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Monsanto’s Cancer Causing Ingredient in Children’s Cereal Contains ‘Troubling Levels’, Environmental NGO Warns

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Monsanto’s Cancer Causing Ingredient in Children’s Cereal Contains ‘Troubling Levels’, Environmental NGO Warns

Assessments by The Environmental Working Group (EWG) have revealed that there are nonetheless “troubling ranges of glyphosate, the cancer-causing ingredient within the herbicide Roundup” in kids’ breakfast cereals and snacks.

The Washington, DC-based advocacy group launched in a press release on June 12 the place they said that the chemical had been detected “in all 21 oat-based cereal and snack merchandise sampled in a brand new spherical of testing.”

RT stories: Moreover, all the merchandise however 4 had been discovered to comprise ranges greater than EWG’s security threshold for baby consumption, which is 160 elements per billion (ppb). The merchandise “Cheerios” and “Honey Nut Cheerios Medley Crunch” had been discovered with the very best glyphosate ranges with 729 ppb and 833 ppb respectively. The findings comply with two earlier analysis research carried out with impartial labs carried out the final 12 months.

Monsanto, the maker of Roundup, was acquired by the German agro-chemical large Bayer in 2018.

“The glyphosate ranges on this report are far under the strict limits established by the Environmental Safety Company (EPA) to guard human well being,” a Bayer spokesman advised RT when contacted for remark. “Even on the highest stage reported by the EWG (833 ppb), a grownup must eat 158 kilos of the oat-based meals day-after-day for the remainder of their life to succeed in the strict limits set by the EPA.”

Read More: Best Group Costumes for Halloween Costume Ideas

Though the EPA doesn’t take into account glyphosate carcinogenic, organizations together with the World Well being Group, Worldwide Company for Analysis on Most cancers and California’s Environmental Wellbeing Hazard Evaluation have disagreed. Critical doubts have additionally been forged on the EPA’s neutrality concerning glyphosate, with critics accusing the company of colluding with Bayer to move off the chemical as protected.

A petition from the EWG to the EPA calls on the company to reinstate the `1993 customary for glyphosate presence in oats, much more restrictive than the present one.

“However it may take years for EPA to behave, and the company has been caught colluding with Monsanto to advertise the declare that the chemical is protected,” wrote medical doctors Olga Naidenko and Alexis Temkin of the CWG.

Read More: Blockchain-Powered Remittance Project REMIIT Proposes to Build a Money Transfer Platform

The Bayer spokesperson questioned the credibility of EWG, claiming the group has “a protracted historical past of spreading misinformation about pesticide residues.”

Bayer is at the moment preventing off a sequence of high-profile lawsuits alleging that Roundup is liable for most cancers. Final month, a jury in California ordered the corporate to pay over $2 billion to a few from Oakland who contracted non-Hodgkins lymphoma after utilizing the glyphosate-containing pesticide on their property for many years.

Read More: 

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Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Albany husband and wife charged with Social Security fraud

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Albany husband and wife charged with Social Security fraud

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The U.S. Department of Justice says Denise Mitchell, 57, and John Mitchell, 61, of Albany, were arraigned Wednesday and charged with Social Security fraud. The federal indictment charged them with knowingly concealing Denise Mitchell’s work history and making a false statement in order to deceive the Social Security Administration (SSA) into paying disability benefits to her when she was not entitled to them.

The indictment alleges that from at least June 2015 until June 2017, Denise Mitchell and her husband John Mitchell, who acted as her representative payee, knowingly failed to disclose that she was working in order to deceive SSA into continuing to pay disability benefits.

The indictment also alleges that on June 8, 2017, she knowingly made a false statement in a form filed with the SSA regarding her work activity between August 2012 and June 2017.

The Mitchell’s could be sentenced to up to five years in prison, a fine of up to $250,000, and a term of supervised release of up to three years. 

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Boston-area coronavirus wastewater tracker: Descent could be ‘earliest sign’ of region heading in right direction

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Boston-area coronavirus wastewater tracker: Descent could be ‘earliest sign’ of region heading in right direction

The Boston-area coronavirus wastewater tracker has been a roller coaster this summer amid the delta variant, but local infectious disease experts hope a recent descent in the COVID-19 tracker is the beginning of a sustained downward trend.

