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Does Mixing Cannabis With Tobacco Have Any Benefits?

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Some cannabis users prefer to roll a joint of tobacco and cannabis together into what is known as a “spliff.”This is commonly done in Europe, Australia, and other parts of the world. However, in America, this is not common and many Americans would be surprised to see someone do it.

Reasons for mixing

There is a myriad of reasons why people mix tobacco and cannabis. Most do it due to the unique effect that comes from smoking it. They explain that they experience a smooth, relaxing, and better controlled high compared to when they smoke pure cannabis. Other users report that the mixture gives more energetic effects and a bit of a “head rush.” It is also reported to produce more intense euphoria among some users, and this can be explained by the fact that both tobacco and cannabis bring about euphoria.

Some users also tend to mix cannabis and tobacco to use a smaller amount of cannabis at a time. This was even the reason for the consumption method in the early days when weed was scarce. Another reason for mixing is to help the weed burn better because it is so moist but burns better together with tobacco. Whatever the reason for auser to mix cannabis and tobacco, it is worth noting that each has their preferred consumption method and there is no right or wrong method to use cannabis for recreational purposes.

However, for medicinal use, users should avoid the smoking method and instead use vaporizers or tinctures. Speaking Of medicinal marijuana, it is critical to buy it from trusted and reputable vendors such as Cannaflower to be sure that you get high quality and pure cannabis.

The study on the effect of mixing cannabis and tobacco

The researchers from University College London (UCL) set out to investigate the real effects of mixing cannabis and tobacco.

Mixing temporarily improves memory

The researchers concluded that mixing the two has the advantage of helping with memory. This is attributed to nicotine, which makes one’s memory sharper for a short moment. The effect is vital since the THC makes neuron responses slower.

Mixing has many disadvantages

On the flip side, smoking cannabis together with tobacco has a ton of disadvantages. The UCL research found out that smoking the mixture will raise your blood pressure and heart rate temporarily. However, the biggest disadvantage of a smoking spliffs is the likelihood of addiction due to the addictive nature of tobacco. Marijuana on its own is deemed to be one of the most non-addictive substances, but tobacco is known to be not only one of the most addictive substances but also very dangerous. Some studies suggest that combining the two could lead to a dependence on cannabis.

Statistics show that 61% of people who smoke spliffs are very likely to get hooked on marijuana or even switch to cigarettes. For pure cannabis users, there is a probability of 80% that they will keep away from cigarettes.

Bottom line

While mixing cannabis and tobacco will help the marijuana to last longer and creates a unique sensation when getting the cannabis into the lungs while mixed with a filterless cigarette, there are barely any other benefits of mixing them. Conversely, it is a harmful and terrible idea that can result in lung cancer and a slew of health problems.

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Trudy Rubin: Biden’s principled UN speech contradicted by facts on the ground

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Trudy Rubin: Biden’s principled UN speech contradicted by facts on the ground

President Joe Biden sounded all the right notes in his Tuesday address to the United Nations General Assembly. He spoke on the need for global cooperation against pandemics and the climate crisis, as well as the need to counter rising autocracies by means other than warfare.

As an aspirational framework, the speech was admirable and spelled out what the United States should be aiming for.

Yet, Biden’s words seemed painfully divorced from the realities on the ground, especially after the White House botched the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan, and created a spat with France that further undermines NATO.

Those events raise questions about the Biden team’s foreign policy team’s competence, and its commitment to allies. In addition, the divisive politics of GOP Trumpsters are amplifying the world’s questions about whether America still has the capacity to lead.

Biden’s push for accelerated cooperation on COVID-19 was important. Only a tiny fraction of the vaccine doses promised to poorer nations at a June summit of the world’s richest industrial nations has been delivered. Without a wider global vaccination rate, new variants of the coronavirus will flourish. And without U.S. leadership, a wider — and effective — global vaccination push is unlikely to happen.

Yet, as with climate change, domestic U.S. political divisions are thwarting global progress on vaccinations. The undermining of the domestic vaccine process by leading GOP officials has diminished U.S. credibility worldwide.

