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9 Points to Remember If You are Thinking of A Govt Job in India

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All those who want to get a Govt job in India, must read these points before start preparing for an exam.  This will help you save your precious time and your parents’s hard earned money.

1. Realize your Aim. This is a very important step. It is important to analyze your capability and decide what exactly you want to be in your life. If you have no aim, no goal, you will reach no where.

2. Know everything about the job profile ( Duties, responsibilities). Next step is to know everything about the job profile. When you know everything about the Job profile you get to know the importance of that position.And during preparation always keep in mind those things that you will achieve after you clear the exam. This thing will keep you motivated. Self motivation is very important to clear any govt exam or to get a govt job. Generally students start preparation with too much aggravation and in couple of months they just dump everything. And some students prepare irregularly (Means prepare 2 months and skip 1 month, prepare for another 1 month and skip 2 months) , they take couple of attempts, get frustrated, feel boredom and say “this is too difficult”. Exam is not difficult, difficult is to keep yourself motivated, difficult is to be regular and punctual in your preparation. So if you start preparing for any exam, and gets frustrate in couple of months or couple of attempts, just don’t stop preparing. Keep yourself motivated and trust yourself.

3. Read the Prescribed syllabus carefully. Analyze all Subjects. Analyze the topics you are weak in, and also the topics you are Good in and make a table. As you need to work hard on the topics you are weak in. If you have 2 tier exam (Prelims and Mains), take them altogether. Do not think like “first I will prepare for pre and if I get through I will prepare for mains” . This statement means you don’t trust yourself and you are not going to prepare well. Have faith in yourself and take both tiers together. Two reasons why should prepare for both tiers together (i) You won’t have enough time to prepare for mains (ii) However the syllabus is approximately same but you find more difficult questions in mains. So if you prepare for the hard exam (Main) you will be able to clear the easier one (Prelim) without any difficulty

4. Analyze time. Analyze how much time you have for the upcoming exam and how much time you need to prepare for that particular government exam. Make a time table and decide your study hours in a day and stick to that time table. This will help you complete your syllabus or preparation on time.

Here’s the Quick Info-graphics

5. Division of Topics. Divide your topics from all the subjects in the days you have to prepare. Prepare all the subjects altogether For e.g if you have subjects and have 5 hours a day to study. Then read all 4 subjects for 1 hours, in the last hour revise what you have studied and practice some questions. Because if you prepare subjects one by one, and when you reach to subject 4, you will forget everything that you have studied 1st subject. There you will take more time to revise 1st subject.

6. Study Material. Find the right and authentic source to prepare for the govt exam.Do not multiple publisher’s books for one subject. Watch Youtube videos, there are plenty of videos on Youtube where you can learn tricks. Remember buying more and more books will not get you through. Buy less books and make sure whatever study material you are buying contains relevant content.

7. Practice Often as it will improve your performance and will increasing your speed in answering the question. Afterall, govt exams are all about knowledge, Speed and Time Management.

8. Join test Series. Prepare for a week and take test on Weekend. This will help you find your where you are lacking and will help you find your weaknesses and it is very important to mitigate weaknesses.

9. Take Regular Mock test for atleast last 20 days before the examination.Doing this will improve your accuracy and will help you find where will you stand in the real examination.

All these point will contribute towards your govt job preparation. I got these points from those candidates who already cleared some or other government exam. And I am sure if you trust yourself, be serious and punctual and prepare for the exam properly, you will get through.

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Former Chatham clerk-treasurer pleads guilty to defrauding village

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Former Chatham clerk-treasurer pleads guilty to defrauding village

CHATHAM, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Former Chatham clerk-treasurer, Barbara Henry, 59, of Chatham has pleaded guilty to attempted official misconduct. New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli says Henry unlawfully waived her own health insurance premiums at the town’s expense.

“Ms. Henry took advantage of her public position to have the taxpayers fully fund her insurance costs,” said DiNapoli. “This kind of corruption drives up costs and erodes the public trust.”

