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‘ American people should make this decision ‘ Tulsi Gabbard Slams Pelosi Over Judgment

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' American people should make this decision ' Tulsi Gabbard Slams Pelosi Over Judgment

Democratic Rep. Tulsi Gabbard slammed the decision of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to launch an impeachment investigation of the President Trump, claiming that “most of the individuals reading this transcript will not find this highly convincing cause to throw out a President who won elections in 2016.”

WATCH: “I believe that when you leave the bubble here in the city of Washington and you get to the place where most individuals live — look, I am not a lawyer, but I believe most individuals reading this transcript will not find that highly convincing cause to throw out a chairman who won the 2016 election,” said Gabbard during an appearance on Hill. TV.

“I believe instead that what most individuals are going to see is, hey, this is another move by Democrats to get rid of Donald Trump, to further deepen the hyper-partisan divisions we have here.” “Look, Donald Trump is corrupt. He is not capable of serving our nation as president. He’s unqualified as commander in chief to serve our nation, “she continued. “I’m running to defeat the president. Daily Wire reports: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced late Tuesday that her Democratic Caucus was moving on with an impeachment investigation after reporting that Trump urged Zelensky to explore former Vice President J. I believe it is so crucial that the United States can move forward, bridge this gap, that this is the American people who make this decision. The reports were not then verified, but the White House announced it would release a transcript of the exchange between the two rulers the next day.

While many of her Democratic peers quickly endorsed Pelosi’s judgment, Gabbard spoke in particular against it. The Hawaiian congresswoman argued that the prosecution is “extremely divisive” at a moment when the U.S. is already very politically divided.

After Trump’s discussion with the Ukrainian president had circulated in the White House, Gabbard criticized Trump’s exchange for being unsurprisingly corrupt but maintained that it should be removed from office via the ballot box rather than by Congress.

“He uses his position for his own political advantage— I believe that’s very evident. It’s not surprising, too. I mean, this is what Donald Trump did throughout his moment here in the White House[ and] in his relations with other nations in our national politics. This is another instance of his bribery again, and how he is truly self-serving, “Gabbard said. “We need a president who will first and foremost put the interests of the Americans, put the interest of our country first, and Donald Trump is not that guy,” she continued. “The American people realize what’s going on, they are watching what’s taking place. “I believe it is essential for them to decide again who should be our next Chairman, to understand how autonomous this Chairman serves us and why it is essential that we, the Democrats, the Republicans and the Independents, come together to defeat him.”

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Pressure is on in CU president search as school and student leaders seek diversity, funding

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Pressure is on in CU president search as school and student leaders seek diversity, funding

Colorado parents and students who are questioning the value of higher education present the ultimate challenge in the University of Colorado System’s search for a new president.

Dispelling those doubts will be a critical part of the president’s job, along with fundraising, protecting students and faculty through the pandemic, and enabling improvements including diversification at each of CU’s four campuses, interim President Todd Saliman said in a Denver Post interview.

Democracy depends on solid higher education, Saliman said.

“Not only is a four-year degree critical to getting a job that will provide you with a livelihood for the rest of your life, but people who have four-year degrees live longer. They generally live healthier and happier lives. And they’re more engaged on a civic level,” Saliman said. “Higher education is key for people’s economic health and also for the health of our society.”

He voiced the priorities as CU’s politically divided regents embark on a presidential search that will be carried out by professional recruiters and must take into account multiple demands from student groups, outside advocates, staff and faculty.

Public funding for CU and Colorado’s other public universities lags behind what is provided in most other states – taxpayers cover less than 5% of CU’s budget — making fundraising crucial to be able to compete with schools elsewhere. And the tenure of previous president Mark Kennedy, a former congressman from North Dakota, ignited controversy due to his conservative positions on social issues. He resigned under pressure in June after faculty members censured him for “failure to lead” on matters of diversity, equity and inclusion.

Campus groups are campaigning for greater diversity at the Boulder, Denver, Aurora and Colorado Springs campuses, urging better recruitment of administrators, staffers, professors and students of color – and a reckoning for past failures to ensure a welcoming environment for everybody.

