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How to Make a Difference in Society as a Philanthropist

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It’s a dream to have a happy life, if you’ve one, consider yourself to be lucky.  Life is quite hard for some people because of inaccessibility for everyday human needs. Everyone has the right to live and enjoy their lives but are restricted by affordability and other circumstances.

If you’re willing to help, then consider philanthropy by donating some money and time for people who need it. However, it doesn’t have to money every time. Simple gestures like raising voice for unheard, spending some at the orphanage, can help you become a philanthropist.

Don’t confuse it with charity because it’s about monetary help, while a philanthropist focuses on human welfare. Bill Gates is known to be the biggest philanthropist of the world, due to his generous donations. Here’s how to make a difference in society as a philanthropist.

Promote Education 

In developing countries, the government has failed to offer free education due to which the illiteracy ratio is quite high. It’s the 20th century, and yet children are unable to get their fundamental right to education. If anyone who wishes to walk the path of literacy needs hefty amounts of money. But don’t you think that ‘education is for all.’

As a philanthropist, donating for education would have a more significant impact on society than anything else. Not just this generation, but it secures the future of coming generations too! Bavaguthu Raghuram Shetty, an Indian billionaire philanthropist, funded many schools in India.

Of course, if you can’t start with something big, then you might be familiar with the idea of street schools. There are popular all over the world. Begin with a street school in your area – all the street children would get to learn something, if not everything. And even if you’re able to teach them something, it would make a massive difference to the whole society.

Access to free medicines and HealthCare

Philanthropists are working for human well-being. Health facilities are in dreadful conditions in many countries. If you turn up to a news channel, you’ll see approximately 5 million people die every year due to lack of medical facilities.

Bill Gates is one of the most generous philanthropists has promoted the concept of free medicines, through ‘The Gates Foundation,’ it has saved approximately 50 million lives. These people are enough to set examples for youth.

If you’re not a doctor yourself, then talk to friends who are doctors. Think about opening a healthcare campaign for just a single day every month. You along with your friends would get done some basic medical tests for all the people, that are free of cost. This won’t cost an arm, all you need is some equipment and a place for the campaign.

Spreading awareness

Standing against the cruel and wrong is a call for justice. As a philanthropist, you can raise your voice against oppression, violence, or child labor. For child labor, you can create awareness about how children need to be in schools rather than working on streets and support. You can upgrade your abilities as a social worker through an online MSW degree, which introduces you to macro and micro aspects of social work practices.

You can promote ideas to reduce child labor, following how Japan started paying children pocket money for going to school. Yes, instead of charging them, you give it to them, so they’re able to support their families without the need to work. Similarly, you can spread awareness against domestic violence and other social issues.

Support and Develop Orphanages

It’s nothing less than trauma to grow up without parents. All the children at orphanages need constant support because they have been deprived of love. So why not visit an orphanage on your days off. This small gesture of kindness from your side can light up their whole day.

Or if you plan on doing something big, then you can follow the footsteps of J.K Rowling’s Lumos. He has developed an organization that helps all the children in orphanage worldwide. By help, we refer to, fulfilling their needs and want to provide them with better living standards.

Support Unpopular opinions

Usually, you come across some insanely accurate stuff, but not everyone knows that. Being a philanthropist, you can make a difference by supporting what needs attention. For instance – Aaron Diamond Foundation spent millions creating awareness about HIV aids while helping people suffering from it.

Similarly, many women were unaware of breast cancer, due to which philanthropist stood up for awareness programs. These topics had a social stigma attached due to which they never received enough attention. If you want to support unpopular opinions in today’s world, spread awareness about menstruation hygiene, mental health, child abuse. All this can definitely make a difference to society.

Conclusion 

Being a philanthropist, you are not answerable to anyone. You work for human welfare and do what’s best for them. Often times, some issues don’t receive enough attention. Being a philanthropist, it’s your duty to voice them out. In small or big, there are many ways you can make a difference in society as a philanthropist.

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Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Kickin’ It with Kiz: Why trading for quarterback Aaron Rodgers in 2022 makes no sense for Broncos

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Kickin’ It with Kiz: Why trading for quarterback Aaron Rodgers in 2022 makes no sense for Broncos

Anyone, and I mean anyone, who favors selling the future of the Broncos down the river to get quarterback Aaron Rogers is an idiot that has no clue whatsoever. None.

