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L.A. paid $1.3 billion to illegal aliens while creating a crisis of homelessness

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L.A. paid $1.3 billion to illegal aliens while creating a crisis of homelessness

The homelessness crisis in Los Angeles County is a national disgrace, a grim reminder of generations ‘ failure in liberal politics. But while the homeless in Los Angeles suffer cruel indignities, illegal immigrants are showered with cash.

According to Fox News, Los Angeles County paid nearly $1.3 billion in social welfare cash to families of illegal aliens during 2015 and 2016.

According to the LA Times, there are now more than 57,000 individuals without a “fixed, ordinary or sufficient location to sleep,” whilst more than 58,000 illegal alien families earned a benefit of $602 million by 2015.

Although this amount is enormous, it only increases. The following year, some 64,000 illegal alien families earned 675 million dollars.

DailyWire report: According to a research from the Migration Policy Institute, the Los Angeles Sanctuary county drains foreigners who enter the United States illegally and now have the biggest concentration of any county in the country. Illegal foreigners in the county are entitled to benefit from welfare and food stamps.

The senior investigator at the Heritage Foundation who studies poverty and illegal immigration, Robert Rector, said the expenses of the iceberg are Fox’s tip. “They are given $3 in benefit for $1 they spend,” said Rector, including educational, police and fire-related, medical and subsidized accommodation, which can amount to a total of $24,000 per year in public expenses per household.

But with its rigorous boundary policies President Trump can save California hundreds of millions of dollars. The research demonstrates that the county of Los Angeles is expected to pay $200 million less this year than in 2016, with thousands less households receiving advantages. “The amount of entrants is decreasing nationwide. The population is static if it doesn’t shrink, “said Rector.

Meanwhile, fresh U.S. information. The Census Bureau demonstrates that there are now over 22 million non-citizens living in the United States.

The Bureau published its annual American Community Survey on Thursday. According to information extrapolated, 22,1 million are “not a US citizen,” the information showed.

The stats also show that 13.7 percent of the population of 2018—nearly 44.7 million people — was born in another nation, scientists from the Census Bureau said. Since 1910, this is the largest amount of foreign-born people. Most of them come from Latin America.

From 1960 to 1970 only one in 20 US citizens was born abroad.

“The rate of foreign born residents today rose to approximately one in seven in California, Texas, Florida and New York— the biggest country— where the population of foreign born people is 15% greater than elsewhere in the United States,” the daily mail revealed.

The results follow on from the August report by the Office of Justice Statistics of the Department of Justice, which found that 64 percent of all arrests made by the federal government in fiscal 2018 were non-US arrests. Citizens. Citizens.

“While not the United States. Citizens make up 7% of the US population (for 2017 by the U.S. Census Bureau), represented 15% of all federal arrests and 15% of prosecutions for non-immigration crimes in the 2018 U.S. District Court. Non-American. Citizens represented 24% of all federal drug arrests and 25% of all federal estate arrests, including 28% of federal fraud detentions, “said the office in a news release.

It was reported that migrants from Central America flooded the U.S.-Mexico frontier. The study states that foreigners have skyrocketed in other locations than Mexico.

“The nationality of people detained by federal law enforcement has altered significantly over time. Between 1998 and 2018, Mexican federal arrests rose from 28% to 40%, “the Department said. “Citizens in the Central American nations increased their federal arrest share from 1% to 20%, while US people ‘ federal arrest share decreased from 63% to 36%. Central American federal arrests increased over two decades to more than 30 times, from 1,171 in 1998 to 39,858 in 2018. The amount of Mexican nationals federally arrested (78.062) in 2018 surpassed the amount of U.S. citizens ‘ federal arrests (70.542).

“Over 20 years, the rise in federal arrests was 95% owing to immigration offences. Federal immigration arrests risen five-fold from 1998 to 2018 (from 20,942 to 108,667), increasing by over 50,000 in a year from 2017 to 2018. In 2018, 90% of suspects detained for federal immigration offences were male and 10% female. 85 percent of non-U.S. federal arrests. Citizens have been charged with immigration crimes in 2018, while another 5 percent of arrests are related to immigration, “the DOJ said.

