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Marlon Wayans Condemns the Reopen Cleveland Court Decision

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Marlon Wayans Condemns the Reopen Cleveland Court Decision

Marlon Wayans goes back to a legal microscope to compare a guy with Cleveland Brown, the “family guy.” And he’s not pleased about it.

Monday at the LAX, we went to a comedian and actor where we reflected on a possibly critical decision by the CA Supreme Court to review a 2015 decision of the higher court that he was not doing anything wrong with viral burning.

Do not tell me that nigga looks like… Tell me… HERE NIGGA!!! Ol Cleveland Brown ass lookin @ahhmovie 2 @whatthefunny I’m wounded… — marlon wayans (@MarlonWayans) 4 September [email protected] You’re going to remember… Marlon tweeted that Pierre Daniel— an extra in the film— looked like a dead ringer for Cleveland while filming for the film, “A Haunted House 2.”

WhoSay Pierre sued Marlon and the manufacturing firm soon afterwards for the move saying that he was not only racially harassed by Marlon… However, he also supposedly used to roast him on the set, which he said caused him a good deal of damage.

At that moment, a judge said that Pierre actually looked like Cleveland… And, more importantly, the freedom of expression protected from the Marlon antiques. An appeal court confirmed that judgment in 2017, stating that Marlon’s tweet was cheaper if his creative comic method was.

Marlon Wayans Condemns the Reopen Cleveland Court Decision
Now… Now The Supreme Court of the CA weighed in and told them to reconsider the robes below.

He says that if you come to work with a comedian, you have to be prepared for the witches to fly–after all, this is what he’s doing to make a living. MW also suggests that comics in courthouses could continue indefinitely…. Proposing it is equivalent to censorship.

Marlon even claims he should be thankful for placing this Pierre Fella on the map… And “upgrading” him in a film beyond just an extra. We’re going to let him clarify for himself.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Missouri locksmith dressed as George Washington charged for role in Jan. 6th Capitol Insurrection

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Missouri locksmith dressed as George Washington charged for role in Jan. 6th Capitol Insurrection

WASHINGTON D.C. — A Nevada business owner has been arrested and charged for his role in the Capitol Insurrection.

An online tip to the FBI National Threat Operations Center submitted on February 26, 2021 stated,

“I was made aware that an individual that works at Yoder locksmith in Nevada Missouri was involved in the storming of the Capitol on Jan 6th. I am unsure of the gentleman’s first name but know the day of the event he was inside the Capitol and was dressed as George Washington.”

With this information, the FBI reviewed the business’ website and contact numbers and found an image of a man in colonial period attire captioned “Isaac & Kelly Yoder.”

FBI screenshot of “Yoder Lock & Key” website

After cross-referencing the website picture, a Missouri driver’s license photo, social media accounts, photographs from inside the Capitol, CCTV footage, and cell phone usage during the Insurrection the FBI ID’d the man as Isaac Samuel Yoder.

Yoder voluntarily agreed to an interviewed by the FBI on March 16th at the Joplin Resident Agency. At this interview Yoder brought the same outfit seen in photographs and admitted to entering the Capitol on January 6th; saying his family attended the Trump rally with him and that his brothers were exposed to tear gas with one being hit by rubber bullets.

Yoder said he wore a George Washington costume as seen in one Newsweek article titled: “George Washington Says if Capitol Rioters wanted Trouble There’d Be ‘Piles of Bodies.” (Seen below)

Missouri locksmith dressed as George Washington charged for role in
Yoder as seen on January 6th at the Capitol building talking with Capitol Police
BRENT STIRTON/GETTY IMAGES

Footage from the Capitol building’s cameras affirmed Yoder’s testimony showing Yoder in his colonial outfit entering through a west facing door and leaving the same one 18 minutes later.

According to a complaint from the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, Yoder committed multiple violations against United States Code while at the Capitol:

  • (Entering and Remaining in a Restricted Building, in violation of Title 18, United States
    Code, Section 1752(a)(1))
  • (Disorderly and Disruptive Conduct in a Restricted Building, in violation of Title 18,
    United States Code, Section 1752(a)(2))
  • (Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building, in violation of Title 40,
    United States Code, Section 5104 (e)(2)(D))
  • (Parading, Demonstrating, or Picketing in a Capitol Building, in violation of Title 40, United States Code, Section 5104 (e)(2)(G))

A warrant for Yoder’s arrest was served on Wednesday, August 4th at Springfield, Missouri.

