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Clinton’s defense attorney was the latest Kavanaugh Accuser

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Clinton's defense attorney was the latest Kavanaugh Accuser

Following a New York Times report detailing new allegations of sexual misconduct against Justice Brett Kavanaugh of the Supreme Court, evidence has emerged that the latest accuser, Max Stier, used to work for the Clintons.

The Times published a story on Saturday pushing questionable claims that the genitals of Kavanaugh were thrown into the hand of a woman while drunk at a college party.

The allegation was not substantiated, and the supposed victim’s friends deny having any memory of the case.

Max Stier, a lawyer who represented both Bill and Hillary Clinton when Bill Clinton was charged with revealing himself to a girl in the 1990s, is the guy who says he witnessed the incident.

After Paula Jones accused him of exposing himself to her in a hotel room, Stier, a Democrat, represented President Bill Clinton. Clinton settled for $850,000 with Jones and for five years lost his law license.

Stier also worked closely with David Kendall, representing Hillary Clinton in the Whitewater investigation against allegations of illegal processing of classified information. On the other hand of the Clinton impeachment fight, Kavanaugh worked with Ken Starr. Kavanaugh had accused his opponents of “vengeance on behalf of the Clintons” during his confirmation hearings. This allegation seems to verify that.

Saraacarter.com reports: In a significant twist, NYTimes editorial was forced to create a correction to its bombshell tale about Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh that the “presumed victim said she did not recall the supposed sexual assault in question at all.” Editors ‘ Note states: “An previous version of this article, which was adapted from a forthcoming novel, did not include one component of the novel. The book claims the woman student has refused to be interviewed and friends say she does not remember the incident. But NYTimes publishers also omitted another significant detail, that Max Stier, the accuser who “saw Mr. Kavanaugh with his trousers down at another drunken college party, where friends pushed his penis into the hands of a female student,” worked as a Clinton defense attorney, or Stier’s legal battles with Kavanaugh during the Whitewater investigation.

The only allegedly fresh statement created in the novel is not new and comes from Democrat lawyer Max Stier, a Kavanaugh’s Yale classmate with whom he has a lengthy and controversial history. During the Whitewater investigation in the 1990s when Kavanaugh worked for Independent Counsel Ken Starr, they were “matched” against each other in the words of the Yale Daily News. Stier defended President Bill Clinton, whose legal problems started when he was accused by a female of revealing herself to her in her hotel room. Clinton later settled for $850,000 with the lady and ended up losing his law license for five years due to a contempt of court summons for inaccurate testimony. Stier worked intimately with David Kendall, who continued to protect Hillary Clinton against accusations that classified information had been illegally handled. Kavanaugh’s reference to his opponents motivated by “vengeance on behalf of the Clintons” met with stupidity from the liberal media, despite the unusually big amount of Clinton-affiliated lawyers who continued to pop up during his confirmation hearings. (Excerpt from TheFederalist.com) NYTimes was forced to update its narrative only after The Federalist Mollie Hemingway flagged the omission of the article on Twitter: Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, Beto O’Rourke, Cory Booker and Julian Castro, among others, were quick to declare that Kavanaugh “must be impeached”

I was sitting through the hearings. Lied to the United States by Brett Kavanaugh. Senate and the American people most important. He was brought to court by a sham process and his position at the court is an insult to the pursuit of truth and justice.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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NFL’s greatest toes on turf off to memorable start in ’21

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NFL’s greatest toes on turf off to memorable start in ’21

Matt Prater came up short and paid the price, not once but twice.

His attempt to break his own record for longest field goal in NFL history — a 64-yarder in Denver’s thin air eight years ago — backfired Sunday when a former teammate returned his missed 68-yard attempt in Jacksonville’s heavy air a record-tying 109 yards for a touchdown on the last play of the first half.

Prater’s third-quarter field goal from half that distance ignited the Cardinals’ comeback from a 13-7 halftime deficit that sent the Jaguars to their 18th consecutive loss.

