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Ted Cruz: Missiles fired by Iran’s US troops ‘ Paid For Billions of Obama ‘

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Ted Cruz: Missiles fired by Iran's US troops ' Paid For Billions of Obama '

According to Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), Iran was given “missiles fired on US troops on Tuesday by Iran paid for the billions Obama gave.”

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) shot the Obama administration in a Fox News interview Tuesday saying that Obama’s policy towards a state terror sponsor number one was “appeasement” Iran launched more than ten U.S. military and coalition forces ballistic missiles in Iraq on Tuesday.

“I think you’ve seen a dramatic shift if you look at Iran’s policy. The policy was appeasement under Barack Obama, “Cruz said. “The policy under Obama’s catastrophic Iranian nuclear deal was to give Iran more than $100 billion. Cruz went on to state: “The weapons we’ve seen on US servicemen tonight are paid for by the billions the Obama administration has poured into the Ayatollah with and if history teaches anything, it won’t give billions of dollars who hate you and want to kill you.” They literally flown $1.7 billion cash in unmarked bills into the dead of night on pallets in Iran. I don’t want a war. I don’t want a war. Neither do I believe you, Senator. But there must be an answer, doesn’t it?

CRUZ: Sean, I believe it’s just right. Iran’s extremely dangerous. He was the world’s most dangerous terrorist when you look at Soleimani and take Soleimani out. The Defense Department told us that he was directly responsible for the deaths of at least 603 Americans. Women and servicemen. Women. He has led terror groups worldwide, including Hamas, targeting Americans, targeting civilians and picking him up has made America safer. As we look at this attack tonight, we see the Ayatollah Khamenei striking back to America and targeting our bases. But I’m going to say that and I think what you cautioned about in your opening monolog is right. We’re not going to get into a prolonged Middle East Land War. We won’t do it. We won’t. When you see Democrats and the media lightening up their hair and saying we’re going into World War III, it’s paranoia, and they hate Donald Trump, because we all used to get together and agree that when there’s a terrorist attacking America, maybe Soleimani has just orchestrated an attack against the United States. In recent days, the Embassy has said that taking a terrorist is a good thing. I commend President Trump for his strength following the principles of peace, but at the same time we will not harm our sons and daughters for an extended battle in the Middle East.

HANNITY: One of the things we should be thankful for living in the greatest country that God gave man above, this country is our great army, the United States of America, and our sophisticated weapons. One thing we can trust is that Iran’s economy has been greatly affected. Who would think of bribing mullahs and bribing Kim Jong-il? That is the question. In Iran, Senator, they have three main refineries. One. Three. One day, I’d imagine those refineries blew up. They had a domestic problem because that would lead to the people of Iran being very bad. If they want to change the regime, it’s up to them. Perhaps we could help them in some ways with arms, but we are not sending our sons and daughters there.

CRUZ: I think you saw a dramatic shift when you look at Iran’s policy. The policy was appeasement under Barack Obama. The policy under Obama’s disastrous Iranian nuclear deal was to give Iran over $100 billion. In the dead of night, in unmarked bills they literally flew $1.7 trillion in cash into Iran. In a very real sense, the missiles we saw fired on U.S. men and women tonight were paid by the billions of the Obama government that flooded the ayatollah and that, if history teaches anything, does not give billions of dollars that hate you and want to kill you.

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Storm survey: RV park decimated by EF-3 tornado in Fredericktown

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Storm survey: RV park decimated by EF-3 tornado in Fredericktown

MADISON COUNTY, Mo. – Located about 90 miles south of St. Louis, Fredericktown appeared to have sustained the worst of the damage from the strongest tornado to hit the region Sunday evening.

A National Weather Service survey team reported at least an EF-3 tornado hit the area, pending further investigation. The Enhanced Fujita Scale goes from 0-5, with 0 being the weakest.

EF-3 tornados have wind speeds of up to 165 miles per hour.

