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‘ F**k ‘ T-shirt by Aubrey O’Day caused a scene on American Airlines Flight

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' F**k ' T-shirt by Aubrey O'Day caused a scene on American Airlines Flight

Aubrey O’Day claims that she was amazed and troubled when an worker of America Airlines turned her shirt inside the aircraft, but like most media outlets… Another side to it. There’s another side.

Danity Kane’s songwriter took her on Thursday night to Twitter to blast a male AA flight attendant, claiming that he treat her “as a punished lil child all the time” after making her undress in front of everyone, for he “didn’t like my shirt.”

Flight witnesses say TMZ… Her tale has more background. We are informed that O’Day is embarking on the flight with a black shirt with bold white letters across the front, which spells’ F**k’… Uncensored. Uncensored.

' F**k ' T-shirt by Aubrey O'Day caused a scene on American Airlines Flight

When she was asked by the flight attendant to modify it, our sources said that she was going to post it on social media.

We were told Aubrey claimed that she had no other shirt, so they asked her to turn her inside out… But NOT before everybody. She might have been going to the toilet, but we are told she decided on the spot to slip off her shirt and expose her bra.

AA informs us that they reached O’Day for more information so they can look into the event, but according to their Twitter… Aubrey does not have any interest in further coping with the airline.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Lawmakers in Northeast seek USDA support for organic dairy farmers

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Lawmakers in Northeast seek USDA support for organic dairy farmers

Lawmakers from Vermont, New York, New Hampshire and Maine are asking Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to help dozens of organic dairy farms that will lose their contracts with Horizon Organic next year.

The lawmakers, led by Vermont Senators Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders and Rep. Peter Welch want the U.S. Department of Agriculture to place more regulations around large-scale producers like Horizon, whose parent company Danone has notified 89 Northeast dairy farms that starting next September it will no longer buy their milk.

In a letter to Vilsack, the delegations urged the USDA to finalize an amendment to the origin of livestock rule that has been in the works since 2015. The amended rule would eliminate a loophole used by large-scale dairy farms and create uniform standards for transitioning conventional livestock to organic dairy production.

Dairy farmers across the country argue the ongoing delay has contributed to an oversupply of organic milk and kept smaller farms in the Northeast at a financial disadvantage.  

They’re also asking the USDA to take other steps, including temporary price supports, to help the farms find new markets for their products.

“We respectfully request that you use any tools at your disposal and work quickly to support the farmers affected by Danone’s decision. This includes increased support through USDA’s pandemic assistance for producers program.”  

New York Rep. Elise Stefanik says she’ll work with the USDA to ensure North Country dairy farmers are supported. She said they “work tirelessly, and I am proud to work to find targeted solutions to support them.” 

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NYSDOH issues clarification on mask guidance for indoor sports

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NYSDOH issues clarification on mask guidance for indoor sports

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The New York State Department of Health has provided clarification to the New York State Public High School Athletic Association (NYSPHSAA) regarding mask-wearing for indoor sports.

The memo was tweeted by Dr. Robert Zayas, the executive director of NYSPHSAA. The guidance states that student-athletes must wear masks when competing indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The only exception is if sport prevents the athletes from wearing a mask, such as swimming.

The guidance no longer makes an exception where masking may not be tolerable for the athlete. If the athletes are not wearing masks, they must be six feet apart. The department says if the athlete cannot wear a mask, and cannot maintain six feet of distance, they should not participate in the sport.

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Trial starts for I-70 truck driver who caused deadly 28-vehicle crash in Lakewood

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Trial starts for I-70 truck driver who caused deadly 28-vehicle crash in Lakewood

Provided by Lakewood Police Department

Rogel Lazaro Aguilera-Mederos

The vehicular homicide trial for a Texas trucker who lost his brakes on Interstate 70 while descending from Colorado’s high country and caused a 28-vehicle crash that killed four people will start Friday, more than two-and-a-half years after the fiery wreck.

Truck driver Rogel Lazaro Aguilera-Mederos, now 25, faces 41 charges in connection with the incident, including both assault and vehicular homicide. He’s facing decades in prison if convicted of all charges.

On April 25, 2019, his semitrailer full of lumber barreled down Interstate 70 at speeds topping 85 mph, swerving and forcing other vehicles off the road before running into standstill traffic under a bridge near Colorado Mills Parkway in Lakewood.