The south of Boston virus samples have plummeted by more than 50% in the last couple of weeks, while the north of Boston COVID sewage samples have dropped by close to 40%.

“My prediction has been we’re going to be in a downward trend, but I don’t know exactly when that will be,” said Todd Ellerin, director of infectious diseases at South Shore Health. “This could be the earliest sign that we’ll be heading in the right direction.”

The COVID wastewater levels indicate future virus cases in the community.

The wastewater tracker has been fluctuating quite often during the last two months, noted Davidson Hamer, a Boston University specialist in infectious diseases.

“Maybe this is the beginning of a downward trend, which would be fantastic, but it’s too early to tell,” he said.

Massachusetts has had a spike of coronavirus cases amid the more highly contagious delta variant, but cases appear to be plateauing during the last few weeks. Breakthrough infections went down last week for the first time in months.

“To ensure the wastewater levels decrease, we need to increase the community level of full vaccination,” Ellerin said.

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Troy restaurants overcoming pandemic hurdles during restaurant week

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Troy restaurants overcoming pandemic hurdles during restaurant week

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — As patrons venture out for Troy Restaurant Week, businesses are asking customers to be a little patient as staff continue to deal with some of the impacts of the pandemic including a truck driver shortage.

“I just went to the grocery store to pick up some product because our driver was delayed by a day,” said Slidin’ Dirty Owner Tim Taney.

Before they even open up on Wednesday, Taney had to make a stop at the grocery store because his delivery was late twice this week.

Throughout the pandemic, Taney said delays in food drop offs have become frequent.

“It has a pretty big impact on us. And I know that our distributors are really seeing a shortage with drivers. And they’re also seeing issues with the manufacturers. So, it’s really just a chain reaction,” Taney said.  

As Troy Restaurant Week gets into high gear, owners like Taney and Executive Director of Troy’s Downtown Business Improvement District Geoff Brault are asking patrons for a little patience.

“Service businesses, they make up the fabric of downtown Troy. They literally give flavor to the downtown,” Brault said.  

Brault said the struggles of the pandemic aren’t over for restaurants. He said the businesses are still in need of support.  

“Right now is the most important time to support the vital businesses in downtown troy,” Brault said.  

While restaurants work through their challenges, Taney said that won’t stop them from putting on a great restaurant week for customers.  

“I think everyone in Troy taking part in this restaurant week is going to have something worth coming out for,” Taney said.

Restaurant week runs from Monday September 13 to Sunday September 19. A list of participating restaurants can be found here.

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Michelle Wu, Annissa Essaibi-George ready for general election battle

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Battenfeld: Is Boston ready to become another Cambridge?

Despite the smiles and big hug that Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi-George shared Wednesday in the city council chambers after their success in the mayoral preliminary, both have wasted no time in staking out their theses for why they’re the better choice to become Boston’s next mayor.

Wu and Essaibi-George made history on Tuesday night as voters advanced the two female at-large city councilors to the Nov. 2 general election.

It took until around 10 a.m. Wednesday for the city to post the results of all 255 precincts, but — despite brief kerfuffles among internet dwellers watching candidates’ names shuffle around as different parts of the city registered their votes — the final tally settled on what the campaigns’ organizations all knew just a few hours after polls closed last night.

Wu led the pack with 33.4%, followed by Essaibi-George’s 22.5% out of 107,592 votes counted. City Councilor Andrea Campbell was third with 19.7%, just ahead of Acting Mayor Kim Janey’s 19.5%. Former city economic development director John Barros drew 3.2% of the vote.

Asked why the count took so long, the city said, “Due to ballots received on Election Day via U.S. mail and ballot drop boxes, the Election Department had to cross-check those ballots with precinct voter lists from each polling location to ensure voters did not vote twice.”

Wu and Essaibi-George will face off in the Nov. 2 general, and the winner will be the first woman and the first person of color to be elected mayor of Boston.

The pair of veteran city councilors gave each other a hug right before Wednesday’s council meeting in front of snapping cameras. They exchanged some kind words, and complimented each other’s smarts and work ethic to reporters. But this race isn’t going to be all smiles.