An investigation found that from April 2017 to August 2018, Henry allegedly used her position to unlawfully waive her own health insurance premiums, causing the village to pay Henry’s portion of health insurance. Henry was responsible for paying 50% of her health insurance while the village was responsible for the other 50%. She was employed by the village from late 2012 until she resigned in August of 2018. 

DiNapoli says Henry paid $3,586 in restitution for defrauding the village health insurance premiums and stealing from her other employer Cadmus Lifesharing Association, a nonprofit organization based out of Massachusetts. 

Henry was also ordered to pay a $250 fine in addition to the restitution.

This is the second criminal conviction of a village official. Former Police Chief Peter Volkmann was sentenced on July 19, 2021 to pay nearly $93,000 in restitution after his felony guilty plea to grand larceny in the fourth degree.

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‘Death by Dealer’ bill would stiffen penalties for dealers in fatal overdoses

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‘Death by Dealer’ bill would stiffen penalties for dealers in fatal overdoses

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Come Monday, it’s either vaccination or termination for those who work in state run hospitals and nursing homes. Security officers are among those who work at state hospitals who are being forced to make that decision. The lawsuit claims that the vaccine mandate goes against their constitutional rights.

In a newly filled lawsuit against Governor Kathy Hochul, Heath Commissioner Howard Zucker, and the New York State Health Department, 10 individual state hospital security officers are fighting for the option to have regular COVID tests instead of being mandated to get the vaccine. They say it’s unfair that teachers would have the option for regular testing, but they won’t.

“Students who are 12 years or younger can’t be vaccinated,” said Dennis Vacco. “Inherently, the population in schools is less vaccinated than the population in hospitals or in health care facilities. To say nothing of the fact that health care facilities are constructed to prevent the spread of illness within the facility.”

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NYC teacher COVID vaccine mandate moves forward after judge’s ruling

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NYC teacher COVID vaccine mandate moves forward after judge's ruling

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Come Monday, it’s either vaccination or termination for those who work in state run hospitals and nursing homes. Security officers are among those who work at state hospitals who are being forced to make that decision. The lawsuit claims that the vaccine mandate goes against their constitutional rights.

In a newly filled lawsuit against Governor Kathy Hochul, Heath Commissioner Howard Zucker, and the New York State Health Department, 10 individual state hospital security officers are fighting for the option to have regular COVID tests instead of being mandated to get the vaccine. They say it’s unfair that teachers would have the option for regular testing, but they won’t.

“Students who are 12 years or younger can’t be vaccinated,” said Dennis Vacco. “Inherently, the population in schools is less vaccinated than the population in hospitals or in health care facilities. To say nothing of the fact that health care facilities are constructed to prevent the spread of illness within the facility.”

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New York hospitals, nursing homes dread ‘massive exodus’ after vaccine deadline

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New York hospitals, nursing homes dread ‘massive exodus’ after vaccine deadline

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — Nursing homes and hospitals statewide are facing a lot of stress as the state vaccine mandate for healthcare workers goes into effect in just five days.

On September 27, most health care workers will have to have at least one shot of the COVID vaccine or they could lose their job. The mandate could affect a lot of hospitals and long-term care facilities that still have unvaccinated staff members.

“I’m really fearful that we could see 20% of the workforce leave hospitals or long-term care,” said Ann Marie Cook, the President and CEO of Lifespan, which provides services for again adults and their caregivers. “We could see a massive exodus of workers in the short term.”

Check out the state data about vaccination rates at local adult care and skilled nursing facilities:

% of unvaccinated staff at skilled nursing facilities % of staff unvaccinated staff at adult care facilities
Albany 11% 7%
Columbia 25% 10%
Dutchess 18% 24%
Fulton 20% 9%
Greene 15% 11%
Herkimer 19% 14%
Montgomery 17% 17%
Rensselaer 25% 14%
Saratoga 10% 14%
Schenectady 13% 7%
Schoharie 53%
Ulster 20% 19%
Warren 25% 17%
Washington 15% 16%

“I feel like we’re in a pending crisis and we have to think about this and figure out a way how we’re going to care for people,” Cook said. “I have been hearing rumors that a lot of those facilities have stopped taking admissions now to prepare for the fact that maybe 40% of their workforce—hopefully less—will leave the facility.” 

