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Apple CEO Tim Cook: ‘Conspiracy Theorists’ Must Be Banished From The Internet

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Tim Cook says conspiracy theorists must be banished from the internet

Apple Chief Executive Officer Tim Cook claims that “harmful conspiracy theory philosophers” have no position on the Net or on Apple systems.

Prepare blown up cost-free thinkers as well as independent reporters such as Alex Jones after getting the initial “Guts Versus Hate” honor from the Anti-Defamation Organization (ADL). He utilized his time onstage to blow up those that spread out non-mainstream sights online.

” At Apple, our team believe modern technology requires to have a clear perspective. This is no time at all to obtain bound in knots. We just have one message for those that look for to press hate, department, or physical violence: You have no position on our systems. You have no residence below. From the earliest days of iTunes to Apple Songs today we have actually constantly banned songs with a background of white superiority. Why? Due to the fact that it’s the ideal point to do. And also as we revealed this year, we will not offer a system to terrible conspiracy theory philosophers. Why? Due to the fact that it’s the ideal points to do.”

Theverge.com records: “Fierce conspiracy theory philosophers” describes Alex Jones’ Infowars, which was gotten rid of from Apple’s Application Shop previously this year. Jonathan Greenblatt, the ADL’s Chief Executive Officer, especially discussed Jones’ elimination from the system as a crucial minute in resisting versus unfriendly web content, keeping in mind that Apple’s choice to eliminate Infowars caused its elimination from various other systems, consisting of YouTube, Twitter, as well as Facebook.

Much of Chef’s keynote discussion at the ADL’s “Never is Currently” meeting in New york city City concentrated on the ethical standards through which Apple runs. Chef repeated numerous times that although Apple is a modern technology firm, he comprehends that its objective goes much past developing equipment.

” Apple is a modern technology firm, however we always remember the gadgets we make are pictured by human minds, developed by human hands, as well as suggested to enhance human lives,” Chef stated. “I fret much less regarding computer systems that assume like individuals as well as even more regarding individuals that assume like computer systems. Innovation must have to do with human capacity. It must have to do with positive outlook.

” Our team believe the future must come from those that check out modern technology as a method to develop an extra comprehensive as well as confident globe.”

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Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Rockies’ bullpen slowly improving but offseason could bring relief

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Rockies’ bullpen slowly improving but offseason could bring relief

The tale of the Rockies’ 2021 bullpen has been one of trial and error. Emphasis on error.

Their relievers’ 5.08 ERA is the fourth-highest in the majors. Their 1.45 WHIP is also the fourth-highest, and so is their 34.5 percent hard-hit rate, according to FanGraphs.

But things are slowly starting to turn around.

“Bullpen performance in this day and age is critical to team success,” manager Bud Black said Wednesday night after his relievers pitched four scoreless innings a 3-2, 10-inning win at Atlanta. “Our guys, in the second half of the season, have been a little bit more consistent overall, as a group.

“You have seen their ERAs come down, almost to a man, because we had some unsightly ERAs early in the season.”

Over the past six weeks, as right-hander Carlos Estevez took over the closer’s role from the struggling Daniel Bard, right-hander Tyler Kinley started pounding the strike zone and rookie lefty Lucas Gilbreath began figuring things out, the bullpen’s numbers have gradually improved.

In August, the bullpen’s 4.11 ERA ranked 19th for the month, a vast improvement over the 5.82 ERA it posted in May. Over the past 30 days, the bullpen has posted a 4.29 ERA. That ranks as just the 21st-best in the majors, but by Rockies’ standards, it’s solid. For comparison’s sake, in 2018, when the Rockies came one victory away from winning their first National League West, the relievers’ ERA was 4.62.

“The tough part of the first half was that we were not throwing the ball well, at the same time,” said Kinley, who leads the team with 62 2/3 innings and has held opponents scoreless in 14 of his last 16 appearances while posting a 1.53 ERA. “The problem was, we had some guys clicking, but there were also some guys struggling. We just weren’t able to piece it together.