The view of widespread damage on the outskirts of town from Bommarito Automotive Group SkyFox was staggering. Up close, the views on the ground were heartbreaking.

A home just behind 72 West Motors RV/Camper sales off of Highway 72 had its roof torn off. Five people were inside hoping to make it out alive. Fortunately, they did.

“As soon as I said, ‘I think we need to go downstairs,’ it felt like a bomb going off behind me, which was the roof getting ripped off and falling in and all the attic insulation blinding everybody,” said A.J. Smith, standing outside the roofless house. “As this was happening, I ran into my dad’s room. I shook him real quick. He jumped up. I just scooped him up like a little baby and ran downstairs.”

They huddled near a basement support beam, he said.

The entire fleet of 50 new campers at 72 West Motors was damaged or destroyed; campers worth $40,000 to $100,000 or more.

Across the highway and nearby fields, the Black River Electrical Cooperative was also wiped out, along with a couple more homes and businesses.

Most of Black River’s repair trucks were idled awaiting a damage assessment, Monday, as opposed to be used to restore customers’ power.

“We’re used to that (role) but not this (being a tornado victim),” a spokesman said.

Enough trucks remained in service and/or were brought in from the other providers to have power restored to about 5,000 of 6,400 customers who lost service as of 3:00 p.m. Monday, he said.

No one was hurt.

No one was hurt at 72 West Motors either.

“I’ve never been through it. I’ve seen this stuff on TV. I’ve always felt bad for the families. I never thought I’d be one of them,” said Gary Stephens, owner of 72 West Motors. “I know what it feels like to be one of them and it’s not a very good feeling. “There’s always a bright side you know. I’ve got so many friends that’s come by here, so many people, customers drove plum from Springfield. Nobody got hurt. All my family is good and all my workers. My workers mean a lot to me.”

Homes and businesses within the Fredericktown city limits suffered very little damage but most were without power.

They are on the municipal power grid and not Black River’s.

It could be days before everyone’s power is restored, according to authorities.

Missouri State Highway Patrol Lt. Michael Lynch said as of late Monday night there was no curfew set in place for Fredericktown. He said it is not safe for people to be out on the roadways at night if they don’t have to, because there is still debris in on roadways.

Lynch added that authorities have rolling street closures to allow linemen and crews room to work while they restore power.

“The fact that nobody was hurt, best-case scenario for a bad situation, we had no reported injuries, from that we had one reported afterwards and it was relatively minor considering everything,” he said.

Lynch said there was one report of a minor hand injury after, but he believes it was an injury from cleaning up or being in the rubble. 

Meanwhile, the National Weather Service is still looking for damage. They are asking the public to tweet pictures of it to them with the hashtags #mowx #ilwx. They are using the images to ask people if they would like to participate in a damage survey.

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  • Fredericktown, Missouri
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  • Fredericktown, Missouri
  • Fredericktown, Missouri
  • Fredericktown, Missouri
  • Fredericktown, Missouri
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  • 1635195080 306 Storm survey EF 3 tornado hit near Fredericktown Sunday
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  • 1635195080 209 Storm survey EF 3 tornado hit near Fredericktown Sunday

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EF-2 tornado in north-central Missouri hits propane supplier business; on ground for 30 miles

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EF-2 tornado in north-central Missouri hits propane supplier business; on ground for 30 miles

LINN COUNTY, Mo. – An EF-2 tornado was on the ground for more than 30 miles Sunday in north-central Missouri that hit a propane supplier and left some without a home.

Linn County Emergency Management Director Shelby Creed said the tornado was on the ground as it traveled across the entire county for 31 miles.

“I really wasn’t sure how bad it was until we got out there today and did some preliminary damage assessments and actually got to see how bad it was,” Creed said Monday.

The tornado touched down around 4:30 p.m. after residents in Linn County were on high alert for severe weather.

“We then paged out the effective fire departments to activate the storm spotters, then set off the sirens for the effective towns in Linn County,” Creed said.

