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Do We Really Need Online Video Converters?

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The world as we see it is all in images and fleeting moments. Technology has made it easier to save those fleeting moments and freeze them in the form of videos and photos. However, the question is that is it always easy to save the videos and seize the moments virtually? In a world of patents and copyrights and other regulations, unfortunately, the answer is no. This is where the job of online video converter jumps in.

What is an online video converter?

Online video converters are paid or free web applications or services for online media conversion. They allow the users to convert the video links or files to any other formats without the need of installing specific software on your computer.

Basic use of an online video converter:

They usually allow users to download online videos to their phones. We watch lots of videos on YouTube and Facebook etc. but we cannot download them directly. Online video converters can be used for that purpose. They can not only detect the URL of the videos to download and save them, but also offer to edit them.

Changing formats:

Online video converters can also be used to change file formats. The user can choose which video format he wants to save the video in, and the converter does its magic and changes the file into the desired format. For example, it can save in MPEG or an MP4 format. Similarly, they can change video files into mp3 audio files.

How to choose an online video converter?

While choosing an online video converter, one must keep in mind the type of file to be converted and check if the website is offering that. One also needs to keep in mind the type of output file that is required. Simplicity and user-friendly interface is another important factor to be kept in view while choosing a video converter. Lastly, the price factor should also be considered. Some converters are free of cost and some require a certain amount to be paid.

Pros and Cons of an online video converter:

There are many advantages to using an online video converter. They are free to use or have very minimally paid versions, so they are pocket-friendly. They do not take up device storage space and save the effort of downloading software for this purpose. However, they have some cons too. For example, sometimes they are used to pirate online videos which can have legal implications. They can also transfer viruses on your system in some cases. Sometimes videos get encrypted or their pixel quality is affected. Also, some of these websites have pop-ups and advertisements which can be annoying for some users.

In a nutshell, online video converters can be useful to download videos and convert video files into other formats. However, one must choose a website very carefully which offers maximum quality and is safe to use i.e. doesn’t shift any viruses or malware to your system.

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Last call at 24-year Aspen watering hole Jimmy’s brings fans out of the woodwork

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Last call at 24-year Aspen watering hole Jimmy’s brings fans out of the woodwork

ASPEN — The crew that gathered on Saturday night to send off Jimmy’s restaurant and bar after 24 years at the heart of this storied mountain town was misfit, for sure, and also entirely fitting.

There were free thinkers and politicians (some both). There were longtime locals, seasonal and year-round regulars. The wife and grown children of composer Burt Bacharach attended, as did a high-profile criminal defense attorney who sat down to one last dinner.

A team of 20-somethings celebrated at the bar with their winning trophy that they filled with beer for the occasion. They had come from “adult field day” some hours earlier, where they raised money for the Roaring Fork Valley’s free after-school program.

And a handful of jet-setters flew in for the weekend. One ophthalmologist came out from the Bay Area as soon as he got the call from Jimmy; he’d been back here every winter “since disco.”

By the time Jimmy Yeager opened his eponymous bar and restaurant in 1997, Aspen had arrived at a crossroads.

It was no longer the “freaky” Colorado enclave made infamous by creatives like Hunter S. Thompson, nor had it reached peak celebrity mountain-retreat status, a reputation that has stuck for the last 20-plus years and counting.

“Aspen when we moved here wasn’t the Aspen that people think of fondly from the ’70s and ’80s,” said Gordon Gerson over the din of Jimmy’s Saturday night send-off. “But what it is, it’s a small town. You work here as long as we have, and you know everybody. And not everybody thinks the exact same way, but we’re all family.”

Together with his wife, Elaine, Gerson had stepped away from a private goodbye party of 15 or so revelers to talk about the lasting impact of Jimmy’s, their favorite local haunt.

They’d been coming to eat since they moved to Aspen just over 20 years ago, shortly after the restaurant’s start. During one long pandemic stretch, they even ordered takeout from Jimmy’s kitchen for 74 days.

“There was no chance we were going to let it go under,” Gerson said. “Jimmy’s just got a big heart… he cares about his staff way more than he cares about himself.”

