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Putin Deploys S-400 Missiles To Border Prepares For WW3 Up AHead

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Russia deploys S-400 missiles to border in preparation for World War 3

Russian Head Of State Vladimir Putin has actually released anti-aircraft rockets along the Russian boundary to prepare for the break out of Globe Battle 3.

Satellite photos caught by ImageSat International reveal 8 S-400 anti-aircraft rockets being released in the Dzhankoy airbase in Crimea.

Dailystar.co.uk records: The record recommends strategies to relocate the S-400 battery were prepared in current months.

This is well prior to the clash in between Russia and also Ukraine that triggered stress in the area.

Pictures reveal bare ground in April 2018 and also building and construction by November 10.

This is 2 weeks prior to the sea fight in which Russia caught 3 Ukrainian vessels and also their team.

The S-400 projectile has a series of as much as nearly 250 miles and also can get to an elevation of nearly 19 miles.

It is planned to reduce anything from airplane to cruise ship and also ballistic rockets.

Russia has actually reinforced the Black Sea peninsula’s army protections with the projectile batteries because 2017.

The here and now release boosts the currently existing S-400 batteries.

On November 26, Ukrainian vessels got in the Sea of Azov from the Black Sea port of Odessa.

Russia declared the ships had actually gone across right into their area and also did not adhere to correct procedure.

Crimea was linked by Russia in 2014 yet battle proceeds in the Donbass area in between Russian separationists and also pro-Kiev teams.

The sea of Azov exists eastern of Crimea and also southern of Ukraine’s areas which have actually been partly confiscated by pro-Russian separationists.

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Mike Schmidt: Bryce Harper is clear MVP, he’s Pete Rose with power

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Mike Schmidt: Bryce Harper is clear MVP, he’s Pete Rose with power

It’s that time of the baseball year again, the individual award season. Who’s the MVP? Who’s the Cy Young winner? Rookie of the Year?

Does the MVP have to come from a team in the postseason? Does MVP mean “most valuable player to a team” or “best player in the league”? There’s never been a clear-cut answer to these.

I’ve got one clear-cut answer for you: Bryce Harper is THE most valuable player to his team in the National League. He’s the clear-cut MVP if the definition is truly Most VALUABLE Player.

Shouldn’t this award go to the position player whose team would be most at a loss without him? The Braves have Freddie Freeman, Ozzie Albies and Austin Riley, all at 30 homers or more. The Braves would contend if they lost any one of them. Max Muncy, a Dodgers candidate, is near 35 HRs and 90 RBIs, and Justin Turner and Will Smith each have 25 homers and upward of 80 RBIs, a pretty solid threesome.

Fernando Tatis Jr., with nearly 40 HRs and 100 RBIs, has had a magnificent year, some would say an MVP-caliber year. But he has support from Manny Machado, who will have 30 HRs and 100 RBIs, and the Padres have all but fallen out postseason contention. The Giants, a nice surprise in the NL, are getting big contributions from Buster Posey, Brandon Crawford and Brandon Belt.

Bryce Harper is an enigma. You either love him or hate him, as they say. He plays every day and he plays hard. He loves pressure and is not afraid to fail, and he puts “it” out there — “it” meaning he knows he’s the center of attention and enjoys being “the man.” Most players don’t have that kind of talent, or don’t want the pressure.

I can sum this all up: He is today’s Pete Rose with power.

From opening day till August 1, Harper would agree he was at best a mediocre player. He still looked much like the player he was in DC, where he couldn’t get away from that “all or nothing” trap. Occasional headlines, but consistent inconsistency. It’s easy to do that these days with the emphasis on the long ball.

He did not make the All-Star team with a .282 average, 15 HRs and 34 RBIs — decent numbers, but far from league leading.

In my opinion, this first-half performance was a combination of nagging injuries, poor hitting mechanics and no sense of urgency. He simply changed his approach to including left field, accepting walks and letting the game come to him.

Then came the big turnaround, when the team was under .500. On Aug. 1, Harper hit three doubles and started the Phillies on an eight-game win streak. He started to play the game, using the opposite field, bunting, aggressive baserunning, hell bent on sparking the team, Citizens Bank Park and grabbing the MVP.

