Connect with us

News

Putin: ‘ The US Middle Class has not benefited ‘

Published

on

Putin: ' The US Middle Class has not benefited '

Once again, Russian President Vladimir Putin has shown a stronger knowledge of American politics than most US politicians, pointing out that while globalization has benefited the elites, it has been a catastrophe for the average American.

In a latest interview, Putin told Lionel Barber, editor of the Financial Times, “The US middle class has not benefited from globalization; it was left out when this pie was split.”

Putin had some very interesting and precise remarks on the present U.S. political situation, especially as it refers to the middle class of America. Here are some of the main remarks: “Russia has been charged and, odd as it may seem, is still being charged with mythical interference in the U.S. election despite the Mueller report. What actually occurred?

Mr Trump looked at the attitude toward him of his opponents and saw changes in American society, and he took advantage of that.

You and I are speaking before the conference of the G20. It is an economic forum, and there will certainly be debates about globalization, global trade, and international finance.

The US middle class did not benefit from globalization… The Trump team felt this very strongly and clearly and used it in the election campaign.  Has anyone ever considered who genuinely benefited and what advantages have been obtained from globalization, which we have observed and participated in over the previous 25 years since the 1990s?

In specific, China has used globalization to take millions of Chinese out of poverty.

What occurred in the United States, and how did that occur? In the US, these advantages were used by the leading US companies— the businesses, their executives, shareholders, and associates. Globalization has hardly benefited the middle class.

Globalization has not benefited the middle class in the US; it was left out when this pie was split.

The Trump team felt this very obviously and keenly, and in the election campaign they used this. This is where you should look for reasons behind the win of Trump, rather than any supposed foreign interference. This is what we should be talking about here, including when it comes to the global economy. “(my bolds) Viable Opposition reports: Mr. Putin obviously puts Hillary Clinton’s defeat at the feet of disillusioned middle-class voters in America in 2016.  Let’s look at some of the factors for this disillusionment: 1.) Stagnant wages: here is a graph illustrating what occurred to average real wages for full-time employees aged 16 and over since 1979 (setting 1979 salaries at 100): real wages for full-time American employees have only risen by 6.6 percent over the four decades since the start of 1979.  If that’s not salary stagnation, I don’t understand what it is. Here’s a graph illustrating what’s occurred to the average weekly nominal income for full-time American employees aged 16 and over since 1979: over the four-decade period, Corporate America’s earnings have risen by 696 percent or 2.4 times over the same period as its wage earners.

2.) CEO of Worker Wage Disparity: here is a table from the Institute for Policy Studies displaying the most egregious instances of CEO-to-worker pay gaps: here is a graph from the Economic Policy Institute illustrating how the CEO-to-worker compensation ratio has altered since 1965: CEO compensation has even increased when measured against the top 0.1 percent of earners as shown in this graph: 3.)

While it is hard to draw connections from economic class to voting patterns given that education has an impact on voting levels, it is quite evident that Vladimir Putin’s statements about American society and the increasing feeling that middle class America is left behind are precise.  It becomes progressively apparent that globalization benefits the top few and leaves behind the vast majority of society who feel threatened by their location in society.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

Advertisement
Click to comment

News

‘Tis the season — for fresh hop beers

Published

on

‘Tis the season — for fresh hop beers

If you go

What: Joyride Brewing Company Fresh Hop Festival

When: 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Oct. 9

Where: 2501 Sheridan Blvd., Edgewater

More info: joyridebrewing.com or 720-432-7560

A little more than 10 years ago, when Charlie Berger and Patrick Crawford were still building out Denver Beer Co. on Platte Street in Denver, the two friends sat in front of the dusty construction site, offering baby hop plants to anyone who walked by.

“We’d tell them about hops and why we wanted them to grow them, that we were starting a brewery,” said Berger. “It was pretty guerilla marketing right then.”

A few months later, when the brewery finally opened, they invited those citizen farmers to bring in their crops of green, pine cone-like flowers — one of the four main ingredients in beer — then stick around to help brew a pale ale using the fresh hops.

As Denver Beer Co. has grown, the brewery has continued its “hop swap” and fresh hop beer tradition, sending out hundreds of tiny hop starters each spring to (hopefully) grow and flourish in Denver backyards. Since the pandemic forced them to put the annual program on hold last year, the brewers — and their volunteer crew of hop farmers — are extra jazzed about the 2021 Hop Swap Pale Ale, brewed in mid-September and on tap starting in early October.

