wolfman/register.

“A Matter of Course” by Jody Wenner (Independently published, $11.99))

1631980672 599 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebookIt was an ordinary day on the Orange Line train in the Twin Cities.

Marigold (Mari) Winter, who thinks shoes tell you everything about a person, is taking her dying mother, Zi, to the hospital. Lark Brooks is a nervous man going to an interview for a job he thinks will solve his problems. Octogenarian Norma, former head librarian at the St. Paul Public Library, writes in a little notebook vignettes of life she observes. For some reason, she gives her notebook to Lark. Jason is a 17-year-old skateboarder skipping school. Jeannine is with her useless husband, Dean, who she’s thinking of divorcing.

When the man in black motorcycle boots boards the train, talking to himself, everyone knows he’s “off.” And when he accidentally trips over Jason’s legs and falls into Norma’s tote bag, he pulls out his gun and kills Norma and Zi. (This is not a spoiler; it’s the catalyst for the rest of the story.)

The killer is Bobby Davis, a house painter who’s tired of taking orders from homeowners and his boss. His has recently found a big wad of cash on a job site, but the money has made him unhappy and paranoid.

Told in the voices of all the central characters, plus a dogged detective, the story continues as everyone who was in that Orange Line car comes together and their lives are changed. Dean, Jeannine’s depressed husband, somehow comes out of the shooting as a hero, much to his wife’s aggravation because she knows he didn’t do anything heroi.. And Lark and Mari seem to be headed for romance.

What’s wonderful about this book is its tender heart. These are such likable people, even sullen teen Jason, that the reader longs for them to be happy. And it’s not giving anything away to say that Norma’s little notebook, published by Lark and Mari, is the instrument of a perfect ending.

“A Matter of Course,” the author’s 11th book, is as good as any novel from mainstream publishers. It’s a perfect read for those who need an affirmation of humanity’s goodness in these hard days.

“All the Blues Come Through” by Metra Farrari (Wise Ink, $19.99).

1631980672 726 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebookRyan is a botanist who accidentally created a species of flower that sucks up pollution, leaving the air clear. But she can’t grow them fast enough to fill orders. Then she gets an invitation from a mysterious group of scientists who live on an island off the coast of Athens.

When Ryan arrives, she discovers these are oddly-dressed people who know little about science. That’s because they aren’t scientists. They are descendants of the Gods.

That’s the premise of Metra Farrari’s debut, “All the Blues Come Through,” Book One in her Heir to a Myth series.

Once Ryan gets over her shock at seeing an entire city carved out of a mountain, she’s even more shocked to learn her hosts are demigods battling Mother Earth, who is holding the Gods hostage on a mountain and that she, Ryan, is a descendant of the goddess Artemis. The other Descendants want her to rescue the Olympians.

This mix of mythology and contemporary life (the Descendants know some modern phrases) is a lot of fun. There are centaurs, a hundred-eyed monster awakened by Ryan’s powers, and a very hunky dem-god who certainly captures Ryan’s interest. The battle is joined on top of the mountain, where Ryan confronts Mother Nature and Artemis.

Farrari is a first generation Persian American who grew up n Eagan. She was on the production team for the last three seasons of “The Oprah Winfrey Show.”

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FDA advisory panel rejects widespread Pfizer booster shots

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FDA advisory panel rejects widespread Pfizer booster shots

WASHINGTON (AP) — An influential federal advisory panel has soundly rejected a plan to offer Pfizer booster shots against COVID-19 to most Americans.

The vote Friday, 16-2, was a blow to the Biden administration’s effort to shore up people’s protection against the virus amid the highly contagious delta variant.

Over several hours of discussion, members of the Food and Drug Administration panel of outside experts voiced frustration that Pfizer had provided little data on the safety of extra doses.

And they complained that data provided by Israeli researchers about their booster campaign might not be suitable for predicting the U.S. experience.