Kelsey Brunner, Special to The Denver Post

A poster recognizing the employees, or graduating class, of the last year of Jimmy’s hangs on the wine cellar greeting guests as they enter the dining room in Aspen, Colorado on Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021.

The newest of Jimmy’s staff members had been with them for four years, according to Yeager. His longtime business partner, Jessica Lischka, started as a hostess in 2006 and by 2013 had worked her way up to co-owner.

Over the years, Yeager and Lischka say they never turned down a donation request or a youth league dinner. They’ve held parties for all manner of community events, hosted salsa dances and blues sessions.

While the pair aren’t closing Jimmy’s as a result of the pandemic, they are closing when they can still go out on a high note, they said. And when they broke the news to employees back in June, not a single person on staff left for another opportunity.

“This restaurant is the best it’s ever been today,” Yeager said. “You can’t go out any more on top.”

He looked over at Lischka. “We did it,” he said.

Yeager and Lischka sold the restaurant for an undisclosed amount to Austin-based McGuire Moorman Hospitality Group, which also owns Clark’s Oyster Bar inside the downtown space formerly occupied for 44 years by Little Annie’s.

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Big concerts coming to Denver: Alt-J, Thundercat, Chris Isaak, Lil Tecca and more

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Big concerts coming to Denver: Alt-J, Thundercat, Chris Isaak, Lil Tecca and more

Note: All shows are subject to postponement or cancellation due to changing COVID-19 mandates and venue rules. Prices do not include service fees. Please check with event organizers for updated information and see state of Colorado’s guidance at covid19.colorado.gov.

British pop-rock act Alt-J will bring Portugal, The Man — which headlined Red Rocks Amphitheatre this week — and Cherry Glazerr back to Colorado for a show at Broomfield’s FirstBank Center on March 23, 2022. Tickets for the all-ages show are on sale at 10 a.m. Oct. 1. ($50-$99.50, axs.com)

Having just played last weekend’s Westword Music Showcase, mischievous multi-instrumentalist Thundercat will return to RiNo’s Mission Ballroom on Dec. 7, with opener Channel Tres. Tickets for the 16-and-up concert on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 24. ($36-$80, axs.com)

Hippo Campus, which also just played the Westword Music Showcase, is returning for a show at Englewood’s Gothic Theatre on March 21, 2022, with tickets for the 16-and-up concert on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 24. ($28-$30, axs.com)

Smooth-as-silk crooner Chris Isaak plays the Paramount Theatre on Dec. 15 as part of his holiday tour, which includes originals and classics. Tickets for the all-ages performance are on sale at 10 a.m. Oct. 1. ($50-$100, axs.com)

Electronic dance-music trio Cheat Codes will headline a show with Haywyre and Win & Woo at the Ogden Theatre on Feb. 24, 2022, the band announced this week. Tickets for the 16-and-up show are on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 24. ($20-$25, axs.com)

Singer-songwriters Anders Osborne and Jackie Greene have joined forces for a double-headlining show at the Boulder Theater on March 26, 2022. Tickets for the all-ages show are on sale at 10 a.m. Friday, Sept. 24. ($25-$29.50, bouldertheater.com)

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Free family fun at Denver’s newest park, Doors Open Denver, film fests and more things to do

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Free family fun at Denver’s newest park, Doors Open Denver, film fests and more things to do

Wet, and maybe a little wild

Friday-Oct. 30. Evergreen’s annual Rocky Mountain Watermedia Exhibition this year sourced its 65 entries from an impressive 485 submissions representing 25 states. It speaks to the prestige of the event, which focuses on not only on traditional, transparent watercolor paintings but also materials such as acrylic, egg tempera, gouache, and mixed media in a variety of artistic styles. Subjects range from wild animals to the domesticated environment and lots in-between.

The free, opening reception from 4 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 24, at The Center for the Arts Evergreen includes food and drink (beer and wine available for purchase) and free tours of the exhibit at 4 and 5 p.m., led by Sara Miller, CAE’s senior director of exhibitions. Painter and teacher Steve Griggs, the juror for the show, will also hand out 20 awards for the top pieces.