“We get really excited as brewers when we get to dig our hands into the hop cones, lift them up to our noses and just smell what this next year’s worth of beer is going to be like,” Berger said. “We’re as passionate about the raw materials as we are about the beer itself. It’s definitely an exciting time of year.”

Step aside, Märzens. Hold your horses, pumpkin beers. Press pause, Festbiers. It’s fresh hop beer season in Colorado.

During harvest season in August and September, brewers have a once-a-year opportunity to make beer with fresh, rather than dried, hops. The resulting fresh hop, or wet hop, beers tend to taste fresher, brighter and have slightly more vegetal notes.

Rebecca Slezak, The Denver Post

Christi Hatakka and Jennifer Johnson pour out the bag off cashmere hops they grew at Denver Beer Company in Denver, Colorado on September 18, 2021. This was their first year growing.

“Think of using fresh herbs versus dried — they’re extremely similar at their base, but you get a little extra pop out of the fresh,” said Dave Bergen, co-founder of Joyride Brewing Company in Edgewater, which is hosting a fresh hop beer festival featuring 14 Colorado craft breweries on Oct. 9.

Before you dive head-first into the toasty, spicy flavors of fall, give summer one last sip with these Colorado fresh hop beers.

1632832316 821 ‘Tis the season — for fresh hop beers
Fresh hops used in brewing Gilded Goat Fresh Hop IPA at Gilded Goat Brewing Co. (Provided by Gilded Goat Brewing Co.)

Gilded Goat Fresh Hop IPA, Gilded Goat Brewing Co.

Brewery owner John Hoxmeier took matters into his own hands to make this beer, harvesting fresh Chinook and Cascade hops from his own Fort Collins backyard. The resulting 7.3-percent beer has resinous pine, grapefruit and stonefruit notes.

Strata Fresh Hop IPA, Odell Brewing Co.

Made with 650 pounds of fresh Strata hops that were picked at 3:30 a.m. in Oregon, flown straight to Colorado and thrown into Odell’s kettle 13 hours later, Odell’s Strata Fresh Hop IPA has notes of passionfruit, strawberry and fresh-cut grass.

More Like Bore-O-Phyll, Call to Arms Brewing Company

Made with 100 pounds of five-hour-old, fresh Cascade hops from High Wire Hops in Paonia, then dry-hopped with Amarillo, Citra, Galaxy and whole-cone Cashmere hops, this beer packs a big punch. Expect fruit-forward, citrusy flavors like mandarin, pineapple and mango, plus notes of pine. Call to Arms also has another fresh hop beer right now: Fresh Hop Janet Reno’s Dance Party, which has notes of pineapple and fresh peach and a dank, fresh hop finish.

Lone Cone Colorado Wet Hop Ale, Breckenridge Brewery

Named for the 12,000-plus-foot Lone Cone Peak in southwest Colorado, this hoppy, 6.2-percent brew features 100 pounds of fresh Chinook hops from High Wire Hops in Paonia. The brewers describe it as fruit-forward and juicy, with hints of melon rind, pine, white grape juice and just a kiss of caramel.

Tis the season — for fresh hop beers
Edgewater’s Joyride Brewing has made two versions of its Fresh Budz IPA. (Provided by Joyride Brewing)

Fresh Budz, Joyride Brewing Company

Edgewater’s Joyride Brewing made two versions of this wet hop IPA: one with fresh Comet hops from Billy Goat Hop Farm in Montrose, and another with fresh Cascade and Chinook hops from High Wire Hops in Paonia. Prepare your tongue for tangerine, lemon, grapefruit and pineapple flavors — with just a hint of gummy bear.

10° Wet Hop Světlé Výčepní Pivo, Cohesion Brewing Co.

This is a wet hop spin on Cohesion’s standard světlé výčepní pivo (a Czech-inspired pale draft beer), made with Cascade hops from Billy Goat Hop Farm in Montrose. The hops, which Cohesion’s brewers used within 12 hours of harvest, add an extra dose of citrus and freshness to the typical honey and floral notes.

1632832316 951 ‘Tis the season — for fresh hop beers
John Way of City Star with fresh hops. (Emily Sierra, provided by City Star)

Homegrown IPA, City Star Brewing

Head north to downtown Berthoud to get your hands on City Star’s Homegrown IPA, an American IPA made from Centennial hops grown right at the brewery. The brewing team picked the hops and added them to the beer in less than an hour (2 pounds of hops per barrel of beer!), which gives this one its super-fresh, hoppy punch.