“Of suspects prosecuted at the United States District Court in 2018, 57% were U.S. citizens and 43% were non-U.S. Citizens. Citizens. Almost all (99.7%) non-citizens arrested for anything other than first illegal entry in the US District Court were charged.

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Lynx dominate Fever, secure first-round playoff bye

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Lynx dominate Fever, secure first-round playoff bye

The Lynx dominated the Fever, 92-73, in Indianapolis on Friday night to secure a first-round bye in the playoffs.

“There just was no quit. They played as hard as they could,” Lynx head coach Cheryl Reeve said. “Everything we got we had to really earn. Coming here and getting this win was obviously something that was important to us. So, mission accomplished.”

Despite battling injuries all year, the Lynx secured a top-4 seed in the playoffs — and the first-round bye that goes with it — with the win.

“That’s what we came here to do,” Reeve said. “We wanted to make sure that we could control our own destiny. We were the first of the games tonight that had implications on seeding.”

Because the Las Vegas Aces beat the Chicago Sky on Friday night, the Lynx can no longer reach the second seed. But the current fourth seed Seattle trails Minnesota by one game in the standings with two games left this season, one of them being late Friday night.

Sylvia Fowles led the Lynx with a double-double (21 points and 10 rebounds). Napheesa Collier and Crystal Dangerfield scored 17 and 15, respectively. Natalie Achonwa added 11 points off the bench.

“[I’m] extremely proud of these young women,” Fowles said. “I’m happy with where we are. I feel like we still have a few things that we can clean up. To now see what we’ve come from to where we are now, I’m very excited and I’m very proud of [the] things we’ve done this season.”

The Fever came out strong in the first quarter, taking a 5-1 lead, but it would be their largest and last lead of the game.

In the middle of the first quarter, the Lynx started to find their footing and begin to build momentum. They went on a 15-2 scoring run to take a 22-9 lead. Kayla McBride started the scoring run with a 19-foot pull up jump shot.

However, the Fever quickly responded with a 12-5 scoring run of their own and cut the Lynx’s lead to 27-21 to close out the first quarter. They pulled within 40-38 with a 6-0 run late in the second quarter but the Lynx fought back to extend their lead to 51-44 at intermission.

Indiana only scored 10 points in the third quarter and the Lynx led by 25 points, their largest lead, on a Rachel Banham 3-pointer with 6:37 left in the game.

The Lynx are now 16-3 when scoring more than 80 points in a game, 13-1 when leading after three quarters, and 3-0 this season when their starting lineup consists of McBride, Fowles, Napheesa Collier, Crystal Dangerfield and Aerial Powers.

The Lynx will close out the regular season on the road as they take on the Washington Mystics (12-19) on Sunday, Sept. 19, 2 p.m.

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Gov. Hochul signs parole reform bill into law amid Rikers crisis

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Gov. Hochul signs parole reform bill into law amid Rikers crisis

NEW YORK — Amid calls for action over the crisis at New York City’s Rikers Island, Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday signed into law the Less Is More Act in a major overhaul of New York’s parole system.

The legislation, which will take full effect in March 2022, will prevent people from being reincarcerated for technical, non-criminal parole violations.

These violations include missing a curfew, arriving late to an appointment with a parole officer, changing a residence without approval and failing to attend a mandated program.

It will also allow for shortened parole sentences due to good behavior, and expedite the time frame in which parole hearings can be held.

Hochul said that 191 inmates would be released from Rikers on Friday who meet the threshold of the new legislation.

Watch Friday’s event and bill signing in full below:

Most of the city’s jail inmates are being held for trial or on parole violations.

According to the Vera Institute of Justice, 274 people in New York City prisons are being detained for a technical parole violation, out of 6,079 inmates.

