Connect with us

News

How the smartphone revolution has revolutionised medical care

Published

on

medical care
google news

The smartphone has massively changed the way industries work today. With the popularity, ease and rise in users, many sectors have seen this as an opportunity to embrace technology. Developing industry specifics apps for professional and public use is continuously increasing. Smartphones are slowly revolutionising the diagnosis and treatment process of illnesses. Add on’s to smartphones and apps turn smartphones into workable medical devices which help clinicians screen an array of different diseases. Their smaller screens, portability and multiple functions make smartphones a valuable tool. 

The fact that smartphones are a lot more affordable than other medical devices means they are more accessible. Many professionals already have smartphones, making them convenient. The nature of traditional medical devices means they can only carry out one task at a time. Smartphones on the other hand and their specifically designed apps can carry out multiple tasks. Because of this reason smartphones enable professionals to see patients quicker, saving money, time and more importantly lives. The impact of this can increase diagnoses and action quicker, and treatment to be offered immediately. 

how mhealth can help

This infographic above from Makeuseofit provides statistics which indicate how medical apps have grown over time and the impact they can have on medical care. 

Over time the technology on smartphones has increasingly improved. Camera quality and microphones along with flashes offer the same, if not better capabilities for patient care in comparison to some specialised medical devices. Smartphones and as we know smartwatches, thanks to apps and sensors, now have the ability to behave as pedometers, measure heart rate and count calories, providing critical personal data which medical professionals can use. 

Read More: MakeMyTrip Rolls Out In-Destination Activity Suggestions

Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder

The smartphones, as mentioned above, can also be used as tools to diagnose illnesses such as diagnosing Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disorder (COPD). The enabling technologies can help patients manage their chronic diseases. At home away from the clinic with a non-invasive clinical tool. The introduction of this also offers better care to patients. The practitioner will be able to monitor the patients breathing over a period of time and provide better treatments. 

One app that is available and offers COPD help is myCOPD, which is approved by the NHS. The app is built by COPD experts and helps patients perfect their inhaler techniques with video guidance. The app also offers education from world experts and an online pulmonary rehabilitation class. Patients can also view lung function and upload reports and monitor their lung function over time. The app allows users to view how their symptoms may have changed over time and discover prescribed medication through expert opinion.  

Blood deficiencies

The flash and camera on smartphones also offer the potential to diagnose blood disorders. This includes blood deficiencies such as iron and haemoglobin. This can be measured by simply placing the patient’s finger over the cameras flash. Doing this can show the level of haemoglobin in the blood via an app, without using a needle. Apps like this are still in the early stages of approval from the FDA and NICE. A recently discovered app can now detect Anemia in a patient without the need for a blood test. The app is based on an algorithm that detects anaemia. It can assess the level of haemoglobin based on a persons fingernail bed. It uses pictures that are taken on the smartphone. Once the image is taken through the app, it automatically normalises the background lighting. It does this to detect the true paleness of the fingernail bed accurately.

Read More: Virtustream Adds a New Software-as-a-Service tool Support to its Risk

Bone Disorders

Smartphones can also be used to diagnose bone disorders such as Osteoporosis which is common in elderly people. Tapping on the patient’s elbow using the app, the motion picture sensors on smartphones will be able to pick up the resonance that is generated from the app. Apps such as FRAX® is a tool that is freely accessible online in app form. It helps to calculate and evaluate patients who are at low, medium, or high risk of fragility fractures based on clinical risk factors. FRAX® has the ability to calculates an individual’s 10-year probability concerning hip fracture and a 10-year probability concerning a major osteoporotic fracture. This includes forearm, hip, shoulder or spine fractures. The information provided by the app helps physicians make informed decisions and offer better treatment.

It is clear that the potential to use smartphones in medical care is high, and we are beginning to see several new apps surface, making life easier for clinical practitioners and patients. The use of apps means not only can patients better manage their chronic illnesses but, practitioners also get a better insight into the patient’s disease via the metrics and data that apps can provide. 

Read More: 5 “Smart” Internet Of Things That Make Our Life Easier

google news
Continue Reading
Advertisement
1 Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Trending