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Top reasons why fine arts students need a quality printer?

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fine arts students need a quality printer

If you are an artist or a fine arts student, you’ll surely need to take print outs of your artwork for various reasons. Whether you are planning to sell your work online or keep it as a souvenir with you, having a quality printer is a must.

While you can go for the outsourcing option of the print job but that won’t be a feasible option to pursue as it is not very cost-efficient.

This article is going to help you with the reasons to choose the right printer for you’re fine arts career.

Reasons to have a quality printer for your printing assignments

Printing enormous amounts of artwork could be a tiresome and time taking task. Hence, you must have a printing machine like Xerox printers to ease your printing load.

Here are the top 5 reasons as to why you should consider purchasing quality Xerox Printers in Abu Dhabi for your printing assignments.

1. It meets all your printing needs

By carefully identifying your needs, you can decide on the best printing device that supports your cause. A quality Xerox printer will take care of all your printing needs.

Some Xerox machines are thankfully tailored to specific professions like Xerox® Color C70 can be the best suitable choice for digital and printing press. Moreover, it can also be opted out by fine arts students for qualified continuous color feed printing.

2. Quality imaging results

A printer from a reputed printing company would guarantee to provide quality imaging results. When dealing with the hard copied submission of your graphics design; image quality is certainly going to be at the top.

Of course, you won’t want a smudged color or a faded color print out. Henceforth, to avoid getting into such a situation, it is preferred that you use a quality printing device that leaves you with no complaints.

Make sure that the onetime investment you make I worth it, and doesn’t leave you with regrets.

3. Cost-effective solution

A fine arts student would need to take extensive high-quality print-outs of their assignments on a daily basis. Moreover, they would require excellent scanning services to send their sketches to their heads and teachers.

Thus, when there is such an increased need of printing devices in a field, getting a quality multifunctional printing machine is the most cost-efficient solution. Rather than getting print-outs from outside and paying them extra costs, it is recommended to have your own printer.

Although it might seem expensive at once, as soon as you realize your printing need, it won’t feel expensive. Thus having your own multi-purpose printing device for your needs is surely going to be an in –budgeting approach.

Take Away!

The printer is going to be an essential device to consider when you are in an arts field. Thus, having a cost-efficient quality printer will keep you rocking in your career.

By considering services from Xerox Abu Dhabi based printing solution, you won’t have to worry about your printing regime as they cover a wide range of printers providing solutions to individuals from all fields including fine arts and the digital printing press.

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Colorado schools without mask mandates have higher COVID transmission, state data shows

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Colorado schools without mask mandates have higher COVID transmission, state data shows

Students in Colorado school districts that declined to institute mask mandates are infected with COVID-19 at higher rates than in districts that have face-covering requirements, according to data presented Thursday by the state’s top epidemiologist.

Coronavirus cases among school-aged children between 6 and 17 hover around 300 cases per 100,000 people in school districts that do not require masks, while that number is closer to 250 per 100,000 in districts that require masks.

“There is a clear impact that masks are having on transmission,” said Rachel Herlihy, Colorado’s state epidemiologist, during a virtual news conference.

The state has declined to institute an across-the-board mask mandate in schools, but Herlihy on Thursday reiterated that they recommend schools — regardless of their transmission or vaccination rates — require masks in classrooms.

 

Cases among school-age children — some of whom are eligible to get the vaccine — are also significantly higher in Colorado counties that have lower vaccination rates, such as Weld and El Paso counties, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment data shows.

Denver and Boulder counties, which have much higher vaccination rates, have infection rates in children at nearly one-third the levels of the higher-transmission counties.

 

1632422063 284 Colorado schools without mask mandates have higher COVID transmission state

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Pair of Kansas grade school boys jump fence to rescue infants from pool

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Pair of Kansas grade school boys jump fence to rescue infants from pool

TOPEKA, Kan. (KSNT) – It was a normal day for 11-year-old Braden and 10-year-old Jayden Harper as they helped their aunt, Brittany, clean her vehicle at a car wash in Junction City, Kansas.

Normal, until they heard the first screams.

“At first we thought it was just kids playing on the trampoline or in a pool cause it was a pretty hot day. Then the screaming got louder and louder and more intense,” Jayden Harper said.

After hearing the screams come from a home neighboring the car wash, they decided to peer over the fence to get a better look. They discovered that the noise was coming from two young children, twin boys between the ages of 6 months and 18 months, barely bobbing above the water’s surface of a backyard pool.

“I ran up and tried to hop the fence. Braden’s already over, so I had somebody help me hop the fence,” Jayden said.

Once the boys were over the fence, they ran to rescue the children from the pool, then kept them occupied until police arrived at the scene. Thankfully, both the young children were fine thanks to the brave young boys and their actions.

“They got recognized at school for being heroes,” said Brittany Harper, the boys’ aunt. “The police department is supposed to be recognizing them also.”