Supporters say incarcerating people for technical parole violations is costly and fuels recidivism. 

The Republican minority in the Legislature has accused Democrats of focusing more on perpetrators of crimes than victims.

Hochul’s action comes as a spotlight has once again been put on the city’s notorious jail complex, which has spiraled into turmoil during the pandemic.

It’s not just inmates and advocates saying that. City officials, including the mayor, admit there are serious problems.

The growing crisis, brought to light in recent weeks by advocates, news reports and a federal monitor who wrote of “grave concerns” with the city’s jails, has sent officials scrambling for remedies amid plans to close Rikers by 2026.

Mayor Bill de Blasio this week unveiled reforms that include requiring absent guards to get a doctor’s note if they’re out for more than a day, speeding inmate intake procedures and fixing infrastructure problems like broken cell doors.

On Wednesday, the city started suspending jail guards for 30 days without pay if they refused to come to work. Last week, the city said the staffing situation was so dire it was enlisting a telemarketing company to entice recently retired correctional officers to return to work.

Advocates, lawmakers and even the union for jail guards say the measures aren’t enough to fix a system where 10 inmates have died this year, at least five in suspected suicides.

Advocates want inmates released immediately. Some say Rikers should be closed right away.

Lawmakers who toured Rikers complex this week said it’s filthy and inhumane, with overflowing toilets and floors covered in dead cockroaches, feces and rotting food. State Assemblywoman Jessica González-Rojas said inmates told her they felt like they were being treated like slaves and animals.

The union, meanwhile, has said that hiring more guards is the answer and that suspensions will leave remaining officers working “triple and quadruple shifts with no meals and no rest.”

“The mayor cannot discipline his way out of this staffing crisis that he caused by refusing to hire a single correction officer for nearly three years, even as the inmate population doubled,” said Benny Boscio Jr., the president of the Correction Officers Benevolent Association.

In actuality, the city’s jail population has risen by about 58%, topping 6,000 inmates at the end of last week after falling below 3,900 inmates as bail reforms took effect, arrests slowed and some inmates were sent home early in the pandemic.

In addition, city jail Commissioner Vincent Schiraldi said Monday that the city has authorized the hiring of at least 200 correctional officers.

Schiraldi thanked Hochul after she signed Friday’s legislation.

“Eliminating non-criminal, technical parole violations is the decent, humane thing to do and it will only increase public safety by disrupting the incarceration cycle at a critical point, when people are reintegrating into the community,” Schiraldi said.

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Pilot of single-engine biplane dies in Western Slope crash

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Pilot of single-engine biplane dies in Western Slope crash

A pilot died Friday morning in a single-engine plane crash on the Western Slope.

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Kim Janey thanks supporters, does not endorse either finalist for mayor

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Kim Janey thanks supporters, does not endorse either finalist for mayor

Acting Mayor Kim Janey made her first campaign appearance following a fourth-place finish of five major candidates in the mayoral preliminary, and after skipping her own election-night party.

“I don’t want people to walk away without hope,” she said Friday afternoon, addressing a packed room of purple-clad supporters at her Centre Street headquarters. “This is a great day. This is a joyous day. We will continue to be intentional about creating space for joy.”

Janey made her “Joy Agenda” central to both her campaign and her speech Friday. She previously told the Herald that this agenda, which included moves like waiving late fees at the city’s libraries and funding public events, “comes out of a tradition (of) being a Black woman — being the granddaughter of a Black preacher.”

At least a couple of supporters wiped tears from their eyes as Janey spoke, thanking her family, her pastor and her staff for their hard work.

Janey’s only child, her daughter Kimesha Janey whom she had when she was a teen, admitted that she didn’t even want her mother to run for office in the first place.

“I didn’t want her to run — it was selfish of me,” she said, explaining that she knew her mother “was going to be the one that everybody was going to attack, and I didn’t want that for my mom. But she wanted to put the city on her back.”