Since then the Phillies are 27-21 and in contention. Harper has hit .345 with a league-leading OPS up around 1.250, 17 HRs, 42 RBIs, 40 walks, 36 extra-base hits, and an OBP over .460. He was hitting .385 with runners in scoring position, with 13 walks in those at-bats.

To make matters worse, Rhys Hoskins, his protection in the lineup, was lost for the season. Since August, there have been five different cleanup hitters behind Harper. His at-bats with RISP were seventh on the team, his teammates are getting more chances.

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U.S. jobless claims tick up from near a pandemic low

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U.S. jobless claims tick up from near a pandemic low

WASHINGTON — The number of Americans applying for unemployment aid rose last week for a second straight week to 351,000, a sign that the delta variant of the coronavirus may be disrupting the job market’s recovery, at least temporarily.

Thursday’s report from the Labor Department showed that jobless claims rose by 16,000 from the previous week. As the job market has strengthened, unemployment aid applications, which generally track layoffs, have tumbled since topping 900,000 early this year, reflecting the economy’s reopening after the pandemic recession. The four-week moving average of claims, which smooths out week-to-week swings, registered its sixth straight drop — to a pandemic low of 336,000.

Jobless claims still remain somewhat elevated: Before the virus tore through the economy in March 2020, they generally numbered about 220,000 a week.

In a research report, Contingent Macro Advisors concluded that the recent jump in applications for unemployment benefits — especially so last week in California and Virginia — likely reflected a technical problem in processing the claims: “For now, the jump in claims in the last two weeks is not yet alarming but it certainly bears close watching in the coming weeks.”

America’s employers have rapidly increased their hiring since they slashed 22 million jobs in March and April 2020 as the pandemic — and the shutdowns that were meant to contain it — brought economic activity to a near-standstill. Since then, the economy has recovered about 17 million jobs as the rollout of vaccines encouraged businesses to open and expand hours and Americans to go back out to shop, travel and dine out.

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Vermont man arrested and charged with firearm offense after death of girlfriend

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Albany man arrested for drugs, stolen handgun

BURLINGTON, Vt. (NEWS10) — Cody Ahonen, 28, of Mt. Holly, was arrested by agents with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives on September 20. This comes after Ahonen’s girlfriend, Brittany Bouthiette, reportedly shot herself on September 15 while in a vehicle with him.

The Office of the United States Attorney for the District of Vermont says Ahonen is prohibited by federal law from possessing firearms due to a previous conviction for domestic violence.

Police say the gun used by Bouthiette belonged to Ahonen and Ahonen possessed the gun before her death. After Bouthiette was shot, Ahonen attempted to throw the gun into the woods. Police say they located a Glock pistol in a roadside ditch.

Beneath the vehicle, police located a quantity of suspected cocaine base. Inside the vehicle, troopers found an additional pistol, a rifle, a quantity of powder cocaine, hundreds of rounds of ammunition, a digital scale with white residue, and approximately $10,000 in U.S. currency.

The attorney’s office says if convicted of possessing a firearm having been previously convicted of domestic violence, Ahonen faces a maximum sentence of 10 years imprisonment and up to a $250,000 fine.

Ahonen made his initial appearance today in Burlington. He was ordered detained pending trial.

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Experts say Gabby Petito case highlights need for domestic violence awareness

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Experts say Gabby Petito case highlights need for domestic violence awareness

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — There has been no shortage of calls and tips flooding in from around the nation — witnesses eager to share what they know about the disappearance and homicide of Gabby Petito. Capital Region experts say the attention to this case highlights how important it is to be aware and know when to come forward when you suspect domestic violence.

“If you do see something, you should say something, because obviously in this case, law enforcement did get a lot from these tips,” says Amanda Wingle, the Albany County Crime Victim and Sexual Violence Center Deputy Director.

Wingle and retired Troy PD Captain John Cooney say getting witnesses to come forward can sometimes be the hardest part of their job. Cooney now trains officers on domestic violence interview and intervention. He says in Gabby Petito’s case, witnesses gave police vital clues.