The National Weather Service spent Monday surveying the damage before confirming it was an EF-2 tornado that hit Purdin, the north-central part of the county. A propane business known as MO Energy Propane was hit, throwing the office building off its foundation. The 120-mile per hour winds tossed empty propane tanks around. On Monday, the property was covered in shingles, wood pieces, parts of the steel structure, and office supplies.

Along Missouri Route 5 across from the propane business, the tree line was covered in debris like shed siding, installation, and other objects. A home on Expo Lane, about a mile southwest of the propane business, was ripped apart; the entire roof, garage, and shed were gone. Family members of the homeowners said the couple was down in the basement when the tornado hit.

“There was quite a bit of damage,” Creed said. “I’m really surprised we did not get more calls. There’s quite a bit of damage to houses, some trees, outside buildings, and power lines.”

The tornado traveled for more than 30 miles before stopping at the county line. Creed said the county is still assessing all the damage.

“It’s a pretty rural area where the storm went through so in the rural areas, everybody kind of takes care of themselves and their neighbors so they really did not call 911 or the admin line,” Creed said.

By Monday afternoon, friends, family, and neighbors came together to pick up the pieces.

“Make sure you have a plan, you have a bag or a tote ready in case you do need to seek shelter and know where you can seek shelter,” Creed said.

Once complete, the county hopes to pass the damage assessment off to the State’s Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) to see if state aid is needed.

Owners of the propane business did not want to go on camera but said luckily the tanks on the property were empty.

Fortunately, no was in Linn County was hurt from Sunday’s storms. Creed said the American Red Cross is in the county assessing damage but those who lost their home or have damage are staying with family and friends.

“There are community members that are very helping to their neighbors in Linn County,” Creed said. “It makes it a lot easier.”

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Olivia Munn deals with that nasty voice in her head in ‘Violet’

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Olivia Munn deals with that nasty voice in her head in ‘Violet’

What if you had a voice in your head — a voice that never stopped its cascade of negative thoughts?

That’s the premise of “Violet,” Justine Bateman’s writing-directing debut arriving Friday in theaters with Olivia Munn (“The Newsroom,” “The Predator”) as Violet, a successful Hollywood executive plagued by inner demons only she can hear.

“I think Violet is going through a lot of the same things that a lot of us are going through,” Munn, 41, said in a Zoom interview.

“At least for me, I can say that I have my whole life struggled with negative thoughts that make for fear-based decisions. In this film we call that ‘the voice.’

“And this film is really a map to your real self and shutting down that voice, shutting down those fear-based thoughts and decisions.”

As “Violet” unfolds, we see writing on the screen and hear a continuous stream of negativity with Justin Theroux’s voice.

In contrast, we see how Violet rules at her job, lunches with friends, bonds with her roommate (Luke Bracey, “Little Fires Everywhere”). She seems serene, confident, happy even.

“A big part of what we see happen with Violet,” Munn said, “is she’s trying to figure out what’s really her issue with these negative thoughts. Is she something better than that? Does she have a lot more self-love for herself than it may appear?

“Because when you actually hear those thoughts audibly and you hear Justin — that’s a big reason why Justine wanted to use a voice that was not even close to my voice. Because that voice is oftentimes something that feels like another person inside of you.

“So, it’s the erosion of what can happen when you appear one way, and you’re struggling with so much self-doubt and self-hate on the other side.”

It’s not a gender-based condition; it’s not something that afflicts only women. But how to silence that poisonous stream of invective? Therapy?

“I don’t think it’s something that is just cured overnight,” Munn offered. “The biggest thing is realizing that so many people can feel the same things.

“That is what’s been really amazing with this film: seeing the response from people who have seen the film and realizing that they relate to this, too. They relate to Justine’s words and that voice and understanding.

“That’s been really amazing to witness. And for Justine as well. To be like, Wow! there are some people who feel this way, or at least can recognize it. That has made me feel like, ‘Okay, I’m not one of the only ones who struggle with this.’ ”

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