Kim Janey thanked her daughter for getting her politically involved, explaining that she inspired her to become a community organizer and to advocate for education and family issues.

“I’m not supposed to be here,” she said of her rise to the top job in Boston from being a teen parent who grew up in the projects. Referencing the “seeds” she planted in her term so far as mayor, she reminded the audience that “it’s up to us to make sure we see that harvest, this work is not done,” she said. “I want people to leave here encouraged. I want people to leave here committed to doing the work moving forward.”

Janey has not yet endorsed a candidate for mayor out of the two finalists, Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi-George, and has said she is not sure if she will make an endorsement at all. All she said about her former competitors is that she “(takes) comfort in knowing that there will be a woman leading our city.”

Along with Janey’s votes from Tuesday’s primary, votes from Andrea Campbell and John Barros, the three Black candidates in the race, are up for grabs.

Among chatter in the crowd, at least two supporters were overheard saying they’d support Wu, but one supporter said he’d vote for Essaibi-George.

“I don’t know who’s listening in Boston — I’m a Republican, not very popular here,” said Javier Lopez, 24, who attended Janey’s gathering. He said he supported Janey for her religious grounding and her stance against vaccine passports like New York has. “And I know this city, my views aren’t very popular in the city. But again, she shared some of those views,” he added,

Finally, he said, he’s disappointed Janey won’t be the first elected Black and female mayor of Boston. “She would have been an inspiration to young girls everywhere.”

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High school football: St. Thomas Academy runs past Cretin-Derham Hall

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High school football: St. Thomas Academy runs past Cretin-Derham Hall

The first battle in 17 years between two longtime rival East Metro powers went the way of St. Thomas Academy.

It was all Cadets all night at TCO Performance Center in Eagan, as St. Thomas Academy topped Cretin-Derham Hall 41-14 in the first meeting between the two schools since 2004.

The rivalry, which dates even further back than the two schools’ time together in the St. Paul City Conference in the late 1970s and early 1980s, renewed this season as the Raiders moved down from Class 6A to Class 5A.

The matchup drew thousands of patrons to the Vikings’ practice facility, including the likes of Cretin-Derham Hall and Minnesota Viking alums Matt Birk and Michael Floyd.

St. Thomas Academy coach Dan O’Brien said both schools had alumni functions before the big showdown. Raiders coach Chuck Miesbauer noted what helps make the rivalry special is that the kids get to know one another growing up, and on Friday, they got to meet up once again on the gridiron.

“It’s fun. It was great. Our kids were excited about it all week. Both teams had great crowds,” O’Brien said. “To be able to play in this venue, the tailgating, I think it was great for both communities, not just the player. But I think the experience for the fans, the alumni. … It was great to have a rivalry back.”

The Cadets have been one of Class 5A’s elites for years, and a consistent state title contender under the watchful eye of O’Brien. Nothing from Friday’s contest suggests that will be any different this season.

Cretin-Derham Hall (0-3) looked to get on the board on its first drive of the game, but it turned the ball over on downs inside the Cadets’ 10-yard line. That seemed to set the tone for the night. After that, the Raiders struggled to muster much offensively until the final frame.

St. Thomas Academy (3-0), meanwhile, scored early and often. Sophomore running back Savion Lopez ran in a 44-yard touchdown late in the first quarter to make it 7-0. St. Thomas Academy then recovered the ensuing onside kick and scored another touchdown — a 9-yard rush from Love Adebayo.

“We come out and we score right away. We get a stop. We get a play on special teams, any number of things could’ve created a more favorable opening to the game,” Raiders coach Chuck Miesbauer said. “When that stuff happens, you never know what can happen. But we didn’t make some of the plays and maybe we didn’t have some of the right calls on. … We didn’t make big plays across the board, and they did.”

A 52-yard rushing touchdown from Grady O’Neill made it 21-0 Cadets later in the second. Adebayo tallied another rushing touchdown — the second of three rushing scores for him on the night — in the third quarter, and O’Neill scored again — this time, a 7-yard scoring strike from Maximus Sims — early in the fourth to extend the Cadets’ lead to 34-0 — its largest advantage of the game.

