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Trump Issues Order U.S. Military Power to Call Retired Troops

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Trump Issues Order U.S. Military Power to Call Retired Troops

President Donald Trump talks during a meeting at the White House Briefing Room in Washington, D.C. on the coronaviral pandemic on March 26, 2020. President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday to encourage men and women who have represented their country in the past, once again, to help the public in an hour of need as Europe fights the coronavirus. (Drew Angerer / Getty Images)

“The Defense Department and Homeland Security Department have the power to activate the components of the armed forces in Ready Reserve,” Trump said at the coronavirus task force briefings on Friday.

“This allows us to participate in rescue and medical equipment by enabling thousands of seasoned service members, including veterans, to help fight the epidemic,” said Trump.

“We have many individuals – retirees; wonderful militants — they come back — who have volunteered to support the country in this moment of exceptional need.” Trump commended the enthusiasm of the former veterans of the military who wish to get along.

“They do not, ‘How much? How much? “What are we being paid for? They don’t say? ‘I ought to just get back. It’s absolutely incredible to see. It’s beautiful, “said Trump.

Former members of active duty and reservation programs make up the human ready pool.

The order states: “When not serving as a branch of the Navy, the secretaries of the military, of the naval, of the air force and of the director of the national defense of the coastguard are allowed to carry out the task duty of not more than 24 consecutive months, these units and individual members of the ready reserve, subject to the authority of the Director of War and the Secretary of the Homeland security;

The order specifies that federal officials shall coordinate with state officials in the use of units part of the National Guard Reserve.

The order was completed over the weekend.

Pentagon spokesperson Jonathan Hoffman said, “Decisions on which individuals can be allowed are still being checked,” CNN said in a statement on Friday. The Department is not actually able to do several planned activations, but is now completely approved to carry out operations as required, Hoffman said. “These participants typically are in Headquarter units and individuals with high demand medical capability whose callups will not impact their civilian populations.”

According to the Washington Post, Trump’s directive followed the military’s extension to determine if pensioners, nurses and drugs were likely to be recalled.

Lt. Gen. Thomas C. Seamands, Army deputy chief of staff, wrote, ‘Once the country called — you answered, and now, the call can come back,’ to qualified people whom the Army approached, saying that the military is “attractive in assessing the value” of “trustworthy practitioners who practice under shifting circumstances.” “If you serve in a public hospital or medical facility, The Army announced that of the 800,000 informed people, some 9 000 demonstrated their interest in participating. “The Army has not detracted from its present care and training.”

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Dolphins’ first-round draft position again pushed back following another upset playoff win for 49ers

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Dolphins’ first-round draft position again pushed back following another upset playoff win for 49ers

The value of the Miami Dolphins’ first-round pick from the San Francisco 49ers just keeps diminishing.

With a second consecutive playoff upset victory pulled off by the 49ers, the pick they’re sending to the Dolphins will now be one of the final four selections of the upcoming NFL draft’s first round.

San Francisco defeated the top-seeded Green Bay Packers, 13-10, in the NFC’s divisional round on Saturday night, and for the Dolphins, that means the best the pick can be is No. 29 as the 49ers advance to the NFC Championship Game against either the Tampa Bay Buccaneers or Los Angeles Rams.

The remaining scenarios: 49ers lose and Cincinnati Bengals win in AFC Championship Game, the pick is 29; 49ers lose and Bengals lose, 30; 49ers lose in Super Bowl, 31; 49ers win in Super Bowl, 32.

Had San Francisco lost on Saturday night at Lambeau Field, the pick would’ve been settled at No. 25.

It’s the third consecutive week that the selection is negatively impacted. Had the Los Angeles Rams held on to a late lead in the regular season finale against the 49ers, San Francisco would’ve been eliminated with the pick being No. 17. The 49ers’ upset win over the Cowboys in the wild-card round then pushed the selection further back from No. 22.