“Our more recent run is based on a relentless attitude and a relentless mindset that we have to go out every night and do the job. We have simplified our game plans and we’re trusting our stuff.”

The recent improvement by some Colorado relievers might provide building blocks for the 2022 season. Emphasis on might. Because from season to season, relievers can be notoriously mercurial.

Right-hander Yency Almonte, for example, pitched 27 2/3 innings during the truncated 2020 season, tied for fourth-most in the National League. His 2.93 ERA was the best among Colorado relievers. This season, however, Almonte’s command has deserted him to the tune of an 8.37 ERA that is the highest among all big-league relievers (minimum 40 innings pitched).

For Colorado to have a chance to be a winning team next season, and possibly a playoff contender, the bullpen makeover will have to continue.

The first question, of course, is who will be the closer?

Right now, the job belongs to Estevez. The hard-throwing right-hander, who’s begun to effectively mix his slider and changeup with his 96-99 mph fastball, has flashed a lot of promise. In 25 games from July 6-Sept. 3, he posted a 1.96 ERA, with 25 strikeouts vs. just seven walks. Still, Estevez has been inconsistent and walks too many (3.27 per nine innings).

The Rockies will certainly explore the trade and free-agent markets for relief pitching during the offseason, but it remains to be seen if they will spend for an experienced closer or a set-up man.

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Report: MBTA on course toward ‘fiscal calamity’

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Report: MBTA on course toward ‘fiscal calamity’

As candidates for governor and mayor of Boston tout plans for fare-free public transit before the end of the decade, a new report suggests the MBTA could be facing a “fiscal calamity” in a just a few years, needing $1.25 billion in new annual revenue just to meet operating and capital needs.

The Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation published a new report on Thursday describing the financial future of the state’s largest public transit agency as “unequivocal and unsettling.”

Despite the infusion of $2 billion in federal stimulus funds during the COVID-19 pandemic to offset declines in ridership, the nonprofit research group said that by the spring of 2023 the MBTA could be looking at an operating budget gap of between $200 million and $400 million for the next fiscal year.

By fiscal year 2025, the gap grows to $450 million and by fiscal year 2026 it reaches $500 million, requiring substantial fare increases or service cuts and layoffs, according to the report.

The authors of the study described the predicament facing public officials, including the next governor, as a “Hobbesian choice” between raising revenue or accepting service cuts “that will exacerbate inequities and derail the Greater Boston economy.”

The dire forecast for the financial future of the MBTA comes just two days after Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu topped the ticket in the preliminary election for mayor. Wu was among the first elected officials a couple of years ago to call for making the T free, and that platform has been taken up by Democrats like Ben Downing, who as a candidate for governor, has promised fare-free public transit by the end of a first term.

The MTF report said that in order for the MBTA to properly plan Beacon Hill must decide by the spring of 2023 whether it will be possible to come up with an additional $500 million a year in operating budget funding, or pursue alternatives like fare increases.

The gap on the capital side is even larger, according to the business-backed think tank, with between $700 million and $800 million a year needed to finance the $13 billion in infrastructure repairs and maintenance and $7 billion in climate change investments that will be needed by 2031.

Part of the problem for the MBTA will be the lingering effects of the pandemic long after the virus is under control, MTF said.

Commuter rail fares, according to MTF, represented $239 million or 36 percent of the MBTA’s total fare revenues in fiscal year 2019, but with more people working remotely the foundation said it’s unlikely those totals will fully recover from the pandemic.

Downing has put forward a plan to pay for his transportation agenda that would rely on a combination of higher gas taxes, congestion pricing, fees on Uber and Lyft rides and income tax revenue from the proposed “millionaires tax,” which will be on the 2022 ballot.

