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Canadian President Trudeau said gov had no involvement in arrest of top Huawei executive

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Trudeau says government had no involvement in arrest of top Huawei executive - National

Canadian Head Of State Justin Trudeau on Thursday claimed his federal government had no participation in the apprehension of a magnate from Chinese innovation titan Huawei, that was apprehended at Vancouver flight terminal.

Trudeau claimed Ottawa had actually been offered a couple of days’ advancement notification concerning the strategy to apprehension Meng Wanzhou, that encounters extradition to the USA. He decreased to provide more information, considered that Meng encounters a bond hearing on Friday.

The information pounded stock exchange currently worried concerning boosted stress in between the USA as well as China as well as triggered specialists to anticipate that Beijing would certainly strike back versus Canada

” The ideal authorities took the choices in this instance with no political participation or disturbance … we were encouraged by them with a couple of days’ notification that this remained in the jobs,” Trudeau informed press reporters in Montreal in aired comments.

Asked whether he had actually talked with the Chinese premier or the ambassador, Trudeau claimed he had actually had no discussions with worldwide equivalents concerning the instance.

China’s consular office claimed late on Wednesday that it strongly opposed what it called an unjustified apprehension

The relocation comes with a difficult time for Trudeau, whose efforts to increase profession connections with China are sputtering.

Brock College teacher Charles Burton, a previous Canadian mediator that had actually offered 2 posts in China, claimed Beijing was encouraged the UNITED STATE management had actually pushed Canada to proceed with the apprehension

” We can anticipate China to strike back versus Canada really intensely,” he claimed by e-mail.

In June 2014, Chinese business person Su Container was detected a UNITED STATE warrant in Canada, where he had actually been trying to develop residency. Soon after that a Canadian resident in China was apprehension ed as well as billed with snooping. Kevin Garratt invested 2 years in apprehension prior to being deported.

Su begged guilty to conspiring to hack protection service providers as well as was punished to almost 4 years behind bars in 2016.

Inquired about the capacity for connections with Beijing to sour, a Canadian federal government authorities claimed both nations had an advanced connection.

” We will certainly remain to go over concerns throughout a variety of online forum developed to do simply that,” claimed the authorities, that asked for privacy offered the level of sensitivity of the scenario.

Richard Kurland, a Vancouver-based migration attorney, claimed there was long shot Meng would certainly be launched from apprehension. Lots of people hung on UNITED STATE warrants are extradited rapidly, he claimed in a meeting.

” If you have deep pockets, you have alternatives,” he claimed.

Huawei has a little Canadian procedure, utilizing simply timid of 1,000 individuals. However the firm claimed early this year it had actually come to be the 25 th biggest study as well as develo pm ent funder in Canada, many thanks to collaborations with neighborhood colleges.

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Buri Ram’s meatballs sales rocket 3,333% after BLACKPINK’s Lisa said they were her favorite

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Buri Ram meatballs

Thai street food vendors in Buri Ram station saw a massive influx of customers after BLACKPINK’s Lalisa “Lisa” Manoban revealed one of her favorite foods could only be found there. 

Her favorite street food: On the Woody Show for her first Thai TV interview after releasing her solo album on Sept. 11, Lisa, 24, said it has been over a year since she visited her home province of Buri Ram because of COVID-19 restrictions, Bangkok Post reported.

  • In the interview, show host Vuthithorn “Woody” Milintachinda asked the Thai-born K-pop star what she would do when she returned home, to which she replied, “pay respect to my grandfather.”
  • However, she was immediately surprised when Woody asked her if she missed eating Yuen Kin meatballs, a traditional delicacy popular in the province. “How do you know?” she exclaimed. “They’re really popular. People buy and eat them right away at Buri Ram train station.” Woody then exclaimed, “I know it’s your favorite, they don’t have it in Korea?” She replied with, “Sadly, no, there isn’t anything like that.” 
  • Lisa then explained that the highlight of the popular street food is the sauce, Thai chili paste, which can only be found in the station. “That place is so good. You can’t find it anywhere else,” she said.
  • Woody shocked Lisa again when he asked her, “Wait, so your favorite sauce is the Thai chili paste?” After the singer confirmed the question, Woody pointed out that the stalls they were referring to in the conversation were the only ones that offer Thai chili paste as a dipping sauce.