But his record fell anyway.

A thousand miles north, in Detroit’s climate-controlled Ford Field, where Prater plied his craft for the last seven seasons, Baltimore’s Justin Tucker, the most accurate kicker in league history, lined up at his own 40-yard line with three seconds left.

His holder was at the Ravens 44, and the snapper at the Lions 48 after some heroics by Lamar Jackson and a little help from the officiating crew.

Tucker’s attempt from 66 yards out bounced over the crossbar as time expired to send the Ravens to an electric 19-17 win over the Lions.

“That one was more like a kickoff,” said Tucker, who hop-stepped on his way to blasting the ball from his own 44. “It’s like you’re a competitor in a long-drive contest. You just let it rip and hope it stays straight.”

Prater’s league record that had stood for 2,850 days came crumbling down. Although he no longer holds the record for longest field goal, a 64-yarder against the Titans on Dec. 8, 2013, Prater does own the longest field goal for three franchises: Cardinals (62 yards), Lions (63) and Broncos (64).

Kickers have never been this clutch this early, but Kliff Kingsbury having Prater attempt a 68-yarder in Florida was a stretch.

Jamal Agnew returned the miss 109 yards for a touchdown, breaking two tackles and eluding another before sweeping past Prater over the final 10 yards.

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Wildfire burn scars threaten drinking water in Colorado, across the West

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Wildfire burn scars threaten drinking water in Colorado, across the West

By Sara Reardon, Kaiser Health News

Colorado saw its worst fire season last year, with the three largest fires in state history and more than 600,000 acres burned. But some of the effects didn’t appear until this July, when heavy rain pushed sediment from damaged forests down mountainsides, causing mudslides that shut down sections of Interstate 70 for almost two weeks.

Immense quantities of sediment choked the rivers that supply most of the state’s water. In western Colorado’s Glenwood Springs, the water became so murky that the town twice had to shut off the valves that pump water from nearby rivers to avoid overwhelming its filtration system. City managers sent alerts to the town’s 10,000 residents, telling them to minimize water use until the sediment moved downstream.

Wildfires and their lasting effects are becoming a way of life in the West as climate change and management practices cause fires to increase in number, intensity and acreage burned, while extending the length of the fire season. In “burn scars,” where fires decimated forest systems that held soil in place, an increase in droughts followed by heavy rainfall poses a different kind of threat to the water supplies that are essential to the health of communities.

“You know about it; it’s in the back of your head,” said Glenwood Springs resident Paula Stepp. “But until you face it, you don’t know how it’s going to impact your town.”

Dirty, turbid water can contain viruses, parasites, bacteria and other contaminants that cause illness. But experts say turbid water from burn scars is unlikely to make it to people’s taps, because water utilities would catch it first.

Still, the cost to municipal utility systems — and the residents who pay for water — is immense. Rural small towns in particular face the choice between spending millions of dollars to try to filter turbid water or shutting off their intake and risking shortages in areas where water may already be scarce.

And as fires move closer to communities, burning synthetic materials from houses and other buildings can create toxic compounds that leach into water supplies, which is what happened in California after major fires in 2017 and 2018.

“When we put [fires] out, we become less aware of them,” said hydrologist Kevin Bladon, of Oregon State University. But from a water perspective, “that’s when all the problems start.”

Montana’s capital city, Helena, gets its drinking water supply from the Upper Tenmile Creek watershed in a forest thick with trees killed by beetle infestations. City leaders worry a fire would quickly chew through that dry fuel and leave the watershed exposed to sediment contamination. Despite a logging project that cleared many of those trees two years ago, the fire threat remains and city leaders worry the resulting sediment would overwhelm the water treatment plant and shut down the primary water source for 40,000 people.

“If we had a fire up there, depending on where it is and how big it is, it could put the Tenmile plant out for a season or two,” Helena Public Works Director Ryan Leland said.