Cook said with places not taking new patients, she worries about those who need care down the road. “Many older adults once they go into hospital need a rehab stay before they can go home. If some of the long-term care facilities aren’t accepting new admissions, how will older adults go home safely without rehabilitation?” she said. “Long-term care just doesn’t have the staff to care for them. It’s one of those terrible problems where it’s nobody’s fault. But the solutions are not easy to figure out.”

Nursing homes won’t be the only entities impacted by staffing shortages. Hospitals are expected to as well. Some hospital workers say they’ve been having conversations with coworkers who may be hesitant to get the vaccine. “This is obviously a very sensitive topic,” said Chris Burleigh, a Nurse Manager in the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Strong Memorial Hospital. “It’s very controversial, and we are not afraid of those conversations. We are willing to have those conversations and engage with those conversations, but we all need to be kind to each other.”

The potential for understaffing is difficult to accept for health care workers who have been working tirelessly for the last year-and-a-half during the pandemic. “We have been working continuously for 18 months,” said Dr. Paritosh Prasad, Director of Surgical Intensive Care and the Highly Infection Disease Unit, Strong Memorial Hospital. “We are working under incredible stress, strain, and we are used to stress and strain, that is part of our job description, but this is something well outside the norm.”

Dr. Prasad and Burleigh are calling on everyone to do their part to help slow the spread and help elevate some of the stress put on frontline healthcare workers. “We are in a battle for our lives and all of you have the ability to help win this battle,” Prasad said. “We have the power to change how this pandemic rolls out. This is not something that is going to resolve itself without each and every one of our involvement, this is a fight every one of us is in and every one of us has a critical role to play.”

Dr. Prasad also addressed groups that have been standing outside Strong Hospital the past few weeks to protest vaccine mandates. “I am not going to say that leaving the hospital and seeing people protesting and yelling things at you isn’t a punch in the gut,” Dr. Prasad said. “We leave it all on the table for the patients we are taking care of.”

Still, with a lot of uncertainty about what the next few weeks will bring, healthcare workers say they will work together and serve patients who need care. “At the end of the day, we are still going to stand shoulder to shoulder with them,” Burleigh said. “We are still going to take care of our patients, regardless or not if we agree.”

On Tuesday, a federal judge has ordered an extension on the temporary restraining order blocking New York from forcing certain medical workers to be vaccinated, but this specifically applies to those with a religious exemption. The order was extended until October 12.

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NYS preparing for thunderstorms, heavy rain through Friday

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NYS preparing for thunderstorms, heavy rain through Friday

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Governor Kathy Hochul has directed state agencies to prepare for the upcoming thunderstorms and heavy rain in New York. The thunderstorms are possible in the Capital Region, Southern Tier, Mid-Hudson, New York City and Long Island.

Heavy rainfall may cause flooding of roads and ponding of water in low-lying areas. Some storms may contain damaging winds, which could cause downed trees and power lines.

“I have directed state agencies to prepare emergency response assets and be ready to assist local governments if needed,” said Hochul. “New Yorkers should pay close attention to the weather and always be ready with a plan should an emergency arise.”

Preparations include:

The Department of Transportation

  • 1,329 large dump trucks
  • 294 large loaders
  • 80 tracked and wheeled excavators
  • 73 chippers
  • 19 graders
  • 16 vacuum trucks with sewer jets
  • 15 tree crew bucket trucks

Thruway Authority

  • 659 operators and supervisors prepared to respond to any wind or flood related issues
  • 205 Large Dump Trucks
  • 112 Small Dump Trucks
  • 62 Loaders
  • 28 Trailers
  • 6 Vac Trucks
  • 9 Tracked Excavators
  • 10 Wheeled Excavators
  • 10 Brush Chippers
  • 99 Chainsaws
  • 22 Aerial Trucks
  • 21 Skid Steers
  • 87 Portable Generators
  • 65 Portable Light Units

The Department of Environmental Conservation, New York State Police and the Department of Public Service are some of the other agencies prepared to assist when needed.