“The witnesses have got the police to the place they needed to go to start to find the remains. The witnesses have gotten police into the mode of thinking there was aggression and violence in this relationship,” he explains to NEWS10’s Mikhaela Singleton.

Witnesses had called Moab City Police to report Petito and her fiancé, Brian Laundrie, arguing outside their van. Police documents confirm a witness claimed to have seen a physical altercation between the two before police arrived, questioned the couple, ultimately suggesting they separate for the night shortly before Petito’s disappearance.

Cooney says all the body camera video and evidence so far shows police did what they could to intervene in this particular case, but generally, it’s hard to make an arrest without injury to provide probable cause.

“Two people on the road, having disagreements, and really making it clear to the police that they do not wish any help, you can only go so far with that before you have to just send them on their way,” he says. “We have to look at these domestic violence cases as always pro-arrest, but unfortunately, a phone call from a witness doesn’t automatically create a mark or a bruise and that’s what we usually need to see to go further.”

However, he and Wingle agree bystander intervention can be crucial in preventing domestic violence.

“That could be either a direct intervention, going up to the situation and saying something, which may not always be safe, but there’s also other things you can do. You can create a distraction to diffuse the situation or you can also delegate, which means getting others or authority like law enforcement involved,” Wingle explains.

She says the Petito case has gained international attention, likely due to the high visibility through social media.

“It is wonderful that so much attention has been brought to this case. I think it’s a really important time to reflect on the fact that there are thousands of other people that go missing every year, especially people of color, indigenous people, whose cases don’t really get as much attention,” she says.

In order to bring awareness to such cases like Gabby’s that happen every day, she says it’s important to be observant of your surroundings. She says those in a potentially toxic relationship or friends and family observing one should be aware of a cycle domestic abuse cases often follow.

“The cycle starts out with a honeymoon phase, right? Everything is good, everybody just met, everyone’s happy. Then there’s the sense of tension building, the sense of walking on egg shells on the part of the victim, and then often there is what we call an ‘explosion’, which could be either something physical, it could be emotional abuse like shouting, and then the whole cycle just starts over and over again,” Wingle explains.

“Some of the other behaviors we look for are intensity early on in the relationship. Some people might call it ‘love bombing’. Trying to control who the victim sees or what they do with their time, are constantly checking their cell phones, that way of needing to know everything about what they’re doing. Also, ‘gaslighting’ or an attempt to make the victim question their perception of reality,” she goes on to say.

Wingle says while police intervention is both vital and at times restricted by legal thresholds, for resources like hers, nothing is too small a reason to call and get your questions answered.

“We don’t have any requirement like a police report or physical violence having happened. We are happy to speak with anyone who has a little bit of a concern about this, maybe for themselves maybe for their friends or their family,” she says.

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, abuse, if you have concerns or need someone to talk to, call the Albany County Crime Victim and Sexual Violence Center hotline at 518-447-7716.

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Denver weather: Thursday should be windy and cloudy across the Front Range

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Denver weather: Thursday should be windy and cloudy across the Front Range

Winds gusting up to 15 miles per hour will blow across the Front Range on Thursday, bringing clouds into the area.

The high temperature will be near 83, the National Weather Service Boulder said. Winds will start from the south and southwest but will shift to the north and northeast later in the day.

Wind gusts on the plains could reach 25 miles per hour.

Thursday night will be mostly cloudy with a low of 48. Winds will continue through midnight with gust up to 15 miles per hour, the weather service’s forecast said.

The Front Range air quality forecast called for moderate conditions with no air pollution advisories through 4 p.m., according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s website.

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Guest commentary: United Power cannot stick fellow Tri-State cooperative members with their bill

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Guest commentary: United Power cannot stick fellow Tri-State cooperative members with their bill

Upstanding consumer-members of electric cooperatives would be mortified if part of their monthly power bills were sent to their neighbors to be paid. In eastern Colorado’s farming and ranching communities, it’s not cliché to say that neighbors help neighbors, but it’s also safe to say we are proud to responsibly pay our own way.

That’s why consumers of electric cooperatives in eastern Colorado and across the West may be surprised to learn that their electricity bills could rise because of the actions of United Power. United Power and 41 other not-for-profit utility members of cooperative power supplier Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association voluntarily signed power supply contracts, agreeing to share the costs of delivering electricity into their distribution systems. We agreed to share Tri-State’s costs for building and maintaining the transmission system, power plants and everything else required to deliver us reliable power.