To protect against that happening, the city is in the early phases of designing a basin that can trap sediment before the water reaches the plant, Leland. The city also recently announced plans to drill three groundwater test wells, which would give them another drinking water supply option if something happens to the Upper Tenmile watershed. Treated water from the Missouri River is the city’s current backup supply.

The Rocky Mountains and about 200 miles separate Glenwood Springs from Greeley, in northeastern Colorado. But the 2020 fire season caused similar problems in both cities, creating burn scars that later flooded, contaminating water sources.

So far this year, Greeley has had to shut off its intake from the Cache la Poudre River for 39 days because the water was contaminated with sediment, ash and organic matter. “Normally we would never turn it off,” said Greeley water and sewer director Sean Chambers.

To cope, the city has been trading water with a nearby agricultural company that owns reservoirs used for irrigation. The swap gives the turbid water to farmers and redirects the reservoir water to Greeley. “If we didn’t have the trade in place, the cost [of buying water] would be astronomical,” Chambers said.

But Chambers admitted this system is a luxury that smaller towns may not enjoy. Greeley is 10 times the size of Glenwood Springs and has spent more than $40 million this year recovering from the Cameron Peak Fire — the largest fire in Colorado history, which burned for four months in 2020. Those costs may climb as rain continues, he said. Larger towns also tend to have better filtration systems that can handle more sediment, which clogs up filters and requires utilities to add chemicals to remove contaminants before the water is safe to drink.

While dry states like Colorado expect fires each year, recent blazes in wetter places like western Oregon have caught researchers off guard. Last September, fires scorched about 11% of the state’s Cascade mountain range, leaving burn scars above rivers and reservoirs that supply much of the state’s water.

“We have to be very proactive,” said Pete Robichaud, a research engineer with the U.S. Forest Service in Moscow, Idaho

After a wildfire is extinguished, Robichaud’s agency and others send teams of specialists to evaluate the risks that erosion and ash pose to water supplies. Their data can help land managers decide whether to take actions like thinning forests above rivers, dredging contaminated reservoirs, covering the area with mulch or seeds to reduce erosion, or forming a plan for alternative water sources.

Even advance notice of a flood could help immensely, said Stepp, the Glenwood Springs resident. She is the executive director of the nonprofit Middle Colorado Watershed Council, which recently worked with the U.S. Geological Survey to install rain gauges along Glenwood Canyon. These monitor weather upstream and notify downstream water users that a sediment-laden flood could be coming.

She said it is crucial for small communities in particular to partner with state and federal agencies. “Basically, we work with everybody,” she said.

Although debris flows can bring soil bacteria into water supplies, city utilities can disinfect them with chemicals like chlorine, said Ben Livneh, a hydrologist at the University of Colorado-Boulder. But those disinfectants can themselves cause a problem: Organic matter from sediment can interact with these chemicals and create carcinogenic byproducts that are difficult and expensive to remove.

Another waterborne danger comes from chemical byproducts and heavy metals from burned structures. “Those would be potentially really problematic to treat,” Livneh said.

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Missouri husband, wife plead guilty in Capitol insurrection

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Missouri husband, wife plead guilty in Capitol insurrection

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri couple have pleaded guilty for their roles in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol in January. The Kansas City Star reports that 30-year-old Kelsey Wilson and 32-year-old Zachary Wilson, both of Springfield, each pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to a misdemeanor count of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building. Kelsey Wilson was arrested in August on the charge. Her husband was arrested in February. Both face up to six months in prison and a $5,000 fine when they’re sentenced Dec. 10. Court records indicated Kelsey Wilson was a new first-grade teacher at Dayspring Christian School in Springfield at the time of her arrest.

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Broncos Week 4 Talking Points: In last two years, starting 4-0 has meant qualifying for playoffs

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Broncos Week 4 Talking Points: In last two years, starting 4-0 has meant qualifying for playoffs

Beat writer Ryan O’Halloran offers up three storylines ahead of the Broncos’ game against the Baltimore Ravens at Empower Field on Sunday.