The crash caused multiple explosions and very intense fires as the lumber in Aguilera-Mederos’ rig mixed with spilled gasoline and ignited. The fires brought temperatures on the highway’s surface to more than 2,500 degrees.

Four people were killed — Miguel Angel Lamas Arellano, 24, William Bailey, 67, Doyle Harrison, 61, and Stanley Politano, 69 — and six others injured.

Survivors detailed the horror of seeing a truck barrel into stopped traffic, the terror of burning metal and screaming commuters. Others remembered being pulled from their cars by good Samaritans and carried to safety.

Aguilera-Mederos, who escaped with minor injuries, missed multiple runaway truck ramps on his way down the steep stretch of interstate, video taken by witnesses shows. Prosecutors said Aguilera-Mederos, who was 23 at the time, tried to apply both the truck’s brakes and its emergency brake, with no effect.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=COdOFh-St6o 

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Rockies podcast: Colorado tries to play spoiler, lower minor-league teams find success and Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song

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Rockies podcast: Colorado tries to play spoiler, lower minor-league teams find success and Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song

In this packed edition of the On The Rox podcast, Denver Post sportswriters Kyle Newman and Patrick Saunders break down the final stretch of the Rockies’ 2021 season.

Can Colorado play spoiler against the Dodgers and Giants at Coors Field as those teams vie for the National League West crown? Plus, analysis on Trevor Story’s LoDo swan song, how the Rockies’ lower-level minor-league affiliates fared this year, breaking down the team’s recent road surge, Larry Walker’s number retirement this weekend and more analysis.

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Long hospital wait times impacting ambulance services

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Long hospital wait times impacting ambulance services

NORTH GREENBUSH, N.Y. (NEWS10) — For those at North Greenbush Ambulance, they’ve been busier than ever.

“More people want to go to the hospital, and are going to the hospital,” explained Ryan French, North Greenbush Ambulance Director of Operations.

During the height of the pandemic, many were too afraid to go. Now that there are COVID vaccines, it’s thought that people are feeling more comfortable going in for medical treatment. While it’s important that people get the care they need, it’s causing some challenges for hospitals.

“The hospital wait times since the beginning of the summer have gone through the roof,” said French. “Instead of waiting, sometimes 5-10 minutes to get a room, it’s very often to find ourselves an hour or two hours waiting to get a hospital bed in the ER.”

According to St. Peter’s Health Partners, the pandemic has stressed heath care systems, impacting staffing levels. Emergency departments in particular are feeling the pressure, and higher patient volumes are likely a result of patients delaying care.

Despite the challenges, St. Peter’s says high quality care is still being provided. During wait times, French and his co-workers do their best to help patients.

“At some of the hospitals, we sit in the back of the ambulance with the patient for this hour or two hours, and we continue to treat the patient as appropriately as we can, and get them the help that they need,” explained French.

“The hospitals do the best of their ability to get them in as quickly as they possibly can.”

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Jeffco school board candidates look beyond COVID-19

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Jeffco school board candidates look beyond COVID-19

Despite protests and vocal backlash at school board meetings, Jeffco board candidates say they are focused on what comes after the COVID pandemic rather than current COVID-related issues.

Instead, the candidates are focused on improving academic performance, increasing mental health support and hiring and retaining quality teachers. Some candidates, however, believe removing mask mandates is part of improving mental health for students.

Seven candidates are running for three open positions on the five-seat Jeffco school board. The district is the second largest in Colorado with about 80,000 students.

The election has the potential to change the direction of the district. The majority of the current board includes members supportive of and endorsed by the teachers union. If critics of the district and the union win two of the three open seats, they would have the majority.

Read the full story from our partners at chalkbeat.org.

Chalkbeat Colorado is a nonprofit news organization covering education issues. For more, visit co.chalkbeat.org.

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CDC advisers try to work out the details on COVID-19 booster shots

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Top doctors say not so fast to Biden’s boosters-for-all plan

With booster doses of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine now authorized in the U.S., government advisers reconvened on Thursday to tackle the most contentious question yet: Exactly who should roll up their sleeves right away?

Late Wednesday, the Food and Drug Administration signed off on extra shots of the Pfizer formula for a broad swath of Americans: those 65 and older, people at high risk of severe illness, and health care workers and others in danger of becoming infected on the job.