More customers: Days after the interview, vendors at Buri Ram station suddenly saw an influx of customers from outside the province placing online orders to try Lisa’s favorite food.

  • Arunsri Kamnerdklang, owner of Yai Pha, and Ratchanok Maneewan, owner of Je Nok Kok, told the Bangkok Post that their sales have suffered due to the pandemic. However, Lisa’s interview skyrocketed their earnings from a few hundred baht to more than 10,000 baht ($300) a day.
  • The vendors in Buri Ram station are now offering the same Thai chili paste that Lisa and Woody mentioned in the interview. To show their appreciation, Arunsri and Ratchanok said the artist would receive Yuen Kin meatballs and the sauce of her choice when she visited them.
  • A bottle of their famous sauce costs around 60 to 100 baht ($1.81 to $3) while a skewer of the popular freshly fried meatballs with dipping sauce sells for 5 to 10 baht ($0.15 to $0.30).
  • Bordin Ruengsuksriwong, the provincial Tourism Industry Council president, said vendors are entertaining about 2,000 orders per day, a significant increase in their business, even compared to before the COVID-19 pandemic.

New album: Lisa’s interview came days after the singer released the single “Lalisa” from her solo album of the same name and subsequently broke Taylor Swift’s YouTube record with more than 73.6 million views on debut. The music video now has over 160 million views as of this writing.

  • Lisa is the third BLACKPINK member to debut a solo album this year, according to Billboard. Rosé, whose real name is Roseanne Park, made her solo debut in March, while Jennie Kim released her solo single “Solo” in 2018.
  • Lalisa” ranked No. 1 on the Gaon Albums chart in South Korea after its release. The achievement was marked as the artist’s first entry into the chart on her own.

Featured Image via BLACKPINK (left), ข่าวช่องวัน (right)

 

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Hot Property: Lincoln mid-century modern available for first time

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Hot Property: Lincoln mid-century modern available for first time

You don’t even have to swoon over mid-century modern architecture to fall head over post-and-beam for 64 Baker Bridge Road in Lincoln.

Offered on the market for the first time, the 1956 jewel has an impressive architectural pedigree behind its good looks. Reading like a Who’s Who of modernism, the home was originally designed by Carl Koch on more than 10 acres abutting conservation land. And who better than to site the home just-so on those 10 acres than then-neighbor Walter Gropius himself.

Following a 1968 expansion by Walter Hill of Hoover & Hill, the home has been cared for and updated by a family that treasured its historical significance. As a result, the home retains its singular character and “bones” — recently spiffed up with new hardwood flooring and fresh paint.

The single-floor property flows in an L shape, with living and dining on one axis and sleeping quarters on the other, all under a sculptural butterfly roof and cathedral ceilings.

Of course, it wouldn’t be a mid-mod without walls of glass, clerestory windows, and the trademark inside-outside construction. What better way to enjoy the surrounding gardens and landscape than to celebrate them year-round? A step-down dining room includes a Koch trademark — a rubber tree growing in the inside corner, roots on the outside.

Concord grapes, a mulberry tree, peach tree, and a focal garden make use of the natural terrain and flow of the hillside for a natural sanctuary, one that benefits from incredible sunsets over the hill.

There are three bedrooms and 3.5 baths in the more than 2,800-square-foot property. A four-car garage offers car enthusiasts, artists, and hobbyists bonus space.

The property is on the market for $1,649,000 The sale is represented by Terry Perlmutter with Barrett Sotheby’s International Realty, 617-519-5179.