Garden of the Lost, Burns Family Artisan Ales

The soft fruit and citrus notes from the fresh Chinook hops grown at Sweet Ridge Farm in Wheat Ridge pair perfectly with the toffee, caramel, dark chocolate and coffee notes from the four types of malted barley used to make this 6.1-percent black IPA.

Hop is My Copilot, FlyteCo Brewing, Bruz Beers and Uhl’s Brewing

Three Colorado breweries collaborated on this aptly named fresh hop hazy IPA. In late August, a contingent of brewers hopped into a single-engine airplane (built by FlyteCo’s Eric Serani and his dad), then took off for the Western Slope. They loaded the plane up with Chinook and Cascade hops from High Wire Hops in Paonia, then jetted off back to Denver to dump them into the brew kettle. This juicy, fruity, citrusy beer gives you a face full of fresh hop aroma, according to Serani.

1632832316 867 ‘Tis the season — for fresh hop beers
Comrade makes its award-winning Superdamp beer with 600 pounds of wet Chinook and Cascade hops from Billy Goat Hop Farm in Montrose and High Wire Hops in Paonia. (Provided by Comrade Brewing)

Superdamp, aka Fresh Hop Superpower IPA, Comrade Brewing

Comrade makes this award-winning beer with 600 pounds of wet Chinook and Cascade hops from Billy Goat Hop Farm in Montrose and High Wire Hops in Paonia (the fresh hop version won back-to-back Great American Beer Fest silver medals in 2014 and 2015, and the regular version won gold in 2019 and silver in 2020). With a bright, light golden color, this IPA bursts with fresh hop flavors and modest, smooth bitterness. It smells like intense grapefruit, pine, berry and tropical fruit.

Fresh Hop Juicy Bits, WeldWerks Brewing Co.

For the first time ever, WeldWerks is making a fresh hop version of its popular Juicy Bits New England-style IPA. It’s made with freshly picked Citra and Mosaic hops from Yakima, Washington, that were frozen within a few hours of harvest, then shipped to Greeley in a refrigerated truck.

Fresh Hop Juicy Banger IPA, Station 26 Brewing Company

Station 26 made its flagship West Coast-style IPA with fresh Cascade, Chinook and Nugget hops from Paonia’s High Wire Hops for extra brightness and added hoppy aromas.

Continue Reading

News

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations stay on high plateau as virus’s trajectory remains uncertain

Published

on

Colorado’s COVID hospitalizations stay on high plateau as virus’s trajectory remains uncertain

Colorado’s COVID-19 hospitalizations remain stuck at a high level and it’s not clear whether they can be expected to fall in the near future as the virus’s trajectory in the state continues to be uncertain.

Hospitalizations are essentially on a plateau, with 966 people receiving care for confirmed or suspected COVID-19 as of Monday afternoon. That number has bounced between 959 and 980 since Sept. 20, according to data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.

Normally, hospitalizations follow cases with a one- or two-week delay: if the number of new COVID-19 infections start to fall, hospitalizations can be expected to do the same within about 14 days. Cases in Colorado appeared to go down in the week ending Sunday, with 10,091 new infections recorded — but that data may not be complete.

Cases also had appeared to fall in the week ending Sept. 19, but late reports to the state public health department continued to come in through Monday, ultimately adding up to a small increase that week compared to the previous week.

The delayed numbers may clear up a mystery from last week: why hospitalizations remained elevated while cases appeared to fall steadily. The initial part of the decline was a mirage, and cases roughly plateaued in the first three weeks of September, with between 12,645 and 13,712 new infections recorded each week.

Talia Quandelacy, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health, said it’s possible this week’s decline in cases is real, since infections are falling nationwide.

“There’s some hope that we’re starting to follow that trend,” she said.

Continue Reading

News

Five-vehicle crash on I-225 in Aurora shuts down all northbound lanes

Published

on

Five-vehicle crash on I-225 in Aurora shuts down all northbound lanes

Northbound lanes of Interstate 225 are closed at E. Alameda Avenue for a crash involving five vehicles.

The crash occurred just before 5 a.m. on northbound I-225 just south of E. 6th Avenue. Traffic headed in that direction is being diverted off the highway at Alameda.

One car rolled over, police said. Nobody was seriously injured.

Police said it may take an hour to clean up the scene.