During the regents’ latest Sept. 10 meeting, Diversify CU Now advocate Devon Reynolds, a 29-year-old doctoral student in environmental sciences, told the board that everyone — “especially those who are white” — needs to think about what antiracism means.

“Have you reckoned with what white antiracism means in this presidential search? This hire could be transformative for this institution,” Reynolds said. “Or it could leave things as they’ve been.”

Regents must make sure underrepresented groups “are overrepresented” in the search process and in hiring decisions, she said.

Regents chairman Jack Kroll told Reynolds that the regents “look forward to continuing this conversation” and said “we must do our best to reach as wide and diverse an audience as possible.” The regents have voted to increase the role of students and staff in the selection process by adding two seats on the now 18-member search team.

Intercampus student forum president Chris Hilton, an undergraduate at CU-Denver, said student voices must be heard, adding that when he participated in the last presidential search that led to Kennedy, students “were not actually heard.”

Hilton told the regents “our student population is a lot more concerned now about the diversity issue” and “that is something we want to have focused on.”

CU campus administrators in 2021 classified about two-thirds of students as white, 12.6% Hispanic/Latino, 9% Asian American, 6.5% international, 2.6% Black/African American and 1.4% American Indian.

No timetable’s been set for completing the search, and CU regents have said they’ll take as long as necessary. They’re currently reviewing bids by recruiting firms to conduct the search.

Regent Sue Sharkey, a Republican, said the most important trait of the next president will be “being able to work with all of our stakeholders”: faculty, staff, students, donors, state lawmakers.

“And parents are stakeholders as well,” Sharkey said.

“The next president must be able to pull all these different groups together and listen to them,” she said, and also “know how to bring in the people who know what you don’t know.”

The president oversees a four-campus system with a budget over $5 billion, not individual campuses, Saliman emphasized, so it falls to chancellors to run the individual campuses — from hiring staff and faculty to making sure students graduate on time.

“The president must know what the job is, and what it is not,” Saliman said.

Funding, including private support, remains a priority, as does the diversification of the students, staff and faculty.

“These are complicated times. The next president needs to have the skills to be able to balance all the priorities and know it is not a matter of prioritizing one over the other,” Saliman said. “This is about how you advance multiple priorities at the same time.”

Most urgently, he said, the new president must ensure pandemic safety to protect faculty and students, “navigating our desire to have as much of a normal experience as possible.”

Students have returned to the campuses this fall despite COVID-19 surges, wearing masks in buildings and in some cases outside. CU vaccination rates at all campuses are higher than 90%, leaders reported.

CU presidents are handsomely paid, on par with corporate chief executives, at about $850,000.

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Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine works in kids ages 5 to 11

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Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine works in kids ages 5 to 11

By LAURAN NEERGAARD

Pfizer said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine works for children ages 5 to 11 and that it will seek U.S. authorization for this age group soon — a key step toward beginning vaccinations for youngsters.

The vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech already is available for anyone 12 and older. But with kids now back in school and the extra-contagious delta variant causing a huge jump in pediatric infections, many parents are anxiously awaiting vaccinations for their younger children.

For elementary school-aged kids, Pfizer tested a much lower dose — a third of the amount that’s in each shot given now. Yet after their second dose, children ages 5 to 11 developed coronavirus-fighting antibody levels just as strong as teenagers and young adults, Dr. Bill Gruber, a Pfizer senior vice president, told The Associated Press.

The kid dosage also proved safe, with similar or fewer temporary side effects — such as sore arms, fever or achiness — that teens experience, he said.

“I think we really hit the sweet spot,” said Gruber, who’s also a pediatrician.

Gruber said the companies aim to apply to the Food and Drug Administration by the end of the month for emergency use in this age group, followed shortly afterward with applications to European and British regulators.

Earlier this month, FDA chief Dr. Peter Marks told the AP that once Pfizer turns over its study results, his agency would evaluate the data “hopefully in a matter of weeks” to decide if the shots are safe and effective enough for younger kids.