In 2007, we, along with United Power and all but two of our fellow members, elected, voluntarily, to extend our wholesale power contracts with Tri-State for an additional 10 years, all the way to 2050. Now United Power wants out of the contract it signed decades early, and it wants out at
the expense of other members.

In the past several years, United Power has been starting fights, in every venue it can find, to terminate its power supply contract with Tri-State at such a low cost that electric rates would rise for all the other utility members of Tri-State, including Morgan County Rural Electric Association. While United Power claims they want a strong Tri-State, it’s working to weaken Tri-State, and this affects our consumers.

Morgan County REA’s and United Power’s service territories share a border in eastern Colorado, and the consumers we each serve are neighbors. For example, United Power’s consumers in Keenesburg are just up the road from our co-op’s consumers in Roggen, and the farmers and ranchers of both cooperatives serve operate side-by-side. Some are consumers of both utilities.

If United Power were successful in terminating its power supply contract at such a low cost, this would harm other Tri-State members, whose consumers will see their power costs rise as they pay for the costs that United Power consumers will no longer pay.

We think that’s wrong, and I suspect many of our neighbors who are United Power’s consumers would agree.

Tri-State serves its members with reliable, affordable and responsible power, including reducing wholesale power rates and increasing clean energy, even as other utilities in the region raise rates. What is essential to know is that Tri-State’s members are working together to address United Power’s concerns by creating options to allow members to self-supply more power or even terminate their contracts early, if they make the remaining members whole.

This is an issue among Tri-State’s members, and not, as United Power would have you believe, an issue between them and Tri-State. As we all work together, we want to make sure that if a fellow member terminates the long-term contract it signed, that action doesn’t cause other members’ rates to increase. This is also an important issue for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Tri-State’s rate regulator, to consider as it examines the importance of power supply contracts – the financial backbone allowing wholesale cooperative suppliers
like Tri-State to finance, build and operate their generation and transmission systems for their members.

United Power characterizes their concerns with a banal analogy to the Eagles’ Hotel California (United Power CEO Mark Gabriel referenced the song lyrics “where you can get in but never leave” in a recent Denver Post story) when their goal really is to check out of their hotel room early and stick the other guests with their bill.

Instead, the consumer-members of United Power should take a close look at their cooperative’s actions, and ask them to work with their fellow members to reach a solution to their needs that doesn’t raise the power costs of their neighbors.

David Frick is the general manager of the Morgan County Rural Electric Association

 

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I-70 closed in Jeffco because of damage to overpass

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Sheridan officer allegedly uses a chokehold on a shoplifting suspect

Eastbound Interstate 70 is closed in both directions at Denver West as road crews repair an overpass damaged by a crash.

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office also reported the Denver West overpass is also closed. The overpass is near the Colorado Mills shopping mall.

The interstate’s eastbound lanes in that area are expected to be closed all day as inspections and repairs are made, the Lakewood Police Department tweeted. Eastbound traffic was to be diverted at Colfax Avenue.

Major traffic delays are expected and the Colorado Department of Transportation suggested motorists find alternate routes.

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Denver on national TV: Emmys, “America’s Got Talent” and “Ninja Warrior,” but only one winner

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Denver on national TV: Emmys, “America’s Got Talent” and “Ninja Warrior,” but only one winner

Colorado contestants and award nominees have been well represented on national TV this month — although only one walked away with their show’s highest honor.

Denver’s Bowen Yang is enjoying another hot streak after turning heads in 2019 as one of the few openly gay and Asian-American featured players on “Saturday Night Live.” In July, he made history by becoming one of the first Chinese-Americans — and the first-ever “Saturday Night Live” featured player — to be nominated for an acting Emmy. Show vet Kenan Thompson also grabbed an “SNL” nom, but Yang isn’t yet a full cast member, and his nomination broke the long-running show’s mold.

