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Reporter asks Trump to send a message to the children under lockdown, POTUS does not disappoint.

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Reporter asks Trump to send a message to the children under lockdown, POTUS does not disappoint.
  • Last Friday, President Donald Trump gave the Americans in the war against the coronavirus an inspiring message of pride and inspiration.
  • Owen Jensen, a Catholic news organization, told Trump at Friday’s coronavirus task force briefing about Jensen’s people nearest to and near to the center.

“Millions of school children in the world, my own included-tired, impatient, a little online, but in the classroom it’s easier. That’s what you think, “said Jensen.

“You know, my children like to jump on the walls and go up into the walls and my wife’s going to miss her, right? All of them are actually waiting. How are you going to say to the children — primary, mid-grade, high school — now, who are watching from home? “Trump set up for children and adults without opening their heads.

TRENDING: Kathy Griffin wanted to break into line for the COVID exam, “I’d say ‘you are the resident of the best country in the world, turned out she’d diarrhea after Mexico Trip. Yet, ever after 1917—a lot of years ago, we have been hit like nothing else. We have been targeted, “said Trump.

“‘We win the fight, and we’ll win the war, and it won’t take much longer, hopefully. Nevertheless, ‘he added,’ we will fight the battle.

The task does not have an age limit, Trump added.

“So I suggest that they have a responsibility to listen, observe, act, hand wash, live with mom and dad at an appartement — they feel as if they are good enough to have you as a father — and just benefit from that,” he said., “he said.

“However, you know they are — they were great young people. Any of them are really happy that they’re not going to learn. I understand. I understand. Perhaps, maybe not yours. So they were — we had no — we had no problem, basically. But again, since we are doing it for them, they will sit back and be very proud of our country. You know, we’re doing it, most of all, for them if you think about it, “said Trump.

The question from Jensen starts on the following video at 1:29:50.

All that rattle under new constraints was later questioned about Mr. Trump.

“I say: if this is your life and your welfare if we need more time, they will have no trouble waiting for it. Work, health, and this is our world. It’s our world. Nonetheless, we need to look after people. We try to get them out concurrently. I want to head back. This is the foundation of our culture. So it must be assured that it’s secure, and everybody knows it, “said Trump.

The comments complemented a recent comment by Trump commended the nation for their crisis response.

Would you think that Americans will understand the appeal of Trump?

“I was more awakened and encouraged than anyone else, by the Americans during this ordeal. Americans have followed the rules of every way of life, have shown immense compassion and have sacrificed a great deal for their fellow people.

“I want to learn that every American is saving lives through their selfless and courageous acts. I want them to know that I’m so proud to be their president because I’ve said that before. I’m very proud of the men of the United States, “said Trump.

Trump pointed out that the Americans did as was demanded and produced sights he never planned.

He said in reference to a reporter “I looked — I saw last night, and I’m looking down Madison Avenue and Fifth Avenue.”

“John, nobody was on the driveway. You could not see the pavement, naturally, I presume. Cars are everywhere over it. It’d be like the rush-hour. I see it and I think ‘I can’t trust it. I can’t trust it. Cars don’t exist. “There was not a single person walking down the street on Fifth Avenue. I never before heard it. You know, I think, probably at one in the morning, maybe at four in the morning. Yet I’ve never seen that before. “Trump said America’s winning the fight that has invaded the nation’s households.

“America is brave with scientific technology, medical creativity, logical, reflective and committed diligence in combating the pandemic. In winning this battle, no effort will be spared. We will fight the war. We must fight. Luckily, we’ll win easily and risk as few lives as possible.

“It is everywhere over the globe where you see what is going on. You can see culture, you can see Italy, you see Spain, all these countries go too far, they go too far, “Trump said.

“I want everybody to thank, though. Later, he added a bright view of the future. I want to thank our great Americans.

“We have been struck by the unseen enemy, and now nations are reeling across the world,” he said. “But we win, and we will be better, bigger and stronger, and stronger than we have ever been.”

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Loveland’s Winter Holiday Council struggles to keep the lights on amid vandalism, thefts

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Loveland’s Winter Holiday Council struggles to keep the lights on amid vandalism, thefts

Meghan Albañez, the new chair of the Winter Holiday Council, warns that without help from the public or the city of Loveland, many of the lights and decorations maintained by the council could go dark.

With projects including holiday decorations at Foote Lagoon, Lake Loveland, Dwayne Webster Veterans Park and the lighting of the Namaqua Star, the group is funded through sales of an annual Christmas ornament, and is staffed entirely by volunteers. Recent vandalism and thefts combined with financial struggles prompted Albañez to address the Loveland City Council on Tuesday, asking for help.

“The more money and help we have the better the chances we have to keep this tradition, one that began in 1989, not only alive but growing bigger and better,” Albañez told the City Council on Tuesday. “Dwindling support coupled with vandalism makes me a little nervous for prolonged survival. We remain optimistic, but we can’t do it alone.”

Several instances of theft and property damage were reported to police over the holiday season, including the destruction of a commissioned display by a local artist on the opening of the annual Light the Lagoon event. A witness described a group of young people dismantling the display, pieces of which were found floating in the lagoon the following morning.

The city currently provides a few in-kind donations, according to Ben Cordsen, a member of the council who manages the sale of ornaments and the selection of the artist who will create it each year. But financing for maintenance and other costs, which includes paying artists to create ornaments and displays, is generated only through ornament sales, he said.

This year, ornament sales generated a little more than $28,000 in revenue, half of which went towards the creation of the ornaments themselves, Cordsen said.