Many Western countries so far have vaccinated no younger than age 12, awaiting evidence of what’s the right dose and that it works safely in smaller tots. But Cuba last week began immunizing children as young as 2 with its homegrown vaccines and Chinese regulators have cleared two of its brands down to age 3.

While kids are at lower risk of severe illness or death than older people, more than 5 million children in the U.S. have tested positive for COVID-19 since the pandemic began and at least 460 have died, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Cases in children have risen dramatically as the delta variant swept through the country.

“I feel a great sense of urgency” in making the vaccine available to children under 12, Gruber said. “There’s pent-up demand for parents to be able to have their children returned to a normal life.”

In New Jersey, 10-year-old Maya Huber asked why she couldn’t get vaccinated like her parents and both teen brothers have. Her mother, Dr. Nisha Gandhi, a critical care physician at Englewood Hospital, enrolled Maya in the Pfizer study at Rutgers University. But the family hasn’t eased up on their masking and other virus precautions until they learn if Maya received the real vaccine or a dummy shot.

Once she knows she’s protected, Maya’s first goal: “a huge sleepover with all my friends.”

Maya said it was exciting to be part of the study even though she was “super scared” about getting jabbed. But “after you get it, at least you feel like happy that you did it and relieved that it didn’t hurt,” she told the AP.

Pfizer said it studied the lower dose in 2,268 kindergartners and elementary school-aged kids. The FDA required what is called an immune “bridging” study: evidence that the younger children developed antibody levels already proven to be protective in teens and adults. That’s what Pfizer reported Monday in a press release, not a scientific publication. The study still is ongoing, and there haven’t yet been enough COVID-19 cases to compare rates between the vaccinated and those given a placebo — something that might offer additional evidence.

The study isn’t large enough to detect any extremely rare side effects, such as the heart inflammation that sometimes occurs after the second dose, mostly in young men. The FDA’s Marks said the pediatric studies should be large enough to rule out any higher risk to young children. Pfizer’s Gruber said once the vaccine is authorized for younger children, they’ll be carefully monitored for rare risks just like everyone else.

A second U.S. vaccine maker, Moderna, also is studying its shots in elementary school-aged children. Pfizer and Moderna are studying even younger tots as well, down to 6-month-olds. Results are expected later in the year.

___

AP journalist Emma Tobin contributed to this report.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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Miss Vermont 2021 reflects on 100 years of Miss America

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Miss Vermont 2021 reflects on 100 years of Miss America

Vt. (NEWS10) – For 100 years, Miss America has been crowning the next generation of female leaders. As it enters its next chapter, young women like Miss Vermont 2021 Danielle Morse are changing what it means to be a winner.

“To be able to fall into that category class that’s representing the 100th year of a Miss America, is just amazing and I just don’t think I’ve wrapped my head around it quite yet,” said Morse.

Both a firefighter and a nurse, Morse says she looked up to the Miss America Organization all her life. For her, being Miss Vermont is a dream come true.

Beginning this month, the Miss Vermont Scholarship Organization (MVSO) is inviting young women from across The Green Mountain State to take part in the 100th anniversary year as candidates for their next Miss Vermont Scholarship Competition.

Miss Vermont and Miss Vermont’s Outstanding Teen 2022 will receive scholarship packages, represent the state at the Miss America and Miss America’s Outstanding Teen competitions and spend the year making community appearances throughout Vermont.

To be eligible to compete for the title of Miss Vermont, you must be between the ages of 18 and 26 and:

  • be a US citizen who has resided in Vermont OR
  • be enrolled and attending school in Vermont OR
  • work full-time in Vermont for 6 months prior to the competition. 

Teen candidates must be between the ages of 13 and 18.

“One of the exciting opportunities about signing up to compete in the program is the opportunity to get started right away as a local representative,” said MVSO Executive Director Darcie Fisher.  “Teens and Miss candidates are able to make appearances and wear the sash of the area they are representing in the months leading up to the 2022 competition.”