But that was not the last hurdle. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sets final U.S. policy on who qualifies for the extra shot. And the CDC’s advisers were set to vote Thursday on how many of the roughly 26 million Americans who had their last Pfizer shot at least six months ago should go ahead and get that third dose.

The widespread dispensing of the boosters would represent an important new phase in the nation’s vaccination drive. Britain and Israel are already rolling out a third round of shots over strong objections from the World Health Organization that poor countries don’t have enough for their initial doses.

Whatever the decision from the CDC, millions more Americans still will face confusion — those who received Moderna or Johnson & Johnson shots early in the vaccine rollout. The government still hasn’t considered boosters for those brands and has no data on whether it’s safe or effective to mix-and-match and give those people a Pfizer shot.

The priority still is to vaccinate the unvaccinated. About 182 million Americans, or 55% of the population, are fully vaccinated.

The COVID-19 vaccines used in the U.S. still offer strong protection against severe illness, hospitalization and death, but immunity against milder infection appears to be waning months after people’s initial vaccination.

The FDA rejected a sweeping Biden administration plan announced a month ago to offer boosters to the general population, instead embracing a more targeted approach for now. Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Janet Woodcock cautioned that booster decisions could very well change as real-world data come in.

“As we learn more about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, including the use of a booster dose, we will continue to evaluate the rapidly changing science and keep the public informed,” Woodcock said.

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Fall foliage update: Peak #Fallorado is coming soon in northern Colorado

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PHOTOS: Fall colors start to pop around Colorado

If you’re looking for a peak experience when it comes to fall foliage, the time to visit your favorite leaf-peeping spot in northern Colorado may come this weekend.

Grand County resident Leah Matamales says she believes the peak has arrived in the Fraser area where she lives, and should arrive soon where she works in Granby (15 miles northwest of Fraser and 600 feet lower in elevation). Steamboat Springs resident Caroline Lalive believes the peak there will arrive soon as well.

“Probably this whole next week will be our peak colors,” said Matamales, director of food and beverage at the Grand Elk Golf Club in Granby. “There’s not much green left. There’s a lot of yellow, and this year we’re seeing a lot more orange and red.”

Because overnight temperatures have been chilly lately, Matamales believes the peak may be short-lived this year.

“This is probably the last really good week before everything starts falling off the trees, would be my guess,” said Matamales, a 16-year resident of the area.

Photos taken on Buffalo Pass near Steamboat Springs on Wednesday show a riot of yellow, but a few aspen still have light green leaves.

“I would definitely say through this week, the weekend and early next week you’ll start to see the peak here for sure,” Lalive said.

Like many mountain locations in the northern part of the state, Steamboat got a dusting of snow Monday morning, with the upper portions of the Steamboat ski area receiving 3-4 inches.

Provided by Caroline Lalive

Fall colors in the Steamboat area — including the ferns along this mountain biking trail — are really starting to pop. Caroline Lalive, a 26-year resident of Steamboat Springs, predicts the peak of fall color there will come early next week. The bike rider is her husband, former Olympic skier Nelson Carmichael, the 1992 bronze medalist in moguls. Lalive was an Olympic alpine racer.

“You look up and see the aspens changing, and with that bit of snow, that’s always such a beautiful contrast,” said Lalive, who has lived in Steamboat for 26 years. “Up high there’s some nice troves of aspens changing, and the undergrowth — the ferns and scrub oak and all of that — is definitely changing. Those are always really cool because the scrub oaks are red and the aspens are yellow.”

At midweek in Vail, three locals we contacted agreed that aspen stands there were still about half green and half yellow. But Jen Mason, executive director of the Colorado Snowsports Museum and a lifelong Vail resident, suspects this weekend and next will be prime for leaf-peeping in that part of the state.

“The height could be Wednesday of next week, but I think this weekend and next weekend are going to be the two prime weekends,” Mason said Wednesday. “Right now we’re like half green, half yellow, but you wake up and all of a sudden the half green, half yellow — those things turn overnight. It can change in two days.”

Members of a Rocky Mountain National Park Facebook group have been posting beautiful fall colors photos, with one woman describing her trip up Old Fall River Road last weekend as “spectacular,” but apparently the peak is a while off.