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Police ID woman killed in weekend shooting on Interstate 70

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Police ID woman killed in weekend shooting on Interstate 70

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Police have identified a woman killed over the weekend in a shooting on Interstate 70 in north St. Louis that also wounded a man. Police say the shooting happened late Saturday night, when officers were called to an area near the I-70 Madison Street exit. Arriving officers found 27-year-old Kala Taylor in a vehicle with several gunshot wounds. She was taken to a hospital, where she died Sunday. Police say another victim of the shooting — a 29-year-old man — was taken by a private vehicle to a hospital and was last listed in critical but stable condition. Police say three other people at the scene of the shooting were not injured. No arrests have been reported.

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Biden nominates Cole Finegan, longtime Democratic attorney, to be Colorado’s next U.S. attorney

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Biden nominates Cole Finegan, longtime Democratic attorney, to be Colorado’s next U.S. attorney

Denver City Attorney Cole Finegan in a 2004 file image.

President Joe Biden on Tuesday nominated Cole Finegan, a former Denver city attorney who once served under Democratic governors John Hickenlooper and Roy Romer, to be the next U.S. attorney for the District of Colorado.

Finegan, currently a managing partner at Denver’s Hogan Lovells law firm, beat out two other finalists — Denver City Attorney Kristin Bronson and Hetal Doshi, a federal prosecutor — for the region’s top federal law enforcement position.

The White House, in a statement announcing eight other nominations for U.S. attorney positions around the country, said confirming these prosecutors will be critical for addressing the uptick in gun violence over the past 18 months.

Finegan is a veteran of Democratic politics in Colorado going back decades.

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NFL’s greatest toes on turf off to memorable start in ’21

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NFL’s greatest toes on turf off to memorable start in ’21

Matt Prater came up short and paid the price, not once but twice.

His attempt to break his own record for longest field goal in NFL history — a 64-yarder in Denver’s thin air eight years ago — backfired Sunday when a former teammate returned his missed 68-yard attempt in Jacksonville’s heavy air a record-tying 109 yards for a touchdown on the last play of the first half.

Prater’s third-quarter field goal from half that distance ignited the Cardinals’ comeback from a 13-7 halftime deficit that sent the Jaguars to their 18th consecutive loss.

But his record fell anyway.

A thousand miles north, in Detroit’s climate-controlled Ford Field, where Prater plied his craft for the last seven seasons, Baltimore’s Justin Tucker, the most accurate kicker in league history, lined up at his own 40-yard line with three seconds left.

His holder was at the Ravens 44, and the snapper at the Lions 48 after some heroics by Lamar Jackson and a little help from the officiating crew.

Tucker’s attempt from 66 yards out bounced over the crossbar as time expired to send the Ravens to an electric 19-17 win over the Lions.

“That one was more like a kickoff,” said Tucker, who hop-stepped on his way to blasting the ball from his own 44. “It’s like you’re a competitor in a long-drive contest. You just let it rip and hope it stays straight.”

Prater’s league record that had stood for 2,850 days came crumbling down. Although he no longer holds the record for longest field goal, a 64-yarder against the Titans on Dec. 8, 2013, Prater does own the longest field goal for three franchises: Cardinals (62 yards), Lions (63) and Broncos (64).

Kickers have never been this clutch this early, but Kliff Kingsbury having Prater attempt a 68-yarder in Florida was a stretch.

Jamal Agnew returned the miss 109 yards for a touchdown, breaking two tackles and eluding another before sweeping past Prater over the final 10 yards.

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Wildfire burn scars threaten drinking water in Colorado, across the West

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Wildfire burn scars threaten drinking water in Colorado, across the West

By Sara Reardon, Kaiser Health News

Colorado saw its worst fire season last year, with the three largest fires in state history and more than 600,000 acres burned. But some of the effects didn’t appear until this July, when heavy rain pushed sediment from damaged forests down mountainsides, causing mudslides that shut down sections of Interstate 70 for almost two weeks.

Immense quantities of sediment choked the rivers that supply most of the state’s water. In western Colorado’s Glenwood Springs, the water became so murky that the town twice had to shut off the valves that pump water from nearby rivers to avoid overwhelming its filtration system. City managers sent alerts to the town’s 10,000 residents, telling them to minimize water use until the sediment moved downstream.

Wildfires and their lasting effects are becoming a way of life in the West as climate change and management practices cause fires to increase in number, intensity and acreage burned, while extending the length of the fire season. In “burn scars,” where fires decimated forest systems that held soil in place, an increase in droughts followed by heavy rainfall poses a different kind of threat to the water supplies that are essential to the health of communities.