Gurney, Boulder

Kiz: The staff here at Kickin’ It Headquarters was willing to pick up Rodgers at Denver International Airport if Broncos general manager George Paton found a way to pry him from Green Bay prior to this season. But we’ve moved on. The Packers have made the mistake of trying to milk one more season out of Rodgers. That’s their problem. Rodgers celebrates his 38th birthday in December. John Elway retired at age 38. Peyton Manning was done before his 40th birthday. Yes, Tom Brady might play until he’s 50, but Rodgers isn’t Brady. If the Packers are looking for first-round draft picks in return for Rodgers in 2022, it would be wise for Paton to tell Green Bay to look elsewhere for a trade partner.

Seriously? You are taking Rodgers if offered, right? Please say one amazing week by Teddy Bridgewater doesn’t prove anything. Remember when people wanted to give Trevor Siemian a deal after the Broncos started 4-0 in 2016?

Nick, skeptical by nature

Kiz: I never thought for one second thought Siemian was the long-term answer. All Bridgewater has proven to me is he’s a significantly superior quarterback than Siemian.

You totally questioned the Bridgewater signing and now everybody gets a free seat on the Broncos’ bandwagon, except for you, Kiz! He was totally Teddy Icewater with his performance in the victory against the New York Giants. Given more time to work with his receivers, he’s only going to get better. His defense will become loyalists in the same way they were for Manning and Jake Plummer. I see a team on the verge of something big!

James, rolling with Teddy B

Kiz: Well, I did doubt Bridgewater as a quarterback who can lead the Broncos to Super Bowl contention. (And I still do.) But question his signing? That would be difficult, because Denver traded for Bridgewater. Don’t let facts get in the way of your good rant, though. What I like best about Bridgewater is he’s comfortable enough in his own skin to not be unnerved by the playing QB in the city that Elway built. That makes him much more likely to succeed in Denver than Case Keenum.

Hey, Mark Kiszla, we would love to get 10 minutes of your time to hop on the radio with us here in Jacksonville and discuss Jaguars coach Urban Meyer. Can you lend us 10 minutes of your time?

Ryan, calls himself “Hack”

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Patriots sign QB Brian Hoyer off practice squad to 1-year deal

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Patriots sign QB Brian Hoyer off practice squad to 1-year deal

The Patriots signed quarterback Brian Hoyer off their practice squad to a 1-year deal Saturday, a source told the Herald.

Hoyer was temporarily elevated from the practice squad last weekend before the team’s season opener against Miami. Rookie starter Mac Jones had been the Pats’ only quarterback on the active roster. Since re-signing in May, Hoyer has been viewed as a mentor for Jones. The 35-year-old veteran leaves Garrett Gilbert as the only quarterback on the team’s practice squad.

The Patriots have one open roster spot left, with rookie kicker Quinn Nordin landing on injured reserve. Like Hoyer, the Pats could sign veteran kicker Nick Folk off their practice squad or elevate him again, as they did last weekend.

Sunday’s kickoff against the Jets is set for 1 p.m. from MetLife Stadium.

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Theater review: ‘Animate’ tries to tame existential questions in production that unfolds at Como Zoo

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Theater review: ‘Animate’ tries to tame existential questions in production that unfolds at Como Zoo

Jack Reuler spent nearly a half-century breaking and re-making the mold of theater in the Twin Cities. With “Animate,” the founding artistic director of Mixed Blood Theatre gives his final directorial effort a flair worthy of P.T. Barnum.

Reuler gathered a who’s who of local talent, called in a chit from film star Don Cheadle and somehow managed to borrow a helicopter to tell a Choose Your Own Adventure story that takes place in and around the exhibits of St. Paul’s Como Park Zoo.

Sally Wingert tries to convince city officials to go ahead with the zoo project in “Animate.” (Photo by Rich Ryan)

It’s ground Reuler and Mixed Blood have trod before. In 2017, “Safe at Home” had audiences traipsing through the press boxes and locker rooms of CHS Field. A couple of years later, patrons clambered onto golf carts and rolled through the St. Paul RiverCentre, weaving among classic cars and actors to experience “Autonomy.”

Like those productions, “Animate” blends gimmickry with zeitgeist: The central conflict involves the fictional Jackson Kennicott Zoo, which is on the brink of developing a shiny new rhino exhibit, funded by a $40 million gift by wealthy octogenarian Preston Davis.