The Dolphins own the 49ers’ selection while the Philadelphia Eagles have Miami’s pick due to the two trades the Dolphins pulled off with the NFC teams last offseason ahead of the 2021 NFL draft. Miami traded back to No. 12 with San Francisco, sending the No. 3 pick, which previously belonged to the Houston Texans, to the 49ers. A move up from 12 to 6, where wide receiver Jaylen Waddle was selected, followed and sent the Dolphins’ 2022 first-rounder to Philadelphia.

The Dolphins are selecting around 15 spots lower than they would be had they traded the 49ers’ pick to the Eagles instead of their own. The Miami selection going to Philadelphia in the upcoming draft is No. 15. The Dolphins also got a 2023 first-round pick from the 49ers in the deal.

With Miami’s reported affirmation early in the offseason that it will stick with quarterback Tua Tagovailoa, the Dolphins seem unlikely to send this first-round pick to another team in a trade.

There are a number of offensive tackles and wide receivers that could go around where the Dolphins will be picking, as general manager Chris Grier and Miami’s new incoming coach will look to address team needs.

The NFL draft is ordered by first having the 18 non-playoff teams pick in reverse order of record, with lower strength of schedule serving as a tiebreaker. Picks 19-24 are then reserved for the wild-card round losers in reverse order of regular-season record. Picks 25-28 go to divisional round losers and so on until the Super Bowl champion picks 32nd.

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Letters: Legislators, hear the catalytic-converter call

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Letters: Legislators, hear the catalytic-converter call

Legislators, we need catalytic-converter help

While it is gratifying to see that the St. Paul City Council has addressed the issue of catalytic converter thefts, for myself and many others it is too little and too late.

In the middle of last year my car’s converter was stolen while the vehicle was in a locked, underground apartment garage. Later, my RV’s one was taken while it was in a locked, fenced storage lot.

Since these thefts were not in St. Paul, I don’t think this city ordinance would help.

As suggested in the Jan. 20 article, it is hoped that the state will also investigate this problem.

Also, why haven’t the insurance companies made complaints about the lack of laws concerning these thefts?

Alinda Wengenroth, Inver Grove Heights

 

Where the blame belongs

Why do the media blame the president for issues he has no control over? If the Republicans were really interested in preserving our democracy, they would be on board to support the nation’s voting integrity. Evidence of changing voting laws to disenfranchise voters in 19 states is very well known. If they wanted to make sure that we retain our right to vote they would be supporters of the bills.

The two Democrats who oppose ditching the filibuster are not the fault of the president. It seems no matter how much he pleads to change their position they seem to believe the Republicans will come around and negotiate. It isn’t going to happen. And when the Republicans take charge of congress, they will certainly get rid of the filibuster because it will suit their needs.

When you have a public that is brainwashed by pundits and the former president and his political allies concerning vaccines and masking against the procedures, the fault is not Biden’s. The opponents talk about the rights of the individual and are certainly not concerned about the health of the nation’s citizens.

The media should put the blame where it belongs.

Gary Spooner, Cottage Grove

 

Plowing problems

On Friday Jan. 14 we received a snowfall of over 3 inches. The snow emergency routes were plowed but not the side streets.

On Tuesday night, Jan. 18, at 11 p.m. a snowplow came through, four days after the snow fell.

Because no one was notified cars weren’t moved so after the plow came large ridges of snow surrounded the vehicles. Imagine if that is a vehicle belonging to a nurse or doctor attempting to go to work the next morning.

Are we saving money with this “new” snow removal plan? Paying someone to plow at 11 p.m.? Waiting four days after a storm for plow service?

My taxes are going up. Could things maybe improve? Someone in charge needs to address this ineptitude.

Carol Dey, St. Paul

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Rosario: A conversation with now ex-Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo

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Rosario: A conversation with now ex-Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo

I asked a veteran Minneapolis cop of color recently what he thought of Medaria Arradondo’s tenure as police chief.

“He underwhelmed,” said the cop. “I expected more.”