“You know about it; it’s in the back of your head,” said Glenwood Springs resident Paula Stepp. “But until you face it, you don’t know how it’s going to impact your town.”

Dirty, turbid water can contain viruses, parasites, bacteria and other contaminants that cause illness. But experts say turbid water from burn scars is unlikely to make it to people’s taps, because water utilities would catch it first.

Still, the cost to municipal utility systems — and the residents who pay for water — is immense. Rural small towns in particular face the choice between spending millions of dollars to try to filter turbid water or shutting off their intake and risking shortages in areas where water may already be scarce.

And as fires move closer to communities, burning synthetic materials from houses and other buildings can create toxic compounds that leach into water supplies, which is what happened in California after major fires in 2017 and 2018.

“When we put [fires] out, we become less aware of them,” said hydrologist Kevin Bladon, of Oregon State University. But from a water perspective, “that’s when all the problems start.”

Montana’s capital city, Helena, gets its drinking water supply from the Upper Tenmile Creek watershed in a forest thick with trees killed by beetle infestations. City leaders worry a fire would quickly chew through that dry fuel and leave the watershed exposed to sediment contamination. Despite a logging project that cleared many of those trees two years ago, the fire threat remains and city leaders worry the resulting sediment would overwhelm the water treatment plant and shut down the primary water source for 40,000 people.

“If we had a fire up there, depending on where it is and how big it is, it could put the Tenmile plant out for a season or two,” Helena Public Works Director Ryan Leland said.

To protect against that happening, the city is in the early phases of designing a basin that can trap sediment before the water reaches the plant, Leland. The city also recently announced plans to drill three groundwater test wells, which would give them another drinking water supply option if something happens to the Upper Tenmile watershed. Treated water from the Missouri River is the city’s current backup supply.

The Rocky Mountains and about 200 miles separate Glenwood Springs from Greeley, in northeastern Colorado. But the 2020 fire season caused similar problems in both cities, creating burn scars that later flooded, contaminating water sources.

So far this year, Greeley has had to shut off its intake from the Cache la Poudre River for 39 days because the water was contaminated with sediment, ash and organic matter. “Normally we would never turn it off,” said Greeley water and sewer director Sean Chambers.

To cope, the city has been trading water with a nearby agricultural company that owns reservoirs used for irrigation. The swap gives the turbid water to farmers and redirects the reservoir water to Greeley. “If we didn’t have the trade in place, the cost [of buying water] would be astronomical,” Chambers said.

But Chambers admitted this system is a luxury that smaller towns may not enjoy. Greeley is 10 times the size of Glenwood Springs and has spent more than $40 million this year recovering from the Cameron Peak Fire — the largest fire in Colorado history, which burned for four months in 2020. Those costs may climb as rain continues, he said. Larger towns also tend to have better filtration systems that can handle more sediment, which clogs up filters and requires utilities to add chemicals to remove contaminants before the water is safe to drink.

While dry states like Colorado expect fires each year, recent blazes in wetter places like western Oregon have caught researchers off guard. Last September, fires scorched about 11% of the state’s Cascade mountain range, leaving burn scars above rivers and reservoirs that supply much of the state’s water.

“We have to be very proactive,” said Pete Robichaud, a research engineer with the U.S. Forest Service in Moscow, Idaho

After a wildfire is extinguished, Robichaud’s agency and others send teams of specialists to evaluate the risks that erosion and ash pose to water supplies. Their data can help land managers decide whether to take actions like thinning forests above rivers, dredging contaminated reservoirs, covering the area with mulch or seeds to reduce erosion, or forming a plan for alternative water sources.

Even advance notice of a flood could help immensely, said Stepp, the Glenwood Springs resident. She is the executive director of the nonprofit Middle Colorado Watershed Council, which recently worked with the U.S. Geological Survey to install rain gauges along Glenwood Canyon. These monitor weather upstream and notify downstream water users that a sediment-laden flood could be coming.

She said it is crucial for small communities in particular to partner with state and federal agencies. “Basically, we work with everybody,” she said.

Although debris flows can bring soil bacteria into water supplies, city utilities can disinfect them with chemicals like chlorine, said Ben Livneh, a hydrologist at the University of Colorado-Boulder. But those disinfectants can themselves cause a problem: Organic matter from sediment can interact with these chemicals and create carcinogenic byproducts that are difficult and expensive to remove.

Another waterborne danger comes from chemical byproducts and heavy metals from burned structures. “Those would be potentially really problematic to treat,” Livneh said.