On the day of the announcement, an interview surfaces in which Davis describes zoo chief Keisha Hardeman (the unflappable Regina Marie Williams, leading a tireless company of actors and audience-schleppers) as “street smart” and “highly articulate.”

Hardeman is an African American female, so the billionaire’s comments are broadly construed as racist. Protests ensue, as does a demand that the zoo return the donation, undoing a decade’s worth of deal-making efforts and robbing the city of a potentially valuable amenity and Hardeman of her legacy.

But smaller moral dilemmas dot “Animate” as well. The zoo must decide the fate of a giraffe deemed a “surplus animal” scheduled to be euthanized. And what of a pair of gorillas who, to human eyes, are a committed couple? Should they be kept together or separated to facilitate reproduction and the survival of the species?

“Animate” tees up the existential question of whether the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. As Hardeman, the zoo director, mulls, it’s not a choice between right and wrong; it’s a call between right and right.

In its best moments, “Animate” makes these tensions feel immediate: It’s one thing to debate the life of giraffe in the abstract. It’s another thing altogether to do so when that giraffe is blithely munching leaves 10 feet away from you.

In its lesser moments, the show can feel preachy and pedantic. Scenes are chopped up into strict eight-minute segments which audiences experience in small groups and in no particular order, so some vignettes feel rushed and others padded. The final scene — in which audiences reconvene at Como Harbor (home of the beloved Sparky the Sea Lion Show) labors to gather the various strands of the show and tie them up into a tidy bow.

For all its spectacle, “Animate” ultimately offers a quieter, more urgent lesson: We live in complex times, with competing needs and an imperative to reconcile intractable problems. Doing so requires nuance, a trait anathema to many characters in the play, and — sadly — a proxy for the binary, no-quarter-given political debate currently poisoning our country.

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Suspect arrested for allegedly stabbing two people in Pittsfield

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Suspect arrested for allegedly stabbing two people in Pittsfield

PITTSFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) — A man was arrested for allegedly stabbing two people on Tyler Street in Pittsfield Thursday night.

According to Pittsfield Police Lieutenant Gary Traversa at around 10:30 p.m. Thursday, officers were called to a reported disturbance involving a motor vehicle crash and multiple stabbing victims in the area of the 700 block of Tyler Street. Two stabbing victims were located and medically assisted by Pittsfield Fire, County Ambulance, and bystanders. The victims were taken to Berkshire Medical Center with serious injuries.

Police arrested 36-year-old Joshua Lofink of Pittsfield Friday just after noon by a member of the Patrol Division, Anti-Crime Unit, and Detective Bureau. Lofink is charged with two counts of assault and battery with a dangerous weapon, and two counts of vandalizing property, the vehicle tires.

Lofink is expected to be arraigned in Central Berkshire District Court Friday afternoon.

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  • 9/18/2021: One last cloudy, humid day
  • Brian Laundrie missing as search for his fiancé Gabby Petito continues
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Heavy police presence as protesters trickle in for DC rally

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Heavy police presence as protesters trickle in for DC rally

By COLLEEN LONG, MICHAEL BALSAMO and ASHRAF KHALIL

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fence around the Capitol is back up. The District of Columbia’s police department is at the ready. The U.S. Capitol Police have requested assistance from nearby law enforcement agencies including the National Guard.

The Capitol Police have taken no chances for Saturday’s rally at the Capitol in support of rioters imprisoned after the violent Jan. 6 insurrection. They’re working to avoid a repeat of the pre-inauguration attack.

An hour before the event was to begin, as music started blaring from the speakers, the few demonstrators in place were vastly outnumbered by the media and a heavy police presence.

A permit for the protest allows 700 people, but police were concerned about violent protesters and counterprotesters. Police were also preparing for the possibility that some demonstrators may arrive with weapons, though backpacks were allowed into the area and there were no checkpoints.

Police warned demonstrators ahead of time no weapons were allowed, and they were not to swim in the reflecting pools.

On Saturday morning, police were already working to separate the handful of Trump supporters and counterprotesters who had arrived hours before the rally was supposed to kick off. Law enforcement officers geared up at a staging area as large dump trucks and cement barricades lined the streets around the Capitol, outside of the fenced area.