Miss Vermont 2021 Danielle Morse was Miss Addison County 2021 prior to being named the current Miss Vermont.  “The time I spent as Miss Addison County was very special to me,” said Morse. “I never knew if I would be Miss Vermont, but I knew that I had this platform and opportunity as a local titleholder to make a change. While I may not have needed the sash to do these things, being Miss Addison County encouraged me to go after my dream of being Miss Vermont.”

Vermont will celebrate the crowning of the 77th Miss Vermont next spring.

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Hearing for Reign Restaurant’s nuisance summons heard today

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Hearing for Reign Restaurant’s nuisance summons heard today

Posted: Updated:

ST. LOUIS – St. Louis City served Reign Nightclub and Restaurant two summons, a nuisance and a liquor license summons.

The hearing for that nuisance summons is scheduled for 10 a.m. Monday. The city blames Reign for some of the violence in the area.

If the city prevails, it could permanently close the popular nightlife spot and board up the building for up to a year. Its landlord is also suing to force Reign to leave its premises, alleging it owes more than $150,000 in rent. Reign denies the accusation.

The city’s liquor control commissioner suspended the Washington Avenue nightspot’s liquor license, calling Reign “a serious threat to the health and safety of the public.”

The suspension will last until hearings resume on September 27, at which point it could become permanent.

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Guest commentary: Work on ending gun violence must move forward, even without ATF leader

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Guest commentary: Work on ending gun violence must move forward, even without ATF leader

If momentum means anything, we don’t like what we’re seeing right now in this administration’s response to gun violence. President Biden’s withdrawal of David Chipman as the director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives was a disappointment to us in our work to reduce gun violence. Don’t get us wrong — we are fans of the President’s stated intentions as expressed in his truly forward-thinking candidate’s platform, and we believe those goals and commitments to be sincere. But delay is not our friend.

Although our country will now go without leadership at the ATF, America can still look to the White House for leadership, innovation, and true courage.

President Biden knows the pain of losing a child, just as we do. Our beloved Jessi was slain in the Aurora theater shooting. And just as President Biden addressed his son’s death from cancer by championing the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot, we have worked to spare other families our tremendous pain through action, and believe a similar governmental full-court press, with unrelenting momentum, is needed to stop the escalating toll of lives guns cause.

Over the past nine years, we have learned what’s essential to stop the gun carnage that claims the lives of more than 100 people every day in the United States.

We urge President Biden to consider the following avenues of action:

Create the Office of Gun Violence Prevention to establish a long-term, sustained effort to reduce gun deaths in America by classifying gun violence as a national security crisis and a public health and safety priority, and make a commitment to cut all forms of gun lethality by 50% by 2026, including suicide, homicide, and unintentional shootings.

Create a National Firearm Injury Prevention Bureau. Thanks to the work of the National Transportation Safety Board, transportation-related death rates have plummeted over the years. Experts have successfully implemented the most effective ways for people to survive hurricanes, tornadoes, fires, and even tsunamis. Our country desperately needs to learn how to design buildings, create floor plans, and devise exit strategies so people can escape public shootings like the mass shooting that claimed our Jessi nine years ago.

Find ways to hold accountable gun manufacturers and sellers who sell guns and ammunition without completed background checks, or who use false advertising to sell firearms.

In 2019, we, along with other survivors, experts, researchers, and advocates, met at the GVPedia Conference in Denver to honor the 20th anniversary of the Columbine massacre. We collaborated with the attendees to draft the Denver Accord, an evidence-based guide to stem gun violence. We urge all leaders to read the Denver Accord to learn the most effective policies to reduce gun violence.

These actions alone are not enough to end violence but together they would be a good immediate deposit like the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot that will enable our country to address the numerous aspects of gun violence including domestic violence, stolen firearms, and suicide.