As the progressive Wu declared victory on Tuesday night, she took aim at “status quo” policies. She repeated those themes in a press conference outside City Hall on Wednesday morning, that while some have thought her ideas too “pie in the sky,” she “knocked those down one by one.”

Essaibi-George, speaking to cheering supporters around midnight, went after a couple of Wu’s big-picture goals, saying that the mayor isn’t about to make the MBTA free or implement rent control.

Essaibi-George, a relative moderate and ally of former Mayor Martin Walsh, said, “Too often the conversation centers around those sorts of abstract ideas” rather than real-world solutions.

A big part of the new phase of the campaign is going to be appealing to Black voters. None of the three Black candidates in the mayor’s race — Campbell, Janey and Barros — advanced, to the disappointment of many.

Political strategist Jacquetta van Zandt said this means that the bulk of the Black vote is “up for grabs” — but that it shouldn’t be treated like a monolith, as Black voters of varying generations and different socioeconomic strata cast their ballots differently.

“Who now will be able to garner the coveted black vote?” becomes the big question, she said. “The message of ‘you are heard and you are seen and we are going to work together’ is how it will have to be.”

Eldin Villafane, a Boston-based political communications consultant, said the candidates will pivot to trying to pitch voters of color why their plan will be the ones that help them.

He also added that, across the board, people vote for people they feel they can trust with power — “Who’s going to be our city boss, and who’s going to have a firm grip on the city amidst a lot of change.”

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Malcolm Yards is the food hall we’ve all been waiting for

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Malcolm Yards is the food hall we’ve all been waiting for

Just when it seemed like the food hall concept was played out, like this market couldn’t possibly take another — and also still in the midst of a pandemic — The Market at Malcolm Yards opened.

But I’m here to tell you that the shiny new facility, built within the ruins of the historic Harris Machinery Co., is an absolute game-changer. The variety and quality of vendors is unmatched and there’s tons of seating, indoors and out. There are proper cocktails — some matched to the flavors of individual vendors — or a beer and wine wall for easy self-service. On top of that, the atmosphere is really, really cool.

Even payment here is slick and modern — you swipe a credit card and they give you a card to pay. You can use it at any vendor, and you get just one bill at the end. Brilliant.

If I were to complain about anything, it would be the temporary issue of unpaved parking lots, which turn into a muddy mess in the rain and are a little hard to navigate. But there’s more development going on in the area, and the permanent solution — likely a ramp — will take some time to figure out. Meanwhile, it’s always a good idea to hop on the light rail or hire a rideshare, especially if you’re going to be drinking.

Really, though, Malcolm Yards, which is smack dab on the border of Minneapolis and St. Paul, and just blocks from Surly Brewing and the new O’Shaughnessy Distilling, is the perfect place to meet a friend, or a group of them, and linger over some amazing food. Bring your friend with a special diet — there are tons of gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan options.

Because it’s only been open for about a month, Community Outreach and Events Manager Molly Hermann said events are just starting to get traction there, but the market has two spaces that can be rented for meetings, parties, weddings and more. Many meeting organizers are simply giving their guests cards to use at the market, so they can choose their own meals, but catering is also available.

The market will also host pre- and post-game celebrations for Gophers sports. Hermann said they’ll open a few hours early on game days and some vendors will offer brunch items. They’ll have beer in cans outside, too, for a tailgating feel.

Here’s my guide to the vendors in the market, with a short description and some recommended dishes from each. Honestly, every morsel of food I’ve eaten here has been good, and some of it downright spectacular.

Be warned, though, it’s not a secret. The place has been busy to packed every time I’ve visited. Lunch is a better option if you’re crowd-averse.

Abang Yoli

Korean Fried Chicken from Abang Yoli at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Chef Jamie Yoo is bringing flavors from his native Korea, melded with other Asian cuisine, to the market, but his professional cheffing background is mostly in French kitchens, including those of Gavin Kaysen. It’s great to see him proudly display his heritage here, with some of the best Korean fried chicken I’ve tried. I love that the chicken is served with the sauce on the side, so that the perfect crunch is not lost. The half-head of cauliflower, doused in a tasty chili crisp, is a worthy side or main if you’re meat-free.