The wealth tax proposes to put a 4 percent surtax on all household income over $1 million, which supporters anticipate will generate up to $2 billion in new annual revenue that must be dedicated to transportation or education. If it does pass, competition for those dollars could be stiff with education advocates also eyeing investments in K-12 education and debt-free college.

The foundation said that even if Congress passes a massive transportation infrastructure package it will “not meaningfully change” the roughly $20 billion gap between available and needed capital to fix existing infrastructure, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and protect MBTA assets from sea level rise and storm surges.

The transportation bill that passed the U.S. Senate would deliver as much as $2.5 billion to Massachusetts over five years, according to MTF, but some estimates from the American Public Transit Association have suggested the Boston metro area would received just $370 million more over five years than it will under the current authorization bill.

Other money in the new federal package would be allocated through competitive grants, which Transportation Secretary Jamey Tesler said recently the state would be ready to compete for “aggressively.”

If state policymakers do find the new revenue, it would still not cover any expanded service options beyond the Green Line Extenstion, South Coast Rail and the Red-Blue Line Connector.

“This report has laid out a stark reality. Patches and quick fixes cannot buy enough time, nor can the MBTA fix this,” the authors concluded.

Matt Murphy / SHNS

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Churchill St. aims to bring good food, community to Shoreview

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Churchill St. aims to bring good food, community to Shoreview

Carly Gatzlaff has lived in Shoreview for more than 10 years and loves the community — but has just one beef.

“From the day I moved here, I complained that there weren’t any good restaurants,” she said.

Kale Caesar Salad from the upcoming Churchill St. in Shoreview. (Courtesy of Jonathan Gans)

Gatzlaff, a former home ec teacher and fashion designer with no formal experience owning a restaurant, is putting her money where her mouth is and opening a restaurant, Churchill St., in the former C & E Hardware building off of Minnesota 96 and Lexington Avenue, at the end of October.

Gatzlaff isn’t going it alone, though. She’s hired Northland Consulting, which consists of former Bachelor Farmer pros — chef Johnathan Gans and manager Josh Hoyt. The vision is an employee-friendly, environment-friendly eatery with “real, good food.”

The team has hired chef Aaron Marthaler, who grew up in Eau Claire, Wis., before going to culinary school in San Francisco. His résumé includes working under award-winning chef Dan Hunter in Australia and stints at The French Laundry and other restaurants in Napa Valley.

The eventual goal is for Churchill St. to be the first B-Corporation restaurant in Minnesota. The definition of a B-Corporation is a “business that balances purpose and profit. They are legally required to consider the impact of their decisions on their workers, customers, suppliers, community, and the environment,” according to the group’s website. Gatzlaff said a business has to operate for 12 months before it can gain the certification, but she’s planning to include sustainability, a healthy work environment — which means health care for those who work more than 25 hours a week and humane hours — from the outset.

To that end, the restaurant will serve breakfast, lunch and dinner, but will close by 9 p.m. each night to offer earlier bedtimes and more family time for employees.

1631848401 731 Churchill St aims to bring good food community to Shoreview
Blueberry hotcakes from the upcoming Churchill St. in Shoreview. (Courtesy of Jonathan Gans)

As for the menu, Gatzlaff said she’s been describing it as “food you’d get at Alma, but in a more casual environment.” Alma is James Beard-award-winning chef Alex Roberts’ restaurant in Minneapolis. Churchill St. will employ a counter-service model, but there will be a full bar with “amazing cocktails, beer and wine.” There will be a to-go counter for quick pickups, a full coffee program and even a little market where the restaurant can sell not only its goods but also high-end charcuterie and other products that are hard to find in the Shoreview area.

There will be about 100 seats inside the restaurant and an additional 40 outside, in a covered area that was once used as a lumber yard.

“In general, I’m trying to build a great place for the community,” Gatzlaff said. “It’s going to be very community-focused but also a great place for employees to work.”