To get around the crash, Denver7 Traffic Expert Jayson Luber recommends taking Potomac Street or Peoria Street to the west, and Abilene Street or Sable Boulevard or Chambers Road to the east.

Read the full story from our partner at thedenverchannel.com.

Continue Reading

News

Broncos Mailbag: With depth depleted, should Denver pursue Golden Tate, other veteran receivers?

Published

on

Broncos Mailbag: With depth depleted, should Denver pursue Golden Tate, other veteran receivers?

Denver Post Broncos writer Ryan O’Halloran posts his Broncos Mailbag periodically during the season. Submit questions to Ryan here.

I am honestly stumped as to why center Lloyd Cushenberry is using such a visible silent count that is very easy to time. Him jabbing at the defensive tackle prior to every snap for a defensive end or rush linebacker would be the equivalent to a pitcher tipping his pitches. Am I wrong and do you expect that has anything to do with the pressure Denver has given up the last few games?

— Jacob, Eagle Point, Ore.

I’ll guess Jacob filed this question before Sunday’s home opener against the New York Jets. But he is right — the Broncos used the same kind of snap sequence in road wins over the Giants and Jacksonville. One of the guards would be looking back at quarterback Teddy Bridgewater, who would signal him to tap Cushenberry. At that point, Cushenberry set the snap count for extending his non-snapping arm.

In that kind of environment, that’s about as much as the Broncos could do if they felt the noise was going to be an issue. It works both ways — at Broncos home games, the silent count allows for pass rushers Von Miller and Malik Reed to get ready.

As for whether it impacted the Broncos’ pass protection in Weeks 1-2, unclear.

With receiver depth being tested, is the front office regretting trading Trinity Benson away? Or still happy they flipped a practice squad player for draft capital?

— Tyler B., Nederland

They shouldn’t regret trading Benson away because he wasn’t going to be on the initial 53-man roster and thus, Detroit or another team would have been able to claim him off waivers for free.

Hindsight is 20-20 when it comes to roster management and injuries. Jerry Jeudy played all 16 games last year, but couldn’t finish this year’s opener (ankle).

Continue Reading

News

Denver native Jack O’Brien, 18, revels in “unreal” experience at Avalanche training camp

Published

on

Denver native Jack O’Brien, 18, revels in “unreal” experience at Avalanche training camp

Amid 56 colored sweaters and elite hockey biographies, Jack O’Brien stood out at Avalanche training camp.

The right-winger was the youngest player on the roster — the only one born in 2003 — and the only Denver native.

O’Brien, 18, was born into burgundy and blue. Highlands Ranch is home. He wore No. 19 growing up for the Littleton Hawks and Krivo School of Hockey in honor of Joe Sakic. He wears No. 92 for major-junior’s Portland Winterhawks in honor of Gabe Landeskog.

His dream was to play for the Avalanche, and he got that chance in last week’s rookie showcase in Arizona, where the young Avs played against peers from the Los Angeles Kings, Anaheim Ducks and San Jose Sharks. He also participated in all five on-ice days of training before.

“Obviously, it’s so cool playing for my hometown team. I grew up going to Avalanche games,” O’Brien said in a phone interview Sunday, a day before camp ended and he was released to prepare for his season in Portland. “It’s unreal to be out there in an Avs uniform.”

O’Brien was 7 years old when Avalanche defenseman Erik Johnson, the club’s longest-tenured player, was traded to Colorado early in 2011. O’Brien spent five days of on-ice camp competing against Johnson, 33, and other notable veterans he grew up idolizing.

So you can imagine what his father, Paul O’Brien, was feeling while watching his son skate at Family Sports Center.

“Surreal,” Paul said. “It’s unreal, really.”

The father made those comments before his son picked up pucks and was the last player off the ice after Saturday’s second camp session. His son can’t get enough of this camp.

“I try to stay on the ice as long as possible,” O’Brien said. “I can’t get enough being on the ice. I love it so much.”

O’Brien began playing hockey at age 5 with the Littleton Hawks, then stepped up to the Krivo School of Hockey in Littleton, run by Russian native Andrei Krivokrasov, at age 11. O’Brien and his family then moved to southern California where Jack played for the Western Selects Brick program. At age 15, Jack moved to Michigan to play for triple-A Little Ceasars in 2018-19. He then chose the major-junior route over college hockey and signed with the Winterhawks, with whom he was a 16-year-old in the 20-under Western Hockey League.