Persistent attempts to rewrite the narrative of the violence and panic of Jan. 6, and the increasing volatility behind the lie that the 2020 election was stolen, have made it impossible to predict what may happen this weekend. After all, law enforcement was only expecting a free speech protest the day Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in an effort to disrupt the certification of Joe Biden’s victory.

Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger said at a news conference Friday it was difficult to say whether threats of violence at the event were credible, but “chatter” online and elsewhere has been similar to intelligence that was missed in January.

The rally, organized by former Trump campaign staffer Matt Braynard, is aimed at supporting people who were detained after the Jan. 6 insurrection — about 63 people held behind bars out of the more than 600 charged in the deadly riot. It’s just the latest attempt to downplay and deny the January violence.

Intelligence collected before the rally has suggested that extremist groups such as the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers will turn up. But some prominent members of the groups have sworn they aren’t going and have told others not to attend. Far-right online chatter has been generally tame, and Republican lawmakers are downplaying the event.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin approved a request for about 100 members of the D.C. National Guard to be stationed at a city armory near the Capitol, to be called if needed as backup. They’ll be without firearms, but will be equipped with batons and protective vests for self-defense.

Congress is out of session and no lawmakers were expected to be in the building Saturday. Biden was in Delaware for the weekend.

Many commenters on online platforms like Telegram that are popular with the far right disavowed the rally, saying they believed law enforcement was promoting the event to entrap Trump supporters. Some urged their followers not to attend an event they said was secretly organized by the FBI.

At the same time, however, some commenters continued to promote rallies planned in cities and state capitals across the country.

Meanwhile, Donald Trump is still using his platform as the most popular leader in the GOP to express sympathy for those who were arrested and continue spreading election misinformation, ratcheting up his attacks as the week wore on.

The Associated Press reviewed hundreds of court and jail records for the Capitol riot defendants to uncover how many were being detained and found roughly 63 held in federal custody awaiting trial or sentencing hearings. Federal officials are still looking for other suspects who could also wind up behind bars.

At least 30 are jailed in Washington. The rest are locked up in facilities across the country. They have said they are being treated unfairly, and one defendant said he was beaten.

Federal authorities have identified several of those detained as extremist group leaders, members or associates, including nine defendants linked to the Proud Boys and three connected to the antigovernment Oath Keepers. Dozens are charged with conspiring to mount coordinated attacks on the Capitol to block Congress from certifying the 2020 Electoral College vote, among the most serious of the charges.

Some jailed defendants are charged with assaulting police officers, others with making violent threats. A few were freed after their arrests but subsequently detained again, accused of violating release conditions.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has set standards for judges to apply in deciding whether to jail a Capitol riot defendant. A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled in March that rioters accused of assaulting officers, breaking through windows, doors and barricades, or playing leadership roles in the attack were in “a different category of dangerousness” than those who merely cheered on the violence or entered the building after it was breached.

But it’s unclear how the cases for the majority of those charged will end. On Friday, a California woman who joined the mob avoided a prison term when a federal judge sentenced her to probation, an outcome fitting an early pattern in the Jan. 6 riot prosecutions.

___

Associated Press writers Michael Kunzelman, Mary Clare Jalonick, Jacques Billeaud, David Klepper, Lisa Mascaro, Jake Bleiberg, Amanda Seitz, Nathan Ellgren and Robert Burns contributed to this report.

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Will the Patriots-Jets rivalry get a needed reboot soon?

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Will the Patriots-Jets rivalry get a needed reboot soon?

The last time the Jets beat the Patriots in regulation, Ke$ha topped the charts.

President Obama was midway through his first term. The Social Network rolled in theaters. And former Jets linebacker Bart Scott famously celebrated the win, a 28-21 divisional-round playoff stunner in Jan. 2011, by giving ESPN a soundbite that lives loudly to this day.

“Can’t wait!” he shouted.

Well since then, the Jets have done a lot of waiting, and even more losing, topping the Patriots just twice in 20 ensuing meetings. Heading into Sunday’s showdown at MetLife Stadium, a suddenly critical game for the 0-1 Pats, this rivalry needs a clear and obvious reboot.

The head coaches fueled the Pats-Jets rivalry as it was once known.

Bill Parcells sparked the feud by switching sides in 1997. Bill Belichick flipped back in 2000. Then Eric Mangini was lured south in 2006. Lastly, Rex Ryan burst through the door in 2009, bombast and all, refusing to kiss rings, pulling off upsets and putting his foot in his mouth.