More from NEWS10

  • Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul drone strike an error
  • Albany County coronavirus update, September 18
  • 9/18/2021: One last cloudy, humid day
  • Brian Laundrie missing as search for his fiancé Gabby Petito continues
  • Shenendehowa defense brings the juice in revenge win over Guilderland

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CU Buffs vs. Minnesota live blog: Real-time updates from the college football game at Folsom Field

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CU Buffs vs. Minnesota football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions


Joe Nguyen

| Digital Sports Strategist

Digital sports strategist for The Denver Post. Previously he was the online prep sports editor. Prior to that, he covered Adams County and Aurora in the YourHub section. He also writes about beer, professional wrestling and video games.

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How the Patriots defense can shut down the Jets and rookie QB Zach Wilson

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How the Patriots defense can shut down the Jets and rookie QB Zach Wilson

Chum in the water.

That’s how Jets quarterback Zach Wilson was jokingly described to a few Patriots defenders this week during their afternoon press conferences at Gillette Stadium. Like every joke, there was a kernel of truth to how the kid was portrayed.

Wilson will be making his second career start against a multiple-veteran defense known for its ability to confuse quarterbacks. Just ask his predecessor, ghost-seeing Sam Darnold. Though naturally, when asked to pounce on Wilson’s inexperience, none of the Pats took the bait.

Instead, safety Adrian Phillips, cornerback Joejuan Williams and others described him as talented and aggressive. His physical talent is rare, just as you’d expect from a former second overall pick. Like Wilson, the Jets are a work in progress, now under first-year head coach Robert Saleh and new offensive coordinator Mike LaFleur, a branch off the Mike Shanahan coaching tree.

Despite their flaws, Gang Green can threaten a fortified Pats defense. Wilson’s unpredictability as a rookie cuts both ways, and his receiving corps is formidable enough. Not to mention, a LaFleur-led 49ers offense rang up 467 yards and 33 points on the Pats less than a year ago.

Here’s how the Patriots defense can ground Wilson and the Jets this weekend:

1. Shadow Corey Davis with J.C. Jackson

Jets wideouts Jamison Crowder and Keelan Cole are both expected to play Sunday after missing the team’s season opener, a solid boost for their offense.

There’s no doubt New York is better off with those two players. But it should be said with the same certainty that neither Crowder or Cole can beat the Patriots. The only Jets receiver capable of that is Corey Davis.

“Tough. He’s an outstanding player,” Bill Belichick said of Davis this week. “Catches the ball and makes a lot of contested catches. Tough guy to tackle, good blocker. He really competes hard, does everything well. He’s a key guy for them.”

Davis caught five passes for 97 yards and two touchdowns in his Jets debut last week at Carolina. He was one of the more coveted wideouts in free agency, after starting his career with a four-year stint in Tennessee. The former fifth overall pick was slow to blossom with the Titans, but now ranks among the NFL’s better receivers.

The simplest solution is to shadow Davis with Jackson, just as Stephon Gilmore would have if available. If Jackson can shut Davis down, the Pats won’t have to bother with double-teams on third down or in the red zone and can allocate extra resources to keep Wilson in the pocket or another defender deep. Without his top receiver or the ability to scramble, the kid will be boxed in.

2. Deny Zach Wilson the deep ball

Between the rookie quarterback and suspect offensive line — which lost stud left tackle Mehki Becton Sunday — this version of the Jets offense is not built to sustain long drives.

Both of New York’s touchdown drives against the Panthers were sustained by two explosive passing plays. Every other series resulted in a punt or a turnover. Wilson wants to get yards in chunks, not patiently march downfield.

“He’s a guy that’s going through each progression, and he wants to throw the ball downfield,” Phillips said this week. “He wants to make that play.”

To generate chunk plays, the Patriots can expect the Jets to dial up deep play-action shots on early downs; plays designed to target the soft zone coverage NFL defenses most often employ on first and second downs. According to Pro Football Focus, the Pats played more single-high coverage last week than any other defense in the league. By calling more two-high coverage and prioritizing pass defense over stopping the run on 1st-and-10, the Patriots should force Wilson to be patient and inevitably reap the benefits of facing a young, overaggressive QB.

