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Movement Chief Calls Trump ‘ Most Successful Pro-Life President in this country’s history ‘

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Movement Chief Calls Trump ' Most Successful Pro-Life President in this country's history '

A pro-life leader called President Donald Trump “the most actively active pro-life president of the country in history,” speaking on Friday’s annual March for Life by Jeff Hunt, the director of the Institute for Colorado Christian University, as the pro-life advocates.

President Trump spoke today at the March for Life rally. Trump is the lifetime’s most pro-life president and the ultimate defender of our innocent lives. https:/t.co/Jzk8JYPXFB— Newt Gingrich (@newtgingrich) 24 January 2020 Trump made history on Friday when he became the first Leader of the March to talk in person.

TRENDING: Poop-Covered Streets Cost San Francisco $192 thousand After Tech Giant Moves Event Hunt on Thursday spoke about Trump in Sirius XM’s “Breitbart News Tonight” commentary. “This is a historic moment, actually,” Hunt said. “Donald Trump is the most successful pro-life president in this country’s history from a strictly political viewpoint. He has done an excellent job in criticizing the abortion industry and their profitable activities in making money from death. “Hunt zeroed on Trump’s success in recommending conservative judges to expand the federal judiciary.

“He has appointed judges who will return to a parliamentary method— the original purpose of the constitution— not to pass legislation from the bench, but to returnto co-equality branches of power,” he said.

Would you agree that President Trump was the most successful pro-life president in the history of this nation?

That’s not all, said Hunt.

“I’m excited about everything he’s done to protect freedom of religion, rights of conscience, the protection of the Planned Parenthood, the appointment to these judges who will interpret the Constitution as written,” he said.

Hunt said the policies of Trump are helping pro-life activists who have been dealing with abortion for years.

He said, “These are great moments. “These are the moves we’ve been waiting for in this country to stop abortion. Looking at the way we have stopped the slave trade in history, that didn’t happen overnight. “That took a lot of work, and people I find as champions, including William Wilberforce, who fought for 60 years to stop the slave industry. RELATED: GOP Sen. Able to call Schiff, Whistleblower, Bidens To Testify in Case Senate Allows Senators to see”[ W]e are having abortion there and this president should be honored, and I think that 100,000 people would be able to say thanks to this president for the work he did.”

Hunt compared Trump to former President Abraham Lincoln during his interview.

“During his[ presidency], Lincoln also grew,” said Hunt.

“He was mainly nervous at the beginning of the Civil War to keep the Union together. It changed as he became a very passionate abolitionist, and eventually the 13th amendment ended the nation’s slavery, “he said.

During the interview he noted that pro-life warriors such as Vice President Mike Pence and White House Adviser Kellyanne Conway were major figures in Trump.

“Leaders and leaders in our country are surrounded by people who influence and direct their thought, and I have seen this president become a committed pro-life leader, and I believe much of it is due to the transparency with which that administration will engage with the community of faith,” he said.

“I have to tell you that I’ve worked with various administrations. It’s great when we work with pro-life leaders. “@@realDonaldTrump at the March for Life:” When we keep a newborn in our brains, we know the endless love every child has for a family. We see the splendor that radiates from every human soul as we watch a child grow.

Pic.twitter.com/1g0hKqmNS4— Students For Trump (@TrumpStudents) January 24, 2020 Trump has punished Democrats and saluted pro-life advocate in a White House media-pool report for their comments on Friday.

“Unfortunately, the far left works vigorously to abolish our rights given to Christ, to shut down faithful charities, to ban public religious believers and silence Americans who believe in sainthood,” Trump said.

“They come after me because I fight for you and we fight for the voiceless.” Trump said that all children deserve to be entitled to life.

“We can not say what our people can accomplish yet unborn, the visions they envision, the masterpieces they create and the discoveries they produce,” Trump said.

“But we know this: love brings into this world every single life. Each child brings a family happiness. Everyone should be safe. They know first and foremost that every soul of man is sacred, and every creation— born and unborn — is created in the holy image of Almighty God, “he added.