But eventually, Ryan’s act wore out. His failures ushered in a more mild-mannered era of losing led by Todd Bowles and Adam Gase. Belichick bulldozed them both. Gase’s floundering steered the Jets back to a fiery defensive coach in Robert Saleh, their new headman.

This week, Belichick said he knows Saleh “a little bit.” Saleh said it would be an honor to share the same field with Belichick, hardly the type of venom their teams used to trade publicly; let alone what Belichick said about leaving the Jets last November: “Not only one of the most defining, but one of the great moments of my career,” he told WEEI.

So if not the coaches, maybe the rookie quarterbacks can jumpstart the rivalry’s next evolution. The Patriots’ hopes rest with Mac Jones, and the Jets’ with Zach Wilson. Jones and Wilson are diametrically opposed passers bound only by draft class and right-handedness.

In the pocket, Wilson is daring, part magician and backyard baller who embodies the league’s newfound fascination with off-platform throws and playing outside of structure. Meanwhile, Jones is a technician, ruthlessly dissecting and dicing defenses in the same way the game’s greats have for decades. Like their head coaches, Wilson and Jones are unfamiliar to one another, but friendly.

“Mac’s a cool dude. We ran into each other at the combine stuff and the draft night,” Wilson said Thursday. “I was excited for him and his opportunity. Super cool.”

“We talked for a little bit, and he’s a great player,” Jones said of Wilson. “Makes a lot of really cool and different plays. He’s a really good quarterback.”

For now, both sound too cool for conflict. And barring a brawl on Sunday, there’s little hope for bad blood further down the Pats roster.

Former Jets defensive lineman Henry Anderson, now in New England, bears no ill will toward his old team.

“That’s just part of the business. It happens all the time,” Anderson said of being released last offseason. “I still keep in touch with those guys. A couple of them live down in Atlanta, and we see each other in the offseason and stuff like that, so still, even though we’re on different sides of the ball, you still have relationships with dudes around the league.”

Pats wide receiver Kendrick Bourne should have garnered interest from New York in free agency. The Jets needed wideouts, and Bourne knew their coaching staff well, having played for Saleh and Co. over four years in San Francisco. In fact, Bourne credits new Jets offensive coordinator Mike LaFluer for molding him into the player he is today.

But the phone never rang in March, with New York instead opting for former Titans receiver Corey Davis. And somehow, at least publicly, that’s OK by Bourne.

“Nah, not a bummer for me,” he said Friday. “I had to go to the best opportunity, so it was really about what was best for me and my future, and here was just the best opportunity for me to grow and expand my career. That was just how it worked out.”

Like any rivalry, restoking the fires of Pats-Jets must happen organically. New York will need to win more consistently. And healthy hate has to flow sometime.

But if not Sunday, or Oct. 24 when the Patriots will host the Jets, when? On Friday, Belichick, who famously hates the franchise and left it at the altar when he resigned as the “HC of the NYJ,” likened the Pats-Jets rivalry to any other divisional series in football.

“You prod and poke and look for areas to attack and exploit based on almost an intimate knowledge of your opponent,” he said. “And they do the same.”

At this rate, Pats-Jets may not feel like Pats-Jets for another 10 years. And in the words of Bart Scott, the rest of the NFL “can’t wait.”

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

Peter Rabbit, a missing puppy named Spot and a cookie-loving mouse are among the stories in a new exhibit opening Sept. 25 at Minnesota Children’s Museum.

“Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites” is described as an immersive exhibit for children 8 and younger. It was originally created by MCM.

“Storyland” features seven beloved and award-winning picture books: “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” by Beatrix Potter, “The Snowy Day” by Ezra Jack Keats, “Where’s Spot?” by Eric Hill, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” by Laura Numeroff, “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, “Abuela” by Arthur Dorros and “Tuesday” by David Wiesner.

According to MCM, each story is transformed into a three-dimensional play space where children walk into and interact with the story and its characters. Here are some highlights:

Seven favorite children’s books are featured in “Storyland.” (MCM/Bruce Silcox)

Children explore Peter Rabbit‘s world while searching for the rabbit’s lost belongings, harvesting vegetables and playing in Peter’s burrow.

“The Snowy Day” is a wintry world after a fresh snowfall.

“Where’s Spot?” is a board book about the search for Spot the dog. This exhibit features sounds and images through busy wall interactives.