It is not known how the babies ended up in the pool unsupervised, and why they were not pulled out sooner. The boys and their aunt said the babies were bobbing up and down near the edge in their footie pajamas.

“I felt sad that the babies had to go through that,” said Braden Harper. “But, relief that we got them out.”

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Parking restrictions in Albany for the upcoming weekend

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Upcoming emergency no parking restrictions in Albany, Sept. 22

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On September 23, Albany Police announced upcoming emergency no parking restrictions for the weekend.

Saturday, September 25

  • 2:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Chestnut Street from 154 Chestnut Street to Lark Street for an event.
  • 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on the east side of King Avenue near 7 King Avenue for a move. 

Sunday, September 26

  • 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Madison Avenue from West Lawrence Street to South Allen Street and the south side of Western Avenue from Allen Street to angled parking spots for Upper Madison Street Fair. 

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  • Booster doses of COVID vaccine could be rolling-out soon
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Home sales dipped in August after two months of increases

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Home sales dipped in August after two months of increases

(Getty Images)

(TheRealDeal) – After rising for two straight months this summer, home sales are once again on the decline.

Total existing-home sales, which includes single-family homes, townhomes, condos and co-ops, fell 2 percent month-over-month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.88 million in August, according to the latest monthly report from the National Association of Realtors. On a year-over-year basis, sales dropped 1.5%.

The slowdown may be partially attributed to a lack of inventory. Total housing inventory at the end of August totaled 1.29 million units, down 1.5% from July’s supply and down 13.4% from a year ago.

The lack of inventory has continued to cause bidding wars and rising prices, driving some prospective homebuyers to the sidelines, awaiting more supply.

“Sales slipped a bit in August as prices rose nationwide,” Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said in a statement. “Although there was a decline in home purchases, potential buyers are out and about searching, but much more measured about their financial limits, and simply waiting for more inventory.”

The median existing-home price for all housing types in August was $356,700, up 14.9% from August 2020’s $310,400. Prices increased in each of the report’s regions, marking 114 straight months of year-over-year gains.

Properties typically remained on the market for 17 days in August, unchanged from July and down from 22 days a year ago. Eighty-seven percent of homes sold in August 2021 were on the market for less than a month.

Ruben Gonzalez, chief economist at Keller Williams, said that he expects year-over-year declines in home sales moving into the fall as there is a return to normal seasonal patterns.

​​”Overall we think home sales will remain strong going into next year, but we should see inventory levels continue to slowly trend toward more normal levels and home price appreciation begin to slow over time,” Gonzalez said in a statement.

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Group of House Republicans file articles of impeachment against President Biden

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Group of House Republicans file articles of impeachment against President Biden

President Joe Biden speaks about prescription drug prices and his “Build Back Better” agenda from the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (WJW) – A group of House Republicans led by Ohio Rep. Bob Gibbs filed articles of impeachment against President Joe Biden on Tuesday, September 21.

Gibbs, of Ohio’s Seventh Congressional District, said Biden is not fit for the job and is willfully violating the separation of powers.

“It’s clear with Nancy Pelosi as Speaker, the House will not hold President Biden accountable for his egregious violations of his constitutional duties. That shouldn’t stop Republicans from calling them out,” Gibbs said on his Facebook page.

“Between his willful negligence of the border crisis, his intentional actions on the unlawful eviction moratorium, and his shameful conduct in the Afghanistan withdrawal, it’s clear Biden is falling woefully short of his oath of office.”

The resolution is cosponsored by Republican Reps. Brian Babin and Randy Wester Sr., both of Texas, and Andy Biggs, of Arizona.

In early August, Gibbs wrote a letter urging the GOP to consider impeachment.

This is the second effort to unseat the president after Georgia Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene filed articles of impeachment a day after Biden was sworn into office. That effort went nowhere in the Democrat-controlled House, and the same outcome seems likely this time.

Biden’s predecessor, former President Trump, was impeached twice, a first in U.S. history.

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Lawmakers in Northeast seek USDA support for organic dairy farmers

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Lawmakers in Northeast seek USDA support for organic dairy farmers

Lawmakers from Vermont, New York, New Hampshire and Maine are asking Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to help dozens of organic dairy farms that will lose their contracts with Horizon Organic next year.

The lawmakers, led by Vermont Senators Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders and Rep. Peter Welch want the U.S. Department of Agriculture to place more regulations around large-scale producers like Horizon, whose parent company Danone has notified 89 Northeast dairy farms that starting next September it will no longer buy their milk.

In a letter to Vilsack, the delegations urged the USDA to finalize an amendment to the origin of livestock rule that has been in the works since 2015. The amended rule would eliminate a loophole used by large-scale dairy farms and create uniform standards for transitioning conventional livestock to organic dairy production.

Dairy farmers across the country argue the ongoing delay has contributed to an oversupply of organic milk and kept smaller farms in the Northeast at a financial disadvantage.  