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Missouri husband, wife plead guilty in Capitol insurrection

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Missouri husband, wife plead guilty in Capitol insurrection

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri couple have pleaded guilty for their roles in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol in January. The Kansas City Star reports that 30-year-old Kelsey Wilson and 32-year-old Zachary Wilson, both of Springfield, each pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to a misdemeanor count of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building. Kelsey Wilson was arrested in August on the charge. Her husband was arrested in February. Both face up to six months in prison and a $5,000 fine when they’re sentenced Dec. 10. Court records indicated Kelsey Wilson was a new first-grade teacher at Dayspring Christian School in Springfield at the time of her arrest.

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Broncos Week 4 Talking Points: In last two years, starting 4-0 has meant qualifying for playoffs

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Broncos Week 4 Talking Points: In last two years, starting 4-0 has meant qualifying for playoffs

Beat writer Ryan O’Halloran offers up three storylines ahead of the Broncos’ game against the Baltimore Ravens at Empower Field on Sunday.

Chasing 4-0

The Broncos are a narrow home favorite (two points) over Baltimore and have a chance to start 4-0 for the sixth time since 1999. Only three of the previous five teams made the postseason after their quick starts — wild-card loss in 2003, Super Bowl loss in ’13 and Super Bowl win in ’15. In the last two seasons, every team that started 4-0 made the playoffs — Kansas City and New England in ’19 and Buffalo, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Seattle and Green Bay last year. The Broncos have wins of 14, 10 and 26 points over the Giants, Jaguars and Jets, respectively. They are dealing with injury adversity, but the Ravens (2-1) will be the first team to test the Broncos’ in-game resolve.

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Opinion: The Bureau of Land Management belongs in Washington, D.C.

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Opinion: The Bureau of Land Management belongs in Washington, D.C.

Since its inception in 1946, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management has been responsible for sustaining the “health, diversity and productivity” of our nation’s public lands, of which there are 245 million acres today. The agency manages these lands for an array of uses including farming and ranching, outdoor recreation, and energy and mineral development, all of which are critical to our local economies and way of life here in the West.

The previous administration’s decision to relocate BLM headquarters from Washington, D.C., to Grand Junction was a controversial one, to say the least. I’ve heard passionate arguments both for and against the move from respected leaders and stakeholders who I believe have the best of intentions for our public lands. Deciding how and from where to manage our lands and natural resources is not a simple issue.

But as the head of an organization that advocates for natural places, and a lifelong lover and user of public lands, I applaud Interior Secretary Deb Haaland’s recently announced decision to return BLM headquarters to our nation’s capital while expanding BLM presence in the West.

When the relocation to Grand Junction began in 2019, hundreds of D.C.-based staff were reassigned to western cities, ostensibly to provide them with “a greater on-the-ground understanding” of the lands and programs managed by the agency. Local, state and national leaders on both sides of the political aisle argued that the new location would foster better relationships and partnerships in the West, where the vast majority of our public lands are located.

In theory, it might have seemed like a reasonable move. But in reality, the relocation decimated the agency’s invaluable institutional knowledge, which some former staffers say was exactly what the previous administration intended. Nearly nine out of 10 of the reassigned staffers chose to leave the agency rather than move West, according to new numbers released by the Biden administration. An analysis by the Government Accountability Office also found that BLM did not follow best practices for achieving effective reform.

It is misleading to suggest that if BLM is not headquartered in the West, then agency staff are somehow disconnected from and out of touch with the values and interests of public land users and stakeholders. Ninety-seven percent of agency employees were already stationed at field offices throughout the West. My organization, Western Leaders Network, consists of more than 450 local and tribal elected officials across the Interior West who work routinely with local and regional BLM offices on issues that affect our public lands, sacred and cultural sites, air quality, water resources, wildlife, livelihoods and local economies. But the BLM also needs DC-based senior staff to serve as liaisons between westerners and federal lawmakers, and to speak up for our western values.

The strength of this agency depends not only on having boots on the ground in the West, but also having a physical presence in Washington where decisions are made every day that affect western lands, air and water. We need that presence in our nation’s capital to coordinate with other public lands and natural resource agencies, have easy access to and testify before Congress, maintain strong working relationships with key federal leaders, and to fight for adequate funding and staffing in order to better steward America’s lands.

This is not “a partisan attack on rural communities,” as Congresswoman Lauren Boebert has said, but a move to better accommodate all communities. I commend the Interior Department and Secretary Haaland for this decision to move headquarters back to their rightful place in Washington, D.C., while committing to growing the bureau in Colorado and across the West. It is critical that we maintain a robust presence in both so that the agency can best serve public lands and all Americans.