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Coronavirus Friday update: Thirteen more deaths and 2,645 more infections

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Coronavirus Friday update: Thirteen more deaths and 2,645 more infections

Minnesota recorded 13 more COVID-19 deaths Friday and 2,645 new infections, according to the state Department of Health.

Those whose deaths were reported ranged in age from their 30s to their 90s with 11 residing in private homes and two in assisted living. Twelve of the deaths happened in September and one in February 2021.

Minnesota’s death toll is 7,983 since the pandemic began with 4,601 fatalities in long-term care. More than 92 percent of deaths have been seniors.

There are 719 patients hospitalized including 208 in critical condition. An estimated 15,700 people with active infections are recovering at home.

Minnesota has diagnosed 681,613 coronavirus infection since March 2020. Of those who tested positive, 657,145 have recovered enough they no longer need to be isolated.

Test-positivity remains at about 7 percent, which is above the 5 percent threshold health officials use to determine if an outbreak is under control. The overall rate of new cases and hospitalizations is remains in the high-risk category.

Nearly all new infections in Minnesota are believed to be caused by the more contagious delta variant.

Health officials say vaccination is the best way to avoid a severe COVID-19 infection. Of the 3 million Minnesotans who are fully vaccinated, 99 percent have not reported a breakthrough infection.

Minnesota has administered 6.3 million doses of vaccine and 3.3 million residents have gotten at least one shot. About 71 percent of the eligible population, age 12 and older, has gotten at least one shot.

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CDTA Flex service expands to southern Saratoga

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CDTA Flex service expands to southern Saratoga

MECHANICVILLE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Thursday, the CDTA will expand its FLEX service into the Southern Saratoga county region, at DeCrescente distributing in Mechanicville.

The CDTA’s on-demand, app-based service will cover the Mechanicville, Halfmoon, and Clifton Park areas starting September 20.

CDTA introduced FLEX to the Capital Region in January of 2020, which connects customers to curb-to-curb service within specified zones by downloading the free TransLoc App to call or request a ride.

The program currently operates in Colonie, Guilderland, Latham, and the UAlbany uptown campus, which also services Albany Medical Center, Albany International Airport, and University at Albany, as part of their universal access agreement.

“It is our mission to create connections and seamless transportation options throughout the Capital Region,” said Carm Basile, CDTA Chief Executive Officer, “we have expanded our route network and increased access and opportunity for thousands of residents.

The Southern Saratoga County FLEX service will operate free of charge during the initial pilot
period, with handicapped accessible vehicles available.

For further information on FLEX service visit the CDTA’s website.

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FDA, CDC debating COVID booster shots

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FDA, CDC debating COVID booster shots

WASHINGTON — Government advisers are debating whether to recommend extra doses of the Pfizer vaccine, a key step toward the Biden administration’s plan to dispense COVID-19 booster shots to most Americans.

Scientists inside and outside the U.S. government have been divided in recent days over the need for boosters and who should get them. A panel of Food and Drug Administration advisers will vote Friday on the safety and effectiveness of boosters.

This week, two top FDA vaccine reviewers joined a group of international scientists in publishing an editorial rejecting the need for boosters in healthy people. The scientists said continuing studies show the shots are working well despite the delta variant.

If the FDA approves the extra doses, a separate committee convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will debate who should get boosters and when.

The World Health Organization has strongly objected to rich nations giving a third round of shots when poor countries don’t have enough vaccine for their first.

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Biden faces limits of $1.9 trillion in COVID aid as some states resist

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Biden faces limits of $1.9 trillion in COVID aid as some states resist

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden entered the White House promising to stop the twin health and economic crises caused by COVID-19, but $1.9 trillion and countless initiatives later he’s confronting the limits of what Washington can achieve when some state and local governments are unwilling or unable to step up.