Biden’s admirable vaccine rollout should have made America the world leader in fighting the virus. Instead, our pandemic of the unvaccinated shames us on an international stage. This makes allies question Americans’ sanity, along with the functionality of the American government and its ability to lead.

So, friends and foes listened politely on Tuesday when Biden rightly called for global action on the coronavirus and the climate crisis, as well as on upholding the U.N. human rights charter and shaping new rules on advanced technology. But even our friends question how a viciously divided America can lead in the future. The adversaries gleefully watch America tear itself apart.

Moreover, Biden’s vocal emphasis on allies seemed strangely disconnected from recent White House maneuvers. There was no coordination with NATO allies on the decision to pull all U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by Aug. 31, even though the allies had 7,500 troops in the country, three times more than the Americans. The botched departure was a slap at NATO and raises questions about the competence of the current State Department leadership.

A further insult to a NATO ally soon followed, when Biden announced a new security accord with Australia and Great Britain that excluded France. Australia also junked a $66 billion deal for the nation to buy conventional French submarines in favor of a new contract for the U.S. and the U.K. to help the Aussies build nuclear-powered submarines. Yes, the new subs will be technologically superior, but French leaders were justifiably furious that they were not informed until the last minute.

This is no way to treat a historic ally, at a time when Biden is touting the critical importance of fellow democracies in competing with Beijing. No wonder many pundits are now comparing Biden’s dissing of allies with the tactics of Trump.

This brings us to the issue of China, which was a subtext of Biden’s U.N. speech (even though the word China was never used).

Biden stressed that “we are not seeking a new Cold War” but said that “the United States will compete, and we’ll compete vigorously, and lead with our values and our strength.” He added, “We’ll stand up for our allies and our friends and oppose attempts by stronger countries to dominate weaker ones, whether through changes to territory by force, economic coercion, technical exploitation, or disinformation.”

And he repeated one of the most important themes of his presidency: “We’ll lead not merely by the example of our power, but by the power of our example.” Or as he told the Munich Security Conference in February, “We’re at an inflection point between those who argue that … autocracy is the best way forward and those who understand that democracy is essential.”

In other words, unlike Trump’s saber-rattling and tariff wars, Biden recognizes that we can’t compete with China unless we up our game at home in infrastructure, education and advanced technology. And we can’t counter Chinese claims that its autocratic model — and internal repression — best suits the 21st century unless we demonstrate that democracy still works.

His call for showing “the power of our example” was the most poignant moment of Biden’s speech because it spoke to the reality of the moment.

America is still capable of global leadership — if it pulls together. The Biden team can overcome its early mistakes and reboot its methods of operation. And voters can still sideline those who deny Biden’s win, oppose vaccines, and have the power to sink this country.

But if all of the above ends in failure, the ideals voiced by Biden at the United Nations will be remembered as so much hot air.

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Netflix buys the complete works of ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ author Roald Dahl

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Netflix buys the complete works of ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory’ author Roald Dahl

A Prop Store employee holds a Wonka Bar from the film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory on display in the Prop Store head office near Rickmansworth, Enlgnad in 2018. (Andrew Matthews/PA via AP)

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — Oompa-loompa doompadee doo, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory has a new home!

Netflix has acquired the works of Roald Dahl, the late British author whose books have spurred several movies (and remakes of those movies) like Matilda, James and the Giant Peach, and of course, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.

The video streaming giant said Wednesday that it acquired the Roald Dahl Story Co., which manages the rights to the author’s characters and stories. No financial terms were disclosed.

The deal builds on a partnership struck in 2018 to create a slate of animated TV series, under which “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” is getting a reboot by Academy Award winning filmmaker Taika Waititi and Netflix is working with Sony on an adaptation of “Matilda the Musical.”

The new deal paves the way for Netflix to bring all of the author’s back catalogue to screens.

“These projects opened our eyes to a much more ambitious venture – the creation of a unique universe across animated and live action films and TV, publishing, games, immersive experiences, live theatre, consumer products and more,” Netflix Co-CEO Ted Sarandos and Luke Kelly, managing director of the Roald Dahl Story Co. and Dahl’s grandson, said in a joint statement.