The pandemic has brought with it a suffocating blanket of fear — a fear that people, misguided by firearm lobby slogans, respond to by purchasing firearms. The increased number of firearms in our homes and communities is reflected in the staggering 32% increase in firearm-related deaths in Colorado between Jan. 1 and September 15, 2021, compared to the same periods in 2019 and 2018, according to the Gun Violence Archive. CBS News reported that 2021 will likely record the highest number of gun violence in 20 years nationwide.

President Biden and political leaders wherever you serve, let us not be victims of our times but, instead, visionaries of a safer, more peaceful future. A future where all violence is rare because our great nation has applied our considerable abilities, listened to our survivors, used the best research, and worked together, with shared humanity and compassion, to stem the gun bloodshed that has stained our nation.

Sandy and Lonnie Phillips are the founders of Survivors Empowered, which assists gun violence survivors and seeks to give them a voice. Their daughter, Jessica Ghawi, was murdered in the 2012 Aurora theater shooting.  

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Patriots coach Bill Belichick applauds Mac Jones and his ‘competitive spirit’ as a blocker

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Patriots coach Bill Belichick applauds Mac Jones and his ‘competitive spirit’ as a blocker

Patriots head coach Bill Belichick doesn’t sound too upset with Mac Jones for getting his uniform dirty during Sunday’s 25-6 win over the Jets.

During his weekly appearance on WEEI’s “The Greg Hill Show” on Monday, Belichick was asked if he was in the camp who enjoyed seeing his rookie quarterback throw his body around, or if he frowned at seeing Jones put himself in harm’s way.

The question was in reference to Jones third quarter exploits, first charging down the field to help push the pile to get Damien Harris in the end zone on the back’s 26-yard third-quarter touchdown run, then later helping spring Kendrick Bourne with his block on an end-around.

How does a quarterback balance protecting himself, with also trying to help out the team, Belichick was ultimately asked?

“Football is a game of decision making. We have a lot of competitive players, and they’re all trying to do things to help the team win. So, they just have to make good decisions on those situations,” said Belichick. “But, being out front of a reverse, that’s kind of part of the play.

“I don’t know how much help Damien needed on the run, but Mac’s a competitive guy, and you love to see his competitive spirit come out.”

Belichick pointed out that Jets rookie quarterback Zach Wilson also showed that competitiveness going after Patriots safety Devin McCourty following an interception.

“So, those are guys that like to play football,” said Belichick. “As long as a play’s going on, it seems like they’re a part of it. So it’s probably a good thing.”

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Minnesota Vikings seek $1.4 million from Fargo company

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Minnesota Vikings seek $1.4 million from Fargo company

FARGO — The Minnesota Vikings have won a $1.4 million judgment against a Fargo-based company, stemming from a claim made by the NFL team that the company stopped making payments on the rental of a suite at U.S. Bank Stadium.

According to North Dakota court documents, the Vikings are seeking payment of $1,435,857.62 from Stadium Entertainment Partners LLC.

The North Dakota Secretary of State’s Office says Stadium Entertainment Partners is a limited liability corporation incorporated in 2014 and dissolved in 2020. Its address is listed as 1201 Page Drive, Suite 100 in Fargo.

A source with knowledge of the situation who declined to be named said Stadium Entertainment Partners was a group of businesses that formed an LLC to lease a U.S. Bank Stadium suite. After doing so, the group learned it didn’t have access to the suite for certain events so it looked to negotiate a new agreement with the Vikings, who refused.

An article in the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal from February 2020 said Stadium Entertainment Partners agreed in August 2016 to lease a suite at U.S. Bank Stadium from the 2016-17 football season through the 2022-23 season, according to records from the case.

The journal reported Stadium Entertainment Partners stopped making payments on its turf suite, which is a suite on the ground floor that has a field-level patio, citing sources who wished to not be named.

The article said the Vikings went to the American Arbitration Association in 2019, which ruled in favor of the team. The AAA is a not-for-profit entity that provides dispute-resolution services to individuals and organizations who wish to resolve conflicts out of court, according to its website.

The Vikings went to Hennepin County District Court in 2020 to effectively force the defendant to pay. The team moved the case to North Dakota courts this year for the same reason.

