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President Trump accuses Obama on his campaign for ‘ ILLEGAL Spying ‘: “They tried to defeat me”

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President Trump accuses Obama on his campaign for ' ILLEGAL Spying ': "They tried to defeat me"

President Trump has criticized President Barack Obama at Sunday’s interview with Maria Bartiromo for illegally spying on his campaign.

This weekend, Bartiromo aired the interview on Sunday morning Futures.

President Trump wondered during the meeting why the victims of the espionage operation are not in jail.

Watch: Transcript: Maria Bartiromo: Attorney Barr’s officers are not included in the Horowitz report. He looks at Brenann. He looks at Brenann. He’s staring at the officers of other Obama. How far are you feeling it’s gone?

President Donald Trump: I think it’s gone up to the top. And I guess they spied on my victory, what they did. What they did was so illegal that there was never anything like it in history. Before I was elected, they tried to defeat me. And then the policy of insurance started. Will you remember the famous policy of insurance? We’re going to get him here if he plays. And that happened. And that happened. There was never such a thing. If this was reversed and it was Trump, President Obama did. Women would be in jail for 50 years today.

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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“New eyes”: Gamers greet Microsoft’s Activision deal with guarded optimism

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“New eyes”: Gamers greet Microsoft’s Activision deal with guarded optimism

By Erin Woo and Kellen Browning, The New York Times Company

When Drew Bienusa began playing Call of Duty, a first-person shooter game published by Activision Blizzard, he was immediately smitten. He loved how immersive having a digital avatar was, and the game was a favorite among his friends.

Bienusa was so dazzled that in 2016, he began livestreaming himself playing Call of Duty on the Twitch platform. He gave himself the gamer name Frozone and amassed 114,000 Twitch followers. In January, he became a professional Call of Duty: Warzone player for the esports organization XSET.

But by then, Bienusa’s feelings about Call of Duty had changed. Bugs in the game went unfixed for months, he said. Activision’s communications with competitive players fell off. And he was turned off by a recent sexual harassment lawsuit against the company that exposed its toxic workplace culture.

So on Tuesday, when Bienusa, 26, woke up to the news that Microsoft planned to buy Activision for nearly $70 billion, he was jubilant. “New eyes, new people, new owners, new management — it’s a step in the right direction,” he said. “It’s almost at a point where it can’t get worse.”

Bienusa was one of many gamers who expressed cautious optimism about the biggest-ever deal in the $175 billion games industry. The acquisition of Activision, if approved by regulators, will help bolster Microsoft’s video game ambitions with a library of popular titles, including Call of Duty, World of Warcraft, Crash Bandicoot and Overwatch. Microsoft also positioned the deal as one that would help it delve into the futuristic digital world of the metaverse.

Yet ultimately, the deal’s success will hinge on how it is received by gamers. Historically, many players have expressed alarm about how acquisitions might affect the quality of online games. When Microsoft bought the maker of Minecraft in 2014, for instance, some gamers were concerned.

This time, the reaction has been more positive, partly because of how much Activision — with more than 400 million players worldwide — has appeared to stumble with its core users in recent years. In interviews, gamers said they saw Microsoft as a potential life raft for Activision Blizzard and as a welcome chance to bring new people into gaming.

In an email to employees, Activision’s chief executive, Bobby Kotick, said the purpose of the deal was to continue strengthening Activision’s games and its company culture. Activision declined to comment further. Microsoft did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

Activision’s decline with gamers has unfolded over the last few years. Many said they had been down on the publisher for some time, concerned that Activision put too much pressure on some divisions — such as Blizzard, which it merged with in 2008 — to deliver frequent hits, rather than giving developers the time to create iconic games. Then last year, Activision became embroiled in a lawsuit over workplace harassment brought by a California employment agency, raising questions about its conduct.

Activision’s track record with some of its games also became spottier. In November, it delayed new versions of Diablo and Overwatch. That same month, the newly released Call of Duty: Vanguard was widely panned as being boring and full of glitches.

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Loveland’s Winter Holiday Council struggles to keep the lights on amid vandalism, thefts

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Loveland’s Winter Holiday Council struggles to keep the lights on amid vandalism, thefts

Meghan Albañez, the new chair of the Winter Holiday Council, warns that without help from the public or the city of Loveland, many of the lights and decorations maintained by the council could go dark.

With projects including holiday decorations at Foote Lagoon, Lake Loveland, Dwayne Webster Veterans Park and the lighting of the Namaqua Star, the group is funded through sales of an annual Christmas ornament, and is staffed entirely by volunteers. Recent vandalism and thefts combined with financial struggles prompted Albañez to address the Loveland City Council on Tuesday, asking for help.