“We will defend this truth together throughout our splendid country. We must set our people’s dreams free. And with intense anticipation, we look forward to all the blessings of every American child’s beauty, talent, intent, righteousness and grace.

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Official says only 225 migrants remain in Texas border town

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Official says only 225 migrants remain in Texas border town

DEL RIO, Texas — Only 225 migrants remained in a Texas border camp where almost 15,000 mostly Haitian migrants had gathered just days ago hoping to seek asylum, the top elected official in Val Verde County said Friday.

County Judge Lewis Owens told The Associated Press in a text message that he’s been told all of the migrants will be removed by the end of the day — a dramatic change from Saturday, when the number peaked as migrants driven by confusion over the Biden administration’s policies and misinformation on social media converged at the border crossing between Del Rio, Texas, and Ciudad Acuña, Mexico.

Many face expulsion because they are not covered by protections recently extended by the Biden administration to the more than 100,000 Haitian migrants already in the U.S. — many of whom left their homeland after its devastating 2010 earthquake — citing security concerns and social unrest in the Western Hemisphere’s poorest country.

The United States and Mexico appeared eager to end the increasingly politicized humanitarian situation at the border that prompted the resignation of the U.S. special envoy to Haiti and condemnation from civil rights leader Rev. Al Sharpton and UNICEF after images spread widely this week of border agents maneuvering their horses to forcibly block and move migrants.

President Joe Biden on Friday said it was “horrible” to see the way agents used horses block people from crossing the Rio Grande and he promised that “people will pay” as a result.

The incident prompted widespread outrage and is under investigation. The agents have been assigned to administrative duties and the Department of Homeland Security said it has suspended the use of horses in Del Rio.

“It was horrible, what you saw to see them treat people like they did,” Biden told reporters. “Those people will pay, there’s an investigation underway now and there will be consequences. … It’s an embarrassment, but it’s beyond an embarrassment — it’s dangerous, it’s wrong, it sends the wrong message around the world and sends the wrong message at home. It’s simply not who we are.”

Homeland Security has said that nearly 2,000 Haitians had been rapidly expelled on flights since Sunday under pandemic powers that deny people the chance to seek asylum. About 3,900 were being processed for a possible return to Haiti or placement in U.S. immigration court proceedings. Others have been released in the U.S. with notices to appear in court or to report to immigration authorities. Thousands have returned to Mexico.

A U.S. official said Thursday that authorities expected the camp to be empty in about two days. The official had direct knowledge but was not authorized to speak publicly. Homeland Security had planned to ramp up to seven daily flights but flew only three Wednesday and five Thursday because of issues with contractors and mechanical delays, the official said. Seven flights were scheduled to Haiti on Friday, six on Saturday and seven on Sunday.

Across a river, Haitians who camped in Mexico awoke Thursday surrounded by security forces, with a helicopter thundering overhead and state police trucks spaced every 30 feet (9 meters) or so between their tents and the edge of the Rio Grande.

After anxious minutes of indecision, dozens of families hurried into the river to cross where there was only one municipal police vehicle, calculating it was better to take their chances with U.S. authorities.

“Things are going badly,” said Michou Petion, carrying her 2-year-old son toward the river. Her husband carried bags of belongings and several pairs of sneakers dangled around his neck.

“The U.S. is deporting a lot to Haiti, now I don’t know if I can enter or leave,” Petion said.

Sharpton said Thursday that he toured the camp and witnessed “a real catastrophic and human disgrace.” A handful of protesters, some wearing camouflage hats from former President Donald Trump’s 2020 campaign, shouted through Sharpton’s remarks.

Sharpton vowed to “continue to come back … and stand with our people and make sure asylum is treated in one way and one manner.”

Some Haitians are being allowed to remain in the U.S. at least temporarily to seek asylum or to stay under some other claim to residency, with notices to appear later before immigration authorities. DHS officials declined to specify the number but said they are people with particular “vulnerabilities,” meaning they are pregnant, have young children or the U.S. doesn’t have the capacity to hold them in detention, especially during the pandemic.