They’re also asking the USDA to take other steps, including temporary price supports, to help the farms find new markets for their products.

“We respectfully request that you use any tools at your disposal and work quickly to support the farmers affected by Danone’s decision. This includes increased support through USDA’s pandemic assistance for producers program.”  

New York Rep. Elise Stefanik says she’ll work with the USDA to ensure North Country dairy farmers are supported. She said they “work tirelessly, and I am proud to work to find targeted solutions to support them.” 

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NYSDOH issues clarification on mask guidance for indoor sports

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NYSDOH issues clarification on mask guidance for indoor sports

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The New York State Department of Health has provided clarification to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) regarding mask-wearing for indoor sports.

The memo was tweeted by Dr. Robert Zayas, the executive director of NYSPHSAA. The guidance states that student-athletes must wear masks when competing indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The only exception is if sport prevents the athletes from wearing a mask, such as swimming.

The guidance no longer makes an exception where masking may not be tolerable for the athlete. If the athletes are not wearing masks, they must be six feet apart. The department says if the athlete cannot wear a mask, and cannot maintain six feet of distance, they should not participate in the sport.

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Trial starts for I-70 truck driver who caused deadly 28-vehicle crash in Lakewood

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Trial starts for I-70 truck driver who caused deadly 28-vehicle crash in Lakewood

Provided by Lakewood Police Department

Rogel Lazaro Aguilera-Mederos

The vehicular homicide trial for a Texas trucker who lost his brakes on Interstate 70 while descending from Colorado’s high country and caused a 28-vehicle crash that killed four people will start Friday, more than two-and-a-half years after the fiery wreck.

Truck driver Rogel Lazaro Aguilera-Mederos, now 25, faces 41 charges in connection with the incident, including both assault and vehicular homicide. He’s facing decades in prison if convicted of all charges.

On April 25, 2019, his semitrailer full of lumber barreled down Interstate 70 at speeds topping 85 mph, swerving and forcing other vehicles off the road before running into standstill traffic under a bridge near Colorado Mills Parkway in Lakewood.

The crash caused multiple explosions and very intense fires as the lumber in Aguilera-Mederos’ rig mixed with spilled gasoline and ignited. The fires brought temperatures on the highway’s surface to more than 2,500 degrees.

Four people were killed — Miguel Angel Lamas Arellano, 24, William Bailey, 67, Doyle Harrison, 61, and Stanley Politano, 69 — and six others injured.

Survivors detailed the horror of seeing a truck barrel into stopped traffic, the terror of burning metal and screaming commuters. Others remembered being pulled from their cars by good Samaritans and carried to safety.

Aguilera-Mederos, who escaped with minor injuries, missed multiple runaway truck ramps on his way down the steep stretch of interstate, video taken by witnesses shows. Prosecutors said Aguilera-Mederos, who was 23 at the time, tried to apply both the truck’s brakes and its emergency brake, with no effect.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COdOFh-St6o 

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Rockies podcast: Colorado tries to play spoiler, lower minor-league teams find success and Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song

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Rockies podcast: Colorado tries to play spoiler, lower minor-league teams find success and Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song

In this packed edition of the On The Rox podcast, Denver Post sportswriters Kyle Newman and Patrick Saunders break down the final stretch of the Rockies’ 2021 season.

Can Colorado play spoiler against the Dodgers and Giants at Coors Field as those teams vie for the National League West crown? Plus, analysis on Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song, how the Rockies’ lower-level minor-league affiliates fared this year, breaking down the team’s recent road surge, Larry Walker’s number retirement this weekend and more analysis.

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Long hospital wait times impacting ambulance services

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Long hospital wait times impacting ambulance services

NORTH GREENBUSH, N.Y. (NEWS10) — For those at North Greenbush Ambulance, they’ve been busier than ever.

“More people want to go to the hospital, and are going to the hospital,” explained Ryan French, North Greenbush Ambulance Director of Operations.

During the height of the pandemic, many were too afraid to go. Now that there are COVID vaccines, it’s thought that people are feeling more comfortable going in for medical treatment. While it’s important that people get the care they need, it’s causing some challenges for hospitals.

“The hospital wait times since the beginning of the summer have gone through the roof,” said French. “Instead of waiting, sometimes 5-10 minutes to get a room, it’s very often to find ourselves an hour or two hours waiting to get a hospital bed in the ER.”

According to St. Peter’s Health Partners, the pandemic has stressed heath care systems, impacting staffing levels. Emergency departments in particular are feeling the pressure, and higher patient volumes are likely a result of patients delaying care.

Despite the challenges, St. Peter’s says high quality care is still being provided. During wait times, French and his co-workers do their best to help patients.

“At some of the hospitals, we sit in the back of the ambulance with the patient for this hour or two hours, and we continue to treat the patient as appropriately as we can, and get them the help that they need,” explained French.

“The hospitals do the best of their ability to get them in as quickly as they possibly can.”

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