In September 2019, according to the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, the AAA ruled in the Vikings’ favor for the amounts of:

  • Legal damages: $1.3 million
  • Prejudgement interest: $52,012
  • Attorneys’ fees and costs: $25,061
  • Admin fees and expenses of the arbitration association: $7,700
  • Compensation and expenses of the arbitrators: $4,668

The business journal story says Stadium Entertainment Partners shared the same Fargo mailing address with Orange Property Management, saying that Michael Marcil is listed as the registered agent for both companies. Orange Property manages more than 800 units across North Dakota and Minnesota, according to its website.

When contacted about the judgment, Marcil said he has nothing to do with Stadium Entertainment Partners.

“Orange Property Management LLC. is a tenant in a south Fargo office building along with several other companies who share a same primary street address that have individual business suites. Orange has never had any ownership, affiliation or involvement with Stadium Entertainment Partners LLC whatsoever and is frustrated the company name was inappropriately used by the Vikings in this matter when legal notifications were sent to the Stadium Entertainment Partners LLC registered agent,” Marcil said in an email.

Marcil said he was mistakenly listed as the registered agent for Stadium Partners, without his knowledge, which is why his name is included on court documents.

“I personally have no involvement with this business and have never had any personal ownership in the company,” he said. “But one of the businesses I do have affiliation with did have limited past involvement (indirectly) as a minority investor but has not been involved since 2016.”

Mark Johnson of the Greene Espel Law Firm in Minneapolis, who represents the Vikings, declined comment other than to confirm the team is seeking payment in North Dakota.

Stadium Entertainment Partners’ attorney listed in North Dakota court documents, Beverley Adams of the Fredrikson & Byron law firm in Fargo, said she does not represent the company.

“I am involved in this matter, though, along with a number of other N.D. counsel,” Adams said in an email. “It is a pending legal matter so I am not able to have any conversations relating to the details of my involvement.”

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Pfizer says its COVID vaccine works in children ages 5 to 11

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Pfizer says its COVID vaccine works in children ages 5 to 11

Pfizer said Monday, September 20, that its COVID vaccine works for children ages 5 to 11 and that it will seek U.S. authorization for this age group soon — a key step toward beginning vaccinations for youngsters.

The vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech already is available for anyone 12 and older. But with kids now back in school and the extra-contagious delta variant causing a huge jump in pediatric infections, many parents are anxiously awaiting vaccinations for their younger children.

For elementary school-aged kids, Pfizer tested a much lower dose — a third of the amount that’s in each shot given now. Yet after their second dose, children ages 5 to 11 developed coronavirus-fighting antibody levels just as strong as teenagers and young adults, Dr. Bill Gruber, a Pfizer senior vice president, told The Associated Press.

The kid dosage also proved safe, with similar or fewer temporary side effects — such as sore arms, fever or achiness — that teens experience, he said.

“I think we really hit the sweet spot,” said Gruber, who’s also a pediatrician.

Gruber said the companies aim to apply to the Food and Drug Administration by the end of the month for emergency use in this age group, followed shortly afterward with applications to European and British regulators.

Earlier this month, FDA chief Dr. Peter Marks told the AP that once Pfizer turns over its study results, his agency would evaluate the data “hopefully in a matter of weeks” to decide if the shots are safe and effective enough for younger kids.

Many Western countries so far have vaccinated no younger than age 12, awaiting evidence of what’s the right dose and that it works safely in smaller tots. But Cuba last week began immunizing children as young as 2 with its homegrown vaccines and Chinese regulators have cleared two of its brands down to age 3.

While kids are at lower risk of severe illness or death than older people, more than 5 million children in the U.S. have tested positive for COVID since the pandemic began and at least 460 have died, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Cases in children have risen dramatically as the delta variant swept through the country.

“I feel a great sense of urgency” in making the vaccine available to children under 12, Gruber said. “There’s pent-up demand for parents to be able to have their children returned to a normal life.”