Chasing 4-0

The Broncos are a narrow home favorite (two points) over Baltimore and have a chance to start 4-0 for the sixth time since 1999. Only three of the previous five teams made the postseason after their quick starts — wild-card loss in 2003, Super Bowl loss in ’13 and Super Bowl win in ’15. In the last two seasons, every team that started 4-0 made the playoffs — Kansas City and New England in ’19 and Buffalo, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Green Bay last year. The Broncos have wins of 14, 10 and 26 points over the Giants, Jaguars and Jets, respectively. They are dealing with injury adversity, but the Ravens (2-1) will be the first team to test the Broncos’ in-game resolve.

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Opinion: The Bureau of Land Management belongs in Washington, D.C.

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Opinion: The Bureau of Land Management belongs in Washington, D.C.

Since its inception in 1946, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has been responsible for sustaining the “health, diversity and productivity” of our nation’s public lands, of which there are 245 million acres today. The agency manages these lands for an array of uses including farming and ranching, outdoor recreation, and energy and mineral development, all of which are critical to our local economies and way of life here in the West.

The previous administration’s decision to relocate BLM headquarters from Washington, D.C., to Grand Junction was a controversial one, to say the least. I’ve heard passionate arguments both for and against the move from respected leaders and stakeholders who I believe have the best of intentions for our public lands. Deciding how and from where to manage our lands and natural resources is not a simple issue.

But as the head of an organization that advocates for natural places, and a lifelong lover and user of public lands, I applaud Interior Secretary Deb Haaland’s recently announced decision to return BLM headquarters to our nation’s capital while expanding BLM presence in the West.

When the relocation to Grand Junction began in 2019, hundreds of D.C.-based staff were reassigned to western cities, ostensibly to provide them with “a greater on-the-ground understanding” of the lands and programs managed by the agency. Local, state and national leaders on both sides of the political aisle argued that the new location would foster better relationships and partnerships in the West, where the vast majority of our public lands are located.

In theory, it might have seemed like a reasonable move. But in reality, the relocation decimated the agency’s invaluable institutional knowledge, which some former staffers say was exactly what the previous administration intended. Nearly nine out of 10 of the reassigned staffers chose to leave the agency rather than move West, according to new numbers released by the Biden administration. An analysis by the Government Accountability Office also found that BLM did not follow best practices for achieving effective reform.

It is misleading to suggest that if BLM is not headquartered in the West, then agency staff are somehow disconnected from and out of touch with the values and interests of public land users and stakeholders. Ninety-seven percent of agency employees were already stationed at field offices throughout the West. My organization, Western Leaders Network, consists of more than 450 local and tribal elected officials across the Interior West who work routinely with local and regional BLM offices on issues that affect our public lands, sacred and cultural sites, air quality, water resources, wildlife, livelihoods and local economies. But the BLM also needs DC-based senior staff to serve as liaisons between westerners and federal lawmakers, and to speak up for our western values.

The strength of this agency depends not only on having boots on the ground in the West, but also having a physical presence in Washington where decisions are made every day that affect western lands, air and water. We need that presence in our nation’s capital to coordinate with other public lands and natural resource agencies, have easy access to and testify before Congress, maintain strong working relationships with key federal leaders, and to fight for adequate funding and staffing in order to better steward America’s lands.

This is not “a partisan attack on rural communities,” as Congresswoman Lauren Boebert has said, but a move to better accommodate all communities. I commend the Interior Department and Secretary Haaland for this decision to move headquarters back to their rightful place in Washington, D.C., while committing to growing the bureau in Colorado and across the West. It is critical that we maintain a robust presence in both so that the agency can best serve public lands and all Americans.