Gwen Lachelt is a former county commissioner of La Plata County, Colorado, and the executive director of Western Leaders Network, a nonpartisan nonprofit organization of local and tribal elected officials across the Interior West who work to advance conservation initiatives and climate solutions.

To send a letter to the editor about this article, submit online or check out our guidelines for how to submit by email or mail.

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Pfizer submits promising data to FDA from vaccine trial with kids ages 5-11

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Pfizer submits promising data to FDA from vaccine trial with kids ages 5-11

In this March 2021 photo provided by Pfizer, vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine are prepared for packaging at the company’s facility in Puurs, Belgium. (Pfizer via AP)

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Pfizer and BioNTech have submitted data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday from a trial on the effects of the COVID-19 vaccine on children between 5-12 years old.

At this time, only children as young as 12 are able to get the Pfizer vaccine.

The Phase 2/3 trial resulted in “robust neutralizing antibody responses” for the children, who received two doses that were smaller than what has been administered to everyone else. The strong immune response came one month after getting the second dose, according to the companies.

“We are pleased to be able to submit data to regulatory authorities for this group of school-aged children before the start of the winter season,” said Dr. Ugur Sahin, CEO and co-founder of BioNTech. “The safety profile and immunogenicity data in children aged 5 to 11 years vaccinated at a lower dose are consistent with those we have observed with our vaccine in other older populations at a higher dose.”

The side effects were also “generally comparable” to the ones that people who are 16-25 years old experienced, according to the companies.

The trial included 2,268 participants who were 5 to 11 years of age and received a 10 µg (microgram) dose level in a two-dose regimen.

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is the only one approved by the FDA for people 16 years and up. It also has Emergency Use Authorization for kids 12-15 years old.

U.S. officials recently allowed certain populations who received the Pfizer vaccine to get booster shots — a third dose administered six months after the last dose to combat waning immunity.

The booster shot is available to eligible people who have received the two-dose Pfizer vaccine at least six months ago. They include people 65 and older as well as people over 18 who have underlying medical conditions, who work in high-risk settings and who live in high-risk settings.

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Clinical trial testing Ivermectin, two other drugs against COVID open for signups

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Clinical trial testing Ivermectin, two other drugs against COVID open for signups

SPARTANBURG, S.C. (WSPA) — A new clinical trial that’s aimed at testing the effectiveness of three common drugs against COVID-19 is now open to all U.S. residents who have tested positive.

The study, conducted by the Duke Clinical Research Institute, is a nationwide double-blind study expected to enroll nearly 15,000 participants from across the United States and hopes to discover new COVID-19 treatments using already existing drugs.

The nationwide effort is called ACTIV-6 and is testing three drugs:

  • Fluticasone, also known as Flonase, a corticosteroid often used for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease that is delivered via inhaler.
  • Fluvoxamine, an antidepressant in pill form.
  • Ivermectin, which is used to treat parasitic infections in both humans and livestock.

The Food and Drug Administration urges against taking Ivermectin to treat COVID-19, but some COVID patients are advocating for the option to take it in hospitals. The trial will allow researchers to test the drug in a safe and controlled environment.

“We have treatments for people with severe COVID-19 who are at high risk for hospitalization or death, but they are complex to administer,” said Adrian Hernandez, MD, the study’s administrative principal investigator in a release. “Currently, there are no approved prescription medications that can be easily given at home to treat mild-to-moderate symptoms of the virus early in its course to prevent worsening of COVID-19.”

Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) are part of the study.

“As I was telling people, if you don’t believe in Ivermectin — or if you do believe in it — this is your chance to contribute to us understanding whether it works or not,” Dr. Leslie Lenert, director of the Biomedical Informatics Center at MUSC, said.

People interested are required to be over 30 years old, have a positive COVID-19 test in the past 10 days and have experienced at least two COVID-19 symptoms within the past seven days. Symptoms include fatigue, difficulty breathing, fever, cough, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, body aches, chills, headache, sore throat, nasal symptoms and/or new loss of sense of taste or smell.

If you meet those requirements, you can sign up and be randomly assigned to one of the three treatments or a placebo.

Once you’re accepted into the trial, the central pharmacies mail the study drug and a pulse oximeter to your home.

Then, participants will take the study medication as directed, fill out daily surveys online and respond to phone call questionnaires on days 14 and 28.

After 90 days, the participants each receive a $100 Amazon gift card as a thank-you gesture for their time and participation in the clinical trial. 

Anyone interested in participating in the ACTIV-6 study can call (843)-792-4675 or visit the study website.

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