The government has no plans to stop expelling others on public health grounds despite pressure from Democratic lawmakers, who say migrants are being sent back to a troubled country that some left more than a decade ago.

The Trump administration enacted the policy in March 2020 to justify restrictive immigration policies in an effort to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The Biden administration has used it to justify the deportation of Haitian migrants.

A federal judge late last week ruled that the rule was improper and gave the government two weeks to halt it, but the Biden administration appealed.

Officials said the U.S. State Department is in talks with Brazil and Chile to allow some Haitians who previously resided there to return, but it’s complicated because some of them no longer have legal status there.

Meanwhile, the U.S. special envoy to Haiti, Daniel Foote, submitted a letter of resignation protesting the “inhumane” large-scale expulsions of Haitian migrants.

Foote, who was appointed in July, wrote to Secretary of State Antony Blinken, saying he was stepping down immediately “with deep disappointment and apologies to those seeking crucial changes.”

“I will not be associated with the United States inhumane, counterproductive decision to deport thousands of Haitian refugees and illegal immigrants to Haiti, a country where American officials are confined to secure compounds because of the danger posed by armed gangs to daily life,” he wrote. “Our policy approach to Haiti remains deeply flawed, and my policy recommendations have been ignored and dismissed, when not edited to project a narrative different from my own.”

The career diplomat was known to be deeply frustrated with what he considered a lack of urgency in Washington and a glacial pace on efforts to improve conditions in Haiti.

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St. Louis County man sentenced for setting fire at 7-11 during unrest

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St. Louis County man sentenced for setting fire at 7-11 during unrest

ST. LOUIS – A St. Louis County man was sentenced for his role in setting fire to a downtown St. Louis 7-11 during the unrest in June of 2020.

Justin Cannamore pleaded guilty and was sentenced to 36 months in federal prison for being a felon in possession of a firearm. He also pleaded guilty to demonstrating a technique capable of causing injury to persons during the civil disorder.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Missouri said Cannamore set the 7-11 on fire “after rioters smashed windows and broke into an ATM machine.”

The U.S. Attorney’s office said he “assisted an unidentified individual by spraying a bottle of lighter fuel” on the building. He then entered the 7-11 and started a “fire in the aisle that self-extinguished when a firework exploded in the same location.”

The U.S. Attorney’s office says days after the fire, the St. Louis County Police Department stopped Cannamore for a traffic violation on June 5, 2020. During the stop, police located and seized a stolen .22 caliber revolver. Cannamore is a previously convicted felon and was prohibited from possessing the weapon.

The FBI, ATF and the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department investigated this case.

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LIVE Brian Laundrie manhunt: Search picks up at Carlton Reserve after FBI issues arrest warrant for Gabby Petito’s fiancé

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LIVE Brian Laundrie manhunt: Search picks up at Carlton Reserve after FBI issues arrest warrant for Gabby Petito’s fiancé

Coming up: WFLA will be live at 11:45 a.m. ET with JB Biunno, Brian Entin, Eagle 8’s Paul Lamison & more

You can find the latest on the investigation involving Gabby Petito and Brian Laundrie hereDownload the WFLA app for breaking news push alerts and sign up for breaking news email alerts.

NORTH PORT, Fla. (WFLA) – An arrest warrant has officially been issued for Brian Laundrie, the fiancé of Gabby Petito. However, the warrant is not connected to what happened to Petito – but what happened after her death.

The FBI in Denver says the arrest warrant was issued by the U.S. District court of Wyoming. Court documents obtained by WFLA show Laundrie was indicted for the “use of unauthorized access devices” following Petito’s death.

According to the documents, Laundrie used a Capital One bank debit card and a pin for two Capital One bank accounts “knowingly and with intent to defraud” between Aug. 30 and Sept. 1 in Wyoming and elsewhere. Using the accounts, he bought items worth more than a thousand dollars, authorities say.

