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Shipping Containers Poised to Solve COVID-19 Hospital Housing Shortage

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::: To efficiently and effectively resolve hospital bed and hospital staff housing deficits nationwide, cargo architecture firm Three Squared designs two custom-outfitted mobile shipping container units—one housing multiple hospital beds for patients, another for housing attending medical staff—complete with electrical and full bathrooms :::

 

Hospital Relief Copyright Three Squared Inc 4

Photo Copyright Three Squared Inc.

Amid throngs of daily reports lamenting the critical lack of hospital beds and similar space shortage concerns for morgues in the wake of COVID-19, with makeshift tents being erected on both fronts as a short-term “BAND-AID,” one company has been think-tanking what could be a hugely viable solution for all. Detroit-based cargo architecture firm Three Squared, whose steel cargo containers are typically used for innovative multifamily and mixed-use housing applications, is now proffering its state-of-the-art cargo container dwellings not only as relief units for hospital and morgue/mortuary overflow, but also as appropriately-appointed and climate-controlled housing units for doctors and nurses needing to stay close to those patients.

“Amid the crisis, we’ve been refocusing our residential lodging efforts to instead resolve the current hospital housing crisis,” notes Leslie Horn, CEO of Three Squared. “In consultation with several doctors who’ve shared front-line problems and needs in relation, and through concerted efforts to rally and align with other builders in the shipping container sector, we’ve identified two distinct gaps in hospital housing and successfully devised two specialized solutions to wholly resolve these needs.”

According to Horn, Three Squared’s first solution would provide direct and immediate relief for those hospitals facing a bed shortage. Specifically, a mobile cargo unit that is delivered via truck, hooked up to temporary plumbing and power, set on temporary foundations, and covered with a temporary tent structure. Each unit contains two hospital beds, also with a central bathroom with running water. The bathroom also has an exterior door so that doctors and nurses can decontaminate before leaving the unit at any time—a feature suggested by one of the consulting doctors.

Another doctor Three Squared consulted with voiced concern around the shortage of temporary housing for doctors and nurses who need to so stay close by patients while also maintaining necessary social distancing protocols. Thus, the company’s second proposed solution involves shipping container units set up in a similar fashion for use as the hospital staff relief—temporary housing for medical staff located near the patient hospital bed cargo units.

“After the pandemic has run its course and the hospital patient and staff-use shipping container structures have achieved their objectives, the cargo units will be picked back up and delivered to a final ‘afterlife’ resting place as housing for homeless, veterans, disaster relief, college dormitories, food growing operations and more. They can also be easily stacked and stand ‘at-the-ready’ to assist in future disaster relief efforts,” Horn notes.

States from coast to coast are facing the reality of hospital and morgue space shortages. As these facilitates scramble to increase capacity, even employing options that present a myriad of downsides and even added challenges, Horn asserts that it’s imperative for the solution to this issue be one that not only can be deployed quickly, but also effectively for however long it needs to be utilized.

“Three Squared’s extensive knowledge and experience in building with standard ISO shipping containers allows us to pivot our focus from affordable multifamily housing structures to fill this immediate medical need, promptly and most efficaciously,” Horn said. “Our particularized craft of architecture has the ability to expedite the construction process and get temporary and even permanent buildings to high need areas in less than half the time as conventional methods. This speed is key for meeting these demands and is one of the key advantages of cargo architecture.”

Not only that, Horn also indicated that the company has devised a streamlined process from design, budgeting and bidding, all the way through fabrication and delivery. With current operations, its team reportedly has the capability to acquire, modify and deliver two shipping container units per week—also with the highly scalable option to ramp up production to meet increased needs, as necessary.

Horn also underscored that, as a company, Three Squared continues to seek feedback and opportunity for collaboration to assist those tirelessly working to care for patients and manage the current COVID-19 healthcare crisis. “We understand that buildings of any scale are the product of no one person, but rather the efforts of many people working together to create the best possible functionality,” she said. “Our staff is devoted to being good stewards and use our residential housing skills, knowledge and experience to do anything we can to help support healthcare workers during these unprecedented times.”