Recommended dishes: Korean Fried Chicken ($12 for a two-piece); Cauliflower ($12 for a half head)

Advellum

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Benjamin Bacon from Advellum at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Although this is a “vegetable eatery,” chef Michael Shaughnessy wants you to know that eating vegetables is about way more than just salads. Indeed, I did not try a single salad off his menu, which also includes some meat, but I did have the best veggie burger I’ve ever eaten, some ridiculously good avocado toast, mung bean pancakes that made me sigh with happiness and a tomato burrata salad that let in-season heirloom tomatoes (there’s nothing better) sing. Shaughnessy’s chef credentials include executive chef runs at the fabulous Young Joni and California-cuisine darling Mill Valley Kitchen.

The Wild Boomer Burger, a mix of wild mushrooms, nutty wild rice and umami-rich miso, is crisped perfectly and served on a pillowy, sesame-seeded bun with a garlicky vegan aioli and pickled onions and chiles to wake everything up. They have a gluten-free bun available, too, and it’s quite good.

The Benjamin Bacon starts with those crispy, flavor-packed mung bean pancakes and ups the ante with some tender, perfectly rendered, maple-soy-glazed pork belly, a killer kimchi and a deeply savory, spicy gochujang aioli. Since it is plated in a set of three pancakes, it’s also highly shareable.

Recommended dishes: Wild Boomer Burger ($15); Benjamin Bacon ($15); Ave Avocado Toast ($13); Tommy Tomato ($12)

Bagu Sushi

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Tataki from Bagu Sushi at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

I don’t consider myself much of an expert on sushi, but I do know that this long-standing sushi outfit (they have a standalone bricks-and-mortar in South Minneapolis) knows its stuff. Fresh fish awaits you in made-to-order rolls, sashimi and fresh-fish appetizers. If you haven’t had fresh wasabi, they offer it, and it’s worth ordering some sushi just to try the herbaceous root in its purest form.

Recommended dishes: Tataki ($13); any rolls with fresh wasabi, which is an extra $5

Bebe Zito

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The Burger from Bebe Zito at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

One of the buzziest burgers in a burger-obsessed town and super-creative ice cream are the focus of this stand, which, predictably, always has a line.

Well-known pastry chef (and the opening ice cream chef at Milkjam) Ben Spangler and his now-wife, Gabriella Grant, started Bebe with a standalone spot in Uptown that quickly became known for its delicious, creative ice cream flavors and long lines, especially on the weekends when they serve the burger. Happily for us, the burger is available whenever Malcolm Yards is open.

The burger is of the smashed variety and its claim to fame is bacon in the grind, which gives it a slightly smoky flavor and very luscious texture. It’s good. Very good. Line worthy.

But the ice cream, with its impossibly creamy bases (please note they do have plenty of vegan versions as well) and bright, creative flavors like Vanilla MSG and Gochujang Brownie, is also stellar. Honestly, the Pistachio w/Almond, which sports pistachios imported from Italy and marzipan, might be my favorite of the genre, and I always try the pistachio ice cream.

Recommended dishes: Pistachio w/Almond ice cream ($4.95 for a scoop); Burger ($6.95)

Boxcar Bar

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The Argentine Sour from Boxcar Bar at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Bartending legend Nick Kosevich developed the cocktails here, and made one that matches the flavor profile of each vendor. I only got the chance to try a few, but as expected, they are top-notch. There are also more conventional drinks available — a friend who always craves bloody Marys ordered one and said it was great.

Recommended drinks: Argentine Sour (goes with Del Sur Empanadas; $12); Snap Pea Collins (goes with Advellum; $12)

Del Sur Empanadas

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A variety of empanadas from Del Sur Empanadas at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Long one of my favorite food trucks, Del Sur opened a bricks-and-mortar eatery in Minnetonka in 2018. It’s kind of a haul for even the best empanadas, so I couldn’t be more thrilled that they have a stall at Malcolm Yards. Flaky, golden crusts are filled with ingredients ranging from the expected (chorizo or sweet beef) to the unexpected (caprese or sweet corn). And every one I’ve tried has been great.