Six months after Congress passed the massive rescue plan, administration records show that more than $550 billion has yet to be disbursed. The sum could help provide a key economic backstop as the coronavirus’ delta variant continues to pose a threat. But in some cases, it’s also led to frustration as aid for renters, testing and vaccines goes unused despite mass outreach campaigns.

Republican critics say the unspent money shows that Biden’s relief package was too big and inflationary; the administration says the unspent funds reflect the extent of planning in case the recovery from the pandemic hits more snags with virus mutations and unexpected economic disruptions. By law, about $105 billion of the state and local aid and more than half of the expanded child tax credits cannot be paid out yet.

“There are some things designed to address immediate hardship and others that are designed to allow for a multi-year policy response — they’re not really bugs, they’re features,” said Gene Sperling, who is overseeing the rescue plan for Biden. “The fact that a solid portion of these funds can be used over a few year period is a good-news story for ensuring a durable recovery.”

But some of the backlog stems from bottlenecks — or outright blockages — at the state or local level, beyond the influence of Washington. The extent of the challenge was apparent when Biden recently announced new vaccine requirements for federal workers and employers with 100 or more workers and emphasized the need for testing and keeping schools open.

“We’re facing a lot of pushback, especially from some of the Republican governors,” Biden said Thursday. “The governors of Florida and Texas — they’re doing everything they can to undermine the lifesaving requirements that I’ve proposed.”

The Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have stood up “Operation Expanded Testing” to work with schools, homeless shelters and care facilities to provide screening testing at no cost to most organizations, and CDC has offered its technical expertise — but that doesn’t mean states will take them up on it.

Iowa and Idaho, for instance, have rejected tens of millions of dollars in federal assistance to boost virus testing in schools. In Texas and a handful of other GOP-controlled states, officials have moved to block schools from conducting contact tracing — for which they have been provided federal dollars — or requiring mask-wearing.

There have been some bright spots, the administration said, including Georgia and Massachusetts, where states have employed federal resources to help keep students safe.

White House officials harbor frustrations over the slow pace of distributing money for some of the programs, but contend what remains is largely out of their control.

Large pockets of money flowed through existing pathways — for instance, expanded tax credits, which required relatively minor adjustments by the IRS. But the federal government was also tasked with standing up entirely new initiatives from scratch, with few carrots or sticks to encourage local officials to join in.

Privately, some officials believe the country as a whole had the tools to avoid the brunt of the latest delta wave and its impact on the economy through vaccinations, robust testing and economic relief money — but didn’t move quickly enough to use them.

The Biden administration can point to clear successes with its relief package. Economic growth has jumped sharply this year, with monthly job gains averaging 636,000 and demand outpacing the supply of autos, furniture, appliances and other goods. The president and his aides point to forecasts suggesting that U.S. economic growth could be the strongest in four decades.

Yet the delta variant has slowed economic activity as hiring slipped in August to just 235,000 added jobs. The slowdown overlapped with the lapse of expanded unemployment benefits, causing 8.9 million people to lose weekly benefit payments and another 2.1 million to lose a $300-a-week supplemental unemployment payment.

The delta variant has spread as funds to combat COVID-19 go untapped.

Of the $51 billion for testing, monitoring and research and development in Biden’s plan, the administration said $13.9 billion has yet to be distributed and will be used to combat the delta variant. Just 10% of the money for homeowner assistance has gone out to states, and aid to renters has been so unevenly distributed that the Treasury Department announced Tuesday the remaining $13 billion will go to “high-performing” states and cities.

“Absolutely it was too large,” said Marc Goldwein, senior vice president of the private Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “But it was also poorly designed in terms of timing and composition — there were some places we should have spent more or longer.”

Goldwein said unemployment benefits should have been tapered down gradually. Direct checks could have been split into multiple rounds, instead of a single $1,400 payment for each eligible person. State and local funds could have been disbursed in conditional tranches.