Gwen Lachelt is a former county commissioner of La Plata County, Colorado, and the executive director of Western Leaders Network, a nonpartisan nonprofit organization of local and tribal elected officials across the Interior West who work to advance conservation initiatives and climate solutions.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Pfizer submits promising data to FDA from vaccine trial with kids ages 5-11

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Pfizer submits promising data to FDA from vaccine trial with kids ages 5-11

In this March 2021 photo provided by Pfizer, vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are prepared for packaging at the company’s facility in Puurs, Belgium. (Pfizer via AP)

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Pfizer and BioNTech have submitted data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday from a trial on the effects of the COVID-19 vaccine on children between 5-12 years old.

At this time, only children as young as 12 are able to get the Pfizer vaccine.

The Phase 2/3 trial resulted in “robust neutralizing antibody responses” for the children, who received two doses that were smaller than what has been administered to everyone else. The strong immune response came one month after getting the second dose, according to the companies.

“We are pleased to be able to submit data to regulatory authorities for this group of school-aged children before the start of the winter season,” said Dr. Ugur Sahin, CEO and co-founder of BioNTech. “The safety profile and immunogenicity data in children aged 5 to 11 years vaccinated at a lower dose are consistent with those we have observed with our vaccine in other older populations at a higher dose.”

The side effects were also “generally comparable” to the ones that people who are 16-25 years old experienced, according to the companies.

The trial included 2,268 participants who were 5 to 11 years of age and received a 10 µg (microgram) dose level in a two-dose regimen.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is the only one approved by the FDA for people 16 years and up. It also has Emergency Use Authorization for kids 12-15 years old.

U.S. officials recently allowed certain populations who received the Pfizer vaccine to get booster shots — a third dose administered six months after the last dose to combat waning immunity.

The booster shot is available to eligible people who have received the two-dose Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago. They include people 65 and older as well as people over 18 who have underlying medical conditions, who work in high-risk settings and who live in high-risk settings.

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Clinical trial testing Ivermectin, two other drugs against COVID open for signups

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Clinical trial testing Ivermectin, two other drugs against COVID open for signups

SPARTANBURG, S.C. (WSPA) — A new clinical trial that’s aimed at testing the effectiveness of three common drugs against COVID-19 is now open to all U.S. residents who have tested positive.

The study, conducted by the Duke Clinical Research Institute, is a nationwide double-blind study expected to enroll nearly 15,000 participants from across the United States and hopes to discover new COVID-19 treatments using already existing drugs.

The nationwide effort is called ACTIV-6 and is testing three drugs:

  • Fluticasone, also known as Flonase, a corticosteroid often used for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that is delivered via inhaler.
  • Fluvoxamine, an antidepressant in pill form.
  • Ivermectin, which is used to treat parasitic infections in both humans and livestock.

The Food and Drug Administration urges against taking Ivermectin to treat COVID-19, but some COVID patients are advocating for the option to take it in hospitals. The trial will allow researchers to test the drug in a safe and controlled environment.

“We have treatments for people with severe COVID-19 who are at high risk for hospitalization or death, but they are complex to administer,” said Adrian Hernandez, MD, the study’s administrative principal investigator in a release. “Currently, there are no approved prescription medications that can be easily given at home to treat mild-to-moderate symptoms of the virus early in its course to prevent worsening of COVID-19.”

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) are part of the study.

“As I was telling people, if you don’t believe in Ivermectin — or if you do believe in it — this is your chance to contribute to us understanding whether it works or not,” Dr. Leslie Lenert, director of the Biomedical Informatics Center at MUSC, said.

People interested are required to be over 30 years old, have a positive COVID-19 test in the past 10 days and have experienced at least two COVID-19 symptoms within the past seven days. Symptoms include fatigue, difficulty breathing, fever, cough, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, chills, headache, sore throat, nasal symptoms and/or new loss of sense of taste or smell.

If you meet those requirements, you can sign up and be randomly assigned to one of the three treatments or a placebo.

Once you’re accepted into the trial, the central pharmacies mail the study drug and a pulse oximeter to your home.

Then, participants will take the study medication as directed, fill out daily surveys online and respond to phone call questionnaires on days 14 and 28.