The warrant issued Thursday comes after almost a full week of police searching for Laundrie where his family says he was last seen: the Carlton Reserve in Sarasota County. According to police, Laundrie’s family says he drove his Ford Mustang there more than a week ago and has not been seen since.

Several law enforcement agencies headed back to the nature preserve on Friday morning to pick up the search again. According to WFLA photojournalist Paul Lamison, a temporary flight restriction – also known as a TFR – was raised up to 1,200 feet over the search as of Friday morning. It was previously about 400 feet.

Meanwhile, on Thursday, the parents of Brian Laundrie were seen leaving their home. Their attorney, Steve Bertolino, tells 8 On Your Side the Laundrie’s met with him before returning to their house.

Police say the Laundrie family retained a lawyer soon after Gabby Petito was reported missing by her family on Sept. 11. Petito mysteriously disappeared during a cross-country road trip she was on with Laundrie, who police say returned home to North Port alone on Sept. 1.

Her white van that the couple had been traveling in was recovered by police from the Laundrie home, and police later identified Laundrie as a person of interest in the Petito case.

This is a developing story, please check back for updates.

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‘I’m gonna die’: Kroger employee describes fleeing gunfire in Tennessee store

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‘I’m gonna die’: Kroger employee describes fleeing gunfire in Tennessee store

COLLIERVILLE, Tenn. (WREG) – A longtime Kroger employee in Tennessee said she thought someone was popping balloons in the floral section of the Collierville store Thursday afternoon, but she soon realized it was gunfire.

“I look up, and I see all the employees running. Well, customers also. This is up front. They’re running from the front,” said Jean Kurzawski.

(Credit: WREG)

The shooting broke out at a Kroger grocery store in Collierville, a suburban community 30 miles (50 kilometers) east of Memphis.

Kurzawski said she was at the back of the store at the salad wall when the gunman fired. She said employees and customers were running in her direction. She headed toward the nearest exit as the gunfire continued.

“I could hear it shooting louder,” said Kurzawski. “We were out in the open, so we found a place in the back of those buildings in a little corner, and we just stayed in that corner.”

Collierville Police Chief Dale Lane said there were 44 Kroger employees inside the store at the time of the shooting. He could not say how many customers were there.

One person was killed, and 12 others were wounded and taken to hospitals, some with very serious injuries. Lane said it appeared the shooter took his own life.

Dispatch received a call about an active shooter at about 1:30 p.m., according to Lane. He said there was an officer nearby who arrived at the store immediately.

Kroger employee Brignetta Dickerson told WREG-TV she was working a cash register when she also heard what she first thought were balloons popping.

“And here he comes right behind us, and started shooting,” Dickerson said. “And he kept on shooting, shooting, shooting. He shot one of my co-workers in the head and shot one of my customers in the stomach.”

Authorities are saying little about the shooter. Investigators were searching the shooter’s car and planned to search a residence.

1632498274 697 ‘Im gonna die Kroger employee describes fleeing gunfire in Tennessee
(Credit: WREG)

Kurzawski said when she heard the gunfire and started running, she thought she might not make it out of the store alive.

“I just thinking, ‘Oh, I’m gonna die, I’m gonna die,’” said Kurzawski. “‘He’s gonna shoot me; he’s going to shoot me.’ It was the most horrifying experience I’ve ever, ever had.”

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Penalty problems through two games not limited to Broncos

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Penalty problems through two games not limited to Broncos

Thirteen things about the Broncos entering Sunday’s home opener against the New York Jets:

1. Broncos coach Vic Fangio spent the week lamenting his team’s penalty problem. Through two games, the Broncos are tied for 10th in enforced penalties (15) and tied for fourth in yards (152). But Vic’s team isn’t alone. The flags are flying around the NFL.

2. Average penalties/yards per team over the last five years: 2017 — 13.6/116.8. … 2018 — 14.5/124.3. … 2019 — 15.8/130.6. … 2020 — 11.8/108.2. And this year — 13.6/119.1. So, up compared to last year, but pretty steady compared to recent seasons.