“As we bring these timeless tales to more audiences in new formats, we’re committed to maintaining their unique spirit and their universal themes of surprise and kindness, while also sprinkling some fresh magic into the mix,” the statement said.

Dahl died in 1990 at the age of 74 but his books, which also include “The BFG,” “The Twits” and “Fantastic Mr. Fox,” remain popular with young readers, with more than 300 million copies sold worldwide and translations in 63 languages.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Child helps mom during carjacking by pistol-whipping driver

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Child helps mom during carjacking by pistol-whipping driver

ALTON, Ill. – Fall is officially here. It’s a beautiful start to the new season. So many things to look forward to, like cozy sweaters, pumpkin spice lattes, and of course the change in the colors. A popular spot to view the beautiful colors is along the Great River Road in Illinois.

There are 33 miles of beautiful colors to see this season along this stretch, located just 25 minutes from downtown St. Louis. Experts in the field say that during the year, leaves are filled with chlorophyll but as trees go dormant for winter, they turn off that chlorophyll and that’s how we get the change in colors.

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State fines oil, gas company $2M after finding a pattern of violations

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State fines oil, gas company $2M after finding a pattern of violations

Regulators imposed a $2 million penalty on a Denver oil and gas company Tuesday for a series of violations to state rules.

The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission decided there was a pattern of violations by the family-owned K.P. Kauffman Co., causing the panel to increase the fine from $1.8 million. The $2 million penalty is the second-largest levied by the COGCC.

The company had faced losing its ability to operate in Colorado if the commission had decided to suspend a certificate needed to transport oil and gas from the well site and prohibited it from receiving new permits.

The COGCC fined Kerr McGee, a subsidiary of Occidental Petroleum Corp., $18.25 million for its part in a 2017 house explosion in Firestone that killed two men and injured a woman. In 2018, the agency fined Noble Energy $1.6 million for violations.

“The decisions made today underscore the main goal for the COGCC as a regulator, which is for operators to be in compliance to ensure protections for public health, safety, welfare, wildlife and environmental resources,” the commission said in a statement about the K.P. Kauffman ruling.

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Ken Jeong flexes his MD: ‘Don’t get medical advice from Nicki Minaj’

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Ken Jeong on the Late Late show

On his Monday appearance on “The Late Late Show with James Corden,” comedic actor Ken Jeong debunked Nicki Minaj’s testicle-swelling vaccine myth tweet and shone a light on the Delta COVID-19 variant.

Medically inaccurate: In the episode, show host Corden asked Jeong, 52, a hypothetical question on whether the COVID-19 vaccines could cause testicular swelling in patients, a nod to the American rapper’s viral tweet from last week. Jeong was a medical doctor before becoming an actor, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

  • Citing his wife, who is also a medical doctor, Jeong said, “I think between the two of us, and I’ve talked to my wife about this, we can confidently say that any of the COVID vaccines — MRNA, adenoviral DNA vector — any of those vaccines do not lead to a swelling of testicles, called elephantiasis, in any cousin, nephew [or] relative.” He added, “It does not cause any ball-swelling whatsoever.”
  • The “Masked Singer” host also joked, “Don’t get medical advice from Nicki Minaj. I do get a little cardiology advice from Cardi B because she’s a licensed cardiologist.”

On the Delta variant: Speaking about the pandemic, Jeong said the medical community could have done a better job at sharing information about COVID-19 and the Delta variant, which is now the predominant strain in the U.S. and the world, NPR reported.

  • I think that there’s so much misinformation out there and not just by extremists,” he said. “There is just so much confusion. I just think we could’ve done a better job messaging just like, ‘This came unexpected. We were unprepared for this because prior to May and June we didn’t know the delta variant would be the predominant strain globally.’”
  • Jeong then explained that what makes the Delta variant so contagious is that the amount of virus in the patient’s nasopharynx is “a thousand times the concentration of the original COVID strain.”
  • The licensed physician compared the vaccines to an umbrella that protects people from the rain, or in this case, COVID-19. “But with this Delta variant, you have a double umbrella, and there’s a monsoon, there’s a hurricane coming down. You are going to get wet. You are going to get affected,” he explained.
  • If that is the case, that this Delta surge does pass in a few months, then there can be some form of population immunity where we can all have some semblance of normality at least in the spring of 2022,” Jeong added.