Churchill St: 4606 Churchill St., Shoreview; churchillst.com

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UAlbany’s Race for Equity 5K is this Saturday, September 18

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UAlbany’s Race for Equity 5K is this  Saturday, September 18

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The Capital Region Vegan Network will host its first-ever vegan food festival—VEG OUT—happening Sunday, September 19, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., surrounding Monument Square in downtown Troy,

The event is outdoors, free to attend, and open to the public. This is the second VEG OUT event, but the first area vegan festival to be hosted since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

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The ISS flies over St. Louis tonight; how to get alerts when it happens again

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The ISS flies over St. Louis tonight; how to get alerts when it happens again

ST. LOUIS– St. Louis will get another great view of the International Space Station (ISS) tonight since there will be clear skies and great weather.

The ISS will fly overhead at 7:58 p.m. It will not be as high as last night. It will fly by Jupiter, Saturn, and the moon.

You can get ‘Heads Up Alerts’ when the space station is flying over St. Louis. You can sign up on Spot the Station.

That website will also allow you to watch the ISS pass overhead from several thousand worldwide locations. You can also find live ISS tracking.

There is even a guide to help you learn how to spot the station.

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Close to the action: Del Webb’s ranches in Las Vegas are 30 minutes from The Strip, way below Denver prices

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Close to the action: Del Webb’s ranches in Las Vegas are 30 minutes from The Strip, way below Denver prices

Just like builders have seen here in Colorado, age-55-plus buyers are rushing back into the market this fall at Del Webb’s active-adult communities further west—wanting to make changes to their style of living as the pandemic plays out. That’s doubly true in Del Webb’s hometown of Las Vegas, where buyers find single-family ranch lifestyles that are not only private and highly amenitized, but just 30 minutes from world-class entertainment on the Las Vegas Strip.

And the prices for those are a sight for sore eyes for Denver areas buyers, who are now seeing new-built ranches in the $600s and $700s.

That includes a Getaway 2-bedroom-plus-study ranch, ready for move-in now for $444,133, in Del Webb North Ranch—in North Las Vegas 20 minutes from the Fremont and Golden Nugget in Vegas’s downtown casino hub. North Ranch has gated security, leading to an attractively laid-out neighborhood where a clubhouse with resort pool and courts is set to open before year-end.

Right now, you could contract on a Canyon Series ranch from as low as $360,900—a real price that includes a lot premium. Del Webb’s Anisa Patton notes that North Ranch is close to Nellis AFB and to a VA hospital (just a mile east), and draws lots of retired military among its buyers.

Del Webb’s other community is 30 minutes east of the Strip, bordering scenic terrain in Lake Meade National Recreation Area. Del Webb is wrapping up a lavish clubhouse for its residents in Lake Las Vegas, with three collections of ranches from $460,000, lot included.

The community has its own 320-acre lake devoted to water sports and events, two world-class golf courses, and village-like shopping and dining, including a grocery, within five minutes.

Visit now and you’ll see the clubhouse set to open, where Del Webb’s April Daley, Lifestyle Coordinator at Lake Las Vegas, has residents involved in choosing what clubs to join. You can also see a few homes that could have you out of Denver before the snow falls, including a Tifton Walk ranch, 1,920 sq. feet plus a 3-car garage, at $635,000—with upgraded flooring, cabinets, and kitchen granite with a “waterfall edge.”

Del Webb Lake Las Vegas has smaller ranches nearing finish in the $470s and offers ranch designs up to 2,735 sq. feet that can be personalized with structural options and 3-car garages. Most all of them feature a contemporary architecture that Patton says resonates with a new generation of age-55-plus buyers.

Both areas have plenty of appeal for Coloradans wanting to move, facing sticker shock now in their local market. “These are best of both worlds,” Patton adds; “close to the dining, shows, shopping, and other entertainment on the Strip, but far enough to enjoy a private, single-family lifestyle.

Meanwhile, both areas have a good choice of homes and sites but are seeing lots of buyers now, anxious to put Covid behind.