O’Neill, who took snaps at quarterback and receiver, also played defensively for the Cadets as part of a package to help contain Cretin-Derham Hall star Tre Holloman, who started at quarterback for the first time this season.

O’Brien said the Cadets’ offensive line — a unit O’Neill called “ridiculous” — “had a nice night.” St. Thomas Academy ran 38 times for 292 yards Friday. O’Neill had 118 yards on the ground, while Lopez had 91 and Adebayo had 61.

“Our offensive line got rolling,” O’Neill said. “Then obviously we’ve got our two running backs that are really good players. That set it up to get me the ball, get other guys the ball and get the offense going.”

The Raiders’ offense got things going in the fourth quarter, thanks to a pair of touchdowns from quarterback Luke Floysand, who came on in relief in the final frame to run for a score and pass for another. Cretin-Derham Hall running back Will Haider tallied 108 yards of total offense.

Cretin-Derham Hall is winless through three weeks but has endured a brutal early-season schedule. The Raiders’ three losses have come to three teams ranked in the top six in the state in Class 5A, and they played Mahtomedi and Spring Lake Park tough.

“We’ve got to stay at it. It’s been a heck of a three-game stretch for us, and man, tooth-and-nail in the first two, and I wish I could say the same about tonight,” Miesbauer said. “All we can do is come back. We can learn from this and see what the next team has in store and try to right the ship. This is a good football team. I believe that to my core. Not reflected tonight. I think reflected in the previous two games. We’ve got five to go, and there’s no reason we can’t play off some of that momentum … and get everything rocking and rolling into the section time.”

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North Country Weekend Calendar: Smooth jazz and local history in Lake George

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North Country Weekend Calendar: Smooth jazz and local history in Lake George

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – There’s music and history in Lake George this weekend, with jazz in Shepard Park and reenactments of the French and Indian War just down the lake at Battlefield Park.

It’s a partly cloudy weekend in the 70s this weekend, with a weekend high of 79 on Saturday.

Friday, Sept. 17, 2021

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

Edward M. Bartholomew Jr. Fund Disc Golf Tournament 

  • What: Disc golf tournament benefitting the Edward M. Bartholomew Jr. Fund, which helps Warren County EDC create job and internship opportunities locally.  
  • When: 11 a.m. learn to play; noon player check-in; 1 p.m. games start, Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: Crandall Park, Fire Road, Glens Falls 

Apple Festival at the Warrensburg Riverfront Farmers Market 

  • What: Apple-themed festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers Market featuring a long list of vendors. Apple recipes and growing tips, apple dessert contest, children’s craft workshop, face painting, live music, free local coffee and a chance to win $20 in farmers market credit. 
  • When: 3-6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: 176 River St., Warrensburg 

Live at Argyle Brewing’s Depot: Caity & The Gallaghers 

  • What: Music at the Argyle Brewing Depot. $15 admission, limited table seating. 
  • When: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: Argyle Brewing at the Depot, 6 Broad St., Cambridge 
1631947713 609 North Country Weekend Calendar Smooth jazz and local history in
Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021 (1 of 2)

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

ADK 5K 

  • What: Closed course 5K race, starting and ending at Adirondack Pub & Brewery. Chip-timed race running through Lake George. Includes a custom glass, food and music and a post-race party with lawn games, music and food trucks. 
  • When: Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Adirondack brewery, 33 Canada St., Lake George 

2021 Freedom Machines golf fundraiser 

  • What: $400 per foursome of attendees, with money raised for Freedom Machines bike charity. Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place, as well as closest to pin and hmost honest. Registration online. Includes lunch and buffet dinner. 
  • When: 8 a.m. – noon with a 9 a.m. start time Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Kingsbury National Golf Club, 111 County Route 41, Hudson Falls 