Stream it on Zoom or attend in person at 31880 Rocky Village Drive in Evergreen. 303-674-0056 or evergreenarts.org

Check out Denver’s newest park this weekend when RiNo’s ArtPark debuts, Sept. 24-27, with a free family-friendly celebration. (Provided by ArtPark)

ArtPark: Denver’s newest outdoor hangout

Friday-Sunday. It’s been a long time coming, but we’re happy the creative minds behind the River North Art District’s ArtPark did it right. The new, manicured open space at 1900 35th St. transformed an otherwise gritty industrial lot into one of Denver’s most attractive new hangouts and art-making centers.

From Friday, Sept. 24, to Sunday, Sept. 27, organizers will hold a grand opening celebration with art projects and workshops, tours of the on-site library and artist-workspace, live music and more. Artists Jaime Molina and Pedro Barrios (with help from Tres Birds Workshop) will unveil their latest works at a 4 p.m. dedication ceremony on Sept. 24: three industrial cement mixers that are now sculptural works, according to a press statement.

Saturday, Sept. 25, and Sunday, Sept. 26, offer more free, all-ages activities — Ethiopian coffee, books and zines, live music, bilingual paper flower and piñata making, yarn-bombing, food trucks — and a 6-9 p.m. Lawn Salon fundraiser ($150 per ticket). Other events are free and open to the public. Visit rinoartpark.com for the full schedule.

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Drag TV show “We’re Here” sashays through Grand Junction for upcoming episode

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Drag TV show “We’re Here” sashays through Grand Junction for upcoming episode

“We’re Here,” the HBO show that brings three drag queens to small towns across America, filmed in Colorado this week.

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Hard Rock Cafe settles feud with Denver Pavilions landlord

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Hard Rock Cafe settles feud with Denver Pavilions landlord

At Hard Rock Cafe in downtown Denver, the band plays on.

Earlier this month, the Florida-based chain of rock ’n’ roll-themed restaurants settled a lawsuit it filed against its Denver landlord in January in an effort to get out of its lease.

At the time the lawsuit was filed, the restaurant within Denver Pavilions along the 16th Street Mall had been closed for nearly 11 months since the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. The eatery reopened in June, about 15 months after closing, according to its Facebook page.

As is typical, specifics of the settlement are not outlined in court documents.

Hard Rock operates in 11,736 square feet, which it has leased since 1996.

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LoDo hotel files for bankruptcy in bid to slow down foreclosure process

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LoDo hotel files for bankruptcy in bid to slow down foreclosure process

The owner of the Nativ Hotel building in downtown Denver has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in an effort to slow the foreclosure process — and a nightclub operator currently facing heat from the city wants to move in.

KDA Properties LLC said in its Wednesday filing that it owes $9.61 million to four creditors.

The bulk of the money — $8.07 million — is owed to Chicago-based Pangea Mortgage Capital. The claim is secured by the four-story building Nativ occupies at 1612 Wazee St., as well as other assets. Pangea did not respond to a request for comment.

“We’ve recently had the intention to exit the property, but we’re going to exit our way,” said Nativ Hotel co-owner Amin Suliaman. “I’m not going to let them bully us out of the property.”

Companies use Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection to reorganize and help keep the business alive, paying creditors over time.

Suliaman told BusinessDen the bankruptcy filing pertains solely to the business’ real estate. He said the 14-room hotel and attached nightclub are run by a different entity that did not file for bankruptcy.

Pangea Mortgage Capital initiated the foreclosure process for the hotel building in December 2020, according to Denver’s Public Trustee Office. Suliaman said the business was about to receive its PPP funds in January and was “blindsided.”

An auction of the property was initially set for May, but has been repeatedly pushed back. Suliaman said the lender has not set an official date because the business has been making its monthly mortgage payment of $56,000.

“This gives us an opportunity to reset with a neutral third party in the bankruptcy court, and forces our lender to address the plan in place that we have to exit,” Suliaman said. “It gets us back to an even playing field.”

Attorney Jeffrey Weinman of Weinman & Associates is representing Nativ in bankruptcy proceedings.

Lily O’Neill, BusinessDen

The hotel is on the market for around $7 million, Suliaman said.