Hochul also recommends New Yorkers be prepared for extreme weather. Safety tips include:

  • Know the county in which you live and the names of nearby cities. Severe weather warnings are issued on a county basis.
  • Learn the safest route from your home or business to high, safe ground should you have to leave in a hurry.
  • Develop and practice a ‘family escape’ plan and identify a meeting place if family members become separated.
  • Make an itemized list of all valuables including furnishings, clothing and other personal property. Keep the list in a safe place.
  • Stockpile emergency supplies of canned food, medicine and first aid supplies and drinking water. Store drinking water in clean, closed containers
  • Plan what to do with your pets.
  • Have a portable radio, flashlights, extra batteries and emergency cooking equipment available.
  • Keep your automobile fueled. If electric power is cut off, gasoline stations may not be able to pump fuel for several days. Have a small disaster supply kit in the trunk of your car.
  • Have disaster supplies on hand

For a complete listing of weather advisories, visit your area’s National Weather Service website.

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Governor’s Traffic Safety free child seat inspections

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Governor’s Traffic Safety free child seat inspections

GLENVILLE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Monday, September 27, from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., the Town of Glenville Police Department will host free car seat checks by certified child passenger safety technicians.

The Traffic Safety Committee reminds parents and caregivers in Schenectady County, this event is part of a yearlong safety initiative in which state and local law enforcement agencies, with various community safety partners, offer free child seat inspections.

Trained technicians use the “Learn, Practice, and Explain” model to educate parents and caregivers on how to choose and properly install appropriate child seats for their child’s age, size, and vehicle, so they can be used correctly every time.

Those who cannot attend this free car seat check event can make an appointment with a local fitting station. Find more information on upcoming car seat check events near you, or contact Mark Agostino at (518) 384-0123 or [email protected]

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Democrats see tax “framework” to pay for huge $3.5T package

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Democrats see tax “framework” to pay for huge $3.5T package

WASHINGTON — The White House and congressional Democrats have agreed to a framework of options to pay for their huge, emerging social and environment bill, top Democrats said Thursday. Now they face the daunting task of narrowing the menu to tax possibilities they can pass to fund President Joe Biden’s $3.5 trillion plan.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California announced the progress as Biden administration officials and Democratic congressional leaders negotiated behind the scenes. The package aims to rewrite tax and spending priorities to expand programs for Americans of all ages, while upping efforts to tackle income inequality and fight climate change.

Staring down a self-imposed Monday deadline, lawmakers said they would work nonstop to find agreement on specifics. Democrats’ views on those vary widely, though they largely agree with Biden’s idea of raising taxes on corporations and the wealthy to fund the package.

“We certainly think it’s progress,” Biden press secretary Jen Pskai said at the White House.

Biden has been putting his shoulder into the negotiations, inviting more than 20 of his party’s moderate and progressive lawmakers to the White House for lengthy meetings this week. He’s working to close the deal with Congress on his “Build Back Better” agenda at a time when his presidential campaign promises are running into the difficulty of actually governing.

But the party has been divided over many of the details.

Moderate Democrats, most prominently Sens. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, are demanding that the massive dollar total be reduced. The revenue options to pay for it — that mostly means taxes — being considered can be dialed up or down, the leaders say. The ultimate price tag may certainly slip from the much-publicized $3.5 trillion.

Republicans are solidly opposed to the package, calling it a “reckless tax and spending spree.” So Democrats will have to push it it through Congress on their own, which is only possible if they limit their defections to a slim few in the House and none in the Senate.

“We’re proceeding,” Pelosi said. “We intend to stay the course and pass the bill as soon as possible.”

The congressional leaders huddled early Thursday with the chairmen of the tax writing committees to agree to the framework, pulling from work already being done on those panels. They are intent on sticking to Biden’s pledge not to raise taxes on people making less than $400,000 a year.

Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., the chairman of the House Ways & Means Committee, has already drafted his version, which would raise about $2.3 trillion by hiking corporate tax rates to 26.5% for businesses earning more than $5 million a year and increasing the top individual tax from 37% to 39.6% for those earning more than $400,000, or $450,000 for married households.

The House panel’s bill also includes a 3% surtax on the adjusted incomes of very wealthy people making more than $5 million a year.

The Senate Finance Committee under Sen. Ron Wyden has not yet passed its bill, but has been eyeing proposals that further target the superrich including efforts to curtail practices used to avoid paying taxes.

“I’m not going to get into any specific stuff today, but I’ve made it very clear as chairman of the Finance Committee a billionaire’s tax will be on the menu,” Wyden said.

Those tax goals align with the Biden administration, which is marshaling arguments that the increases are fundamentally about fairness at a time of gaping income inequality.

According to a new analysis released Thursday by the White House, the wealthiest 400 families worth more than a billion dollars paid an average tax rate of just 8.2% between 2010 and 2018. Treasury Department tables show that is lower than the average tax rate of families with an income of roughly $142,000.

The analysis suggests two clear reasons why billionaires pay a lower rate than the upper middle class: They derive income from stocks, dividends and other assets that are taxed at lower rates and they can permanently avoid paying tax on certain investment gains that by law are excluded from taxable income.

Without divulging a framework, Wyden indicated he is in agreement with the House’s plans for certain retirement savings accounts used by the wealthy to shield liabilities.

Targeting “Mega IRAs,” Democrats hope to correct what they see as a flaw in the retirement savings system enabling billionaires to amass millions in independent retirement accounts without ever paying taxes. Under some proposals, individuals earning beyond $400,000 would be barred from contributing to their IRAs once their account balances top $10 million.

The Biden administration has also shown interest in one climate change tax — a so-called pollution importer fee, which would essentially impose a tariff on goods coming from countries without certain emissions controls — and seen as a way to pressure China.

Gaining less traction seems to be a carbon tax that could fall on households and stray from Biden’s pledge not to tax those earning less than $400,000.

Another big unknown: Whether Democrats can coalesce around a plan to rein in prescription drug costs, which could save the government hundreds of billions that could be used for Biden’s goals

Thursday’s sudden announcement of framework options caught key lawmakers off guard, including Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., the chairman of the Budget Committee, and others playing leading roles in assembling one of the biggest bills Congress has ever attempted.

Schumer later acknowledged about the emerging framework — “it’s hardly conclusory, but it was a good step of progress.”

Yet the framework could help the congressional leaders show momentum as they head toward crucial deadlines and start to address concerns raised by Manchin and other moderates who want a more clear-cut view of what taxes are being considered before they move forward, aides said.

On Monday, the House plans to begin considering a separate $1 trillion package of road and other infrastructure projects as a first test of Biden’s agenda. That public works bill has already passed the Senate, and Pelosi has agreed to schedule it for a House vote to assuage party moderates who badly want that legislation passed but are leery of supporting the larger $3.5 trillion measure.

But progressives are threatening to defeat the public works bill as inadequate unless it is partnered with the broader package. To make sure both bills can pass, Democratic leaders are trying to reach agreement on the bigger bill.

Meanwhile, the House and Senate remain at a standstill over a separate package to keep the government funded past the Sept. 30 fiscal year-end and to suspend the federal debt limit to avert a shutdown and a devastating U.S. default on payments. Senate Republicans are refusing to back that House-passed bill, despite the risk of triggering a fiscal crisis.

___

Associated Press writers Marcy Gordon and Josh Boak contributed to this report.

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Parking restrictions, road closures for Freihofer’s Run this weekend

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Parking restrictions, road closures for Freihofer’s Run this weekend

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Albany Police Department has announced parking restrictions and road closures for the Freihofer’s Run for Women this weekend. The run is taking place on September 25 in Albany.

Parking restrictions:

Friday, September 24, 2021 at 7:00 a.m. through Saturday September 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

  • Elk Street, south side, from Eagle Street west to North Hawk Street
  • North Hawk Street, east side from Washington Avenue to Elk Street

Friday, September 24, 2021 at 5:30 p.m. through Saturday September 25, 2021 at 6:00 p.m.

