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NYC is threatening to call ICE for $250,000 fine for the use of ‘ Illegal Aliens ‘

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NYC is threatening to call ICE for $250,000 fine for the use of ' Illegal Aliens '

The New York City residents may be fined up to $250,000 for threatening ICE calling, criticizing someone for having “restricted English skills” and using “illegal alien” offensive words as well.

The New York City Human Rights Commission announced Thursday that “the threats to call ICE on account of discrimination, derogatory use of’ illegal aliens’ and discrimination on the basis of restricted English skills are illegitimate discrimination under the NYC Human Rights law.” The town announcement identified a list of offensive ways of addressing immigrants, including threats to call the ICE “discriminatory.” It wasn’t immediately clear what New York City considered a “discriminatory” appeal to ICE. “Each act of deliberate discrimination can be evaluated at penalties up to $250,000, and damages are damaging.

Fox reports: The New York City Human Rights Commission has a history of censoring speech that it considers hatred or detrimental. The committee, made up of political candidates, previously prohibited employers and owners by means of gender pronouns other than those preferred by staff and tenants. Violations of such regulations also carried an $250,000 fine if the perpetrators committed’ willed, wanton’ or malicious behavior.’ Thursday’s announcement came when Democrats hit the immigration enforcement raids of the Trump administration and warned them against use of “illegal alien.”

However, as R-Texas Sen. Ted Cruz said, “illegal alien” is the word in federal legislation. Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions specifically directed his Department of Justice not to use terms other than “illegal alien.”

“The term’ undocumented’ does not refer to U.S. code and should not be used to define someone’s illegal existence in the nation,” he said in an email to the agency.

Is Twitter now prohibiting a simple federal law text? 8 U.S.A. Code § 1252c is entitled “Authority for the arrest and detention of certain illegal aliens by State and local law enforcement authorities.” It allows for state or local arrest of illegal foreign felons. https:/t.co/VOnyhcTaquV—Ted Cruz (@tedcruz) 13 September 2018 September 2016

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

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COVID has killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 flu

By CARLA K. JOHNSON

COVID-19 has now killed about as many Americans as the 1918-19 Spanish flu pandemic did — approximately 675,000.

The U.S. population a century ago was just one-third of what it is today, meaning the flu cut a much bigger, more lethal swath through the country. But the COVID-19 crisis is by any measure a colossal tragedy in its own right, especially given the incredible advances in scientific knowledge since then and the failure to take maximum advantage of the vaccines available this time.

“Big pockets of American society — and, worse, their leaders — have thrown this away,” medical historian Dr. Howard Markel of the University of Michigan said of the opportunity to vaccinate everyone eligible by now.

Like the Spanish flu, the coronavirus may never entirely disappear from our midst. Instead, scientists hope it becomes a mild seasonal bug as human immunity strengthens through vaccination and repeated infection. That could take time.

“We hope it will be like getting a cold, but there’s no guarantee,” said Emory University biologist Rustom Antia, who suggests an optimistic scenario in which this could happen over a few years.

For now, the pandemic still has the United States and other parts of the world firmly in its jaws.

While the delta-fueled surge in infections may have peaked, U.S. deaths are running at over 1,900 a day on average, the highest level since early March, and the country’s overall toll topped 675,000 Monday, according to the count kept by Johns Hopkins University, though the real number is believed to be higher.

Winter may bring a new surge, with the University of Washington’s influential model projecting an additional 100,000 or so Americans will die of COVID-19 by Jan. 1, which would bring the overall U.S. toll to 776,000.

The 1918-19 influenza pandemic killed 50 million victims globally at a time when the world had one-quarter the population it does now. Global deaths from COVID-19 now stand at more than 4.6 million.

The Spanish flu’s U.S. death toll is a rough guess, given the incomplete records of the era and the poor scientific understanding of what caused the illness. The 675,000 figure comes from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The ebbing of COVID-19 could happen if the virus progressively weakens as it mutates and more and more humans’ immune systems learn to attack it. Vaccination and surviving infection are the main ways the immune system improves. Breast-fed infants also gain some immunity from their mothers.