The WHL had a delayed start to last season due to COVID-19 and O’Brien signed with the Lincoln Stars of the United States Hockey League (junior-A), playing 23 games before returning to Portland, where he finished the season on a six-game stint. The lack of games probably led to him not getting selected in the July NHL draft.

Continue Reading

News

Nuggets Podcast: Michael Porter Jr. gets paid, Jamal Murray speaks and more Media Day thoughts

Published

on

Nuggets Podcast: Michael Porter Jr. gets paid, Jamal Murray speaks and more Media Day thoughts

In the latest Nuggets Ink podcast, beat writer Mike Singer is joined by Kyle Fredrickson in the wake of Nuggets Media Day and the news that Michael Porter Jr. and Denver have agreed to a five-year max contract extension. Among the topics discussed:

  • Did Nuggets brass make the right call giving Porter a five-year extension that could be worth as much as $207 million. What was it that convinced them MPJ is a max contract player? What does the timing of the agreement say about the relationship between Porter and the franchise? What does this mean for the Nuggets going forward?
  • Speaking on Monday, Bol Bol appeared to embrace the idea that he needs to be a more mature, consistent player. How encouraging were his responses to questions at Media Day? Is there still hope that the third-year player can be a long-term piece of the puzzle for the Nuggets? What must happen for him to finally break through? Is the clock ticking on his time in Denver?
  • Jamal Murray spoke for the first time since tearing his ACL on April 12 at Golden State. What are the main takeaways from his comments Monday? How encouraged should Nuggets fans be in spite of there being no timeline for Murray’s return? How realistic is it to expect him to play this season?
  • The Nuggets and Singer are headed to San Diego. What is the pulse of the team with the season about to begin?

Subscribe to the podcast
SoundCloud | iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

Music: Follow the Leader by The Trujillo Company

Continue Reading

News

98.3 TRY Social Dilemma: Should You Turn Off Your Spouse’s Work Email While On Vacation?

Published

on

98.3 TRY Social Dilemma: Should You Turn Off Your Spouse’s Work Email While On Vacation?

Posted: Updated:

Email_415495

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Today’s 98.3 TRY Social Dilemma came from Kevin. It’s about work and vacations.

Hi Jaime. My wife and I were taking our first vacation in two years. She is always working and brings her work home with her every night. I was looking forward to having her all to myself. As soon as we got to the hotel, a bell goes off on my wife’s computer. She runs right over and is immediately caught up in a work e-mail . . . on vacation. I said, “this isn’t going to be a thing all weekend is it?” She said, “Sorry, it was just this one thing.” I see how many messages she always gets and knew this wasn’t just a “one thing.” So, when she was in the bathroom, I turned the work email notifications off. I knew that she needed the down time and was doing her a favor she couldn’t recognize. We proceeded to have an amazing and relaxing weekend! That first night back, she is super-pissed at me as she realizes how many e-mails she missed. She said that I am not to touch her stuff and that I sabotaged her from getting her work done. I tried to let her see that I actually saved her. Now, she is stressed like we never even took a vacation and our relationship has taken a hit. Am I the jerk she says I am for what I did? Thanks for using this as your dilemma Jaime ~ Kevin.

Wow, this is tough. I understand wanting to make sure that we have time away from work. I’m guilty of answering work emails while I’m on vacation too, but I work really hard to only check once a day. I know Kevin only wanted to help, but I don’t think he should have shut off her notifications without asking her. His intentions were good but making that decision for someone else feels wrong to me.

What do you think? Let’s help Kevin out and let me know on the TRY Facebook page.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

R. Kelly guilty on all counts in sex trafficking trial

Published

on

R. Kelly guilty on all counts in sex trafficking trial

NEW YORK — A jury found R. Kelly guilty on all counts in his sex trafficking trial Monday after decades of allegations about sexual misconduct with minors.

A jury of seven men and five women convicted Kelly of racketeering and other charges on their second day of deliberations.

The charges were based on an argument that the entourage of managers and aides who helped the singer meet girls — and keep them obedient and quiet — amounted to a criminal enterprise.

The verdict came after a month of emotional testimony accusing Kelly of locking victims in rooms, subjecting them to degrading rules and filming sexual encounters as a means of control. 

Prosecutors in the case said there was ample evidence to prove that the R&B star sexually exploited multiple victims over a period of two decades.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Nadia Shihata said Kelly “believed the music, the fame and the celebrity meant he could do whatever he wanted.”