The award: Corden also noted later on in the interview that Jeong was recently inducted in to the Asian Hall of Fame, to which the actor said he was “so honored and speechless.”

  • The organization named Jeong as an inductee in a news release on Sept. 16. He is joined by other prominent Asian community members, including American DJ producer Steve Aoki, First Filipino-American woman Chief Justice of California Tani Cantil-Sakauye, and many more.
  • Jeong said their aim was to get the message out “to stop Asian hate. Stop with the weaponizing of ‘kung-flu’ and ‘China virus.’” He added, “Once this pandemic reaches a new meadow of end, then we as an Asian American culture can also have some peace as well.”

Featured Image via The Late Late Show with James Corden

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ISL football: Lost year makes new season hard to predict

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ISL football: Lost year makes new season hard to predict

All Independent School League football coaches agree upon this: there is a great deal of uncertainty heading into the season.

COVID-19 wiped out the 2020 ISL/Prep football season. Given that, hope springs eternal for the schools as they trot out on the field this Saturday to play a meaningful game for the first time since November 2019.

BB&N should be one of the teams to beat in the ISL. Arizona-bound linebacker Tyler Martin has been a starter since the eighth grader. Tom Porell and Ty Harding will be two-way starters at wide receiver and defensive back, while Shane Hanafin returns at quarterback. Hanafin’s younger brother, Ronan, will join Porell and Harding in the secondary.

The offensive line will be keyed by Nick Ciaffoni, Thaddeus Foote, Declan Pflaumer and James Staknis. Other key players figure to be Jake Berglund (LB/FB), Isaiah Kacyvenski (WR/DB), Jay Kulkarni (LB/HB), Brian Brennan (OL/DL), Jack Kelley (LB/WR), Brett Elliott (TE/DE) along with Westford transfer Bo Maccormack (RB/DB).

If you’re looking for a team capable of bouncing back, look no further than Lawrence Academy, which struggled with numbers in 2019. Notre Dame-bound lineman Ty Chan leads an offensive line that includes stalwarts Hollis Dirstine and Ryan O’Connor. Ryan Puglisi is a sophomore quarterback many feel is destined for stardom, while tight end Matt Ragan has pledged to play on at Boston College.

Milton Academy will be in the hunt once again as 11 starters return. Luke Thorbahn and Jackson Smith are the top running backs, Duncan MacDonald, Jack Wilson and Dan Rosenberg are the key offensive linemen.

The linebacking corps should be solid as Sam Jaffe and Jack Crowley are back along with defensive backs Erich Clarke, Ben Waterman and Mathias Fowler. Jacob Holtschlag will be the starter at quarterback.

Belmont Hill will be solid in the trenches with Nolan Parchesky, Calogero LoGrasso and Jack Henderson back on the line. Michael Ahonen (DB), Harry Lodge (DE) and Sean Egan (LB) are expected to be leaders on defense along with Brian Gallucci (DB). Albert McField and Bert Greene are expected to share the running back duties, while Matt Martines will be one of the better kickers in the ISL.

Governor’s will look to linebackers Matt Shaw and Huriel Calice as well as quarterback Tristan Aboud.

Middlesex won the Mark Conroy Bowl in 2019 and leftovers from that team include three-year lineman Nick DeBruin, Kevin Ma and Peter Sleeper. Quarterback Cam Fries has a veteran group of receivers led by Mark Conde, Liam Connor, Nate Crozier and Eon Morrissey. Liam Connor is one of the top kickers in the state.

St. Sebastian’s will lean on captains Ryan Donovan (OL/DL), Ben Frisoli (WR/DB), Cormac Wright (WR/DB) and speedy Zion Simmons (WR/RB/DB). Quarterback Braeden Donovan will run the show and work behind a line keyed by John Cox and Kristian Nordby as well as Donovan.