Under that optimistic scenario, schoolchildren would get mild illness that trains their immune systems. As they grow up, the children would carry the immune response memory, so that when they are old and vulnerable, the coronavirus would be no more dangerous than cold viruses.

The same goes for today’s vaccinated teens: Their immune systems would get stronger through the shots and mild infections.

“We will all get infected,” Antia predicted. “What’s important is whether the infections are severe.”

Something similar happened with the H1N1 flu virus, the culprit in the 1918-19 pandemic. It encountered too many people who were immune, and it also eventually weakened through mutation. H1N1 still circulates today, but immunity acquired through infection and vaccination has triumphed.

Getting an annual flu shot now protects against H1N1 and several other strains of flu. To be sure, flu kills between 12,000 and 61,000 Americans each year, but on average, it is a seasonal problem and a manageable one.

Before COVID-19, the 1918-19 flu was universally considered the worst pandemic disease in human history. Whether the current scourge ultimately proves deadlier is unclear.

In many ways, the 1918-19 flu — which was wrongly named Spanish flu because it first received widespread news coverage in Spain — was worse.

Spread by the mobility of World War I, it killed young, healthy adults in vast numbers. No vaccine existed to slow it, and there were no antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial infections. And, of course, the world was much smaller.

Yet jet travel and mass migrations threaten to increase the toll of the current pandemic. Much of the world is unvaccinated. And the coronavirus has been full of surprises.

Markel said he is continually astounded by the magnitude of the disruption the pandemic has brought to the planet.

“I was gobsmacked by the size of the quarantines” the Chinese government undertook initially, Markel said, “and I’ve since been gob-gob-gob-smacked to the nth degree.” The lagging pace of U.S. vaccinations is the latest source of his astonishment.

Just under 64% of the U.S. population has received as least one dose of the vaccine, with state rates ranging from a high of approximately 77% in Vermont and Massachusetts to lows around 46% to 49% in Idaho, Wyoming, West Virginia and Mississippi.

Globally, about 43% of the population has received at least one dose, according to Our World in Data, with some African countries just beginning to give their first shots.

“We know that all pandemics come to an end,” said Dr. Jeremy Brown, director of emergency care research at the National Institutes of Health, who wrote a book on influenza. “They can do terrible things while they’re raging.”

COVID-19 could have been far less lethal in the U.S. if more people had gotten vaccinated faster, “and we still have an opportunity to turn it around,” Brown said. “We often lose sight of how lucky we are to take these things for granted.”

The current vaccines work extremely well in preventing severe disease and death from the variants of the virus that have emerged so far.

It will be crucial for scientists to make sure the ever-mutating virus hasn’t changed enough to evade vaccines or to cause severe illness in unvaccinated children, Antia said.

If the virus changes significantly, a new vaccine using the technology behind the Pfizer and Moderna shots could be produced in 110 days, a Pfizer executive said Wednesday. The company is studying whether annual shots with the current vaccine will be required to keep immunity high.

One plus: The coronavirus mutates at a slower pace than flu viruses, making it a more stable target for vaccination, said Ann Marie Kimball, a retired University of Washington professor of epidemiology.

So, will the current pandemic unseat the 1918-19 flu pandemic as the worst in human history?

“You’d like to say no. We have a lot more infection control, a lot more ability to support people who are sick. We have modern medicine,” Kimball said. “But we have a lot more people and a lot more mobility. … The fear is eventually a new strain gets around a particular vaccine target.”

To those unvaccinated individuals who are counting on infection rather than vaccination for immune protection, Kimball said, “The trouble is, you have to survive infection to acquire the immunity.” It’s easier, she said, to go to the drugstore and get a shot.

___

AP Health Writer Tom Murphy in Indianapolis contributed to this report.

___

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

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New York teachers face many obstacles in opening weeks of school

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New York teachers face many obstacles in opening weeks of school

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (WSYR) — Welcoming students back into the classroom full-time was exciting and nerve-wracking for most teachers, with more obstacles caused by more than the pandemic.

“Behaviors were definitely going to be escalated,” said Nicole Capsello, president of the Syracuse Teachers Association. “They haven’t had to be in a structured setting following rules and complying with things, so I think everybody knew that was going to be challenging to begin with.”