3. The Broncos’ penalty breakdown is two on offense, nine on defense and four on special teams. Defensive end Dre’Mont Jones and cornerback Mike Ford have two 15-yard penalties apiece and cornerback Pat Surtain II’s 36-yard pass interference penalty skews the yardage total. They have the fewest offensive penalties and tied for third-most defensive penalties.

4. Fangio said he shows a “good bit,” of the penalties during team meetings. “We stress it,” he said. “Trust me, if anything, I stress it too much. I showed the whole team early on in camp where we ranked in penalties last year and we were ranked to-the-good on defense (27, third-fewest) and kind of in-the-middle on offense (39, 14th) and now it’s flipped. Our offense has done a great job; they’ve hardly been penalized, and we’ve had a couple of rough outings on defense.”

5. Fangio disagreed with cornerback Kyle Fuller’s illegal contact penalty on Jacksonville’s first drive when receiver Marvin Jones essentially tried to run Fuller over. “Really bad call,” Fangio said.

6. Speaking of really bad, that’s been the Broncos’ first-down offense. They rank 21st in yards per first-down snap (5.09) and have 32 plays that have gained less than four yards (tied for eighth-most). The lack of efficiency is setting up second and third-and-long plays.

7. “We want to be more efficient on first and second down, for sure, to make sure that we’re in those third-and-manageable (plays),” quarterback Teddy Bridgewater said.

8. Despite going 2 of 11 on third down, the Broncos still held possession for a whopping 38 minutes, 52 seconds against the Jaguars and enter Week 3 first in the league with a 37-minute average. Last week’s possession time was their 10th-highest since 2000 and the most since 39:22 in 2016. Out of their top 20 games in possession time since 2000, the Broncos are 18-2.

9. An unintentional youth movement will be present defensively against the Jets. Starting or playing rotational roles will be six first- or second-year players: Inside linebacker Justin Strnad (second year, but first playing) and rookies Surtain, safety Caden Sterns and outside linebackers Jonathon Cooper and Andre Mintze.

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Murder suspects shoot at police as they lead them on Bi-state chase

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Murder suspects shoot at police as they lead them on Bi-state chase

WASHINGTON PARK, Ill. – Police said murder suspects opened fire on officers during an early Friday morning chase.

Police were called to the 5500 block of Avon Place for a murder at about 12:30 a.m. in Washington Park, Illinois. They were also called to an officer-involved shooting near 25th and Argonne Drive in East St. Louis.

There was a police chase involving the suspects along I-64 into Missouri.

Then they went westbound on I-70 into north St. Louis County. Shots were repeatedly fired at officers. Eventually, police lost sight of the car somewhere on northbound 270.

A person was taken into custody by St. Louis City police. FOX 2’s Nissan Rogue Runner reporter Jason Maxwell was at the scene.

FOX 2 will continue to update this story with more information as it becomes available.

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Say hello to the tortizza, a dinner life raft

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Say hello to the tortizza, a dinner life raft

By Eric Kim, The New York Times

When it first opened in 2018, the Manhattan bar and vodka distillery Our/New York would serve makeshift tortilla pizzas that had been quickly burnished in a toaster oven behind the bar. The founder and partner, Dave Ortiz, got the idea from his friend, chef Ilan Hall. “Long story short: A celebrity chef hooked me up,” he said.

The medium-size flour tortillas — affectionately called “tortizzas” by the patrons — were draped in tomato sauce, ricotta cheese and red-pepper flakes. They were marvelous (and free of charge).

You’ll have to pay for your own tortillas, but when prepared at home, the tortizza can be a delicate slip of a weeknight dream — a life raft when time is of the essence. Although you can use corn tortillas for this dish, the moisture in flour tortillas will cause them to puff up in spots once baked in a hot oven, and those bites are the most fun to eat.