Building up for sale; hotel largely not operating

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Fall fun guide: Don’t miss these 2021 Colorado Oktoberfests before they blow away

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Fall fun guide: Don’t miss these 2021 Colorado Oktoberfests before they blow away

It seemed cruel last year that we couldn’t enjoy the crisp, cold air together while sipping beers, gnawing on giant pretzels and enduring polka music.

Fortunately, this year’s crop of Oktoberfests isn’t quite so puny, and the fact that they’re all outside is good news in this dicey era of public health. Some started last weekend, or even in late August, when many of us were still in a summer mindset. But there are many more on tap.

Here’s a sampling of these family-friendly, fall events — many of them free (see this link for haunted houses and corn mazes). Be sure to mask up, and check with each event to see if they require proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test for entry.

Daniel Brenner, Special to the Denver Post

Contestants hold beer steins to see who can last the longest during Denver Oktoberfest Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017 on Larimer Street.

The 51st Denver Oktoberfest promises better music production, shorter lines and seamless payment for its array of foods, beers, seltzers and Cutwater cocktails this year. While it doesn’t feature the tongue-in-cheek 5K of years past, it does have keg bowling, a marketplace, stein hoisting, 30-plus bands and long-dog (Dachshund) racing. The fest continues Friday, Sept. 24-Sunday, Sept. 26, along Larimer Street between Market and Lawrence Streets, and 21st Street between 20th and 22nd streets. Wristbands are $15-$65. denveroktoberfest.com

Longmont Oktoberfest takes over Roosevelt Park on Saturday, Sept. 25, with, appropriately, a hearty showing by local producer Left Hand Brewing, but also 10 other breweries, distilleries and cideries. Drinks and German-themed food and festivities — including contests for best-dressed, stein-holding, and bratwurst-eating — complement the mix of rock, bluegrass and other genres on the live-music stage. Entry is $10-$35. lhbfoundation.org/longmont-oktoberfest

Colorado Springs Oktoberfest takes place Sept. 24-26 at the Western Museum of Mining and Industry with traditional food and drink, live bands, the ever-popular weiner dog races, retail vendors, and contests for stein hosting and best costumes. Admission is free, but tickets are required for the beer school, schnapps school and wine-tasting events. $10 parking. csoktoberfest.com

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CSU Rams vs. Iowa football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions

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CSU Rams vs. Iowa football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions

Colorado State (1-2) at No. 5 Iowa (3-0)

1:30 p.m. Saturday, at Kinnick Stadium (Iowa City)

TV/Radio: FS1/1430 AM, 98.1 FM

Line: Iowa -23.5

Weather: 10% chance of thunderstorms, 73 degrees

What to know

Positive momentum. The misery of two awful loses to begin the year got wiped away last week in CSU’s stunning upset victory at Toledo. It wasn’t pretty (zero offensive touchdowns) but the Rams, as 14.5-point underdogs, showcased impressive resiliency and a dominant defense. CSU held Toledo’s offense to just 0.5 yards per rush (28 carries for 13 yards). The Rams compiled seven sacks. CSU should have a newfound confidence that its defense can actually win games this year.

David vs. Goliath. CSU enters another matchup this week as significant underdogs against the talented Hawkeyes. Iowa is riding a nine-game winning streak dating back to last year and it has already beaten two ranked opponents this season: No. 17 Indiana and No. 9 Iowa State. The Hawkeyes’ defense is currently second in the nation with six interceptions over their first three games. Starting quarterback Spencer Petras hasn’t thrown a pick this year. Iowa is a team with real College Football Playoff aspirations.

Do the wave. The in-game atmosphere at Kinnick Stadium ranks among the best in all of college football with 60,000-plus expected in attendance Saturday. Pay attention at the end of the first quarter when the entire crowd all turns at once to wave at the tall building behind the east stands. They’re acknowledging patients on the top floors of a nearby Children’s Hospital. The heartwarming tradition dates back to 2017 and should be celebrated by college football fans everywhere.

Help on the way. CSU’s Week 3 victory over Toledo was more impressive when you consider the Rams were shorthanded with targeting ejections and multiple injuries to key players. But coach Steve Addazio told reporters this week that junior starting defensive back Tywan Francis is “probable” after missing last week. It’s also possible that star sophomore wide receiver Dante Wright returns from injury. CSU is missing a downfield passing threat from its offense. The Rams need all the help they can get against Iowa.

