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Ethereum (ETH) Drops to $13 on Coinbase Pro

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Ethereum (ETH) Briefly Drops to $13 on Coinbase Pro – Btc Bitcoin News
As originally highlighted by investors on social media sites, the rate abnormality took place in the USD Coin ( USDC) market, the dollar-pegged stablecoin co-created by Circle as well as Coinbase.

The rate swiftly returned back to the $98 variety, showing that what took place was a flash accident, which is frequently triggered by a collection of pre-set mathematical professions triggering several stop-orders to set off.

Ethereum formerly endured a flash accident in 2017 when the rate disposed from greater than $300 to $0.10 when 800 stop-loss as well as margin liquidation orders were caused on GDAX. Similar to the most recent flash accident, the rate of ETH quickly recuperated as well as Coinbase provided a reimbursement for financier losses.

There is no indicator currently that considerable losses were triggered by today’s weird rate activity, as the ETH/USDC market is rather slim on Coinbase Pro.

ETH is currently down 11.5% over the last 24- hrs to $9113, providing the 3rd biggest cryptocurrency a $9.44 billion market cap.

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Colorado high school football scoreboard: Week 4

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Colorado high school football scoreboard: Week 4

Thursday night scores

Colorado Springs Christian 46, Rocky Ford 0

Denver North 60, Mitchell 7

Englewood 19, Littleton 14

Lakewood 27, Chaparral 23

Montrose 35, Palisade 7

Mountain View 50, Greeley West 27

Pine Creek 45, Discovery Canyon 7

Rocky Mountain 25, Northglenn 19

Rye 30, Center 8

Skyline 17, Silver Creek 7

Westminster 20, Far Northeast Warriors 16

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‘Ted Lasso’ Opts for a Fever Dream Change of Pace in ‘Beard After Dark’

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‘Ted Lasso’ Opts for a Fever Dream Change of Pace in ‘Beard After Dark’
Apple TV+’s Ted Lasso. Apple

Warning: The following contains spoilers

Ted Lasso is a narrative wavelength complete with crests and troughs that serve the story. After the heart-wrenching emotional reveals of last week’s episode, “Man City,” the ninth episode of Season 2, “Beard After Dark,” written by Brett Goldstein & Joe Kelly, opts for a unique change of pace.

Normally, Ted Lasso is an ensemble sitcom that follows a wide range of characters. Each episode provides further updates and developments for the journeys of Ted, Rebecca, Roy and Keely, Jamie, Nate and others. But this week, the show hones in on Ted’s right hand renaissance man Coach Beard (Brendan Hunt) in a singularly focused installment. The experimental pseudo bottle episode slots into the expanded tapestry of Ted Lasso after Apple upped the show’s episode order from 10 in Season 1 to 12 in Season 2. With greater freedom comes new storytelling flourishes.

After the crushing defeat to Man City and the highly-charged locker room incident between Jamie and his father, Coach Beard needs to blow off some steam. Alone. What we discover on this simultaneously cathartic and self-destructive journey is that the embarrassing loss is not the only weight pressing down on Beard. He and his girlfriend Jane have broken up after he told her he loved her and she was unable to say it back.

“Beard After Dark” begins by leading the viewer to assume that its thematic focus is on how we respond to failure. But what it quickly becomes is a revealing look into one man’s psyche and his attempt to grasp a lifeline amid a swarming internal storm.

Beard, a man of few words, struggles against his inner demons which manifest themselves in the form of fútbol commentators detailing his many perceived short-comings. What we come to realize is that despite his eclectic skills (“That man has had many lives, many masters,” Ted says of him in Season 2’s “Rainbow”), Beard is prone to acute self-loathing. Yet even at his lowest point of despair, he still manages to help others in typical Ted Lasso fashion. Humoring, defending, and uplifting the lovable bar cretins that glom onto his story in what becomes a night they’ll never forget shines a light upon his true colors. Beard boasts an altruistic spirit, even as he grapples with his own elusive happiness and questionable companionship.