I got a different take from another police officer I know, also of color.

“He was good. He tried,” said the officer. “With the police union and political resistance, no one person can reform a culture that in many cases needs to change.”

And that pretty much sums up the major camps of views on Arradondo, 54, a South Minneapolis native, 32-year police veteran and divorced father of two who announced last month that he would not seek a third term as chief. His last day in office was Jan.15.

Most newly appointed police chiefs in recent years, particularly those of color, have been promoted or elevated to the top in response to high-profile police-involved shootings, excessive-force incidents or other crises that have further frayed trust between police and communities of color. It is not that surprising that a spate of them — from Dallas to Seattle to Sacramento to now Minneapolis — have left the job in the past two years.

But arguably few have faced more challenges in a short time — the George Floyd murder, a destructive riot, a rise in violent crime, a manpower shortage and a wave of cops retiring early or leaving the force in the midst of a pandemic — than “Chief Rondo.”

He became the first Black chief in the department’s 155-year history following the July 2017 fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk, a white woman, by a cop of Somali descent. Public outrage and demands for accountability and substantial police reform both locally and nationally reached an unprecedented crescendo in May 2020 after the world witnessed Derek Chauvin snuffing out the life of Floyd at the corner of 38th Street and Chicago Avenue — just a few blocks from where Arradondo grew up and first dreamed of becoming a cop in his hometown.

If Chauvin and the MPD became the face of police brutality in America, Arradondo became at that moment the face of the progressively minded police chief in America. He reached out personally to Floyd’s relatives. He knelt in reverence and lowered his hat as Floyd’s casket passed by. He testified against one of his own at the Chauvin murder trial and he may potentially do so again in St. Paul in the federal civil rights trial of the three other former Minneapolis cops charged in Floyd’s death.

He also tussled with a city council that resisted his efforts to hire more police officers and that also backed a controversial plan to essentially eliminate the police department in its present form and replace it with a vaguely detailed Department of Public Safety. A majority of Minneapolis voters rejected that plan at the ballot box in November, by a 56 percent to 44 percent margin. Some critics of the chief lambasted him for “campaigning in uniform” and partly blamed his public opposition to the proposed change for its failure at the ballot box.

He has received some praise for, among other steps, revising rules limiting high-speed pursuit chases that have resulted in deaths, eliminating low-level marijuana police stings, banning neck- and choke-hold restraints, and calling for a need to tweak union contract and arbitration agreements that in his view make it difficult to discipline officers.

Yet some Black community members and activists who aggressively lobbied for Arradondo to be named chief four years ago have expressed disappointment that he did not do enough to rein in or boot out problem cops like Chauvin. They point out the group of SWAT cops seen and heard on body-camera videos during the riots “hunting” for protesters in an unmarked white van. In one incident captured on surveillance video, they fired rubber bullets at and kicked and punched a protester, Jaleel Stallings, a St. Paul truck driver and Army veteran, after Stallings fired his licensed firearm at the van in self-defense. Stallings, who said he was not aware that the shooters inside the vehicle were cops and feared they might be white-supremacist vigilantes, was charged with several counts of attempted murder. He was acquitted in October after a jury trial. He has filed a civil lawsuit against a city that has paid out a combined $47 million alone in out-of-court settlements in the Ruszczyk and Floyd deaths.

Although an internal affairs probe was launched, none of the cops in the Stallings case have reportedly faced any discipline. There are also underway separate city and federal civil rights probes into whether the Minneapolis Police Department historically engaged and still now engages in a pattern of discrimination and excessive force. The results of those probes, including a possible consent decree, could lead to substantial reform changes.

But Arradondo’s popularity with most residents, particularly those who live in neighborhoods most affected by a surge in homicides not seen in a generation and other violent crime, is without question.

A Star Tribune poll conducted last September found that more than half of Minneapolitan respondents had an unfavorable view of the scandal-scarred department. Yet, only 22 percent had an unfavorable view of Arradondo.

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