The school year is off to a rockier start than most could have imagined. A chaotic day ensued at Henninger High School Wednesday when multiple fights broke out and teachers uncovered many construction-related issues, including doors without locks, nonfunctional security cameras, and fire alarms without covers.

This led to students being asked to stay home Thursday. When they returned on Friday, a fire started in a bathroom sent students home early. “Everybody right now is feeling a little defeated. But I will say that this is not just a one-building issue, it’s not just a one-school district issue,” Capsello said. “It is a societal issue.”

She believes the recent uptick in youth violence in our community and the staffing shortages across all positions, from custodians to food service workers to teachers and administrators is contributing to the rise in obstacles. “We definitely need more adults to be able to come in and help alleviate,” she said.

Capsello believes the teachers she represents need more support. “Clear communication across all parties involved and a partnership with our community is really what’s going to get to the heart of things,” she said. Because it takes a village to not only raise but educate a child.

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Apply here: Join the FOX 2 digital team

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Apply here: Join the FOX 2 digital team

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Are you interested in the world behind the headlines? Do you want to work in the FOX 2 and KPLR 11 newsroom? We are looking for a digital reporter to join our team.

This is a short description of the job:

“The Digital Reporter should be a skilled writer who can craft headlines and content that provide value to the audience and driver user engagement. The reporter will use data to make decisions about audience interest trends. The reporter will be able to reach out to contacts, source the web and find information on social media to build stories that will be high performing across multiple websites. While the reporter will largely work from a single space, the ability to take photos and create video is a plus. A strong knowledge of social media platforms is expected.”

Take your career to the next level or start something new:

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Arvada “Samaritan” killed by single shot after officer mistook him for active shooter, autopsy report says

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Arvada “Samaritan” killed by single shot after officer mistook him for active shooter, autopsy report says

Johnny Hurley (Photo courtesy of Cody Soules via Denver7)

Johnny Hurley, hailed by police as a “good Samaritan” for his actions during the Olde Town Arvada shooting in June, was killed by a single gunshot to the pelvis after a responding officer mistakenly assumed Hurley was the active shooter, according to a coroner’s report released Monday.

Forensic pathologist John D. Carver formally ruled Hurley’s death a homicide, due to that gunshot wound, in the six-page report released by the Jefferson County Coroner’s Office.

The report details the events of June 21, when Hurley confronted active shooter Ronald Troyke, who had just killed Arvada police Officer Gordon Beesley with a shotgun and fired at parked vehicles.

After Troyke returned to his own vehicle to exchange the shotgun for what police have described as an AR-15 rifle, Hurley — who had been shopping nearby when the shooting started — approached the gunman “and shot him several times” with his own handgun, according to the report.

Hurley “removed Troyke’s assault rifle from his body,” Carver wrote in the autopsy report. “Another responding officer then saw the decedent holding the assault rifle, and fired his handgun at him, mistakenly assuming that the decedent was the active shooter.”

Doctors at Lutheran Medical Center in Wheat Ridge declared Hurley dead shortly after he arrived at the hospital, according to the report.

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Patriots QB Mac Jones doesn’t feel restricted by play-calling

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Guregian: The legend of Patriots quarterback Mac Jones is growing

Mac Jones doesn’t feel the offensive play-calling has been too safe or too conservative during the opening two games.

The Patriots rookie quarterback, appearing on WEEI’s “Merloni & Fauria” show Monday, told the hosts he doesn’t feel like he’s being held back.

Basically, it’s on him to make the plays.

“At the end of the day, it’s about moving the ball, taking what the defense gives you,” said Jones. “If they give you the deep shot, then take it. If they give you the short, then take the short. It’s what the defense is doing, really.”

During his weekly appearance on the radio show, Jones was asked a number of questions related to the offense in terms of its troubles in the red zone, and the lack of big plays. He said offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels puts them in a position to succeed.