Yang, sadly, lost the Emmy earlier this week to Brett Goldstein (“Ted Lasso”) but doesn’t seem to be sweating it. The New York-based writer and comic’s “Las Culturistas” podcast continues to nab listeners, and Time Magazine last week named him to its 2021 Time100 list, which includes the magazine’s picks for the 100 most influential people in the world. Yang was one of a handful of comedians on the list alongside “Ted Lasso” star (and “SNL” vet) Jason Sudeikis.

“In 2018, someone sent me a clip of Bowen Yang lip-synching to my ‘Grey’s Anatomy’ character, Cristina Yang,” actor Sandra Oh wrote in Time. “I was like, ‘Oh my god — look at this kid. He’s way better at this monologue than me.’ … I am so proud to see him finding his way on his own terms.”

Yang was born in Australia, but starting at age 9 grew up in Aurora and eventually attended Smoky Hill High School. (His Instagram previously identified him as being from Denver, but Aurora still claims him as its own.)

Denver comic Josh Blue, who rocketed to national headliner status after winning the fourth season of NBC’s “Last Comic Standing” in 2006, finished an impressive run on the season-ending episode of “America’s Got Talent” on Sept. 15.

The 42-year-old’s family-friendly routines and endearing stage presence (he has cerebral palsy, but his act’s not solely about that) propelled him into the finals, along with aerialist Aidan Bryant, magician Dustin Tavella, singer Brooke Simpson, and comedian Gina Brillon.

Denver comic Josh Blue finished third in this season of “America’s Got Talent,” but previously won NBC’s “Last Comic Standing.” (Provided by Josh Blue)

The winner of the NBC show’s 16th season turned out to be Tavella, whose magic act and heart-tugging personal tales won over judges and the online-voting public. Still, it followed weeks of Blue appearing in dozens of national articles about the show, and certainly didn’t hurt his drop-in performance at Denver’s High Plains Comedy Festival on Friday (a veteran of High Plains, Blue typically receives a hero’s welcome there).

All in all, Blue finished third in the competition, with Tavella first and Bryant second.

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Review: What’s the truth in Curious Theatre Company’s “The Lifespan of a Fact”?

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Review: What’s the truth in Curious Theatre Company’s “The Lifespan of a Fact”?

There’s a telling moment that comes late in the “The Lifespan of a Fact” on stage —  make that on stage! —  at the Curious Theatre Company, through Oct. 16.

“Mom’s pissed,” Jim Fingal says anxiously to John D’Agata, after hanging up the phone. The young, slightly stocky magazine intern is standing in the living room of the writer whose piece he’s fact-checking. On the other end of the call was the editor-in-chief of the magazine, who is shocked to learn that Fingal is in Las Vegas.

If you go

“The Lifespan of a Fact,” written by Jeremy Kareken, David Murrell and Gordon Farrell. Based on the book by John D’Agata and Jim Fingal. Directed by Christy Montour-Larson. Featuring John Hauser, Sheryl McCallum and William Hahn. Through Oct. 16 at Curious Theatre Company, 1080 Acoma St. curioustheatre.org or 303-634-0524. COVID-19 protocols: Proof of vaccination or PCR test within 72 hours of showtime and masks required.

She last saw him across her desk at the magazine’s offices —  in New York City. In many ways, the fact-checker and the writer have bumped heads like spoiled siblings. When Penrose arrives, one of them is even physically throttling the other.

The dramatic comedy is inspired by a book, itself based on a wrestling match that took place at a magazine. Co-written by John D’Agata and Jim Fingal, the book recounted with obsessive flair and unflagging attention to detail the contretemps the two came to over an article — or essay — slated to run in the well-regarded literary magazine The Believer. Article? Essay? Which one is accurate turns out to be one of the play’s jokes. (And the piece actually ran in 2010.)

The clever dramatic comedy was written by Jeremy Kareken, David Murrell and Gordon Farrell. (It had a run on Broadway in late 2018 into 2019, and starred Danielle Radcliffe, Bobby Cannavale and Cherry Jones.) The writers situated their fictional version of the magazine in New York City.

Michael Ensminger, provided by Curious Theatre Company

From left: John Hauser, Sheryl McCollum and William Hahn in “The Lifespan of a Fact” at the Curious Theatre Company.