8th Annual Harry Elkes Ride 

  • What: Annual ride hosted by Adirondack Cycling Advocates in Brant Lake. Choice of three rides; 15, 32 or 50 miles. $25 admission cost with free t-shirt. Maps and route info will be available on arrival. 
  • When: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. with 9:30 and 10 a.m. start times Saturday, Sept. 18. 
  • Where: The Hub, 27 Market St., Brant Lake 
1631947716 293 North Country Weekend Calendar Smooth jazz and local history in
Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021 (2 of 2)

15th Annual Fall Mum Festival 

  • What: Over 7,000 garden mums available, locally grown at Binley Florist. Also features pumpkins, corn stalks and other seasonal décor. Warren County K-9 officer will be showing skills with his dog. Petting zoo, pony rides and face painting included. Free admission. 
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Binley Florist, 773 Quaker Road, Queensbury 

6th Annual Boating for Babies Fundraiser by Yankee Boating Center 

  • What: Annual fundraiser for Glens Falls Hospital and local charities. 50% discounts on boat rental, with rentals for the weekend starting at $120 for 2 hours and up.  
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Yankee Boating Center, 3910 Lakeshore Drive, Lake George 

Thistle Day Parade 

  • What: Argyle Thistle Day Parade, celebrating Argyle’s Scottish heritage.  
  • When: 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Argyle 

Live at Hicks Orchard: Whiskey River 

  • What: Local honkey tonk dance band, with craft cider, local beer and food. 
  • When: 5-8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Hicks Orchard, 18 Hicks Road, Granville 
1631947719 880 North Country Weekend Calendar Smooth jazz and local history in
Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

6th Annual Boating for Babies Fundraiser by Yankee Boating Center 

  • What: Annual fundraiser for Glens Falls Hospital and local charities. 50% discounts on boat rental, with rentals for the weekend starting at $120 for 2 hours and up.  
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Yankee Boating Center, 3910 Lakeshore Drive, Lake George 

International Day of Peace Gathering 

  • What: Local celebration of the International Day of Peace. Gathering on the lawn with prayer, meditation and a song of peace. 
  • When: 11:30 a.m. – noon Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Adirondack Friends Meeting House, 27 Saratoga Ave., South Glens Falls 
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Broncos scouting report: How Denver matches up against Jaguars and predictions

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Broncos scouting report: How Denver matches up against Jaguars and predictions

Broncos (1-0) at Jaguars (0-1)

When: 11 a.m., Sunday.

Where: TIAA Bank Field, Jacksonville, Fla.

Radio/TV: 850 AM, 94.1 FM/KDVR-31.

Weather: Scattered thunderstorms with a high of 85.

Broncos-Jaguars series: Broncos are 5-6 in 11 games; Jaguars won 26-24 in last meeting, Sept. 29, 2019, in Denver.


Key matchup

CB Pat Surtain II versus WR DJ Chark

Making his first NFL start in place of the injured Ronald Darby, Broncos cornerback Pat Surtain II will be tasked with covering a Pro Bowl wideout who already turned in a big game in Week 1.

Surtain figures to be on Jacksonville’s D.J. Chark for much of the day, a matchup that will decide how well and how quickly rookie quarterback Trevor Lawrence can settle in against the Denver secondary. Safety and team captain Justin Simmons is confident the rookie will come through.

“(Surtain) has proven that he can play at the highest level with the best of them his whole football career,” Simmons said. “He’s got guys like Kareem (Jackson) and me to be able to kind of direct traffic and make sure he’s comfortable. Communication is going to be the biggest thing that keeps him at ease… We’ve got to be able to make sure that we’re doing all that we can to help him.”

Chark had three catches for 86 yards and a touchdown last week, while Surtain played only 16 defensive snaps in the win against the Giants, and was burned for a touchdown by wideout Sterling Shepard.

Surtain said Shepard’s 37-yard catch-and-run TD in the second quarter last Sunday, which gave New York its only lead of the game, was a learning moment.