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This Coronavirus Memorial Will Continue to Expand as More People Die

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This Coronavirus Memorial Will Continue to Expand as More People Die

‘In America: Remember,’ near the Washington Monument on September 17, 2021. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

When it comes to large-scale atrocities, it stands to reason that memorials should be put in place in order to remember the lives that have been lost; now, the coronavirus pandemic has received just such a memorial. Conceived by the artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg, the temporary memorial, which will be in place for 17 days, consists of more than 660,000 white flags being planted on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Each of the flags represents a life lost to the coronavirus pandemic, and more will be added to the installation as more people continue to die.

People who’ve lost family members and friends during the pandemic will have the option of filling out an online form in order to dedicate a flag to someone, or else they can visit in person and plant a flag themselves. “I wanted to have enough pathways, where people could wander the paths privately for their own quiet reflection,” Firstenberg said. “So people would have plenty of special spaces where they could plant their personalized flags.”

A lot of art has been made over the last few years that directly addresses the coronavirus pandemic.  Mirko Ilić, Maira Kalman and Pablo Delcan were among the artists who contributed to a digital PSA billboard campaign last year, and the Public Art Fund has also launched exhibitions spotlighting the work that artists have made during the outbreak of Covid-19. Many creatives struggled with producing work during a time of such acute stress, while others thrived.

When explaining the flag memorial, Firstenberg explained that she chose white for the flag color because it represented innocence and purity. “Early on, we gave in to our lesser selves, and I hope now that seeing all these flags gives our nation a moment to pause and to think about who we are,” the artist said. “This says something about who we are as Americans.”

This Coronavirus Memorial Will Continue to Expand as More People Die

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‘I’ve honestly never felt more free’: new video shares how Black Americans feel living in Japan

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Black Americans in Japan

“Living while Black in Japan” is a short documentary made by filmmaking couple Keith Bedford and Shiho Fukada about what it’s like for Black Americans living in Japan. 

About the film: The documentary, uploaded to NPR’s YouTube channel, features three women and three men from the Black American community in Japan who shared their views on sensitive topics such as police and racism in the U.S.

  • George Floyd’s killing had struck a chord among the interviewees, with some expressing concern that the same could happen to their loved ones back in the U.S. 
  • LaTanya Whitaker, a gospel teacher and a restaurant owner in Japan, said it scares her that the incident is “something that can happen to my husband or to my son.”
  • Expressing the same fear, Rivonne Moore noted that racism in America has kept her in Japan. “Yeah, I did not intend to stay for 12 years,” she said. “But here I am.”
  • A worker in music and entertainment, interviewee Ebony Bowens moved to Japan immediately after graduating from university in New York. “You know, I can do things here in Japan that I can’t do…back at home, in the U.S.”
  • Tamru Grant’s words seemingly echoed Bowens’ sentiments. He said that he found freedom while living in Japan because he felt targeted back in the U.S. “It’s a really tense situation… when you see this white cop coming towards you, especially if it’s two.”
  • Grant said about his experience in Japan: “Living in Japan, as an African American, I’ve honestly never felt more free.” He talked about how he can catch a cab without even trying, and that he can say “good morning” to an old Japanese woman and she will look him in the eye and say “good morning” back without any fear.
  • Henry Moreland Seals, who has been working in Japan for 24 years, shared stories of kindness from strangers he met in Japan. He recounted a story where he was walking and came across a garden. An old man who owned the garden invited Seals and his friend in. The Japanese man then offered them free vegetables, like tomatoes. Seals says, seemingly in disbelief, “He was just friendly and kind.”
  • He also noted that in Japan, “We didn’t have to worry whether someone was gonna call the police on us. That we were going to get shot, that we were going to get assaulted,” whereas in the U.S. this is a present fear in many Black Americans’ lives.
  • Tyrone Jones II noted that there is black fear in the U.S. because they are viewed “less of a person, more of a threat.” He acknowledged, however, that since Japan is an extremely homogeneous society, he still sticks out “like a sore thumb.”
  • The interviewees noted that the media still plays a huge role in how Japanese view African Americans, and they are working to “dispel as many myths as possible.” They talk about how in the U.S., it’s racism but in Japan, it’s ignorance.
  • Grant says, “Have I felt racial bias in Japan? It’s hard to answer that question because not really.”