That Beard and Jane do end up with one another by episode’s end raises all sorts of questions and alarm bells that Higgins tried to warn his friend about earlier this season. If Beard can only define his own current happiness through his relationship with others, then he’ll need more than just a new pair of pants. But the episode also leaves you with the strange and ineffable possibility that he and Jane, in their own broken and distorted way, may indeed be perfect for one another.

Ted Lasso has previously flirted with darkness lurking underneath the surface of its happy-go-lucky optimism. “Beard After Dark” takes a side-door entrance to something equally unsettling yet still compelling and thematically important despite its circuitous route. Whether it’s the episode’s play on the familiar wild-and-crazy night trope, Beard’s inverse of President Bartlet’s admonishment of God in The West Wing‘s famous Season 2 episode “Two Cathedrals,” or the sly Fight Club references, it manages to be both unexpected and fitting all at once. Bizarre and funny, yet wan and tinted with sadness.

Mileage may vary on “Beard After Dark,” but it’s an ambitious curveball for a show that could happily ride its pitch perfect feel-good formula for the rest of its days. Yet Ted Lasso is apparently and refreshingly uninterested in simply staying the course.

‘Ted Lasso’ Opts for a Fever Dream Change of Pace in ‘Beard After Dark’

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1,420 coronavirus cases found in Massachusetts schools in first report of the year

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1,420 coronavirus cases found in Massachusetts schools in first report of the year

A total of 1,420 staff and students in Massachusetts schools have tested positive for the coronavirus in the first infection report of the school year, according to the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education.

The report, which will be published weekly on Thursdays, shows 1,230 students and 190 staff tested positive for the coronavirus from Monday to Wednesday, according to DESE.

During this time last year, there had been 96 total cases reported. Coronavirus pool testing is being used in more than 2,200 public and private schools, about double last year’s count, according to DESE.

Districts with the most cases include Springfield with a whopping 78 cases, Wachusett with 46 cases, Fall River with 31 cases, Lowell and Middleboro with 24 cases each and 23 cases at Sabis International Charter.

There were 21 cases reported at Boston Public Schools.

With no remote learning options allowed this year, all kids are back to school in person full time. Across all grade levels, an estimated 920,000 students and 140,000 staff are now participating in some form of in-person learning.

The report includes the number of positive COVID-19 cases as reported to DESE by school districts including charter schools and collaboratives.

The number of positive cases for students and staff includes those who are enrolled or employed by the district.

DESE originally planned not to report cases again this school year, but changed its decision earlier this month.

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Miranda drives in four as Saints rout Indianapolis

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Miranda drives in four as Saints rout Indianapolis

Jose Miranda went 3 for 5 with a home run and four RBIs, and four Saints pitchers held host Indianapolis to two hits as St. Paul cruised to an 8-0 win on Thursday at Victory Field.

Batting leadoff and playing second base, Miranda hit a two-run double in the fifth and a two-run homer in the Saints’ four-run sixth inning, raising his batting average to .341. BJ Boyd drove in St. Paul’s first two runs with a second-inning double and a groundout in the fourth.

Derek Law started and allowed one hit and struck out six in four innings without a walk. Winner Chandler Shepherd (7-6) and Vinny Nittoli each pitched two scoreless innings, and Robinson Leyer pitched a 1-2-3 ninth to secure the Saints’ sixth win in their past nine games.

Left fielder Jimmy Kerrigan went 3 for 4 with two runs for the Saints.

James Marvel (5-7) took the loss for Indianapolis, charged with all eight runs — five earned — on nine hits and two walks in six innings. He fanned two.

Phillip Evans and John Nogowski had the Indians’ only hits, both singles.

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Hochul suspends state hiring freeze

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Hochul suspends state hiring freeze

ALBANY, N.Y. (WIVB) — The state hiring freeze implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic has been lifted through the end of the fiscal year.

Gov. Kathy Hochul made the announcement Thursday morning. It comes after she released an updated State Financial Plan, which her office says projects “$2.1 billion in revenue above projections as the economic recovery beats expectations.”

To summarize what the suspension of this hiring freeze means, state agencies can now hire without getting a waiver from the Division of the Budget. Hochul says agencies should prioritize hiring for their core missions and manage resources with prudence.