“These are popular areas that won’t last long, and prices will go up.” Del Webb has its own in-house lender (they’re based here, in Broomfield) with special incentives that’ll cover some of your closing costs. When you book your Vegas trip, visit DelWebb.com to set up a special tour of either community.

The news and editorial staffs of The Denver Post had no role in this post’s preparation.

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‘New’ Van Gogh drawing to go on display in Amsterdam museum

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‘New’ Van Gogh drawing to go on display in Amsterdam museum

By MIKE CORDER

AMSTERDAM (AP) — A drawing newly attributed to Vincent van Gogh that has never been displayed publicly before is going on show at the Amsterdam museum that bears the Dutch master’s name.

Detail of Study for “Worn Out”, a drawing by Dutch master Vincent van Gogh, dated Nov. 1882, on public display for the first time at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

The “new” Van Gogh, “Study for ‘Worn Out,’” from November 1882, is part of a Dutch private collection and was known to only a handful of people, including a few from the Van Gogh Museum.

The owner, who is remaining anonymous, asked the museum to determine if the unsigned drawing is by Van Gogh.

From the style, to the materials used — a thick carpenter’s pencil and coarse watercolor paper — it conforms to Van Gogh’s Hague drawings, Senior Researcher Teio Meedendorp said Thursday.

There are even traces of damage on the back linking it to the way Van Gogh used wads of starch to attach sheets of paper to drawing boards.

“It’s quite rare for a new work to be attributed to Van Gogh,” the museum’s director Emilie Gordenker said in a statement. “We’re proud to be able to share this early drawing and its story with our visitors.”

It comes from a time in the artist’s career when he was working to improve his skills as a painter of people and portraits by drawing them. Over and over again.

The museum already owns the almost identical drawing, “Worn Out.”

“It was quite clear that they are related,” Meedendorp said.

The study has been loaned to the museum and goes on show from Friday through Jan. 2.

It shows an elderly, balding man sitting, hunched forwards, on a wooden chair, his balding head in his hands. Even the model’s pants appear to conform to the English title — a patch is clearly visible on the right leg.

It is a far cry from the vibrant oil paintings of vases of sunflowers and French landscapes that eventually turned the tormented Van Gogh — after his death in 1890 — into one of the world’s most famous artists, whose works have garnered astronomical prices at auction.

Instead, it illustrates how as a young artist in practicing his craft in The Hague in 1882, Van Gogh had to confront an uncomfortable truth.

“He discovered that he lacked the ability to paint people. So he was already drawing them but he liked to paint,” Meedendorp said. “So in order to be able to paint people as well he went back to the drawing board.”

Van Gogh, who was famously reliant on his brother Theo’s generosity throughout his life, gave the drawings an English title in a bid to build a bit of name recognition and possibly even land a job at an illustrated magazine.

“In his mind, he had an idea that he would reach out farther than Holland in the end as an artist,” Meedendorp said.

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Ramesh Ponnuru: Say Trump’s name, Republicans. Restraint makes him stronger.

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Ramesh Ponnuru: Say Trump’s name, Republicans. Restraint makes him stronger.

“I tell it like it is,” Donald Trump told an interviewer in May 2015, and over the next months and years that boast would find a lot of takers. The perception of his forthrightness was a major political asset. In the South Carolina Republican primary held in February 2016, voters who said they prized “telling it like it is” over any other quality in a candidate gave him 78 percent of their votes.

Trump didn’t get this reputation by saying things that had a high rate of correspondence with verified reality. He lies frequently about matters large and small. Trump is nonetheless more honest than most politicians in one sense: There is a kind of routine fakery that they employ and he rarely has. He does not pretend to like or respect his opponents, for example, as most candidates feel obliged to do. His critics deplore this norm-breaking, and they have a point: The norm of pleasantries between political rivals, often insincere ones, helps in its small way to keep the peace and to focus attention on issues.