Recommended dishes: Any empanada, but especially the chorizo, sweet beef or mushroom), $3.75 apiece

Joey Meatballs

Malcolm Yards is the food hall weve all been waiting
Spaghetti and meatballs from Joey Meatballs in The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Although you might be tempted to skip over this stall — build-your-own-pasta isn’t exactly groundbreaking stuff — I suggest you think again. The fresh, tender pasta is made in house, and the red sauce as bright and balanced as they come. Oh, and if you like meatballs, there’s a reason that word is in the name. They are huge, juicy and full of flavor. The portions here are generous, too.

Chef Joshua Hedquist has a great story, too. He fought his way from being a teen with a rap sheet to heading kitchens, and he believes in second chances so employs people, including felons, who need a second chance.

Recommended dishes: The Baller (spaghetti and two meatballs, $16.75)

Momo Dosa

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The Keema Dosa at Momo Dosa at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

If you’ve never had momo or dosa, you are in for a treat. Momo are Nepalese dumplings, and you can get them here filled with everything from mutton to vegetables. They are served with two mild chutneys — a mint and a tomato — so you can choose your own adventure.

Dosa are thin crepe-like wraps made from fermented lentils and rice. The wrap itself, nutty, crisp and a little chewy at once, is the star of the show, but the fillings here are so good that I can’t pick a favorite — I’m going with two. If you like meat, the Keema Dosa, filled with ground meat, red onion, parsley, zucchini, cheese and spices, is fantastic, but if you’re a vegetable lover, I can’t recommend the Masala Dosa, stuffed with curried potatoes, enough.

Recommended dishes: Chicken Momo ($11); Keema Dosa ($13); Masala Dosa ($11)

Sunday at the Market

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Tamago egg salad sandwich from Sunday at the Market at The Market at Malcolm Yards. (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

You might be tempted to overlook this oddball little stall, which serves charcuterie boards and Japanese-style sandwiches, but if you have never had Japanese egg salad, it’s definitely worth a try. The sandwiches are served on fluffy white bread with just enough green lettuce to give it visual appeal and a little crunch, and the egg salad itself is fluffy and creamy.

They also serve best-in-class Red Table meats and Alemar cheeses.

Recommended dishes: Tamago egg salad sandwich ($6.50)

Wrecktangle Pizza

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The Shredder from Wrecktangle Pizza at The Market at Malcolm Yards (Jess Fleming / Pioneer Press)

Detroit-style pizza is trending, and Wrecktangle makes some of the best in the metro.

Deep-dish crust, crispy cheese on the edges and fresh, creative toppings combine to make a craveable pie. There’s everything from a breakfast pizza to one with blue cheese alfredo and spicy chicken to classics like pepperoni and sausage. I’m personally more of a classic gal, but I do like spicy. The Shredder, with pepperoni, pickled jalapenos and whipped honey infused with Cry Baby Craig’s hot sauce, is exactly my jam.

Recommended dishes: The Shredder ($20 for an 8 x 10 pizza, which is six slices)

The Market at Malcolm Yards

  • Where: 501 30th Ave. S.E., Minneapolis
  • Contact: malcolmyards.market
  • Prices: Most items $20 or below. Varies by vendor.
  • Good to know: Ample on-site parking, but also on light-rail line. Vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free options aplenty.
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National Grid voltage conversion in the City of Cohoes

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National Grid voltage conversion in the City of Cohoes

COHOES, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On September 21, National Grid will be adjusting the voltage on transformers on both sides of Columbia Street, and Chestnut Street to Sunset Court, on Tuesday.

Residents in the area will be without power during the work period beginning at 8 a.m. until 12 p.m.

Traffic signals at the intersection of Columbia St. & Simmons Ave and Columbia St. & Masten Ave. will be without power during the work period.

Traffic control flaggers will be in place, National Grid said, to use alternate routes when possible with caution when traveling in the area, as delays are expected.

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Red Sox take big series win over Mariners, head home in ideal positioning for playoff chase

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Red Sox take big series win over Mariners, head home in ideal positioning for playoff chase

With two weeks left in the heat of a playoff chase, every game certainly matters for the Red Sox. But there was something about how they finished this difficult road trip that might go a long way into determining if they play deeper into October.

After a tough beginning to the trip, the Red Sox ended it on an emphatic high note. A night after winning in dramatic fashion, they took a close game that looked destined for more drama and turned it into a rout. The Red Sox scored six runs in the top of the 10th to break the tie and poured it on for a 9-4 victory over the Seattle Mariners and a critical series win.