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Nanda: The Taliban must earn recognition by respecting human rights

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Nanda: The Taliban must earn recognition by respecting human rights

How will countries respond to the Taliban’s call for international recognition as a lawful government of Afghanistan? It depends on whether the Taliban’s actions start to match the commitments it made of forming an inclusive government, guaranteeing to stop foreign militant groups, including al-Qaeda, from using Afghan territory against the U.S. and its allies, and protecting human rights of all Afghans, especially girls and women.

Defending several new appointments to the all-male interim cabinet announced on September 7, spokesman Zabirhullah Mujahid said, “It is the responsibility of the United Nations to recognize our government [and] for other countries, including European, Asian, and Islamic countries, to have diplomatic relations with us.” Some new cabinet members are from ethnic minorities – Hazaras, Tajiks, and Uzbeks – but there are no women. Most are Taliban loyalists and hardliners, and several are on the U.N. sanctions list. Elections were not mentioned.

Since the Taliban took over on August 15, several NGOs have documented the Taliban’s human rights abuses, which include reprisal attacks and targeted killing of civilians, especially human rights defenders, and Afghan soldiers who had surrendered.

Although the government had promised to protect the human rights of women, many Afghan women are so afraid that they don’t leave their homes without a male guardian. And their protests in many cities have met with violent crackdowns and beatings.

Although boys can go to schools up to secondary level, girls are permitted only up to sixth grade. A Taliban spokesman said that “a safe learning environment” was needed before girls can return to secondary school. He said that the Taliban were “finalizing things” to allow girls back in school. New rules for education, such as girls and women can only be taught by female teachers, or, if there are not enough females, then by older, “pious” men. Women can study only in gender-segregated universities.

The fear that the Taliban would restrict women’s rights is coming to pass. The Ministry of Women’s Affairs is now the “Ministry for Preaching and Guidance and the Propagation of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice.” Twenty years of reforms and progress are being erased. Uncertainty remains whether women may be allowed to work and under what conditions.

In international law, each government has complete discretion as a political matter whether to recognize a new government, especially one that comes to power through the use of force. Restrictions on women and their exclusion from the government will certainly be a major hindrance for the international recognition sought by the Taliban.

The United States, for example, did not recognize the Communist governments of China and the Soviet Union for decades, notwithstanding their effective control over their territories. Along with effective control, legitimacy is another consideration countries take into account. When the Taliban ruled Afghanistan from 1996-2001, only three governments – Pakistan, the U.A.E., and Saudi Arabia – recognized it. This time around, even Pakistan and China – both of which have welcomed the Taliban’s takeover – seem to be in no hurry to grant recognition.

The U.N. is not in the business of recognizing governments. Rather, the question is who represents a country? On September 20, Afghanistan’s new rulers sent a communication to the Secretary-General, António Guterres, with the letterhead “Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan,” signed by Ameer Khan Muttaqi as Minister of Foreign Affairs, requesting to address the General Assembly High Level Leaders Week, the yearly gathering in session September 21-27. Five days earlier, on September 15, the currently accredited Afghan Ambassador, Ghulam Isaczai, sent to the Secretary-General a list of Afghanistan’s delegation. After due deliberations, the General Assembly’s nine-member credentials committee will determine who represents the country. And this will take time.

As the Taliban seek international recognition, they should get a clear message that, as a prerequisite, they must respect and protect human rights of all, especially girls and women, that they must prevent foreign militant groups from using Afghan soil against other countries, and that human rights defenders, humanitarian aid workers, and other at-risk people must be provided safe passage and evacuation without interference.

Ved Nanda is a distinguished university professor and director of the Ved Nanda Center for International Law at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. His column appears the last Sunday of each month and he welcomes comments at [email protected]

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8 new COVID cases in Albany CSD

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8 new COVID cases in Albany CSD

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Albany City School District has reported eight new cases of the coronavirus.

Two cases are associated with a prekindergarten classroom at Delaware Community School. Two cases are associated with North Albany Middle School. One involves the sixth grade. The second case involves the eighth grade. 

Two cases are associated with the seventh grade at William S. Hackett Middle School. Another case is associated with the ninth grade at Albany High School. And the final case is associated with the sophomore class at Tony Clement Center for Education. 

In each case, the person who has tested positive and any associated contacts are quarantining at home.

The district is continuing with safety procedures, including cleaning and sanitizing the school buildings every night.

Learn more at the district’s website.

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