But his highest-profile Republican critics keep illustrating why Trump’s style can feel like a refreshing break from cant. Take Chris Christie, the former governor of New Jersey, who supposedly “took dead aim at both Trump and his more ardent followers” in a Sept. 9 speech at the Ronald Reagan Library.

“We need to renounce the conspiracy theorists and the truth deniers,” he said. If he had any particular conspiracy theorist in mind, though, he kept it to himself. The name of our most recent Republican president did not pass his lips. Christie did find time to explain that leaders need to tell “the hard truth.”

Two days later, commemorating the Sept. 11 attacks, former President George W. Bush made remarks that have widely been taken as criticisms of Trump and a subset of his followers. His reference to “violent extremists at home” who wish “to defile national symbols” appears to be a reference to the rightist mob that breached the Capitol on Jan. 6 — although some people have read the passage to sweep in left-wing rioters as well. When he said that “much of our politics has become a naked appeal to anger, fear, and resentment,” nobody thought he was taking a shot at President Joe Biden. But he, too, avoided specificity.

Maybe Christie and Bush hoped that pulling punches would discourage below-the-belt counterpunches. If Bush harbored that hope, he was mistaken. Trump slugged back on Tuesday by accusing Bush of leading “a failed an uninspiring presidency.” Yes, by name.

Or perhaps Christie and Bush just thought they were being decorous. One of the lessons Republican politicians drew from the 2016 primaries was that sinking to Trump’s level to attack him doesn’t work. Bush may well have thought that a solemn observance was not the right occasion to critique a successor. But then why make veiled criticisms either?

Shrinking from naming Trump makes his opponents look weak and shifty. It plays into Trump’s self-depiction as strong and candid. It also suggests that Trump remains so powerful that even ex-presidents whose political careers are long over cannot risk taking him on.

A merely elliptical criticism also lends itself to misunderstanding. Was Bush talking about Black Lives Matter protesters after all? When he called out “nativism,” did he mean to tar everyone who supported Trump’s border-wall idea? Does he really think that the Capitol rioters are morally equivalent to the 9/11 hijackers? (He didn’t explicitly say that, but the suggestion was there.)

Paul Ryan, the former speaker of the House, ran into similar problems when he tried to finesse the Trump question in his own speech at the Reagan Library in May. Unlike Bush and Christie, he spoke the name. He praised Trump for accomplishments in office and for attracting new voters to the Republican Party. When he got to the constructive-criticism portion of his remarks, though, it was a different story.

“We need to be frank,” he said. “Today, too many people on the right are enamored with identity politics in ways that are antithetical to Reagan conservatism.” Which people? Republicans who think of themselves as closer to Trump than to Ryan in politics thought he was smearing them all as racists. He may not have meant that, but he left himself open to that reading.

Trump himself cut through the verbal fog. His response: “Paul Ryan has been a curse to the Republican Party. He has no clue as to what needs to be done for our Country.” You may not find that especially persuasive. But you can’t have any doubt about what he’s trying to say.

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Hochul doubles down on health care vaccine mandate amidst lawsuit

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Hochul doubles down on health care vaccine mandate amidst lawsuit

ALBANY, N.Y. (WETM) — On Wednesday, Gov. Kathy Hochul reaffirmed her commitment to health care worker COVID-19 vaccine mandates after health professionals sued the state.

Federal judge David Hurd in Utica issued the order after 17 health professionals, including doctors and nurses, claimed in a lawsuit Monday that their rights were violated with a vaccine mandate that disallowed religious exemptions.

“I believe the mandates are smart,” said Gov. Hochul. “They are one of the reasons we having an increase in the number of people getting the vaccine. I have heard from hospitals that they are seeing more of their health care workers who are on the fence, taking their time evaluating, and so we are having the effect we want.”