After 90 days, the participants each receive a $100 Amazon gift card as a thank-you gesture for their time and participation in the clinical trial. 

Anyone interested in participating in the ACTIV-6 study can call (843)-792-4675 or visit the study website.

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Hazelwood experiences ‘network malfunction’ delaying bus routes

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Hazelwood experiences ‘network malfunction’ delaying bus routes

Posted: Updated:

Hazelwood West High School

HAZELWOOD, Mo. – The Hazelwood School District has experienced a “districtwide network malfunction” Tuesday morning causing bus routes to be delayed.

The district said it has also impacted multiple computer systems and not only are bus routes delayed but “other services may be delayed.”

They said they are “working to identify all the systems impacted” in order to solve the problem.

Continue to refresh this story for the latest updates.

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Schools in St. Charles County decide when quarantined students can return

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Schools in St. Charles County decide when quarantined students can return

ST. CHARLES COUNTY, Mo. – St. Charles County schools are changing how they deal with COVID tracing Tuesday morning.

Schools can now decide when students who are quarantined can return to the classroom as long as they wear a mask. St. Charles County Executive Steve Ehlman said health officials and school districts will have more discretion in setting contact tracing and quarantine guidelines.

The council tabled a resolution that would have eliminated quarantine orders for schools. The measure would have left those rules up to individual school boards. The St. Charles County Council also voted unanimously to approve a resolution opposing any federal COVID vaccine mandates.

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Pac-12 bowl projections: Oregon on track for the playoff, ASU to the Alamo, outlooks improve for OSU and Washington

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Pac-12 bowl projections: Oregon on track for the playoff, ASU to the Alamo, outlooks improve for OSU and Washington

With the first month of the 2021 season complete, several Pac-12 teams face daunting climbs to the six-win mark needed for bowl eligibility.

Arizona looks utterly and completely doomed, and Colorado isn’t far behind. The Buffaloes are dead last in the country in scoring against FBS opponents (6.7 points per game).

A few others have shown enough life at various points to make mini-winning streaks possible. It doesn’t take much for the bowl math to improve, but with each passing week, margin for error slips away.

We envision at least one team falling a single victory short of the postseason requirement and looking back on a bungled September opportunity against a Group of Five or FCS opponent as the fateful result.

The top contenders for that unfortunate end-game are Washington (the loss to Montana), Washington State (to Utah State), Cal (to Nevada) and Utah (to San Diego State).

For the first time, the Hotline’s bowl projections include the remaining schedule for each team in order to provide context on the road ahead.

College Football PlayoffTeam: Oregon (4-0/1-0)Home games (four): Cal, Colorado, Washington State, Oregon StateRoad games (four): Stanford, UCLA, Washington, UtahComment: In the event they finish as a one-loss Pac-12 champion and need a boost to their CFP candidacy, the Ducks would want to face the highest-ranked team possible from the South in Las Vegas. Only ASU and UCLA currently have one loss. Oregon needs the winner of this weekend’s showdown in the Rose Bowl to keep rolling.

Rose Bowl (vs. Big Ten)Team: UCLA (3-1/1-0)Home games (four): ASU, Oregon, Colorado, CalRoad games (four): Arizona, Washington, Utah, USCComment: If Oregon jumps into the CFP, everyone else would move up one rung, with the Rose Bowl taking the highest-ranked team available. The UCLA-ASU winner on Saturday night will have a significant advantage considering the selection committee’s emphasis on head-to-head results.

Alamo Bowl (vs. Big 12)Team: Arizona State (3-1/ 1-0)Home games (four): Stanford, Washington State, USC, ArizonaRoad games (four): UCLA, Utah, Washington, Oregon StateComment: The Sun Devils were hardly impressive in their only road game thus far (at BYU), and all four remaining trips are difficult. (The visits to Seattle and Corvallis are back-to-back in November.) But the home schedule creates multiple pathways to the six-win mark.