In “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom,” children sort and match letters and send them up the coconut tree, dip a paintbrush into a water-filled well to write letters and beat out rhythms with steel drums while singing along with the story.

The exhibit will run through Jan. 2. Tickets are $14.95, available at mcm.org/tickets. Masks are required for all visitors 5 and older. Check the website for more COVID-19 restrictions.

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Albany Police Department reports arresting Corey Foster, 29, of Albany on Thursday. They say he was carrying cocaine and a loaded handgun on Sherman Street.

At about 10:45 a.m., detectives stopped Foster on Sherman Street between Robin Street and North Lake Avenue. They say it was part of an ongoing investigation.

Police say Foster was holding cocaine in both hands. They also say that he was carrying a bag with a 9mm handgun. He’s charged with:

  • Second- and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon
  • Seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance

Police say they also arrested Foster on the strength of an April bench warrant issued from Albany City Criminal Court for failure to appear on previous arrests.

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  • Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul drone strike an error
  • Albany County coronavirus update, September 18
  • 9/18/2021: One last cloudy, humid day
  • Brian Laundrie missing as search for his fiancé Gabby Petito continues
  • Shenendehowa defense brings the juice in revenge win over Guilderland

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

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NORTH PORT, Fla. (AP) — Police in Florida on Saturday searched a vast wildlife reserve near the Gulf Coast for 23-year-old Brian Laundrie, a person of interest in the disappearance of his girlfriend, Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.

Dozens of North Port police officers, FBI agents and members of other law enforcement agencies searched the 24,000-acre (9,712-hectare) Carlton Reserve in the Sarasota, Florida area.

“His family says they believe he entered the area earlier this week,” North Port Police tweeted Saturday.

Laundrie’s family earlier told officers that they haven’t seen him since Tuesday. Police said the conversation Friday evening was the first time they’d spoken with the Laundries in detail about the case, and that the meeting came at the family’s request. An attorney for the family called FBI investigators and said they wanted to talk about Laundrie’s disappearance, police said.

Laundrie and Petito, 22, left in July on a cross-country trek in a converted van to visit national parks in the U.S. West. Police said Laundrie was alone when he drove the van back to his parents’ home in North Port, Florida, on Sept. 1. Petito’s family filed a missing persons report Sept. 11 with police in Suffolk County, New York.

Laundrie has been identified as a person of interest in the case.

“It is important to note that while Brian is a person of interest in Gabby’s disappearance, he is not wanted for a crime,” North Port police said in Friday’s statement. It added that the investigation is now a “multiple missing person” case.

An attorney for Brian Laundrie, Steven Bertolino, did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press on Friday night.

Attorneys for the Petito family released a statement saying that Laundrie was not “missing.”

“All of Gabby’s family want the world to know that Brian is not missing, he is hiding. Gabby is missing,” the statement from the law office of Richard B. Stafford said.

Earlier in the week, Petito’s family pleaded for the Laundrie family to tell them where their son last saw her. Petito and Laundrie were childhood sweethearts who met while growing up on Long Island, New York. His parents later moved to North Port, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Sarasota.

Police video released by the Moab Police Department in Utah showed that an officer pulled the van over on Aug. 12 after it was seen speeding and hitting a curb near the entrance to Arches National Park. The body cam video showed an emotional Petito, who sat inside a police cruiser while officers also questioned Laundrie.

Laundrie says on the video the couple got into a minor scuffle that began when he climbed into the van with dirty feet, and said he didn’t want to pursue a domestic violence charge against Petito, who officers decided was the aggressor.

Ultimately Moab police decided not file any charges and instead separated the couple for the night, with Laundrie checking into a motel and Petito remaining with the converted sleeper van.

The official conversation with the family Friday came shortly after the North Port Chief Todd Garrison had publicly vented frustration over Brian Laundrie’s lack of help on Wednesday, pleading for Laundrie’s lawyer to arrange a conversation. “Two people left on a trip and one person returned!” an earlier tweet by the police chief had said.

Their trek in the Fort Transit van began in July from Long Island. They intended to reach Oregon by Halloween according to their social media accounts, but Petito vanished after her last known contact with family in late August from Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, authorities said.

In other developments, a sheriff in Utah said Friday that detectives have determined there is no connection between Petito’s disappearance on the trip and a still-unsolved slaying of two women who were fatally shot at a campsite near Moab, Utah. The bodies of the two women, Kylen Schulte, 24, and Crystal Turner, 38, were found six days after the traffic stop involving Laundrie and Petito.