In New Jersey, 10-year-old Maya Huber asked why she couldn’t get vaccinated like her parents and both teen brothers have. Her mother, Dr. Nisha Gandhi, a critical care physician at Englewood Hospital, enrolled Maya in the Pfizer study at Rutgers University. But the family hasn’t eased up on their masking and other virus precautions until they learn if Maya received the real vaccine or a dummy shot.

Once she knows she’s protected, Maya’s first goal: “a huge sleepover with all my friends.”

Maya said it was exciting to be part of the study even though she was “super scared” about getting jabbed. But “after you get it, at least you feel like happy that you did it and relieved that it didn’t hurt,” she told the AP.

Pfizer said it studied the lower dose in 2,268 kindergartners and elementary school-aged kids. The FDA required what is called an immune “bridging” study: evidence that the younger children developed antibody levels already proven to be protective in teens and adults. That’s what Pfizer reported Monday in a press release, not a scientific publication. The study still is ongoing, and there haven’t yet been enough COVID-19 cases to compare rates between the vaccinated and those given a placebo — something that might offer additional evidence.

The study isn’t large enough to detect any extremely rare side effects, such as the heart inflammation that sometimes occurs after the second dose, mostly in young men. The FDA’s Marks said the pediatric studies should be large enough to rule out any higher risk to young children. Pfizer’s Gruber said once the vaccine is authorized for younger children, they’ll be carefully monitored for rare risks just like everyone else.

A second U.S. vaccine maker, Moderna, also is studying its shots in elementary school-aged children. Pfizer and Moderna are studying even younger tots as well, down to 6-month-olds. Results are expected later in the year.

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Photos: Not your normal Emmy ceremony

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Photos: Not your normal Emmy ceremony

OK, it definitely wasn’t the Pandemmys, or the Zoomemmys, or whatever you want to call last year’s virtual Emmy ceremony — with everyone at home, and visitors in hazmat suits showing up to bestow awards

This year was different — defiantly so. People were together, and not even in masks (except during commercial breaks.) There were plenty of hugs and kisses — in fact, quipped presenter Seth Rogen, he had just been sneezed in the face by Paul Bettany. (Guests had to present vaccine proof and negative COVID-19 tests.)

But of course, this wasn’t the PRE-COVID Emmys either. The crowd, in a tent in downtown Los Angeles, was much smaller than in normal years. And many overseas nominees couldn’t come due to travel restrictions — especially the cast and crew of “The Crown,” which accepted its six drama awards from a party in London, as “Schitt’s Creek” had done a year earlier in Canada.

And in a year where so much was different, there were some familiar problems. Awards were concentrated among a few shows. The hashtag #EmmysSoWhite emerged — a record number of nominees of color yielded only two Black winners, RuPaul for “RuPaul’s Drag Race” and Michaela Coel for writing “I May Destroy You.” A slew of Black actors were passed over.

Cedric the Entertainer proved an infectiously joyful and hard-working host, but the comedy bits were spotty at best. It also didn’t help that some overlong speeches dragged down the proceedings, for example from the director of “The Queen’s Gambit,” who was criticized on Twitter for a speech that to some, seemed to feel as long as a chess game.

Still there were feel-good moments: Debbie Allen. Jean Smart! Kate Winslet. Ted Lasso himself — heck, all Ted’s friends, too. And perhaps best of all, the fiercely original Coel, giving a stunning (and concise!) speech about writing.

Some key moments of the evening:

A JEANAISSANCE…

Yes, the expected Jeanaissance happened, with veteran Smart receiving a standing ovation after winning best actress in a comedy — her fourth Emmy in a long career — for playing a Las Vegas stand-up comic in “Hacks.” She immediately paid tearful tribute to her husband, Richard Gilliland, who died in March: “I would not be here without him, and without his … putting his career on the back burner so I could take advantage of all the wonderful opportunities I have had.” It was a theme — personal loss — that was threaded through a number of speeches.