“I should’ve known that route was coming based on his stem,” Surtain said. “I could’ve squeezed it and initiated (the contact) earlier and just had tighter coverage on it.”

Coach Vic Fangio is confident Surtain will play that necessary tight coverage on the outside against Chark, who dominated in 2019 with a 1,000-yard receiving season before injuries limited him to 13 games and 706 yards last year.

“(Surtain) did good (against the Giants),” Fangio said. “There weren’t a ton of plays, but I was pleased with his play overall.”


Who has the edge?

Quarterback

Teddy Bridgewater was sharp in his Denver debut, throwing for 264 yards, two TDs and no picks in a win over the Giants. Meanwhile, Trevor Lawrence threw three interceptions in his dud of an NFL debut, a loss to Houston. Edge: Broncos

Running back

Both teams have a capable one-two punch, with Melvin Gordon/Javonte Williams highlighting Denver’s backfield opposite the combo of Carlos Hyde/James Robinson for Jacksonville. But Denver has more skill at the position. Edge: Broncos

Receiver/tight end

The Broncos are without No. 1 WR Jerry Jeudy, who suffered a high ankle sprain last week. But KJ Hamler, Tim Patrick and Courtland Sutton can pick up the slack. The Jaguars feature DJ Chark and ex-CU star Laviska Shenault Jr. Edge: Broncos

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Man sentenced to 12 years in $200 million phone-fraud scheme

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Man sentenced to 12 years in $200 million phone-fraud scheme

SEATTLE — A Pakistan resident has been sentenced to 12 years in prison for a conspiracy to “unlock” phones from AT&T’s network, a scheme the company says cost it more than $200 million.

Muhammad Fahd, 35, of Karachi, recruited an employee of an AT&T call center in Bothell, Wash., via Facebook in 2012, and began bribing that employee and his coworkers to use their credentials to unlock phones.

That allowed the phones to be removed from AT&T’s network, even if customers had not finished paying for the expensive devices or their service contracts had not expired. The customers could then buy cheaper service for their phones.

Fahd later had workers install malware on the company’s network, allowing him to unlock the phones from Pakistan. He persisted even after the company detected the initial scheme and fired two of the workers involved, prosecutors said.

Fahd sold the illegal phone-unlocking service through online retailers, raking in millions. His extravagant lifestyle included frequent trips abroad, $1,000-a-night hotel stays in Dubai and a $30,000 watch. He bragged of hiring the British singer-songwriter Jay Sean to play his wedding for $100,000, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Seattle.

He paid three AT&T workers $922,000 from 2012 to 2017 before he was arrested in Hong Kong in early 2018. More than 1.9 million phones were unlocked as part of the conspiracy, AT&T’s forensic analysis found.

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Twins slug four home runs in win over Blue Jays

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Twins slug four home runs in win over Blue Jays

TORONTO — Jorge Polanco giveth, and Jorge Polanco taketh away.

Filling in at shortstop for Andrelton Simmons, who had to remain in the United States this weekend, Polanco helped give the Toronto Blue Jays the lead with his arm and helped take it away for good with his bat.

Polanco committed a pair of errors in the bottom of the second that directly led to two runs, and then quickly helped the Twins swipe the lead back in the top of the third, hitting the first of back-to-back-to-back home runs in the Twins’ 7-3 win over the Blue Jays on Friday night at the Rogers Centre.

“It’s easy to know what to do when you’re making great plays and everyone’s smiling and that’s fine. But what do you do when stuff’s hitting the fan?” manager Rocco Baldelli said. “What he did was just kind of bear down, got back to what he knows. … Started out not the best day, ended up a great day.”

Polanco’s two-run home run — one of three hits on the night for him — in the third gave the Twins a 4-2 lead at the time. Josh Donaldson, a former Blue Jay who got a standing ovation before his first at-bat, followed with a home run of his own.