About the filmmakers: Bedford, who is African American, and Fukada, who is Japanese, moved from New York to Japan three years ago so their son could learn more about Japanese culture, according to NPR

  • Bedford said that while he likes living in Japan, he still feels a sense of being an outsider in the country. Fukada reportedly felt the same feeling of being the “other” when they were living in the U.S. 
  • The family put their plans of returning to America on hold after the killing of George Floyd as they were worried that Bedford or their son could fall victim to the same violence.
  • With their film, Bedford and Fukada are hoping to inspire a more accepting and welcoming society in both Japan and the U.S. 

Featured Image via NPR

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Week 2 high school football schedule

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Week 2 high school football schedule

THURSDAY’S GAMES 

Minuteman at Keefe Tech, 6

Whittier at Malden, 6

FRIDAY’S GAMES 

Essex Tech at Blue Hills, 4

Nantucket at Mashpee, 5

Wareham at Holbrook/Avon, 5

Wilmington at Greater Lowell, 5

Atlantis Charter/Bishop Connolly at Cathedral/Matignon, 6

Attleboro at Bishop Feehan, 6

Boston Latin at O’Bryant, 6

Bristol-Plymouth at Martha’s Vineyard, ppd.

Cambridge at Medford, 6

Chelmsford at Lexington, 6

Greater Lawrence at North Reading, 6

LaSalle (RI) at Catholic Memorial, 6

Marblehead at Lynn Classical, 6

Revere at Chelsea, 6

Somerville at Everett, 6

Springfield Central at BC High, 6

Walpole at Natick, 6

Winchester at Waltham, 6

Holliston at Medway, 6:15

Carver at Case, 6:30

Diman at Bourne, 6:30

East Boston at Brighton, 6:30

Nipmuc at Dover-Sherborn, 6:30

St. Bernard’s at Stoneham, 6:30

St. Mary’s at Bellingham, 6:30

Sharon at Seekonk, 6:30

Andover at Acton-Boxboro, 7

Apponequet at Abington, 7

Archbishop Williams at Norwell, 7

Barnstable at Reading, 7

Belmont at Wakefield, 7

Beverly at North Andover, 7

Braintree at Stoughton, 7

Burlington at Woburn, 7

Concord-Carlisle at Ashland, 7

Danvers at Haverhill, 7

Dartmouth at GNB Voke, 7

Dedham at Medfield, 7

Dennis-Yarmouth at Plymouth North, 7

Dighton-Rehoboth at Plymouth South, 7

Fairhaven at West Bridgewater, 7

Foxboro at Whitman-Hanson, 7

Franklin at Brockton, 7

Gloucester at Malden Catholic, 7

Hanover at East Bridgewater, 7

Hingham at Arlington, 7

Hopkinton at Nauset, 7

Hull at Cardinal Spellman, 7

Ipswich at Lowell Catholic, 7

King Philip at Needham, 7

Latin Academy at Weston, 7

Lincoln-Sudbury at Melrose, 7

Lowell at Tewksbury, 7

Lynn English at Swampscott, 7

Mansfield at North Attleboro, 7

Marshfield at Methuen, 7

Masconomet at Peabody, 7

Millis at Randolph, 7

Nashoba Tech at Manchester-Essex, 7

Newburyport at Bedford, 7

Newton North at Weymouth, 7

Northeast at Saugus, 7

Old Rochester at Bishop Stang, 7

Oliver Ames at Quincy, 7

Pembroke at Cohasset, 7

Pentucket at Dracut, 7

Roxbury Prep at Georgetown, 7

Scituate at Duxbury, 7

Sharon at Seekonk, 7

Shrewsbury at St. John’s (S), 7

Silver Lake at Rockland, 7

Taunton at Durfee, 7

Triton at Shawsheen, ppd.