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Saving animals is his life’s work. He wished he could have done more during Marshall fire.

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Saving animals is his life’s work. He wished he could have done more during Marshall fire.

SUPERIOR — The delicate paw impressions in the snow-dusted path leading to Dave Crawford’s burnt-down home in Superior’s Original Town stopped the long-time animal activist in mid-stride.

“Those look like squirrel tracks — could be the ones I used to watch from my window every day,” he said, scanning the scorched and denuded trees lining the alley beyond his incinerated garage, a smile sneaking across his grizzled face. “That’s the best thing I’ve seen all day.”

It’s through animals that the 60-year-old Iowa native takes inventory of his blackened and flattened neighborhood, pointing out in a 360-degree sweep which creatures survived and which perished in the Marshall fire. Two dogs were rescued from houses across West William Street from his, but a block to the west, a tortoise, turtle and cockatiel weren’t so lucky.

“It was heartbreaking — it wakes me up at night,” said Crawford, who grabbed his two cats before escaping the advancing flames. “To think how utterly dependent they are on us.”

The wind-fueled wildfire that swept through Superior and Louisville, destroying nearly 1,100 homes in a matter of hours, prompted Crawford to start developing an app that will allow neighbors to alert one another during emergencies that they have animals that need rescuing. Hundreds of Boulder County families have been desperate to find out what happened to their pets in the wake of the Dec. 30 fire.

“I was driving by houses that had animals inside that would be dead in 90 minutes and I’m unaware of that,” Crawford said. “I had time to rescue a lot of animals but I didn’t know they needed rescuing.”

The work on the app is being done by the nonprofit organization, Animal Help Now, which Crawford founded a decade ago and still leads today as executive director. Animal Help Now puts people across the United States in contact with local wildlife rehabilitation organizations should they come across an injured or orphaned animal, like a bird having flown into a window or a bear cub abandoned after its mother is struck and killed by a car.

The organization also provides contacts to no-kill wildlife handlers who can remove a family of raccoons from an attic or a skunk from under the porch.

“We have the definitive list of humane wildlife control operators,” Crawford said.

While Crawford ran Animal Help Now out of his former Superior home, relying on a group of 30 volunteers to help keep the website going, he said the organization is well backed up on the cloud. Elena Rizzo, research director and wildlife rehabilitator liaison for the organization, said she isn’t surprised by Crawford’s need to jump back into his animal advocacy work so soon after experiencing his own life-altering tragedy.

Since the fire, she said Crawford was busy trying to get information on a moose that someone reported being stuck in a fence in the Colorado mountains (it turned out, upon further investigation, that the moose was fine).

“And immediately he’s trying to help animals in the area,” she said. “I would say Dave goes the extra mile for every animal. He’s one of the most passionate people I know.”

It’s a passion, Crawford said, that stemmed from his work in an Iowa pig slaughterhouse as a teenager. That job opened his eyes to the treatment of animals on factory farms and served as a “catalyst” to making a career working on their behalf.

He started the group Rocky Mountain Animal Defense in the 1990s in Boulder County, and was involved in numerous campaigns to fight animal cruelty and habitat destruction. RMAD took on the company that made Nalgene bottles nearly 20 years ago, highlighting its role in also manufacturing restraint devices for laboratory animals.

Crawford and his group convinced voters in Estes Park to vote down a wildlife zoo that had been proposed near the entrance of Rocky Mountain National Park, where those same animals roamed freely in their natural habitat. RMAD also fought against the use of animals in Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus productions. In 2017, Ringling Bros. ended operations after nearly a century and a half, in part because of concerns over treatment of its animals.

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Denver firm sets national record in U.S. lobbying industry

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Denver firm sets national record in U.S. lobbying industry

Denver-based Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck has set the standard for federal lobbying revenue with its fourth quarter performance, the firm announced this week.

The firm reported $15.96 million for its fourth-quarter federal lobbying revenue for 2021 — a 29% boost compared to the same quarter in 2020 and a record in the industry, according to a Thursday announcement. The law and lobbying firm’s total revenue for last year amounted to $56.25 million which jumped 14% from the firm’s overarching numbers for 2020.

“When you compete with very established firms, firms that have been lobbying for 40, 50 years, I’m very proud of the record we’ve achieved,” said Norman Brownstein, the firm’s founder and chairman, in a Friday telephone interview. He noted that his firm opened its Washington, D.C., office in 1995, with the goal of becoming “the No. 1 bipartisan lobbying group in the country,” and has since helped enact almost 20 laws.

“We actually know how to pass legislation,” Brownstein added.

While K Street in Washington is typically considered the nation’s haven for lobbyists, Brownstein’s firm has kept Colorado on the map — and the team isn’t new to the limelight. The firm made Women Inc. Magazine’s list of “Top 100 Law Firms for Women” and was named a top lobbying firm in 2020 by Bloomberg Government.

Brownstein highlighted the importance of keeping the firm’s Denver roots as his law and lobbying practice expanded over the years.

“I felt, even though it was more challenging, that we still could do it from Denver if we had the kind of great firm that we’ve assembled,” Brownstein said. “I took that on, as not only a challenge to be No. 1, but No. 1 from Denver, Colorado.”

Marc Lampkin, Brownstein’s government relations department chair and managing partner of the Washington office, described 2021 as “an extraordinary year.” Factors that helped create “a frenetic pace in Washington unlike anything we’d seen before” included President Joe Biden’s new administration, with infrastructure and Build Back Better agenda topping the list of priorities, he said. The shift in power within Congress and American industries still in need of COVID-19 relief also contributed to the momentum, Lampkin added.

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