Hurd and the health professionals cited violations of the Constitution, New York State Human Rights Law, and New York City Human Rights Law, because the state Department of Health regulation requiring workers to get the vaccine provided no exemption for “sincere religious beliefs that compel the refusal of such vaccination.”

However, Gov. Hochul said she intentionally left religious exemptions out of the mandate. “This is my personal opinion because I’m going to be defending this in court,” she said. “I’m not aware of a sanctioned religious exemption from any organized religion. In fact, they’re encouraging the opposite. They’re encouraging their members. Everybody from the Pope on down is encouraging people to get vaccinated.”

Rick Ostrove, an attorney with Leeds Brown Law in New York, said the lawsuit has merit to the extent that there’s not a religious exemption allowance. However, the lawsuit doesn’t have merit beyond that. “The state is required to allow for genuinely held religious exemptions,” he said. “This law does not have that. So, it’s got to allow for that, but then the employer or the state has the right to evaluate the request. You don’t just get a religious exemption because you claim a religious exemption. It has to be a genuinely held religious belief.”

Ostrove thinks employees and health care workers are going to find it difficult to be granted an exemption. “I think people who are relying on a successful lawsuit, as opposed to getting the vaccine, are going to find themselves on the short end of the stick in most cases.”

Gov. Hochul said the patient’s health and safety are most important. “A patient [should] not have to worry when they go in there for health care that they’re going to contract a virus from one of the people who are supposed to protect their health.”

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Missouri records 1,987 new COVID cases; fifth straight day below 2,000

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Missouri records 1,987 new COVID cases; fifth straight day below 2,000

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – State health officials have recorded less than 2,000 new COVID for each of the last five days.

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, the state has recorded 657,388 cumulative cases of SARS-CoV-2—an increase of 1,987 positive cases (PCR testing only)—and 11,028 total deaths as of Thursday, Sept. 16, an increase of 7 over yesterday. That’s a case fatality rate of 1.68%.

Please keep in mind that not all cases and deaths recorded occurred in the last 24 hours.

State health officials report 52.9% of the total population has received at least one dose of the vaccine. Approximately 64.1% of all adults 18 years of age and older have initiated the process.

The state has administered 72,690 doses of vaccine in the last 7 days (this metric is subject to a delay, meaning the last three days are not factored in). The highest vaccination rates are among people over 65.

Boone County, the city of Joplin, and St. Louis County are the only jurisdictions in the state with at least 50% of its population fully vaccinated. Thirteen other jurisdictions in the state are at least 40% fully vaccinated: St. Charles, Franklin, Atchison, Jackson, Cole, Gasconade, Greene, Shelby, Nodaway, and Montgomery counties, as well as Kansas City, Independence, and St. Louis City.

Vaccination is the safest way to achieve herd immunity. Herd immunity for COVID-19 requires 80% to 90% of the population to have immunity, either by vaccination or recovery from the virus.

(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

The Bureau of Vital Records at DHSS performs a weekly linkage between deaths to the state and death certificates to improve quality and ensure all decedents that died of COVID-19 are reflected in the systems. As a result, the state’s death toll will see a sharp increase from time to time. Again, that does not mean a large number of deaths happened in one day; instead, it is a single-day reported increase.

At the state level, DHSS is not tracking probable or pending COVID deaths. Those numbers are not added to the state’s death count until confirmed in the disease surveillance system either by the county or through analysis of death certificates.

The 10 days with the most reported cases occurred between Oct. 10, 2020, and Jan. 8, 2021.

The 7-day rolling average for cases in Missouri sits at 1,800; yesterday, it was 1,745. Exactly one month ago, the state rolling average was 2,122. 

Approximately 49.2% of all reported cases are for individuals 39 years of age and younger. The state has further broken down the age groups into smaller units. The 18 to 24 age group has 81,742 recorded cases, while 25 to 29-year-olds have 56,320 cases.

People 80 years of age and older account for approximately 44.2% of all recorded deaths in the state.