Key Matchups

CSU punter Ryan Stonehouse vs. Iowa return unit. Stonehouse is arguably the nation’s top punter. His ability to flip the field and force the Hawkeyes to move 80 or 90 yards for touchdowns will be essential to CSU hanging in the game. The Rams will get hammered if Iowa’s offense has a short field to the end zone all day.

CSU front seven vs. Iowa offense. We finally witnessed the potential of CSU’s talented defense against Toledo. It now must prove that performance wasn’t an aberration. Look for defensive lineman Scott Patchan to potentially have a breakout game on Saturday against the Hawkeyes.

Predictions

Kyle Fredrickson, sports reporter: Iowa 35, CSU 10

It’s difficult to imagine the Rams scoring many points. But their defense is good enough to prevent an embarrasing blowout.

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Pick 6: Odds Broncos win most regular-season games in NFL, Pat Surtain II wins defensive rookie of the year

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Pick 6: Odds Broncos win most regular-season games in NFL, Pat Surtain II wins defensive rookie of the year

All aboard the Broncos hype train.

Denver is 2-0 for the first time since 2018 and that early-season success is shifting the betting odds in the team’s favor.

The Broncos, as of Thursday, are now slightly favored to make the playoffs for the first time since the Peyton Manning era at -166 — meaning a $166 bet would win $100 — according to Fanduel Sportsbook. Feeling optimistic? They also have the ninth-best odds at +2,000 to finish the year with the most regular-season wins in the league, according to BetMGM.

How about super optimistic? Denver has +2,500 odds to win Super Bowl LVI, according to DraftKings Sportsbook, an improvement from +4,000 that the oddsmaker gave them entering the season.

Here’s a look at some current odds in the world of sports.

+2,000

The odds the Broncos will finish with the most regular-season wins in the NFL this year, according to BetMGM. Denver has the ninth-best odds. Tampa Bay (+300) is the favorite, followed by Kansas City (+700), Buffalo (+800) and San Francisco (+800).

+500

The odds Broncos cornerback Pat Surtain II will win the NFL defensive rookie of the year award, according to Caesars Sportsbook. He is the favorite, ahead of Cowboys linebacker Micah Parsons (+550) and Washington linebacker Jamin Davis (+750.

+1,100

The odds the Rapids will win the 2021 MLS Cup, according to BetMGM. They have the fifth-best odds. New England (+400) is the favorited, followed by Seattle (+500).

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10 NYSCOPBA members file lawsuit against state over vaccine mandate

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10 NYSCOPBA members file lawsuit against state over vaccine mandate

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Come Monday, it’s either vaccination or termination for those who work in state run hospitals and nursing homes. Security officers are among those who work at state hospitals who are being forced to make that decision. The lawsuit claims that the vaccine mandate goes against their constitutional rights.

In a newly filled lawsuit against Governor Kathy Hochul, Heath Commissioner Howard Zucker, and the New York State Health Department, 10 individual state hospital security officers are fighting for the option to have regular COVID tests instead of being mandated to get the vaccine. They say it’s unfair that teachers would have the option for regular testing, but they won’t.

“Students who are 12 years or younger can’t be vaccinated,” said Dennis Vacco. “Inherently, the population in schools is less vaccinated than the population in hospitals or in health care facilities. To say nothing of the fact that health care facilities are constructed to prevent the spread of illness within the facility.”

Former New York Attorney General Dennis Vacco represents the security officers for his Buffalo law firm and said they could lose their jobs, healthcare benefits, and seniority, if they do not get their first shot by Monday.

‘In this instance, we are alleging that the constitutional right to be free from bodily interference and to choose their own treatment is being infringed upon because our clients are being forced to choose between a state mandated treatment, the vaccination, or their employment.”

Vacco requested a temporary restraining order from the court, but it was denied Thursday. However, the lawsuit will be moving forward.

“If we ultimately prevail in the lawsuit, I think that the state is going to be responsible for damages to these employees,” said Vacco.

The state has until October 12 to respond to this lawsuit. NEWS10 reached out to members of the Governor’s Office for a statement on this issue but was told that they do not comment on pending litigation.

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