Noble & Greenough will rely on OG/DT Cam Charron (Yale commit), FB/LB Jake Bollin, WR/DB Matt Travisano and WR/DB Joey Duggan. Tabor will be young thus RB Javar Williams, WR/LB Brock Mozoki, LB Mikey Croteau and SS Hector Perez are expected to shoulder a bigger load.

Brooks returns QB/DB Michael Wolfendale, WR/DB Rayden Waweru, WR/DB Fru Nkimbeng and linemen Jack O’Brien and Dave Thomson. Groton should be solid in the skill positions as QB Patrick Eldredge, TE Henry Jamison, RB Christopher Kadri, FB Bensen Han and WR Logan Taylor are back along with linemen Forest Nelson and Luke Romano.

Roxbury Latin has linebackers Luke DeVito and James Birch back, while Aidan Brooks is a three-year starter at quarterback. There is depth in the skill positions with Harry Lonergan, Angus Leary and Birch at running back, while Chris Weitzel, Antonio Morales and Charlie Clough are the top receivers. Thayer Academy has the heavily recruited Okunlola brothers, Samson (OT/DT) and Samuel (DE/TE) back along with RB/LB Dylan McDonough.

St. George’s featues several experienced players on both sides of the ball, led by WR/DB Alpha Barry, Sr., OL/DL Fritz Nottebohm, OL/DE Bilal Khan, LB Daimien Garcia, WR/DB Bryce Ferrell, OL/DL Jeremy Martinez, C Conor Weeks, LB Rejos Neopaney, RB/LB Diego McCray, RB/LB Jesse Guay and WR/DB Garrett Gray. Rivers returns a quartet of starters from 2019 in OL/DL Samuel Lyons, OL/DL Daniel Shanley, WR/DB Kalyl Lindsey and TE/DL Brendan Poirier.

St. Mark’s went through a winless campaign in 2019 and will be looking to TE/LB Zaki Williams, FS Brendan Peters, WR/SS Grady St. John and LB/OL Dwayne Hinds to turn things around. In addition, OL/DL Liam Groh, RB/LB Robert Dooley, RB/LB Levi McAllister and WR/DB Si Jones are expected to play major roles.

Among the local schools competing in the Evergreen League, Dexter Southfield should have one of the top offensive lines around with West Virginia commit Sully Weidman, Netinho Olivieri and Liam Andrews leading the way. Derik Nelson and Mason Hatfield will be the featured backs, while Jack Keleher is a returning two-way starter at tight end and defensive end.

Pingree will look to two-way lineman Nico Mangano and defensive back Jack Feeks as returning starters. QB/FS Hunter Weidman and QB/DE Alex Theriault are two more to watch.