Las Vegas Bowl (vs. Big Ten)Team: Oregon State (3-1/ 1-0)Home games (four): Washington, Utah, Stanford, ASURoad games (four): Washington State, Cal, Colorado, OregonComment: The victory at USC tilted the bowl math in OSU’s favor, effectively offsetting its loss at Purdue. The Beavers need three more wins for their first postseason berth since 2013 and, at this point, should be favored in at least six games. They couldn’t have asked for better positioning at the start of October.

Holiday Bowl (vs. ACC)Team: Utah (2-2/1-0)Home games (four): ASU, UCLA, Oregon, ColoradoRoad games (four): USC, Oregon State, Stanford, ArizonaComment: Of note in the Pac-12 bowl selection process: The Alamo, Las Vegas and Holiday bowls are not required to invite teams based on order-of-finish; they can skip one for another so long as there isn’t more than a one-game difference in conference record. But starting with the Sun Bowl, teams are slotted based strictly on conference record.

Sun Bowl (vs. ACC)Team: Washington (2-2/1-0)Home games (four): UCLA, Oregon, ASU, Washington StateRoad games (four): Oregon State, Arizona, Stanford, ColoradoComment: The bowl math hasn’t turn indisputably positive just yet for the Huskies, especially given recent history: They have lost six in a row at Stanford and four of their last six at Arizona and were awful in Boulder in 2019. It’s not difficult to sketch a scenario in which UW has five wins entering the Apple Cup.

LA Bowl (vs. Mountain West)Team: Stanford (2-2/1-1)Home games (five): Oregon, Washington, Utah, Cal, Notre DameRoad games (three): ASU, Washington State, Oregon StateComment: The rugged September schedule provides a back-end bonus with just three remaining road games. A victory over Oregon this weekend would reconfigure the math while a loss would likely turn Washington, Utah and Cal into must-win games. And all three are quite winnable.

ESPN bowl (Gasparilla, Armed Forces or First Responders)Team: USC (2-2/1-2)Home games (four): Utah, Arizona, UCLA, Brigham YoungRoad games (four): Colorado, Notre Dame, ASU, CalComment: For all their deficiencies, the Trojans have a reasonable path into the postseason due to a manageable upcoming schedule: It pays to play in the same division as Colorado and Arizona. Win those, and they should cobble together the fifth and sixth victories somewhere, somehow.

Non-qualifierTeam: Arizona (0-4/0-1)Home games (four): UCLA, Washington, Cal, UtahRoad games (four): Colorado, USC, Washington State, ASUComment: Spoiler alert: The Wildcats have taken on the role of spoiler. Even if Jordan McCloud provides a significant lift, they won’t win more than three games. More likely, the Wildcats finish 2-10 or 1-11.

Non-qualifierTeam: Cal (1-3/0-1)Home games (four): Washington State, Colorado, Oregon State, USCRoad games (four): Oregon, Arizona, Stanford, UCLAComment: Combine the five-point home loss to Nevada with the two-point road loss to TCU and the overtime loss at Washington, and the Bears have missed more opportunities than any team in the conference. That triple-whammy of wasted chances couldn’t possibly come back to haunt them, could it?

Non-qualifierTeam: Colorado (1-3/0-1)Home games (four): USC, Arizona, Oregon State, WashingtonRoad games (four): Cal, Oregon, UCLA, UtahComment: If the offense simply made incremental improvement, CU’s prospects for victory would increase exponentially. But the schedule is a huge problem: The Buffs need to win five out of eight and play UCLA and Oregon on the road. They need a Flatirons miracle.

Non-qualifierTeam: Washington State (1-3/0-2)Home games (four): Oregon State, Stanford, Brigham Young, ArizonaRoad games (four): Cal, ASU, Oregon, WashingtonComment: At this point, the best-case scenario for WSU is an Apple Cup victory that eliminates the Huskies from the bowl race. Because we can’t find five wins for the Cougars within that lineup of eight, not given the way BYU’s playing.


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