Utah’s Grand County Sheriff Steven White said without elaboration in a news release the two cases were unrelated.

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

While Mac Jones looked good in his debut, 16 points isn’t going to cut it.

In the big picture, Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels can only take a conservative game plan so far, especially in a passing league.

At some point, he really has to loosen the reins on Jones and open up the playbook. Sunday against the Jets figures to be the day for that with Jones dueling fellow 2021 first-round pick Zach Wilson.

The Jets’ soft secondary sets up as an ideal opponent should McDaniels decide to get a little more creative with his play-calling.

Though Jones only scored one touchdown, he still impressed with his ability to handle a variety of blitzes, along with his accuracy, decision-making and toughness in the wake of getting popped while delivering passes.

He went 29 for 39 for 281 yards and a touchdown with no interceptions in the Miami loss.

Still, there’s progress to be made.

“I think we’re moving in the right direction,” Jones said Wednesday. “We just got to focus on what we need to get better at. That’s kind of, for me, just fundamentally, what can I do each day extra, or whatever, just to improve so that when I get to the game, we play fast, and we play better than we did last week.”

Here’s how Jones can earn his first win against the Jets:

1. Exploit corners

Unlike Miami the week before, the Jets don’t boast a couple of Pro Bowl corners out on the boundary.

Brandin Echols and Bryce Hall aren’t exactly household names. Echols is a rookie out of Kentucky, and Hall is a second-year player. During Week 1, Sam Darnold burned them for two touchdowns, including a 57-yard-bomb to Robby Anderson.

While Jones put the ball up 39 times last week, many were check-downs. He should be able to air it out a little more, and test the Jets’ young cornerbacks.

With the Jets employing a Cover-3 zone defense, Jones might also be able to utilize his tight ends more on seam routes, or with deeper routes. Whatever the case, the makeup of the Jets defense allows for Jones to take more chances, especially targeting the corners.

Said McDaniels: “There’s certain things he could do and there’s certain things that he’s not ready to do and hopefully we make the right choices each week based on what the opponent does, how they play and what we need to be able to do at the line of scrimmage as well.”

2. Convert in the red zone

Jones had no problem sustaining drives, converting 11 of 16 third-down chances against the Dolphins, which sported the NFL’s best third-down defense last year.

He authored three drives of 14 plays or more. The issue was converting those red-zone possessions into touchdowns, as the Patriots were just 1-for-4 in the money area.

Part of that was due to untimely penalties, fumbles, and poor execution.

Field goals are no longer going to cut it against most opponents. The Patriots can’t think the Jets will be the exception. Field goals will allow them to hang around in the game. Touchdowns should bury them early.

“It’s something we’ve been working at, and something we’ll continue to work at,” said wide receivers coach Troy Brown, asked this week about the red-zone woes. “We have to get better at that part of the game. We’ve all gotta fix things that we didn’t do great in the game and obviously, continue to get better.

“I think it’s just an issue across the entire unit,” he went on. “It’s just about scoring points, and putting points on the board. And, obviously, when you’re in the red area, you’d prefer to have touchdowns and not field goals. We’re 1-for-4. It’s below our expectations.”

3. Eliminate turnovers

The Patriots fumbled too many times, and had too many costly penalties during the loss to the Dolphins last week. So it behooves them to clean it up against the Jets, particularly on offense.

Rhamondre Stevenson and Damien Harris fumbled. Left tackle Isaiah Wynn was called for an offensive holding penalty with the Pats facing a 2nd-and-10 from the Miami 14. That triggered settling for a field goal during that red-zone try. Shaq Mason’s illegal blindside block in the third quarter negated a 17-yard completion to Kendrick Bourne.

“One thing we used to take pride in was not giving the game away. And we gave the game away. We took away our chance to win the game, and we can’t do that,” said running backs coach Ivan Fears. “There’s no way you feel good about that. We gotta play again. That’s the only good thing we got going here, we get to play again, and again and again, and hopefully we get to put this one behind us with some doggone solid play and dependable play.”

Running back James White said, with the Patriots putting the ball on the ground four times, with two charged fumbles, teams will be looking to further test them by punching the ball out. He’s right.

That’s why the team spent considerable time with the backs, receivers and tight ends on ball security in preparation of the Jets.

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