When the play opens, editor-in-chief Emily Penrose (Sheryl McCallum) is interviewing Fingal (John Hauser) about whether he is up to the task of fact-checking the “essay.” Although the piece is about a suicide, she’s thrilled at its possibilities for the publication’s reputation. The scene has the fleet feel of an exchange out of “His Girl Friday.” He’s keen to do it; he was editor of Harvard’s Crimson newspaper. She’s keen to have it done; the presses in Kankakee, Ill., are primed.

Given the article’s author, it turns out to be a Herculean task. (Or is it Sisyphean?) William Hahn portrays D’Agata, who is immediately and repeatedly dismissive of Fingal and the job he’s been assigned. D’Agata’s position: Art doesn’t need vetting and his essay about a 16-year-old who committed suicide by jumping off the observation deck of the Stratosphere hotel is art. Period. Fingal sees facts as the allies of truth and nonfiction and he offers Penrose 130 pages of annotations and queries by way of proof.

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Looking for one last peak hike before winter? Try one of these thirteeners near Denver.

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Looking for one last peak hike before winter? Try one of these thirteeners near Denver.

Summer is over, days are getting noticeably shorter, the aspen are changing and three or four ski areas say they hope to open next month.

That doesn’t have to mean your hiking season is over, though. Fall can be a great time to hike Colorado’s higher peaks. They aren’t likely to be as crowded as in summer,  the risk of afternoon thunderstorms isn’t as great and there’s bound to be great leaf-peeping opportunities while driving to the peaks.

If you yearn to get in one more good hike before the snow flies, here are three 13,000-foot peaks close to Denver we that we highly recommend:

James Peak

13,294 feet

Located on the Continental Divide, James Peak is a prominent high peak on the western horizon as seen from the scenic Buffalo Herd overlook on Interstate 70 at Genesee. It also overlooks the Winter Park ski resort, which lies only four miles to the west. From the summit of James, you can see the skyline of downtown Denver 38 miles away.

This peak is normally climbed via St. Mary’s Lake and St. Mary’s Glacier near Idaho Springs. A Colorado Mountain Club guide book, “The Best Indian Peaks Wilderness Hikes,” puts the round-trip hike distance at 7.2 miles via that route (some trail descriptions have it slightly longer), with an elevation gain of 2,950 feet. It’s also accessible via mining roads northwest of Central City, via the little town of Apex, but four-wheel drive vehicles with high clearance are recommended.

After you summit James, you can knock off two other nearby thirteeners, Parry Peak (13,391 feet) and Mount Bancroft (13,250), all of which are connected by short ridge walks. Bancroft is about 1.25 miles from James and Parry is about 0.7 of a mile from Bancroft.

John Meyer, The Denver Post

The hike to the summit of Mount Audubon, a thirteener near Brainard Lake, is worth it just for this view of majestic Mount Toll, one mile away in the Indian Peaks.

Mount Audubon

13,223 feet

We love this peak for multiple reasons. First, it’s prominently visible from much of the metro area, appearing as a distinctive hump-backed mountain in the Indian Peaks northwest of Boulder, so you get to relive your experience up there every time you see it on the western horizon.

It is accessed via the picturesque Brainard Lake Recreation Area, one of the most beautiful spots in the Front Range. And best of all, we think the views from the summit are as good as you will see from any Front Range peak. This summit is worth it just for the view of neighboring Mount Toll, a striking triangular peak that looms just a mile to the southwest.

Longs Peak, a majestic fourteener that is the tallest peak in northern Colorado, beckons 10 miles to the north. The hike to Audubon’s summit is 3.8 miles one way from the Mitchell Lake trailhead at Brainard Lake, according to a national forest route description. Just remember before you go: Entry reservations are required at the Brainard Lake Recreation Area.

From the summit of Square Top ...

John Meyer, The Denver Post

From the summit of Square Top Mountain, a 13,000-foot peak just west of Guanella Pass, the twin fourteener summits of Grays and Torreys peaks are visible four miles away.

Square Top Mountain

13,794 feet

While hordes of fourteener climbers swarm Mount Bierstadt on the east side of Guanella Pass, you’re likely to encounter far fewer folks heading up Square Top on the west side of the pass.

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