  • Washington Avenue, both sides from South Swan Street east to Eagle Street
  • Park Street, both sides from Lancaster Street to State Street
  • North Hawk Street, west side from Elk Street to Washington Avenue

Saturday, September 25, 2021, 12:01 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.

  • Washington Park, both sides of ALL Washington Park roadways

Saturday, September 25, 2021, 5:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.

  • Washington Avenue, both sides from South Swan Street west to Lexington Avenue
  • Western Avenue, both sides from Washington Avenue west to Robin Street
  • Sprague Place, both sides from Western Avenue to State Street
  • Henry Johnson Boulevard, both sides from Washington Avenue to State Street
  • Eagle Street, both sides from State Street to Columbia Street
  • State Street, both sides from South Swan Street to Eagle Street
  • South Swan Street, both sides from Washington Ave north six spaces on each side

Road closures:

Friday, September 24, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. until Saturday September 25, 2021 at 6:00 p.m.

  • Washington Avenue eastbound and westbound between Eagle Street and South Swan Street
  • Washington Avenue eastbound at Dove Street
  • Washington Avenue eastbound at Lark Street
  • North Hawk Street between Elk Street and Washington Avenue

Saturday, September 25, 2021 12:01 a.m. until 2:00 p.m.

  • Washington Park, All roadways, including Henry Johnson Boulevard between State Street and Madison Avenue

Saturday, September 25, 2021 5:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

  • Washington Avenue, between South Swan Street and Lexington Avenue
  • Western Avenue, between Washington Avenue and North Lake Avenue
  • Robin Street, between Washington Avenue and Western Avenue
  • Sprague Place, between Western Avenue and State Street
  • Henry Johnson Boulevard, between Central Avenue and Madison Avenue
  • Lark Street, between Elk Street and State Street
  • Dove Street, between Elk Street and State Street
  • South Swan Street, between State Street and Elk Street
  • Eagle Street, between State Street and Pine Street
  • Corning Place, between Lodge Street and Eagle Street
  • Willett Street, between Madison Avenue and State Street
  • Lancaster Street, between Lark Street and Willett Street
  • Hudson Avenue, between Lark Street and Willett Street
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Meghan and Harry visit One World Observatory with Hochul, de Blasio

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Meghan and Harry visit One World Observatory with Hochul, de Blasio

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Come Monday, it’s either vaccination or termination for those who work in state run hospitals and nursing homes. Security officers are among those who work at state hospitals who are being forced to make that decision. The lawsuit claims that the vaccine mandate goes against their constitutional rights.

In a newly filled lawsuit against Governor Kathy Hochul, Heath Commissioner Howard Zucker, and the New York State Health Department, 10 individual state hospital security officers are fighting for the option to have regular COVID tests instead of being mandated to get the vaccine. They say it’s unfair that teachers would have the option for regular testing, but they won’t.

“Students who are 12 years or younger can’t be vaccinated,” said Dennis Vacco. “Inherently, the population in schools is less vaccinated than the population in hospitals or in health care facilities. To say nothing of the fact that health care facilities are constructed to prevent the spread of illness within the facility.”

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Veterans at Saratoga Revolutionary battlefield dig find camaraderie

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Veterans at Saratoga Revolutionary battlefield dig find camaraderie

Posted: Updated:

Veteran Tim Madere sifts through dirt as part of an archeological dig at the site of the Second Battle of Saratoga, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Stillwater, N.Y. Veterans with American Veterans Archaeological Recovery are searching for Revolutionary War artifacts at the Saratoga National Historical Park this month. (AP Photo/Michael Hill)

STILLWATER, N.Y. (AP) — Military veterans who carefully dug and sifted through clumps of dirt this month at a Revolutionary War battlefield in Saratoga County did more than uncover artifacts fired from muskets and cannons. The meticulous fieldwork gave the veterans—some dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder and physical injuries—a familiar sense of camaraderie and mission.