With winnable games ahead of them, a handful of off days and Chris Sale coming back this weekend, the Red Sox are in a great position with 14 games to go. After going 3-3 in their six-game trip against the White Sox and Mariners, they sit tied atop the wild-card standings heading into a three-game set with the last-place Baltimore Orioles.

“It’s a happy flight,” manager Alex Cora said. “Like I said before, not too many people thought the last homestand of the season was going to mean something. Now it means a lot. Hopefully it’s going to be fun Friday and the rest of the week and we can take care of business.”

The game was tied at 3 from the third inning on until the Sox broke it open in extras. The Red Sox had recorded just one hit — Jose Iglesias’ seventh-inning infield single — in six innings before the 10th, when they figured it out against the Mariners’ bullpen as singles from Alex Verdugo, Xander Bogaerts and J.D. Martinez gave them a 5-3 lead.

Then, a familiar face was again at the center of clinching a Red Sox victory. Kyle Schwarber, a night after his three-run double sent them to a huge win, came up again Wednesday in a huge spot with one out and the bases loaded. He worked the count full before rifling a two-run single to right, which gave the Sox more than enough breathing room.

Two batters later, Christian Vazquez lofted a two-run double down the right-field line to put the icing on the cake before Martin Perez completed another big performance from the Red Sox’ bullpen to cap the win and their first series victory in Seattle since 2013.

“Hopefully this is the beginning of something great for us and we can get hot swinging the bats,” Cora said.

The Red Sox had an early 3-0 lead after Hunter Renfroe’s first-inning homer and a two-run second that included doubles from Bobby Dalbec and Iglesias. But the Mariners got it all back in the third. Renfroe was charged with his 13th error of the season on a throw to third that squirted by Rafael Devers to allow a run to score before Kyle Seager’s two-run, game-tying double.

Tanner Houck settled down to strike out the side in the fourth, but only lasted 4 1/3 innings as Cora pulled him before he could face the Mariners lineup a third time. The bullpen, though, had his back, tossing 5 2/3 innings and not allowing a run until it didn’t matter in the 10th.

“I have applauded our bullpen all year,” Houck said. “They have stepped up. They’ve done an incredible role. They are a significant part of this team and they’ve stepped up to every occasion that we’ve called upon them.”

With an eight-game homestand that includes three off days ahead of them, the Red Sox like where they’re at. Eleven of their final 14 games are against teams with a sub-.500 record, and they’ve lined it up to have Sale and Nathan Eovaldi pitch in as many games as they can. And they’re feeling good about themselves after splitting a six-game trip against two playoff-caliber teams.

“I think that gives us momentum,” Adam Ottavino said. “We’re going to have three series at home, a place we expect to win. We’re going to need to win a lot of those games, so hopefully the fans really bring it and we can bring it on the field.”

Cora similarly hopes they can ride this momentum back to Boston for a big final two weeks of the season.

“I think playing meaningful games at home, it means a lot,” Cora said. “I know last year was a tough one for the organization and for the fans. Obviously coming into the season, nobody expected this homestand to mean something for the playoff hunt. So we’re in this position. Like I said, Friday should be Chris (Sale), Friday night at Fenway, I’ve been saying all along. Hopefully it’s loud and it’s intense.

“We’ve got plenty of games at home, and we’re really good at home. We took care of business here. Just enjoy the families. Hopefully nothing happens off the field as far as like COVID and all that, and we’re ready to go on Friday.”

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USDA wants you to kill this bug on sight

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USDA wants you to kill this bug on sight

(WWLP) — The Department of Agriculture is asking residents in New England and beyond to kill one specific bug on sight.

That bug is the spotted lanternfly. It’s a colorful, polka-dotted moth that is completely harmless to humans, but it leaves a secretion that is extremely deadly to trees and other plants. Now, it’s been less than 10 years since the lanternfly was first spotted near Pennsylvania, but since then, it has spread all across the northeast.

It’s one bug the USDA doesn’t want you to feel bad about killing.

Full-sized spotted lanternflies are large, gray bugs, about one inch long, with black spots and red underwings. Nymphs of the insect look black with white dots and older nymphs are red with black and white spots.