“As we continue to combat the pandemic, we must keep New York moving forward and that includes building our workforce to ensure we can support New Yorkers at the highest level,” Hochul said.

Between March 2020 and August 2021, Hochul’s office says the number of full-time workers in executive agencies went from roughly 118,000 to approximately 107,500.

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New Missouri health director on state law limiting health officials’ authority: ‘This is one that haunts me’

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New Missouri health director on state law limiting health officials’ authority: ‘This is one that haunts me’

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – The state’s new health director said the new law limiting the authority of public health officials worries him. Another concern of his – vaccination numbers.

Less than three weeks into the job, Don Kauerauf told reporters Thursday that masks work. He said there’s not a one-size-fits-all solution but believes the state health department should provide baseline guidance for schools and communities to follow.

To date, only 46.6% of Missourians are fully vaccinated, a percentage the director for the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS) said needs to increase.

“Still Missouri is well below where we should be in vaccinations, we’ve got to get better,” Kauerauf, the former assistant director for the Illinois Department of Public Health, said. “That’s going to be our key. Those people that are hesitant, get them vaccinated.”

Kauerauf took over as the director of DHSS on Sept. 1, after Dr. Randall Williams was asked to resign in April. He said a mandate is a political decision and instead wants Missourians to take personal responsibility.

“The word mandate is a word I cannot stand,” Kauerauf said. “I think in the public health world, when you start saying the word “mandate,” you’re basically acknowledging that everything else has failed.”

He told lawmakers Wednesday he wears a mask because of his daughter who has various cardiac conditions and special needs.

“I wear a mask and I would recommend to anyone to wear a mask if you’re in those areas where there’s a chance of passing or receiving the virus,” Kauerauf said. “We know it does work, the mask does provider a barrier.”

The new director stressed to reporters during a media call the importance of local decisions, which is why a new law in Missouri has him concerned.

“This is one that haunts me,” Kauerauf said about House Bill 271. “This is the one I’m worried about, public health is not politics.”

HB 271 limits local orders restricting businesses, churches, schools, or gatherings to 30 days under a statewide emergency unless approved by a majority vote of the local governing body, like a city council. If there is no emergency, then the restriction or order could only last for 21 days unless approved.

“Public health is going to happen after COVID and if we’ve lost that local respect of the system, how are we going to recover from that?,” Kauerauf said. “It should be a concern to all us is that loss of respect, and we cannot set a public health system back.”

Kauerauf praised the state’s vaccine incentive program, MOVIP which has received 45,000 entries according to DHSS, saying it came at the perfect time.

“This program most certainly provided vaccinated at the most critical time for Missourians that if we did get a certain percentage of the population that got vaccinated because of this MOVIP, it was at the right time when the Delta Variant was first taking off in this state,” Kauerauf said.

Even with the incentive program, he said the state is seeing a rise in vaccinations when a community is being ravaged by the variant.

“It’s clear the importance of vaccinations,” Kauerauf said.

He said the state health department is working to release new guidance to schools and local communities but did not elaborate on the ideas. Instead, Kauerauf said the goal is to keep kids in school, especially after seeing the test results of the assessment for students released by the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education earlier this week.

“That’s alarming and understanding that some of the core math subjects where they’ve had some of the greatest decreases,” Kauerauf said. “We are going to have some documentation that we are working on now for schools, to provide some clear ideas to achieve that keep kids in schools, allowing the locals to customize to the point where it’s really addressing the needs of that community.”

According to the Missouri Hospital Association, nearly one in three Missouri children ages 12 to 17 have been vaccinated, but earlier this month, a record of 1,133 children under 18 tested positive for COVID, a record-setting number.

Kauerauf said he has been married for 26 years to his wife that is also in public health, as the chief of communicable disease for the Illinois Department of Public Health, and has triplets who are 22 years old.

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Young, stacked U.S. team faces familiar battle in Ryder Cup

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Young, stacked U.S. team faces familiar battle in Ryder Cup

The Americans would seem to have a lot in their favor at the Ryder Cup.

They are on home soil at Whistling Straits along the Wisconsin shores of Lake Michigan. A full house is expected, along with louder than usual cheering for the Stars & Stripes because of COVID-19 travel restrictions for European-based fans.