Upper Cape at Southeastern, 7

Wayland at Amesbury, 7

Westford Acadmy at Billerica, 7

Winthrop at Austin Prep, 7

Xaverian at Bridgewater-Raynham, 7

Norton at Canton, 7:30

SATURDAY’S GAMES

Tech Boston at KIPP, 10

Bishop Fenwick at Arlington Catholic, 1

Boston English/New Mission at Lynn Tech, 1

Central Catholic at St. John’s Prep, 1

Falmouth at Norwood, 1

Framingham at Milton, 1

Milford at Wellesley, 1

Old Colony at Cape Cod Tech, 1

Somerset Berkley at Lawrence, 1

South Shore at Tri-County, 1

Watertown at Hamilton-Wenham, 1

Hamden Hall at Rivers, 2

Middleboro at New Bedford, 2

Martha’s Vineyard at Salem, 5

Newton South at Brookline, 6

Westwood at North Quincy, 7

DANNY V’S BEST BETS

FRIDAY

Nantucket at Mashpee, 5

LaSalle (RI) at Catholic Memorial, 6

Springfield Central at BC High, 6

Walpole at Natick, 6

East Boston at Brighton, 6:30

St. Bernard’s at Stoneham, 6:30

St. Mary’s at Bellingham, 6:30

Apponequet at Abington, 7

Barnstable at Reading, 7

Lincoln-Sudbury at Melrose, 7

Scituate at Duxbury, 7

Shrewsbury at St. John’s (S), 7

Xaverian at Bridgewater-Raynham, 7

SATURDAY

Tech Boston at KIPP, 10

Central Catholic at St. John’s Prep, 1

Milford at Wellesley, 1

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Sotheby’s puts rare U.S. Constitution copy up for auction

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Sotheby’s puts rare U.S. Constitution copy up for auction

NEW YORK — A very special document will be auctioned off later this year — a rare copy of the U.S. Constitution.

Sotheby’s announced Friday — appropriately on Constitution Day — that in November it will put up for auction one of just 11 surviving copies of the Constitution from the official first printing produced for the delegates to the Constitutional Convention and for the Continental Congress. It’s the only copy that remains in private hands and has an estimate of $15 million-$20 million.

“This is the final text. The debate on what the Constitution would say was over with this document. The debate about whether the Constitution was going to be adopted was just beginning,” Selby Kiffer, an international senior specialist in Sotheby’s Books and Manuscripts Department, told The Associated Press.

“This was the Constitution, but it didn’t take effect until it had been debated and ratified. So this was the first step in the process of us living now under this 234-year-old document,” he said of the document created during the summer of 1787 in Philadelphia.

It will join about 80 constitutional and related documents up for auction by the venerable house. The copy of the Constitution is on public view at Sotheby’s York Avenue galleries until Sept. 19 and then travels to Los Angeles, Chicago and Dallas, before returning to New York this fall.

It is Kiffer’s second time handling the rare document. He also spearheaded its auction in 1988. Back then, it went for just $165,000. “While it’s a lot of years later and I’ve handled a lot of great things and I’m more experienced, I have to say it’s just as exciting, if not a little bit more exciting, the second time around,” he said.

The document is from the collection of Dorothy Tapper and proceeds from the sale of the collection will benefit The Dorothy Tapper Goldman Foundation, which is dedicated to furthering the understanding of U.S. democracy and how the acts of all citizens can make a difference.

“It would have belonged to either a member of the Continental Congress or to one of the delegates to the Continental Convention. Those were the only people who had access to this first printing,” Kiffer said, estimating that there were several hundred copies made originally. “Your eye is immediately drawn to that first line, ‘We the people of the United States.’”

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