PLAYERS TO WATCH

Tristan Aboud, Sr., QB, Governors; Michael Ahonen, Sr., WR/DB, Belmont Hill; Liam Andrews, So., OL/DL, Dexter Southfield; Alpha Barry, Sr., WR/DB, St. George’s; Jake Bollin, Sr., RB/LB, Noble & Greenough; Aidan Brooks, Sr., QB, Roxbury Latin; Huriel Calice, Sr., LB, Governor’s; Cam Charron, Sr., OL/DL, Noble & Greenough; Nick Ciaffoni, Sr., OL/DL, BB&N; Jackson Conners-McCarthy, Jr., WR/LB, Brooks;Jack Crowley, Jr., LB, Milton Academy; Luke DeVito, Sr., OL/LB, Roxbury Latin; Ryan Donovan, Sr., OL/DL, St. Sebastian’s; Joey Duggan, Jr., WR/DB, Noble & Greenough; Thaddeus Foote. Sr., OL/DL, BB&N; Ben Frisoli, Sr., WR/DB, St. Sebastian’s; Daimien Garcia, Sr., LB. St. George’s; Ronan Hanafin, Jr., WR, BB&N; Shane Hanafin, Sr., QB, BB&N; Ty Harding, Sr., WR, BB&N; Mason Hatfield, Sr., RB/DB, Dexter Southfield; Dwayne Hinds, Sr., LB, St. Mark’s, Sam Jaffe, Sr., LB, Milton Academy; Henry Jamison, Sr., TE/LB, Groton; Christopher Kadri, Sr., RB/DB, Groton; Jack Keleher, Sr., TE/DE, Dexter Southfield; Kalyl Lindsey, Sr., DB, Rivers; Harry Lodge, Sr., DE/TE, Belmont Hill; Calogero LoGrasso, Sr. OL/DL, Belmont Hill; Samuel Lyons, Sr., OL/DL, Rivers; Duncan MacDonald, Sr., OL, Milton Academy; Tyler Martin, Sr., LB, BB&N; Matt Martines, Sr., PK, Belmont Hill; Dylan McDonough, Sr., RB/LB, Thayer; Brock Mozoki, Jr., LB, Tabor; Derik Nelson, Sr., RB, Dexter Southfield; Samson Okunlola, Jr., OT/DT, Thayer; Samuel Okunlola, Jr., DE/TE, Thayer; Netinho Olivieri, Sr., OL/DL, Dexter Southfield; Declan Pflaumer, Sr., OL/DL, BB&N; Brendan Poirier, Jr., TE/DL, Rivers; Thomas Porell, Sr., WR, BB&N; Daniel Shanley, Sr., OL/DL, Rivers; Matt Shaw, Jr., LB, Governor’s Academy; Zion Simmons, Jr., RB/WR/DB, St. Sebastian’s; Jackson Smith, Sr., LB, Milton Academy; Logan Taylor, Sr, WR, Groton; Luke Thorbahn, Sr., RB, Milton Academy; Matt Travisano, Sr., WR/DB, Noble & Greenough; Sully Weidman, Sr., OL/DL, Dexter Southfield; Javar Williams, Sr., RB, Tabor; Zaki Williams, Sr., TE, St. Mark’s; Jack Wilson, Sr., OL/DL, Milton Academy; Cormac Wright, Sr., WR/DB, St. Sebastian’s

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Minneapolis ophthalmologist to compete on Thursday’s episode of ‘Jeopardy’

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Minneapolis ophthalmologist to compete on Thursday’s episode of ‘Jeopardy’

Caroline Minkus, an ophthalmologist from Minneapolis, is set to compete on “Jeopardy” in an episode that airs at 4:30 p.m. Thursday on KARE 11.

Currently in its 38th season, “Jeopardy” is the top-rated quiz show on television and attracts a weekly audience of more than 20 million viewers.

“Jeopardy” has made headlines in recent months following the death of longtime host Alex Trebek in November. Producers invited a series of guest hosts – including Katie Couric, LeVar Burton, Anderson Cooper and Aaron Rodgers – before selecting executive producer Mike Richards as Trebek’s replacement.

Just over a week after that announcement, an online expose revealed Richards had made controversial remarks on a podcast and had made questionable decisions during his time at “The Price Is Right.” Richards taped one week of shows and then stepped down from the position.

At the end of August, he was fired from the show. Ken Jennings and Mayim Bialik will sharing hosting duties through the end of the year.

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Scientists awarded the Albany Prize for research on COVID vaccines

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Scientists awarded the Albany Prize for research on COVID vaccines

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Three scientists have won the 2021 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research, a distinguished prize, during an awards ceremony on Wednesday. Their findings allowed for the rapid development of mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines.

The recipients are:

  • Barney S. Graham, M.D., Ph.D., former Deputy Director, Vaccine Research Center, and Chief, Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health
  • Katalin Karikó, Ph.D., Senior Vice President, RNA Protein Replacement Therapies BioNTech SE, and Adjunct Professor of Neurosurgery, the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
  • Drew Weissman, M.D., Ph.D., the Roberts Family Professor of Vaccine Research, the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

RNA is a molecule found in human cells. Pieces of RNA are used to construct proteins inside the body so that new cells can grow. There are several different types of RNA, including mRNA (messenger RNA), to build proteins necessary for human life. mRNA is used in the COVID vaccines produced by Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna.