Given Three Squared’s sustainable and eco-friendly housing units are billed as being “faster, stronger and more energy efficient”—and considering the specialized adaptations mentioned above—this cargo architecture company just might have devised the definitive quick fix to stave off this seemingly imminent disaster.

~~~

As the Executive Editor and Producer of “The Luxe List,” Merilee Kern, MBA is an internationally-regarded brand analyst, strategist and futurist. As a prolific branding and marketplace trends pundit, Merilee spotlights noteworthy industry innovators, change makers, movers and shakers. This includes field experts and thought leaders, brands, products, services, destinations and events across all categories. Connect with her at www.TheLuxeList.com / Instagram www.Instagram.com/LuxeListReports / Twitter www.Twitter.com/LuxeListReports / Facebook www.Facebook.com/LuxeListReports / LinkedIN www.LinkedIn.com/in/MerileeKern.

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Nuggets Podcast: Nikola Jokic’s MVP moment, Bryn Forbes’ addition, potential trade targets and All-Star starters

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Nuggets’ Nikola Jokic on stunning 49-point performance: “Maybe I was just mad”

In the latest edition of the Nuggets Ink podcast, beat writer Mike Singer and deputy sports editor Matt Schubert discuss Nikola Jokic’s epic 49-14-10 triple-double amid another busy week for the Denver Nuggets. Among the topics discussed:

  • What did Wednesday’s night’s performance against the Clippers do for Nikola Jokic’s MVP campaign? With the reigning MVP leading the league in a handful of categories, including most advanced metrics, could the tide be turning in Nuggets big man’s favor? What needs to happen for him to win a second straight award?
  • A week after their trade with the Pistons was voided, the Nuggets once again dealt Bol Bol (and P.J. Dozier and a second-round pick) in a three-team deal that brought back guard Bryn Forbes. What will this addition do for the Nuggets? Is this an indication the front office is hopeful Michael Porter Jr. and Jamal Murray will return before the end of the season?
  • The trade deadline is just three weeks away. Will the Nuggets look to upgrade their roster further? What position might they target? Who are some players who might be available to them? And what might the Nuggets have to give away to get something meaningful in return?
  • All-Star ballots are due for media members. Who does Mike Singer have on his ballot for the East and West starters?

Subscribe to the podcast
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Producer: AAron Ontiveroz
Music: “Follow the Leader” The Trujillo Company

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U.S. and Russia try to lower temperature in Ukraine crisis

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U.S. and Russia try to lower temperature in Ukraine crisis

GENEVA — The United States and Russia sought to lower the temperature in a heated standoff over Ukraine, even as they reported no breakthroughs in high-stakes talks on Friday aimed at preventing a feared Russian invasion.

Armed with seemingly intractable and diametrically opposed demands, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov met in Geneva for roughly 90 minutes at what the American said was a “critical moment.”

But there was no apparent movement on either side. Blinken said the U.S. and its allies remain resolute in rejecting Russia’s most important demands, which were laid out in writing in two proposals last month, and reiterated on Friday. Moscow wants NATO to promise that Ukraine will never be added as a member, that no alliance weapons will be deployed near Russian borders, and that it pull back its forces from Central and Eastern Europe.

Blinken told Lavrov the U.S. would give Russia written responses to Moscow’s proposals next week and suggested the two would likely meet again shortly after that — possibly delaying any invasion for at least a few more days.

Despite that, there was no indication the U.S. responses would be any different from the flat-out rejections already expressed publicly by Washington and its allies, clouding future diplomatic efforts.

With an estimated 100,000 Russian troops massed near Ukraine, many fear Moscow is preparing an invasion although Russia denies that. The U.S. and its allies are scrambling to present a united front to prevent that or coordinate a tough response if they can’t.

“We didn’t expect any major breakthroughs to happen today, but I believe we are now on a clearer path to understanding each other’s positions,” Blinken said after the meeting.

Blinken said Lavrov repeated Russia’s insistence that it has no plans to invade Ukraine, but the U.S. and its allies were not convinced.

“We’re looking at what is visible to all, and it is deeds and actions and not words that make all the difference,” he said, adding that Russia should remove its troops from the Ukrainian border if it wanted to prove its point.

Lavrov, meanwhile, called the talks “constructive and useful” but declined to characterize the U.S. pledge.

“I can’t say whether we are on the right track or not,” he told reporters. “We will understand that when we receive the U.S. written response to all of our proposals.”

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Louie Anderson, Emmy-winning comedian, dies at 68

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Louie Anderson, Emmy-winning comedian, dies at 68

LOS ANGELES — Louie Anderson, whose more than four-decade career as a comedian and actor included his unlikely, Emmy-winning performance as mom to twin adult sons in the TV series “Baskets,” died Friday. He was 68.

Anderson died at a hospital in Las Vegas of complications from cancer, said Glenn Schwartz, his longtime publicist. Anderson had a a type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Schwartz said previously.

Anderson won a 2016 Emmy for best supporting actor for his portrayal of Christine Baskets, mother to twins played by Zach Galifianakis. Anderson received three consecutive Emmy nods for his performance.

He was a familiar face elsewhere on TV, including as host of a revival of the game show “Family Feud” from 1999 to 2002, and on comedy specials and in frequent late-night talk show appearances.

Anderson voiced an animated version of himself as a kid in “Life With Louie.” He created the cartoon series, which first aired in prime time in late 1994 before moving to Saturday morning for its 1995-98 run. Anderson won two Daytime Emmy Awards for the role.

He made guest appearances in several TV series, including “Scrubs” and “Touched by an Angel,” and was on the big screen in 1988′s “Coming to America” and in last year’s sequel to the Eddie Murphy comedy.

Anderson also toured regularly with his stand-up act and as a stand-up comedian.

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