As for the players? Younger than ever, to be sure, but no less stacked. The Americans have eight of the top 10 in the world ranking — Europe only has Jon Rahm at No. 1 — on a team that has won twice as many majors.

This is nothing new, of course. With one exception, the Americans always bring a better collection of players to the Ryder Cup.

They just rarely leave with the precious gold trophy.

“We have the best players this year,” said Paul Azinger, the lead analyst for NBC Sports who still uses pronouns as if it were 2008 when he was the U.S. captain. “And obviously, they (Europe) roll in with the most confidence and maybe the best team.”

The trick is getting the American players to realize that. At the last Ryder Cup in France three years ago, the U.S. was just as loaded with nine major champions on the 12-man squad who had combined to win 10 of the last 16 majors.

They got smoked again.

“I feel like on paper, from head to toe, the world ranking, I would say we’re a stronger team,” U.S. captain Steve Stricker said. “But I don’t think our guys feel we’re better. They know deep down how hard it is to beat them.”

All that matters on paper are the results. Europe has won nine of the last 12 times in the Ryder Cup. And while the U.S. still holds a 26-14-2 advantage dating to the start in 1927, that’s not the real measure. Continental Europeans did not join the fray until 1979, and since then they are 11-8-1.

Europe, with Padraig Harrington now at the helm of the juggernaut, tries to extend its dominance at the 43rd Ryder Cup, which was postponed one year because of the pandemic.

Three relentless days of matches Sept. 24-26 will be held at Whistling Straits, the cliffside course with 1,000 or so bunkers that has hosted the PGA Championship three times in the last 17 years. American players, it should be noted, have been runner-up in all three.

Why do the Europeans keep winning the Ryder Cup?

They relish the role as underdogs. They seem to play with a chip on their shoulders, perhaps because the Americans don’t — and probably should — have one on theirs.

“That’s our advantage, I guess, in a way, right?” Ian Poulter said in a SiriusXM PGA Tour Radio interview. “That we have delivered when perhaps we shouldn’t have delivered. And this is the magical question that gets asked all the time. That’s what has the American press scratching their head. That’s what has the American team scratching their heads at times. On paper — on paper — the U.S. team should have delivered.

“It’s for us to enjoy and for the American team to figure out,” he said. “There is a level of magic sauce which we’ve been able to create over the years.”

Europe is bringing winning experience to Wisconsin.

Lee Westwood ties a European record by playing in his 11th Ryder Cup at age 48. He joins Sergio Garcia, already with the highest points total in history, on a short list of those who have played in Ryder Cups over parts of four decades. Garcia has contributed 25 1/2 points, the same amount as this entire U.S. team combined.

Whatever experience the Americans bring are mostly bad memories. Their lone victory in the last decade was at Hazeltine in 2016 against a European team that had six rookies. Only one of them, Matt Fitzpatrick, made it back on another team.

The six rookies are the most for the Americans since 2008 when they won at Valhalla.

Those include Collin Morikawa, who was an amateur when the last Ryder Cup was played and since then has won two majors, a World Golf Championship and led the U.S. standings in his first year of eligibility. It includes FedEx Cup champion Patrick Cantlay and Olympic gold medalist Xander Schauffele, who were a formidable team at the Presidents Cup in Australia two years ago.

“I think it’s a good time for a younger influx of players,” Schauffele said, “and really excited to run with these guys.”

And while the veterans include Dustin Johnson and Jordan Spieth — the only Americans to have played at least three Ryder Cups — they also include Brooks Koepka and Bryson DeChambeau, who have made their dislike for each other abundantly clear over the last few months.

DeChambeau has stopped talking to the press after he was criticized for saying he wasn’t vaccinated because he’s young and healthy and would rather give it to people who need it (even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said there is no shortage).

He also has endured heckling, with fans calling him “Brooksy” to get under his skin.

Koepka, meanwhile, injured his wrist hitting a tree root beneath the turf at East Lake. He plans to be at Whistling Straits and said he would be ready to go, though at what strength won’t be known until he gets there.