TOP STORY: Funeral procession for fallen Marine Jared Schmitz 

Month / Year Missouri COVID cases*
(reported that month)
March 2020 1,327
April 2020 6,235
May 2020 5,585
June 2020 8,404
July 2020 28,772
August 2020 34,374
September 2020 41,416
October 2020 57,073
November 2020 116,576
December 2020 92,808
January 2021 66,249
February 2021 19,405
March 2021 11,150
April 2021 12,165
May 2021 9,913
June 2021 12,680
July 2021 42,780
August 2021 60,275
September 2021 26,361
(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

Missouri has administered 6,828,380 PCR tests for COVID-19 over the entirety of the pandemic and as of Sept. 15, 16.9% of those tests have come back positive. People who have received multiple PCR tests are not counted twice, according to the state health department.

According to the state health department’s COVID-19 Dashboard, “A PCR test looks for the viral RNA in the nose, throat, or other areas in the respiratory tract to determine if there is an active infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A positive PCR test means that the person has an active COVID-19 infection.”

The Missouri COVID Dashboard no longer includes the deduplicated method of testing when compiling the 7-day moving average of positive tests. The state is now only using the non-deduplicated method, which is the CDC’s preferred method. That number is calculated using the number of tests taken over the period since many people take multiple tests. Under this way of tabulating things, Missouri has a 10.8% positivity rate as of Sept. 13. Health officials exclude the most recent three days to ensure data accuracy when calculating the moving average.

The 7-day positivity rate was 4.5% on June 1, 10.2% on July 1, and 15.0% on Aug. 1.

As of Sept. 13, Missouri is reporting 1,922 COVID hospitalizations and a rolling 7-day average of 1,996. The remaining inpatient hospital bed capacity sits at 21% statewide. The state’s public health care metrics lag behind by three days due to reporting delays, especially on weekends. Keep in mind that the state counts all beds available and not just beds that are staffed by medical personnel.

On July 6, the 7-day rolling average for hospitalizations eclipsed the 1,000-person milestone for the first time in four months, with 1,013 patients. The 7-day average for hospitalizations had previously been over 1,000 from Sept. 16, 2020, to March 5, 2021.

On Aug. 5, the average eclipsed 2,000 patients for the first time in more than seven months. It was previously over 2,000 from Nov. 9, 2020, to Jan. 27, 2021.

The 2021 low point on the hospitalization average in Missouri was 655 on May 29.

Across the state, 507 COVID patients are in ICU beds, leaving the state’s remaining intensive care capacity at 18%.

If you have additional questions about the coronavirus, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is available at 877-435-8411.

As of Sept. 16, the CDC identified 41,593,179 cases of COVID-19 and 666,440 deaths across all 50 states and 9 U.S.-affiliated districts, jurisdictions, and affiliated territories, for a national case-fatality rate of 1.60%.

How do COVID deaths compare to other illnesses, like the flu or even the H1N1 pandemics of 1918 and 2009? It’s a common question.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), preliminary data on the 2018-2019 influenza season in the United States shows an estimated 35,520,883 cases and 34,157 deaths; that would mean a case-fatality rate of 0.09 percent. Case-fatality rates on previous seasons are as follows: 0.136 percent (2017-2018), 0.131 percent (2016-2017), 0.096 percent (2015-2016), and 0.17 percent (2014-2015).

The 1918 H1N1 epidemic, commonly referred to as the “Spanish Flu,” is estimated to have infected 29.4 million Americans and claimed 675,000 lives as a result; a case-fatality rate of 2.3 percent. The Spanish Flu claimed greater numbers of young people than typically expected from other influenzas.

Beginning in January 2009, another H1N1 virus—known as the “swine flu”—spread around the globe and was first detected in the US in April of that year. The CDC identified an estimated 60.8 million cases and 12,469 deaths; a 0.021 percent case-fatality rate.

For more information and updates regarding COVID mandates, data, and the vaccine, click here.

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