3. Tackle well

Aside from allowing Davis to run free in the secondary and Wilson to drop bombs, the Pats’ surest way to another loss Sunday is poor tackling.

New York will scheme its running backs and wide receivers into open space on the edge, just as the Dolphins game-planned last week. The Patriots only missed six tackles versus Miami, a palatable number, but most led to big gains. Here were the top offenders in Week 1: Jackson 2, Ja’Whaun Bentley, Kyle Dugger, Jalen Mills and Davon Godchaux.

Last season, the Pats missed 11 tackles against the 49ers, who successfully exploited their slow linebacking corps on virtually every drive. The Patriots have since received reinforcements, with the return of Dont’a Hightower and arrival of Matt Judon, but they aren’t any faster. The Jets know this.

But if the Pats can anticipate these plays, and wrap up 1-on-1 or gang tackle, it won’t matter. Force the Jets to earn their yards, instead of giving them away, and they’ll stumble into trouble soon enough.

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Democrats tackling flash points of taxes, health, climate

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Democrats tackling flash points of taxes, health, climate

By ALAN FRAM

WASHINGTON (AP) — Revamp the tax code and important federal health care and environment programs. Spend $3.5 trillion over 10 years, but maybe a lot less. Ensure that no more than three Democrats in all of Congress vote “no” because Republicans will be unanimously opposed.

Try to finish within the next couple of weeks. And oh yes: Failure means President Joe Biden’s own party will have repudiated him on the cornerstone of his domestic agenda.

That’s what congressional Democrats face as they try writing a final version of a massive bill bolstering the social safety net and strengthening efforts to tame climate change. Here’s a guide to some pivotal differences they must resolve:

PRICE TAG

The White House and top Democrats compromised on a $3.5 trillion, 10-year cost for the bill. That’s a huge sum, though a fraction of the $61 trillion in federal spending already slated over that period.

Moderates led by Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona have said $3.5 trillion is too expensive, and votes from every Democrat in the 50-50 Senate are mandatory for success. Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., have recently acknowledged what seems inevitable: The final cost may have to drop.

Manchin has suggested limiting the total to $1 trillion to $1.5 trillion, which progressives reject as paltry. Led by Senate Budget Committee Chairman Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., they initially said at least $6 trillion was needed for serious efforts to help families and curb global warming.

Eventually a compromise will be reached, with some expecting it in the $2 trillion to $2.5 trillion range. But since House committees just finished crafting a $3.5 trillion version of the package, a smaller price tag means some priorities would have to be trimmed.

TAXES

To pay for much of the bill, the House Ways and Means Committee approved $2.1 trillion in tax boosts, mostly on the rich and corporations. Some details and numbers seem likely to change.

Biden, who’s promised to not increase taxes on people earning under $400,000, will probably get his proposal to raise the top individual income tax rate on the richest Americans to 39.6%. That would be up from 37% approved under former President Donald Trump.

But Democrats also want to raise other levies on the wealthiest. It’s unclear which proposals will survive and in what form.

For example, Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., has expressed interest in boosting taxes on the value of some large estates that heirs inherit. Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., omitted that from his panel’s plan.

Democrats want to provide tax credits for children, health care and child care costs and low-income workers. If the bill’s size shrinks, Democrats might save money by delaying, gradually phasing in or out or limiting some of those breaks. Some moderates say a proposed tax credit for buying electric vehicles shouldn’t go to higher-earning people.

Biden wants to raise the 21% corporate tax rate to 28% but may have to settle for around 25%. Democrats face other differences over taxes on corporate foreign income and stock buybacks.

MEDICARE

Three moderate Democrats blocked a House committee from approving a top priority for Biden and progressives: saving hundreds of billions by letting Medicare negotiate lower prices for pharmaceuticals it buys. Another committee approved the language, so it’s not dead.

Still, the plan is opposed by drug manufacturers and some moderates want to water it down.

Democrats planned to use the savings to pay for another progressive goal: new dental, vision and hearing Medicare coverage. If the drug-pricing language is diluted and produces less savings, it’s unclear how the Medicare expansion would be financed.