A week before the matches, Koepka was quoted in a Golf Digest interview as saying the Ryder Cup week is hectic, odd and takes him out of his routine because of the team element. Azinger read the interview and suggested if Koepka doesn’t love the Ryder Cup, he should give his spot to someone who does.

This is the drama Stricker can do without as he leads a team desperate for a win. He said he spoke to Koepka and DeChambeau in the last month and they assured him they would put their differences aside.

That’s never been a problem for Europe, which has not been immune to personality conflicts over the years. It just never shows inside the ropes, in uniform, with a 17-inch trophy at stake.

“You have your favorites, guys who get along with, some you get along with a little worse,” Garcia said. “I can’t speak for the Americans — I don’t know what happens there — but it feels like when we get in the team room, everyone takes their armor off and puts it aside. You can feel that. Everyone is happy to put their arm around everyone else and try to help. It’s just the way it is.”

Maybe it’s that European magic sauce. Whatever it is, it’s been working.

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MassMutual fined for failing to monitor GameStop saga’s ‘Roaring Kitty’

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MassMutual fined for failing to monitor GameStop saga’s ‘Roaring Kitty’

State regulators are fining MassMutual $4 million and ordering it to overhaul its social media policies after accusing the company of failing to supervise an employee whose online cheerleading of GameStop’s stock helped launch the frenzy that shook Wall Street earlier this year.

The settlement announced Thursday by Secretary of the State William Galvin centers on the actions of Keith Gill, who was an employee at a MassMutual subsidiary from April 2019 until January 2021.

His tenure ended as GameStop’s stock price suddenly soared nearly 800% in a week, with hordes of smaller-pocketed and novice investors piled in, to the shock and awe of professionals.

Gill’s job at MassMutual was to create educational materials for current and potential customers, but regulators say he was also posting more than 250 hours of videos on YouTube and sending at least 590 Tweets about investing and GameStop through accounts unaffiliated with the company.

Regulators cited those messages, alleging MassMutual failed to monitor the social media accounts of Gill and other employees who were registered as broker-dealer agents in the state, and therefore subject to certain supervision requirements.

The MassMutual unit where Gill worked prohibits broker-dealer agents from discussing generic securities on social media.

In his online messages, Gill would often talk about why he owned and was optimistic about GameStop’s stock, even though it had been struggling for years. He used the nicknames “Roaring Kitty” and “DeepValue,” with an expletive in the middle of the latter one, and he amassed tens of thousands of followers.

Gill, and the red headband he wore in many of his videos, became such central characters in the GameStop phenomenon that he testified in a Congressional hearing about it. There he professed once again, “I like the stock,” a statement that became a rallying cry for GameStop investors in forums across the internet.

Regulators also said MassMutual failed to have reasonable policies and procedures to monitor the personal trading of its registered agents, among other things. To watch for excessive trading, for example, the MassMutual unit where Gill worked had a rule to flag transactions of $250,000 or more in a single security made across all the accounts by registered representatives.

Regulators say Gill sold $750,000 worth of GameStop options and bought $703,600 of GameStop stock in one day during January, but his employer’s trade surveillance system didn’t flag either of the trades.

In the settlement, MassMutual neither admitted nor denied state regulators’ findings. It said in a statement that it’s “pleased to put this matter behind us, avoiding the expense and distraction associated with protracted litigation.”

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High school football: Growing numbers, culture contribute to St. Agnes’ consistent success

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High school football: Growing numbers, culture contribute to St. Agnes’ consistent success

St. Agnes’ football program featured 26 players when Tom Flood took over five seasons ago.

Now, the 2-0 Aggies have nearly 70 players out for the team.

The growth is largely a result of three factors: A school growing in enrollment, three consecutive section final appearances and, perhaps most important, a culture kids gravitate toward.

Senior quarterback Isaac Schmidt said kids at school see the “brotherhood” that lives within the football program, and it’s something they, too, want to be a part of.

“I honestly think it’s because of the sense of unity that we have,” said senior defensive back and athlete Caleb Flood, Tom’s son. “We started out with 26 kids, now we have 25 freshmen and five eighth graders. They just want to be a part of something bigger than themselves, and I think we offer that.”