Crispy-edged and light, like lither thin-crust pizzas, tortizzas can be topped with whatever you like and nothing you don’t. These tortizzas include a layer of shredded mozzarella cheese that, when melted in the oven, creates a sturdy barrier for the toppings. A dusting of dried oregano somehow makes everything taste of pizza parlor incarnate. The topping, inspired by a Greek salad — and specifically, California Pizza Kitchen’s now-discontinued Greek pizza — is a medley of diced cucumbers and tomatoes and slivers of creamy avocado. Feta delivers sharpness and dreaminess, as does the simple garlicky yogurt sauce (a couple of ingredients shy of a tzatziki).

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Estes Park police officer found dead following domestic violence investigation

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Estes Park police officer found dead following domestic violence investigation

An Estes Park police officer was found dead in his home Thursday night, hours after authorities opened an investigation into allegations of domestic violence involving that officer, the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

Chief Wes Kufeld of the Estes Park Police Department notified the Larimer County Sheriff’s Office at 2:30 p.m. Thursday about an alleged “domestic violence situation” involving one of the department’s current officers that occurred Sept. 17, the sheriff’s office said.

The Eighth Judicial District Critical Incident Response Team was activated to investigate the matter, with the Larimer sheriff’s office taking the lead. Authorities say they interviewed family members of the officer on Thursday afternoon.

Investigators received information that the involved officer was at his residence with two other family members, sheriff’s officials said

According to the news release, investigators made several attempts to contact the officer without success, but eventually the two family members were removed from the residence safely.

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FOX Files: ‘Death to America,’ other graffiti messages painted by man in same neighborhood

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FOX Files: ‘Death to America,’ other graffiti messages painted by man in same neighborhood

BALLWIN, Mo. – Vandalism in West County covered garage doors, signs, and even a pick-up truck in Ballwin near Oakwood Farm Lane and Reinke Road.

The suspect is a 19-year-old who lives one block away.

“It’s the most frustrating thing. You get a wake-up call in the middle of the night. You come out and see what happened and you don’t really see the full extent of it until the sun comes up,” Chris Conway said.

Conway’s fence is one of about a dozen examples of spray-painted vandalism.

He added, “I kind of feel a little pressure to get it cleaned up if I can, being the first house in our neighborhood. It’s just really frustrating and then some added pressure being on the corner here.”

Throughout the Oakwood Farms subdivision, you’ll see garage doors spray-painted “Blood” or “Blood Gang.” Some neighbors tried cleaning up the spray paint, but you can still see the images. Even landscaping lights and street signs are tagged.

“I walked through the neighborhood and found multiple homes that were vandalized,” Delia Overschimdt said.

The took pictures, including a now cleaned-up example that says, “Death to America.”

“It kind of made me nervous, sometimes in the evening I walk my dogs, so am I going to be safe walking through my neighborhood?” Overschmidt said.

They learned the suspect lives in the neighborhood – just ten houses down from one of the homes he vandalized.

“That was news to me. I thought it was maybe something from the city, but obviously, this young man’s got some issues and I hope he gets help,” Overschmidt said.

Court records show Ballwin police caught up with 19-year-old Daniel James Fleming Jr. the night he was allegedly vandalizing homes. It was Tuesday, Sept. 21.

An officer said the suspect was riding a bike and carrying a backpack of spray paint. He’s now charged with felony property damage.

An officer wrote in a probable cause statement, “The defendant admitted that he had been spray painting in the area. He said he had done so because he was bored. He falsely told police he was 16-years-old and provided false names and a false address before admitting his true identity and address.”

Conway said, “It hurts to hear that it was someone from our own neighborhood.”

He took time off from work to try wiping away the memory of what happened, adding, “We take care of our neighborhood. A lot of great people who live here and take care of their place and just sad to see.”

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Kirkwood home explosion tied to production of marijuana concentrate

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Kirkwood home explosion tied to production of marijuana concentrate

ST. LOUIS – Police said Sunday morning’s explosion at a home in Kirkwood is tied to the manufacturing of a potent marijuana concentrate using butane gas.

The Post-Dispatch reported production of the product sometimes called “honey oil” is blamed for explosions elsewhere across the country.

No one was hurt in the blast.

Police have not made any arrests in regards to the incident, but investigators confiscated several marijuana plants from the property.

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