“Obviously, Josh does a really good job preparing all of us. And we have a plan for what the defense is going to give us,” he said. “We don’t over-plan or anything like that to expect what they might do, or what we think they’re going to do, we just kinda stick to what we do, and he calls great plays, and we gotta execute them better. And, I think the offense, when we watch the film together, we’re all going to say that. We can definitely play better, and execute the plays that were called better, and we will.”

Jones, who completed 22 of 30 passes for just 186 yards in the 25-6 Jets win, also didn’t necessarily feel he was passing up opportunities, although upon further review, he knows he could have gone deep to Nelson Agholor in the end zone on the double-pass against the Jets, instead of going short to Jonnu Smith. So he’d love a do-over on that one.

“Yeah, I think with that type of play, it’s just hard sometimes to read it out as best you can … it’s a one-and-done deal,” he said. “I saw Jonnu flash in front of me, and got it out really quick. If you go back and watch it, I definitely could have held the ball, and made a look before I caught it to see if anyone was around me. I just didn’t have as good of awareness as I should have had.”

Jones said throwing to the open guy shouldn’t be so “confusing or complicated.”

Asked if he was afraid to throw an interception, Jones said he doesn’t fear making mistakes, but given statistics, he definitely errs on the side of caution.

“When you look at turnover statistics, the team that turns the ball over less usually wins,” he said. “I don’t know what it is, but it’s pretty high percentage-wise. … Yesterday, we could have capitalized more on the turnovers we got, but as long as you’re ending every possession with a kick, then things will be moving in the right direction. That’s always what I’ve been taught. But, I think, there may be some things I can adjust, and I will do that and just listen to the feedback I get.”

The former Alabama star was always taught that punts, field goals, or touchdowns with the extra point are fine. Turnovers aren’t. That philosophy has been engrained in him.

“Yeah, I think that’s just an old saying in football. Some coaches see it, some coaches don’t, but from what I’ve been listening to here, we just want to control the ball, and we want to end the possession in a kick,” he said. “Sometimes, it’s going to be a punt. You want them all to be extra points. That’ll be ideal.”

The red zone woes? The Patriots have converted just 2-of-7 opportunities during the two games played.

Jones said there’s been an emphasis on red zone play, it’s more about execution than anything else.

“The field gets tighter. You don’t have space to work with,” he said. “Sometimes that can be an issue, but I think it’s more about us executing the plays that are called, and doing it against tighter looks, and me making more competitive throws. And things like that. I don’t think there’s any big thing we’re missing, it’s just little things.

“Josh has done a good job preparing me in the red zone,” he went on. “I feel it’s more me than anybody else. I can make those tight window throws, and I have in the past. So, we can be better. It just kind of is what it is.”

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State senator’s wife charged with domestic assault

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State senator’s wife charged with domestic assault

CHISHOLM, Minn. — The wife of a Minnesota state senator was arrested Sunday night on charges that she physically abused her husband.

Charlotte Tomassoni, 69, of Chisholm, was charged with misdemeanor domestic assault, committing acts to cause fear of immediate bodily harm or death. Her husband is Sen. David Tomassoni, an independent who represents parts of Itasca and St. Louis counties.

Sen. David Tomassoni, DFL-Chisholm (Courtesy photo)

According to a Chisholm police report, an officer arrived at around 6:36 p.m. at the back door of the residence, where they found David Tomassoni sitting in the kitchen.

He told police officers that his wife, Charlotte, had been yelling at him earlier in the day and that “she was intoxicated and might be high on something,” the police report said. He said she was upset about “past family dynamics,” so he said he left the residence so she could “cool off for a while,” but returned around 4:30 to watch the Minnesota Vikings game on TV.

He told police his wife was still upset, so he went into the basement to get away from her. He said she came downstairs at that time and was yelling at him again. According to the report, she threw his computer and hit him in the chest with a broomstick before returning upstairs.

State senators wife charged with domestic assault
Charlotte Tomassoni (Courtesy Forum News Service)

David Tomassoni was recently diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. Due to his ALS, he has lost a lot of his upper-body strength and he felt he wouldn’t be able to defend himself, the report said.

After she went back upstairs, she yelled down to him that if he came upstairs she was going to stab him with a knife, the report said.