Donaldson’s home run knocked Blue Jays starter Hyun Jin Ryu out of the game, but the offense still wasn’t done.

“When we score, we tend to score in bunches,” Donaldson said. “And we were able to do that again tonight.”

Miguel Sanó greeted Ross Stripling with a home run, marking the first time the Twins have completed the trifecta since 2019, as the Twins (65-83) did to the Blue Jays (82-65) what their potent offense often does to opposing pitchers.

The Twins got one more home run in the sixth inning from Brent Rooker, who, in his first game off the paternity list since welcoming daughter Blair Evelyn, finished with a pair of hits and two runs driven in.

“You’re never really in the clear when you’re facing an offense like this, so you have to score.And then you have to score some more or else you’re really going to be in for a challenging night. But our guys were up for it,” Baldelli said.

And their pitchers were up for the challenge, too, keeping the homer-happy Blue Jays inside the ballpark. Well, all except for MVP candidate Vladimir Guerrero Jr., who hit his major league-leading 46th home run off starter Michael Pineda in the third inning.

If not for Polanco’s errors leading to a pair of runs, that might have been the only run the Blue Jays would have scored all night against a quartet of Twins pitchers that included Jorge Alcala, Tyler Duffey and Alexander Colomé.

That group held Blue Jays hitters to just five hits as the Twins captured the series opener in Toronto. The Twins have six more games remaining against the Blue Jays, who are now half a game out of wild card position, in the next two series, giving them the opportunity to play spoiler.

But that’s not their focus. Playing good, winning baseball like they did most of Friday is.

“We’re trying to set the tone, not just finish strong this year but leading into next year. We have guys that are going to be here, most likely, going into 2022.  We want to start setting the tone now that we still have the expectations to win,” Donaldson said. “And go out there and play hard to where we roll into spring training, continue setting that foundation that we’re setting now.”

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102 new positive cases Albany County’s Sept. 17 COVID report

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102 new positive cases Albany County’s Sept. 17 COVID report

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Albany County

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Albany County Executive Daniel P. McCoy provided the latest report on the county’s progress on vaccinations and controlling the spread of the Coronavirus. 

As of Thursday, September 16, 70.6% of all Albany County residents have received at least the first dose of the vaccine, and 64.8% have been fully vaccinated. The first dose vaccination rate for the county’s 18+ population is now up to 81.6%. 

County Executive McCoy announced that the total number of confirmed cases of COVID in Albany County is now at 27,775 to date, with 102 new positive cases identified since Thursday, September 16. The county’s five-day average of new daily positive cases is now up to 79.4. Albany County’s most recent seven-day average of percent positive rates is now up to 4.6%, and the Capital Region’s average rate is now down to 4.3%.

Among the new daily cases of COVID identified in the county, 25 had close contacts to positive cases, 69 did not have clear sources of infection at this time, five reported traveling out of state and three are healthcare workers or residents of congregate living settings.

There are now 498 active cases in the county, up from 461 yesterday. The number of people under mandatory quarantine increased to 977 from 913. So far 87,296 people have completed quarantine to date. Of those who completed quarantine, 27,277 of them had tested positive and recovered – an increase of 63 additional recoveries.

The County Executive reported that there were six new hospitalizations since Thursday, September 16, and 36 county residents are now hospitalized with the virus – a net increase of two. There are currently seven patients in ICU’s, unchanged from Thursday, September 16. There are no new COVID deaths to report, and the death toll for Albany County still stands at 400 since the outbreak began.

“Today marks the second consecutive day that more than 100 new cases of COVID were identified within a 24-hour period. This shows that the spread of the virus doesn’t seem to be slowing down, and we know that even vaccinated individuals can still spread it without actually getting sick,” said County Executive McCoy. “Everyone can play a role in helping us beat COVID-19 for good – whether it’s getting the shot, encouraging others to get the shot, or wearing a mask while indoors and at large outdoor gatherings, especially as we welcome back PearlPalooza to Albany tomorrow.”

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