AND THE GREAT KATE

While “Mare of Easttown,” also featuring Smart, lost out to “The Queen’s Gambit” for best limited series, it won three key acting awards, including the Great Kate — Winslet, of course — who captivated audiences with her role as a “a middle-aged, imperfect, flawed mother,” in her words, in which she also nailed a very difficult Philadelphia accent. The show “is this cultural moment, and it brought people together and gave them something to talk about other than a global pandemic,” Winslet noted.

THE LASSO EFFECT

It was unquestionably the feel-good show of the year, and “Ted Lasso” — about the unrelentingly upbeat American coach of a British football team — started winning early, with ebullient stage actress Hannah Waddingham accepting the award for best supporting actress in a comedy, closely followed by Brett Goldstein for supporting actor. Then Jason Sudeikis, the titular coach, made it a happy trio, winning best actor. “This show’s about families, this show’s about mentors and teachers, this show’s about teammates, and I wouldn’t be here without those three things in my life,” said Sudeikis. He told castmates and crew: “I’m only as good as you guys make me look.” The Apple TV+ show capped off the night by winning best comedy.

CAN WE COME?

“We’re going to party,” said Peter Morgan, creator of “The Crown,” as the royal saga from Netflix won drama writing, directing and all four acting honors. At times it seemed like that party — held in London due to travel restrictions — might be more fun than the long party in Los Angeles. Olivia Colman, who became the second actor to win for playing Queen Elizabeth II on the same show, after Claire Foy, was delighted but tearful as she recalled the death of her father during COVID. “He would have loved all of this,” she said.

VACCINE HUMOR

There was not much politics in Emmy speeches, unless you counted Stephen Colbert riffing on the California governor recall attempt with a slightly labored joke about “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” being recalled. “Mrs. Maisel has survived the recall and will remain marvelous,” he concluded. But Cedric the Entertainer delivered some topical humor with a riff on vaccines. Likening the various jabs to stores, he called Pfizer the Neiman Marcus, Moderna the Macy’s, and Johnson & Johnson the TJ Maxx of vaccines. He also offered up a dig at Nicki Minaj for the story about her cousin’s friend in Trinidad.

DEBBIE ALLEN GETS TO STOP THE CLOCK…

“Turn that clock off,” Allen said as she launched into her speech accepting the Governors Award. “I’m not paying any attention to it.” She added she was “trembling with gratitude and grace and trying not to cry … it’s taken a lot of courage to be the only woman in the room most of the time.” She urged a younger generation to “Tell your stories … it’s your turn.” The crowd cheered — when you have her career as an actor, dancer, choreographer and activist, you’re allowed to ignore the playoff music.

BUT NOT EVERYONE IS DEBBIE ALLEN

Then there was Scott Frank, director of “The Queen’s Gambit.” When he won, he thanked some folks, then more, then more, reading from a prepared speech.. The playoff music swelled, several times, but he continued, saying at one point: “Really?” Frank was called out on Twitter. “This is why directors need editors,” wrote writer-producer Danny Zuker, calling the remarks “The Irishman” of speeches.

A WRITER, ON WRITING

Luckily, what followed was probably the night’s highlight — the remarks by Coel, of “I May Destroy You.” She said she had something to tell the writers out there. “Write the tale that scares you, that makes you feel uncertain, that isn’t comfortable,” she said. “I dare you.” In a world, she added, where we all feel the need to be visible, equating it with success, “do not be afraid to disappear … See what comes to you in the silence.” Coel dedicated her show, in which she played a survivor of sexual assault, “to every single survivor of sexual assault.”

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Boston Dance Alliance First Open Call since 2019

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Boston Dance Alliance First Open Call since 2019

BOSTON, MA. SEPT. 19: Instructor Heidi Henderson, light green top, a professor in the dance department at Connecticut College, works with a class focusing on contemporary dance, Sunday Sept. 19, 2021 at the Boston Dance Alliance, in Brighton.This was the first open call the group has had since 2019 due to COVID. Choreographers from around Boston were on hand to see the dancers ages 18 and up perform for possible use in upcoming productions. (Herald Photo By Jim Michaud/ Boston Herald)

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