Kelly had continually denied the allegations, and his defense team said Kelly’s accusers were never forced to do anything against their will. Kelly’s defense attorney, Deveraux Cannick, argued that Kelly could not be a predator because of the way he treated his accusers.

“He gave them a lavish lifestyle,” he said during closing arguments. “That’s not what a predator is supposed to do.”

The judge set a sentencing date of May 4. He could face life in prison. Kelly’s next court appearance will be Nov. 1, when the judge will hear any defense motions in the case.

Kelly faces additional sex-related charges in both Illinois and Minnesota.

Here are the charges Kelly was found guilty of: 

  • COUNT ONE – Rackteering
  • COUNT TWO – Mann Act Transportation 
  • COUNT THREE – Mann Act Coercion and Enticement
  • COUNT FOUR –  Mann Act Coercion of a Minor
  • COUNT FIVE – Mann Act Transportation of a Minor
  • COUNT SIX – Mann Act Transportation
  • COUNT SEVEN – Mann Act Coercion and Enticement
  • COUNT EIGHT –   Mann Act Transportation
  • COUNT NINE –     Mann Act Coercion and Enticement
Continue Reading

News

Upcoming emergency no parking restrictions in Albany, Sept. 28

Published

on

Upcoming emergency no parking restrictions in Albany, Sept. 22

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On September 28, Albany Police announced upcoming emergency no parking restrictions.

Wednesday, September 29

  • Wednesday, September 29th at 6:00 a.m. until Thursday, September 30th at 4:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Broadway from Clinton Avenue to Spencer Street for underground electrical repairs. 
  • Wednesday, September 29th at 6:00 a.m. until Wednesday, October 13th at 6:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on the east side of Hawk Street from Washington Avenue to Elk Street. 
  • Wednesday, September 29th at 6:00 a.m. until Friday, September 15th at 6:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Marinello Terrace from 10-18 Marinello Terrace and both sides of Summit Avenue from 68 Summit Avenue to Marinello Terrace for service vehicles. 

Thursday, September 30

  • Thursday, September 30th from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Greenway near 392 Greenway for a crane.
  • Thursday, September 30th at 6:00 a.m. until Friday, October 1st at 3:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on the west side of Quail Street from 363-375 Quail Street for water and sewer repair. 
  • Thursday, September 30th at 7:00 a.m. until Wednesday, October 6th at 5:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Myrtle Avenue from South Main Avenue to Ridgefield Street for gas install.
  • Thursday, September 30th at 6:00 a.m. until Friday, October 8th at 4:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on the north side of Westerlo Street from 90 Westerlo Street to Grand Street for underground gas main repairs. 

Friday, October 1

  • Friday, October 1st from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Hudson Avenue from Lark Street to Willett Street for event vehicles. 
  • Friday, October 1st from 4:00 p.m. to 11:59 p.m., parking will be restricted on the north side of Hudson Avenue near 351 Hudson Avenue for service vehicles. 
  • Friday, October 1st from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on both sides of Lark Street from Hudson Avenue to Lancaster Street to Twilight Market. 
  • Friday, October 1st at 8:00 a.m. until Sunday, October 3rd at 8:00 p.m., parking will be restricted on the south side of Lancaster Street near 136.5 Lancaster Street for a move. 

More from NEWS10

More from News10

  • Power cuts in China may lead to Christmas shopping shortages in the US
  • Watch: Florida deputies survive ambush during traffic stop
  • Off the Beaten Path: Barkeater Chocolates
  • 5 things to know this Tuesday, September 28
  • 98.3 TRY Social Dilemma: Should You Turn Off Your Spouse’s Work Email While On Vacation?

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Union demands better protection at youth facility

Published

on

Union demands better protection at youth facility

Posted: Updated:

CLAVERACK, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Following an incident that left three staff members injured at Brookwood Secure Center for Youth in Claverack, the union representing most of the workers is calling for change.

The incident took place on September 15.

New York State Police and the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office were called to the scene. They were able to quickly gain control of the situation, but three staff members suffered minor injuries.

On Monday, CSEA is demanding the New York State Office of Children and Family Services take steps to improve safety at the facility.

They are calling on the state to move the most violent residents over the age of 18 to a more secure facility.

“OCFS must take immediate steps to better protect the workers at Brookwood from the most dangerous people under their care,” said CSEA President Mary E. Sullivan. “We cannot allow these violent attacks on workers to continue, and we need more staff now to protect the workers and residents.”

Sullivan said the move would provide a safer environment for the younger residents and offer the best chance for reform.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

Trending