St. Agnes coach Tom Flood watches during practice in St. Paul on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021, Flood has led the Aggies to section championship games in three straight seasons (Jace Frederick / Pioneer Press)

Tom Flood gave his senior class a lot of credit for the culture that exists within the program. They’ve done the things necessary to build it. Caleb Flood noted much of the team is in the weight room — run by defensive coordinator Sam Thompson — every day in the offseason. They’ve also embraced what the program is all about: winning.

But the Aggies’ definition of winning, Tom Flood noted, is different than simply going off what the scoreboard reads.

“It’s walking off the field going ‘I left everything I had on the field tonight for the guy next to me,’ ” he said. “That’s winning. That’s what it’s about.”

It’s Henry Tibesar filling in at quarterback last season after Schmidt went down with an injury, then playing left tackle this fall as a junior, because that’s what the team needed.

That mindset is what Flood got players to buy into early in his tenure. Current seniors credit leaders from the 2018 squad — Conrad Tibesar, Terrell Jones and others — for establishing a standard they could carry forward.

“Lucky for us, we came in as freshmen with a pretty strong senior class, with guys who understood what they wanted and what they wanted from Coach Flood,” Caleb Flood said. “So for us to be able to see that for four years, to be able to imitate that and be able to build off that was huge. We just install that into the young kids who come into the program every day, and it helps out a ton.”

Tom Flood said the Aggies have 30 players on their “C squad” at the moment and estimated three-quarters of them had never played football before. He loves that. Flood’s son, Caleb, played soccer in eighth grade before joining the football team as a freshman.

He encourages all kids to get out of their comfort zone in high school and try new things. If football is one of them, then awesome. The program implemented Tackle Bar football — at the urging of St. Agnes athletic director Mike Streitz — years ago, and Flood has become a big proponent of it, noting it allows kids to immerse themselves into the sport at a gradual rate and eases safety concerns parents may possess.

Any new kids, Schmidt said, quickly learn what it means to play football for the St. Paul Catholic school and embrace a more mature, goal-oriented approach.

That has indeed led to results. St. Agnes has gone 23-7 since 2018, with three of those losses coming to Minneapolis North — a perennial state title contender — in the Class 2A, Section 4 final.

“You’ve got to aspire to be that,” Tom Flood said. “If you want to beat them, you’ve got to aspire to be that, and part of that is getting more kids out, more kids playing football and being part of that.”

You can’t win a section title, he noted, with just 26 kids. Not against the likes of the Polars, anyway. But St. Agnes appears to be reaching a point where it can compete with the best. Not only do the Aggies have growing numbers, they also have talent.

They aren’t stocked with beef up front, but 295-pound senior lineman Dominic Smith is a large, agile, talented lineman. Flood and Schmidt could play at the collegiate level, as could running back John Patros.

And there are many more talented underclassmen, from sophomore linemen Daniel Koontz and Cadman Foley and the Simmons brothers — De’Vaun, Elijah and Elonzo.

1631859275 796 High school football Growing numbers culture contribute to St Agnes
St. Agnes senior quarterback Isaac Schmidt launches a ball up to the sky during a kick return drill at practice in St. Paul on Thursday, Sept. 16, 2021. (Jace Frederick / Pioneer Press)

Perhaps St. Agnes, which hosts St. Croix Lutheran at 7 p.m. Friday at Concordia-St. Paul — can give Minneapolis North a run for its money this season in the playoffs. But if not, so be it. Caleb Flood said the team’s goal is simply to improve every day. Schmidt noted the culture that’s been established in the football program has permeated into the school building, noting that every year he’s been at St. Agnes has been even better than the year prior.

That’s another win for the Aggies.

“The wins and losses aren’t what’s really important in this program,” Tom Flood said. “As long as these kids are growing as young men and building character, I could care less what the score is.”

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Body of New Yorker missing since 2015 believed found at Grand Canyon

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Body of New Yorker missing since 2015 believed found at Grand Canyon

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The Capital Region Vegan Network will host its first-ever vegan food festival—VEG OUT—happening Sunday, September 19, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., surrounding Monument Square in downtown Troy,

The event is outdoors, free to attend, and open to the public. This is the second VEG OUT event, but the first area vegan festival to be hosted since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

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