“The more money and help we have the better the chances we have to keep this tradition, one that began in 1989, not only alive but growing bigger and better,” Albañez told the City Council on Tuesday. “Dwindling support coupled with vandalism makes me a little nervous for prolonged survival. We remain optimistic, but we can’t do it alone.”

Several instances of theft and property damage were reported to police over the holiday season, including the destruction of a commissioned display by a local artist on the opening of the annual Light the Lagoon event. A witness described a group of young people dismantling the display, pieces of which were found floating in the lagoon the following morning.

The city currently provides a few in-kind donations, according to Ben Cordsen, a member of the council who manages the sale of ornaments and the selection of the artist who will create it each year. But financing for maintenance and other costs, which includes paying artists to create ornaments and displays, is generated only through ornament sales, he said.

This year, ornament sales generated a little more than $28,000 in revenue, half of which went towards the creation of the ornaments themselves, Cordsen said.

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Saving animals is his life’s work. He wished he could have done more during Marshall fire.

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Saving animals is his life’s work. He wished he could have done more during Marshall fire.

SUPERIOR — The delicate paw impressions in the snow-dusted path leading to Dave Crawford’s burnt-down home in Superior’s Original Town stopped the long-time animal activist in mid-stride.

“Those look like squirrel tracks — could be the ones I used to watch from my window every day,” he said, scanning the scorched and denuded trees lining the alley beyond his incinerated garage, a smile sneaking across his grizzled face. “That’s the best thing I’ve seen all day.”

It’s through animals that the 60-year-old Iowa native takes inventory of his blackened and flattened neighborhood, pointing out in a 360-degree sweep which creatures survived and which perished in the Marshall fire. Two dogs were rescued from houses across West William Street from his, but a block to the west, a tortoise, turtle and cockatiel weren’t so lucky.

“It was heartbreaking — it wakes me up at night,” said Crawford, who grabbed his two cats before escaping the advancing flames. “To think how utterly dependent they are on us.”

The wind-fueled wildfire that swept through Superior and Louisville, destroying nearly 1,100 homes in a matter of hours, prompted Crawford to start developing an app that will allow neighbors to alert one another during emergencies that they have animals that need rescuing. Hundreds of Boulder County families have been desperate to find out what happened to their pets in the wake of the Dec. 30 fire.

“I was driving by houses that had animals inside that would be dead in 90 minutes and I’m unaware of that,” Crawford said. “I had time to rescue a lot of animals but I didn’t know they needed rescuing.”

The work on the app is being done by the nonprofit organization, Animal Help Now, which Crawford founded a decade ago and still leads today as executive director. Animal Help Now puts people across the United States in contact with local wildlife rehabilitation organizations should they come across an injured or orphaned animal, like a bird having flown into a window or a bear cub abandoned after its mother is struck and killed by a car.

The organization also provides contacts to no-kill wildlife handlers who can remove a family of raccoons from an attic or a skunk from under the porch.

“We have the definitive list of humane wildlife control operators,” Crawford said.

While Crawford ran Animal Help Now out of his former Superior home, relying on a group of 30 volunteers to help keep the website going, he said the organization is well backed up on the cloud. Elena Rizzo, research director and wildlife rehabilitator liaison for the organization, said she isn’t surprised by Crawford’s need to jump back into his animal advocacy work so soon after experiencing his own life-altering tragedy.

Since the fire, she said Crawford was busy trying to get information on a moose that someone reported being stuck in a fence in the Colorado mountains (it turned out, upon further investigation, that the moose was fine).

“And immediately he’s trying to help animals in the area,” she said. “I would say Dave goes the extra mile for every animal. He’s one of the most passionate people I know.”

It’s a passion, Crawford said, that stemmed from his work in an Iowa pig slaughterhouse as a teenager. That job opened his eyes to the treatment of animals on factory farms and served as a “catalyst” to making a career working on their behalf.

He started the group Rocky Mountain Animal Defense in the 1990s in Boulder County, and was involved in numerous campaigns to fight animal cruelty and habitat destruction. RMAD took on the company that made Nalgene bottles nearly 20 years ago, highlighting its role in also manufacturing restraint devices for laboratory animals.

Crawford and his group convinced voters in Estes Park to vote down a wildlife zoo that had been proposed near the entrance of Rocky Mountain National Park, where those same animals roamed freely in their natural habitat. RMAD also fought against the use of animals in Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus productions. In 2017, Ringling Bros. ended operations after nearly a century and a half, in part because of concerns over treatment of its animals.

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