While the archaeological dig at the Saratoga National Historical Park produced evidence from the tide-turning Second Battle of Saratoga, the teamwork behind the finds also benefited the veterans. “We can all come together, share your battle stories, your deployment stories, and share your love for the history of what you’re digging,” said Bjorn Bruckshaw, of Laconia, New Hampshire, during a break on a recent hazy morning.

Bruckshaw, 38, was part of a three-person crew that spent the morning digging small holes at spots that set off metal detectors, then searching through the damp clumps to uncover old nails, mostly. But the self-described Revolutionary War buff loved it.

An Army veteran injured in a roadside bombing in Iraq, Buckshaw is among 15 veterans taking part in the dig through American Veterans Archaeological Recovery, an organization that helps service members transition into the civilian world. While the group deals mostly with vets with disabilities, their focus is on what participants can do in the field instead of any injuries, said AVAR’s Stephen Humphreys.

1632455564 827 Veterans at Saratoga Revolutionary battlefield dig find camaraderie
Veteran Megan Lukaszeski takes part in an archaeological dig at the site of the Second Battle of Saratoga, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Stillwater, N.Y. Veterans with American Veterans Archaeological Recovery are searching for Revolutionary War artifacts at the Saratoga National Historical Park this month. (AP Photo/Michael Hill)

“In the military, you’re trained to be on time for everything,” Bruckshaw said. “Transitioning into the civilian world is a little bit harder for a lot of people. For me, it was a little bit difficult, suffering from TBI”—a traumatic brain injury—”and PTSD from my combat injuries. But you have support groups like these.”

National Park Service archaeologist William Griswold said the team is looking for artifacts that shed more light on the Battle of Bemis Heights, or the Second Battle of Saratoga, on Oct. 7, 1777. The American victory over British and German soldiers is credited with persuading France to lend crucial support to the fight for independence. The battle also burnished the heroic resume of future traitor Benedict Arnold, who was wounded in the leg and is memorialized here with a monument to his boot.

While maps and journal accounts from the time describe troop movements during that fateful battle, artifacts can pinpoint movements and provide a reality check. For instance, historians know the British at Saratoga loaded their cannons with tin canisters packed with iron balls, or “case shot,” that spread out like shotgun blasts. Locations of the buried iron balls found here are being used to deduce more precisely where the cannons fired from.

“It’s a good way to check a lot of these textual sources because, in the fog of battle, people often make mistakes or embellish things,” Griswold said.

Fieldwork was first conducted here in 2019, with supervision from the National Park Service’s regional archaeology program. The American Battlefield Trust is a sponsor. Work was interrupted by the pandemic last year, but crews with shovels and metal detectors were back this month and wrapping up this week.

1632455564 356 Veterans at Saratoga Revolutionary battlefield dig find camaraderie
Volunteer trainer Bill Rose, left, watches veterans Katherine Kuzmick and Bjorn Bruckshaw work at an archaeological dig at the site of the Second Battle of Saratoga, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Stillwater, N.Y. Veterans with American Veterans Archaeological Recovery are searching for Revolutionary War artifacts at the Saratoga National Historical Park this month. (AP Photo/Michael Hill)

“It’s partially about the chase,” said veteran Megan Lukaszeski. “You never know what you’re going to find. You could dig and you could find nothing, or you could dig and find the most amazing things.”

After retiring from the Air Force, Lukaszeski went to school to study archaeology. The 36-year-old from New York has already taken part in AVAR excavations to recover remains at WWII crash sites in England and Sicily through the group’s partnership with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency. She plans to get her master’s degree and pursue archaeology professionally.

For others, the work is more a chance to learn about archaeology while having some fun. Former Army Col. Tim Madere once hunted for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. This month, the 68-year-old sifted dirt through a screen in a hunt for artifacts and shared laughs with other workers. The Savannah, Georgia-area resident said he has gotten over most of his PTSD but believes you can never totally get rid of it.

He sees this sort of fieldwork as a good way for people to manage it. “You hear their stories and then you tell yours, so that we kind of get a better appreciation of what all these Americans did to protect the United States,” he said. ”It’s good to see other people, and they’re doing well.”

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