When police entered the home they found her laying on the living room couch, the report said. She was asked to stand up and was patted down for weapons. According to the police report, she appeared to be intoxicated as she was slurring her words, had poor balance and smelled of alcohol.

The report said police observed two 12-packs of beer bottles on the living room floor and several empty beer bottles on the coffee table and floor around the couch. Officers also allegedly observed two steak knives on the kitchen table.

Charlotte Tomassoni was convicted of fourth-degree driving while impaired in 2012 and was sentenced to two years of supervised probation.

Judge Bhupesh Pattni granted Tomassoni conditional release shortly after her arraignment Monday, where she pleaded not guilty. She was granted a public defender. Her next court date is Oct. 4.

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New ‘test and stay’ approach could minimize student quarantine

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New 'test and stay' approach could minimize student quarantine

ATLANTA (NewsNation) — A new COVID testing model is looking to minimize time missed from school due to quarantine. The resource-intensive approach is sometimes called “test to stay.” It is essentially a modified quarantine that allows kids to stay in school as long as they’re tested regularly and adhere to precautions such as wearing masks and social distancing.

Students at Marietta City Schools in Georgia who have come in contact with someone who has COVID have to come to school early every day for seven days and take a rapid test. As long as those tests come back negative, they’re allowed to go to class. If a test comes back positive, they have to quarantine.

Grant Rivera, the superintendent of Marietta City Schools, said he took the proposal to his contacts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among other health authorities. “We’ve always followed the recommended protocols. I don’t want to be reckless. I’m a former special education teacher, high school principal turned superintendent—I don’t want to make up protocols. And I said, ‘Is this scientifically sound?’ And they said, ‘Yes.’”

The tests are free to the district, thanks to a partnership with the Georgia State Health Department. But the approach is considered resource heavy because school administrators and staff are the ones that have to administer these tests.

“Although our state and across the country, they have not yet adapted to a modified quarantine protocol, every scientist and researcher that I talked to said, ‘Yes, if the viral load is so low that it won’t trigger a rapid antigen test, you’re good to come to school that day,’” Rivera said.

Right now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is not endorsing the approach. The agency says it needs more data before it makes any sort of recommendation. It also says that it’s working with the districts and jurisdictions that are using the approach right now, like the one in Marietta, to gather more information so they can see if it actually works at limiting the spread of COVID.

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Jefferson County officer back at work after brush with death

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Jefferson County officer back at work after brush with death

JEFFERSON COUNTY, Mo. – An officer injured last May has returned to duty. The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office says that Deputy Zach Faulkner is back in the office. He will be on “light duty” for the next few months as he continues to recover.

Faulkner was hospitalized in May and spent weeks recovering after a shootout with a murder suspect. He is part of the Jefferson County SWAT team.

The SWAT team was outside the home on Lake Drive when Anthony Legens, 36, began shooting at authorities, who fired back. He was shot and killed later that evening.

Tanya Gould’s body was found in the Cedar Hill home last spring. Investigators were a the residence to search for a missing man.

Faulkner is a SWAT team member. He was shot at and taken to the hospital to have emergency surgery. He eventually recovered with help from the community and BackStoppers.

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More than 1,000 Denver students stage walk-out to call for Tay Anderson’s resignation

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More than 1,000 Denver students stage walk-out to call for Tay Anderson’s resignation

More than 1,000 students walked out of Denver Public Schools classrooms across the city Monday to call for the resignation of school board member Tay Anderson, who was censured by his colleagues last week for “behavior unbecoming of a board member.”

Friday’s vote by the DPS board to publicly reprimand Anderson followed the release of a third-party investigation into allegations of sexual assault against the 23-year-old elected official.

The months-long investigation did not substantiate any of those claims, but did conclude Anderson had flirted online with a 16-year-old student this summer before knowing her age, and made coercive and intimidating social media posts during the investigation.

The students who walked out Monday morning assembled outside the school district’s downtown headquarters, chanting “Hey hey, ho ho, Tay Anderson has got to go,” and “Women’s rights are human rights.” City public safety officials estimated 1,000 to 1,200 students gathered outside the district offices, a DPS spokesman said.