Since 2001, the annual award of $500,000 has been granted to those who have altered and positively impacted the course of medical research. In 2020, the program paused due to the pandemic. Because of this, this year’s recipients will collectively receive $1 million.

The Albany Prize is one of the most significant prizes in medicine and science in the United States.

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  • Republican senators won’t budge on debt limit increase as Democrats push big spending bill

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Dive team joins search for person of interest in Gabby Petito’s death, Brian Laundrie

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Dive team joins search for person of interest in Gabby Petito’s death, Brian Laundrie

You can find the latest on the investigation involving Gabby Petito and Brian Laundrie hereDownload the WFLA app for breaking news push alerts and sign up for breaking news email alerts.

VENICE, Fla. (WFLA) – Authorities in Sarasota County say they do not have Brian Laundrie in custody, despite social media rumors.

Search crews headed back to the Carlton Reserve in Venice on Wednesday to look for the 23-year-old. Around noon, the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office SURF (Sheriff’s Underwater Recovery Force) team pulled up to the Carlton Reserve to assist with the search.

The sheriff’s office explained SURF Team members are divers who are called upon to search for evidence in bodies of water. According to North Port Police PIO Josh Taylor, it’s just part of the overall search process right now.

“At this time, this does not mean anything has been found,” he said.

North Port Police Commander Joe Fussell, who is leading the search at Carlton, said Wednesday law enforcement is “hungry” to find Laundrie.

“We’ve deployed numerous resources and we’re trying to cover every acre of this preserve,” he said.

Laundrie is the only person of interest in the death of Gabby Petito. Police say the 22-year-old woman from North Port disappeared while on a road trip with Laundrie. The Teton County coroner confirmed Tuesday a body found in Wyoming belongs to Petito. Her death has been ruled a homicide.

Law enforcement in Florida have been focusing their search efforts for Laundrie on the 25,000-acre nature reserve since Friday when Laundrie was reported missing by his family.

According to police, loved ones claim Laundrie left his North Port home to hike in Carlton Reserve on Tuesday, Sept. 14 and hasn’t been seen since.

Multiple agencies, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, North Port Police Department and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission are involved in the search. Since the start, crews have been open about challenges they’re facing during their efforts.

“We’re expecting to get wet by the end of the day and check the entire area for Brian Laundrie,” Fussell said Tuesday.

According to officers, 75% of the area they’re searching is underwater. Resources involved in the search include ATVs, UTVs, drones and K-9s.

Police say during their days of searching in the reserve, they haven’t found any significant items.

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College Football Playoff expansion stalls as commissioners sort through issues

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College Football Playoff expansion stalls as commissioners sort through issues

A plan to expand the College Football Playoff stalled Wednesday when a key committee was unable to reach consensus on whether to grow the postseason format from four to 12 teams.

The 10 major college conference commissioners and Notre Dame’s athletic director who make up the management committee met to share feedback from their members and address concerns about the expansion proposal that was unveiled in June.

“As the committee moves forward, there remains issues to be discussed,” CFP Executive Director Bill Hancock said in a statement. “Given the complexity of these matters, the management committee will meet again in Chicago next week to continue our discussions.”

The meeting in the Dallas area, which was attended in person by some of the participants and virtually by others, was a prelude to the Chicago session that was supposed to include the CFP board of managers.

The board is comprised of university presidents and chancellors representing each conference. The board has final say in all matters related to the playoff and there was hope the management committee would bring the presidents a recommendation to approve a format change.

Instead, the management committee will reconvene next week, with the presidents joining via Zoom. No vote is expected.

Since the public rollout of the 12-team playoff plan, there have been concerns raised about components of the format, including the possibility of increasing the number of games in a season required to play for a championship to as much as 17. There were also concerns about the impact subsequent conference realignment could have on a new version of the CFP.

In July, the Southeastern Conference invited Texas and Oklahoma to leave the Big 12 and join the powerhouse league in 2025 after the Big 12’s current television contracts expire.

The Big 12 responded by inviting American Athletic Conference members Houston, Cincinnati and Central Florida to join the league along with BYU, which is a football independent that also competes in the West Coast Conference.

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