SALT AND IRS

In a town that loves acronyms, SALT, shorthand for state and local taxes, is on the table.

Democrats from high-tax coastal communities are demanding an increase in the current $10,000 limit on deductions taxpayers can claim for state and local taxes they pay.

With Pelosi unable to afford losing more than three Democratic votes, many think that deduction ceiling will be increased. To make up for the lost revenue, the IRS could be given extra money or banks might be required to report more financial transaction information to the IRS, ideas aimed at bolstering tax collections.

OTHER PRIORITIES

The House has proposed grants for power companies that move toward renewable fuels and fines on those that don’t, a pillar of the chamber’s climate change agenda. Manchin, chairman of the Senate energy committee and a fierce defender of his state’s coal industry, has told colleagues he opposes that.

The House has proposed a plan for mandatory family leave that’s significantly costlier than what Senate Democrats envision. And lawmakers await a decision from the Senate parliamentarian on whether language helping millions of immigrants remain in the U.S. violates budget rules and must be omitted.

TIMING

Last month, Pelosi told moderates that the House would consider their top priority, a separate $1 trillion bill financing road and other infrastructure projects, by Sept. 27.

In what seems a mutual political suicide pact, progressives have threatened to vote against that bill unless unenthusiastic moderates support the $3.5 trillion package. Ideally, Democratic leaders would love for both bills to be voted on together.

With so many loose ends, it seems highly unlikely the $3.5 trillion measure will be finished then. That’s raised questions about how Pelosi will keep her party’s antagonistic wings supportive of each other’s priority bills and how she will shepherd both to passage.

DEMOCRATS’ TWO SECRET WEAPONS

For one thing, a collapse of the effort would mean a jarring failure to enact their highest priorities, weakening their bid to retain their congressional majorities in next year’s elections. Every Democrat knows that.

Another is Pelosi herself, who’s proven deft at holding Democrats together and squeezing out votes she needs.

House Budget Committee Chairman John Yarmuth, D-Ky., cited both factors in an interview last week, describing what he tells Democrats.

“I’ve said everybody should be posturing and doing the best you can to stand up for your priorities, but in the final analysis you’re going to vote for this thing,” Yarmuth said. “And by the way, have you met Nancy Pelosi?”

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Watertown man arrested for fleeing police, striking utility pole, possessing drugs

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Watertown man arrested for fleeing police, striking utility pole, possessing drugs

Watertown City Police

WATERTOWN, N.Y. (WWTI) — On Thursday, Watertown police arrested a man after fleeing, in possession of illegal drugs.

On September 16, a parolee identified as Ronnell Wilson, 41, of Watertown, was observed operating a Dodge Caravan by Metro-Jefferson Drug Task Force, who advised uniformed patrol officers to respond to the area.

Wilson was then observed traveling east on State Street when officers attempted to stop the van, Police said slowed down to pull to the side of the road, however, Wilson then accelerated and fled East, out of the city.

Police said Wilson, reached a speed of 50 mph in the city and continued to accelerate. He then turned left onto Weaver Road, but lost control and struck a utility pole. He exited the vehicle and ran into the residential backyards.

Additional police and parole officers responded to the area to assist with the search when officers lost sight of Wilson in the heavily wooded area.

At 1:58 p.m., Wilson was located and arrested Police said, during an article search of the area, K9 Ricky and his handler Officer McConnell located several bags of suspected drugs packaged for sale, which were abandoned by Wilson. The drugs contained cocaine and fentanyl.

Wilson was charged with:

  • Two counts of third-degree Criminal Possession of a Controlled Substance (felony)
  • Third-degree Unlawful Fleeing a Police Officer (misdemeanor)
  • Resisting Arrest (misdemeanor)
  • Infractions of Unlicensed Driving
  • Failed to Use the Designated Lane.

Wilson is currently being held on no bail in the Jefferson County Jail.

The Town of Watertown Fire Department and National Grid were also called to the scene due to the damaged pole. The road was temporarily closed for repair.

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