Anderson, during an evening speech broadcast online from Brother Jeff’s Cultural Center in Five Points, took a softer tone than his incendiary remarks Friday. He apologized to those hurt during the investigative process and promised to listen to students’ concerns.

He did not directly address the behaviors for which the board censured him.

“I know this process has been very difficult during already difficult times,” Anderson said. “I hope that over time, and with hard work, I will be able to earn your trust back.”

He also apologized to Denver taxpayers for what he called “fiscal mismanagement” — an apparent reference to the cost of the law firm hired by DPS to conduct the investigation — and recapped some of his achievements as a school board member, before laying out plans for what he still hopes to accomplish during his time on the board.

Meanwhile, as Anderson spoke about “getting back to work,” his school board colleagues were participating in a virtual meeting about student achievement. (Anderson had appeared briefly in the meeting prior to giving his speech.)

Some students at the protest told Chalkbeat Colorado they felt Anderson should resign over the sexual assault allegations — even though they weren’t substantiated.

“Sexual assault is not a thing to play with,” Ashley Robinson, who organized the walkout at North High School, told Chalkbeat. “Nobody is out to get Tay Anderson. It could be Santa Claus, and we would want him out.”

North senior Destinee Mcleain said that while it was significant the sexual assault allegations were not substantiated, she still was concerned about the finding that Anderson had behaved flirtatiously online with a student.

“He has spent enough time around students that he knows a high school student from an adult female,” she told Chalkbeat.

Eleven students from various city high schools also met with DPS Superintendent Alex Marrero, school board president Carrie Olson and vice president Jennifer Bacon.

In the meeting, students detailed their concerns about student safety and said they were “embarrassed and disappointed to see how Director Anderson was responding to the censure by continuing to disparage and attack anyone who was concerned about his behavior towards students,” Olson said during an afternoon news conference inside DPS headquarters.

As a result of Monday’s conversations, school board officials said students would be included in discussions as the board writes a code of conduct for its members.

“Our students’ messages came through today, loud and clear,” Bacon said. “We need to do more to make sure that our students feel safe and that board members are held accountable for everything we do.”

On Friday, a defiant Anderson defended himself before and during the special school board meeting, calling the censure vote a “high-tech lynching.” A host of Black leaders stood beside him to deride white supremacy, referring to the vote and investigation as a “witch hunt.”

Bacon pointedly called out Anderson’s response to the censure, saying the board hopes that he will “not provoke and disparage anyone who has concerns with his behavior.”

Asked about Anderson’s use of the phrase “high-tech lynching” to describe his treatment, Bacon, who is Black, said, “We took the steps necessary to ensure that due process was properly given.”

Anderson forcefully rejected calls to resign Friday ahead of the censure vote. The board has no power to remove Anderson from his post.

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Ticker: Registry resumes some services; Twitter to pay $809.5M to settle lawsuit

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Ticker: Registry resumes some services; Twitter to pay $809.5M to settle lawsuit

The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles on Monday resumed offering some services that had been put on hold during the coronavirus pandemic.

Twenty-one locations statewide will offer appointments for in-person vehicle and driver services, walk-in visits, and business-to-business transactions, which includes bulk transactions for auto dealers and insurance agents, the agency said.

Walk-in services will be available at Braintree, Brockton, Danvers, Easthampton, Greenfield, Fall River, Haverhill, Boston (Haymarket), Lawrence, Leominster, Milford, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Plymouth, Revere, Springfield, Yarmouth, Taunton, Watertown, Wilmington and Worcester.

Twitter to pay $809.5M to settle lawsuit

Twitter said Monday it will pay $809.5 million to settle a consolidated class action lawsuit alleging that the company misled investors about how much its user base was growing and how much users interacted with its platform.

The San Francisco company said the proposed settlement, which must still be signed off by a judge, resolves all claims against it without Twitter admitting any wrongdoing. The original lawsuit filed in 2016 claimed that Twitter executives “knowingly made inaccurate public statements regarding these metrics, and failed to disclose internal information about them, resulting in an inflated share price that fell when the truth about user engagement became known.”

The company said it plans to use cash on hand to pay the settlement in the fourth quarter of 2021. It expects to record a one-time charge as a result.

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