Where to spot a spotted lanternfly

Nymphs of SLF, from left to right, youngest to oldest (photo credit: Teá Kesting-Handly)

The bug can be found congregating on sides of buildings, in or on vehicles, or on plants they prefer to attack, including tree of heaven, grape, and walnut. They may attach themselves to goods being transported into the state from the following states:

  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Indiana
  • Maryland
  • New Jersey
  • New York
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Virginia
  • West Virginia

What to do if you find a spotted lanternfly

If you happen to come across a spotted lanternfly, New York’s Department of Environmental Conservation and the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources both encourage taking a photo or collecting the specimen and reporting it online. Search the area for both adult insects as well.

Massachusetts has identified the insect in the state several times in the last few years but no evidence shows that they have become established in the state.

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Ask Amy: Woman should leave abusive relationship

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Ask Amy: Woman should leave abusive relationship

Dear Amy: I am in a relationship with a man my age. We share many interests and values. The problem, I believe, is his lack of respect for me.

I want to be communicated with in a way that shows love and kindness.

He says he respects me, but his behavior does not demonstrate it. He yells, is critical, and is very impatient with me.

I’m confused. He says he wants to be in this relationship (we’ve lived together for over a year), but acts poorly, and while I am not perfect and do often yell back (and feel terrible about it), I also believe I am protecting myself, albeit not in the best way.

If you know anything about battered wife syndrome, do you think that I have it?

Is it me, or is he an abuser?

— Oregon Woman

Dear Oregon: Battered wife syndrome is classified as a serious condition triggered by psychological and/or physical intimate partner violence.

Based on what you say, you are in an unfulfilling and chronically upsetting intimate relationship with someone who treats you badly and who — according to you — compels you to defend/retaliate, followed by periods of you feeling “terrible” about your own behavior.

The way I see it, part of the time you are being treated badly, and part of the time you are treating yourself badly.

That’s a lot. It is also a symptom of abuse.

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Massachusetts teachers unions blast Charlie Baker over refusal on statewide teacher vaccine mandate

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Massachusetts teachers unions blast Charlie Baker over refusal on statewide teacher vaccine mandate

The two largest teachers unions are blasting Gov. Charlie Baker over the state’s lack of a uniform vaccine policy at schools, saying he is “abdicating his responsibility” by leaving students and teachers unprotected against coronavirus variants.

“A statewide mandate requiring educators to be vaccinated, in accordance with what President Biden is calling for, would best protect our communities – including communities of color, which have been hit the hardest by the pandemic,” Massachusetts Teachers Association President Merrie Najimy said in a statement.

She added: “Given the surging rates of infection from coronavirus variants, Governor Charlie Baker is abdicating his responsibility by not leading a coordinated statewide strategy to address this crucial public health initiative.”

The Republican governor has defiantly signaled there would be no statewide COVID vaccine mandate for Massachusetts educators, despite a call to action from President Biden for governors to do so last week. Instead, Baker has placed the decision on the backs of cities and towns.

During a meeting with reporters on Monday, Baker said cities and towns “are the primary employer and primary owner of the conditions of work with municipal employees,” which includes teachers.

“The accountability, authority and responsibility rests with the municipal governments and they therefore need to figure that one out,” Baker said in response to a Herald reporter’s question.

It’s led to a patchwork of municipal vaccine mandates, most notably in Boston. Beginning Monday, all municipal employees — including teachers — must provide proof of vaccination or submit to weekly COVID-19 testing, per the policy the local teachers union signed Sept. 9.

Several other districts, including Brookline, Amherst-Pelham, Berkshire Hills, Holliston and others have also imposed or are considering similar mandates, according to reports.

“Educators and our students cross town lines every day, and the virus isn’t contained by municipal boundaries,” American Federation of Teachers Massachusetts President Beth Kontos said. “Public health decisions during a deadly pandemic are too important to be left to politicized local decision-making. On masking, testing and vaccination policy, we need statewide leadership guided by public health experts.”

It’s a decision, however, Geoff Beckwith of the Massachusetts Municipal Association supports.

“We appreciate very much the approach Gov. Baker has taken,” he said. “Gov. Baker defers to municipal leaders and government about what works best for them.”

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