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Cost of living in New York vs New Jersey in 2020

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New York vs New Jersey

New York City is the most expensive city in America and is also known as the most populated. There are about 3 million people who work in Manhattan each day. more than half of all these commuters use public transport to move from the city to the outer boroughs where they live.

The daily round-trip travel on NYC and New Jerseys packed trains and subways are especially jam-packed at times.

You may be wondering why people don’t live in the city that they work in. however, for many people, the city they work in is too expensive and it actually works out cheaper to travel daily to work. It many be cheaper to check available rooms in NYC or New Jersey, which allow you to share the room with others as well.

To work out the total monthly cost for each place, lets take a look at theaverage home prices and annual property taxes. This has been calculatedby using the monthly mortgage payment for each assuming a 20% down payment and 4% interest on a 30-year fixed rate mortgage.

These figures are then added together, in addition to the cost of either a monthly subway pass(NYC) or PATH train pass (New Jersey).

How much it costs to live in New Jersey versus New York City

It is important to take into account the utilities, tax breaks and maintenance fees. These costs are more specific to homeowners, but they are also relevant to renters as well. Research revealed that Manhattan is the most expensive place for homeowners with an average monthly cost of $4500. The plus side to this is that the travel time is shorter than average.

Newark and Jersey City are much more affordable than New York City’s outer boroughs, despite New Jersey having the highest property tax rate in the country.

Cost of living

Manhattan: $4,531 a month

Median home price: $965,300

Monthly mortgage payment: $3,687

Monthly subway pass: $121

 

Brooklyn: $2,857 a month

Median home price: $625,400

Monthly mortgage payment: $2,389

Monthly subway pass: $121

 

Bronx: $1,908

Median home price: $384,700

Monthly mortgage payment: $1,469

Monthly subway pass: $121

 

Jersey City: $2,036 a month

Median home price: $337,100

Monthly mortgage payment: $1,287

Monthly PATH pass: $89

 

Hoboken: $4,101 a month

Median home price: $694,400

Monthly mortgage payment: $2,652

Monthly PATH pass: $89

 

Newark: $1,381 a month

Median home price: $210,200

Monthly mortgage payment: $803

Monthly PATH pass: $89

The above is just an idea of the estimated costs involved when living in New York City versus New Jersey. You can always scout around for prices and opt to commute daily into the city using the subway or bus when needed. Alternatively, consider co-living as an option to rent a room in the location you wish to stay. There are many changes you can make when deciding to move or live on a budget so don’t let the expensive costs scare you into thinking that it is not possible.

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Pankaj Sharma is a Digital marketing Consultant and guest blogger. He covers topic like business, education, travel and entertainment stuff with fun. He's continued blogging and keep on inspiring other bloggers for the living.

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Colorado’s state court administrator makes reforms after audit found lackluster accountability

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Colorado’s state court administrator makes reforms after audit found lackluster accountability

Employees who leave the State Court Administrator’s Office must now wait six months before they can be re-hired by the agency as independent contractors, one of several reforms aimed at remedying the lackluster accountability, rules and oversight within the agency that were laid out in a state audit in 2020, State Court Administrator Steve Vasconcellos told Colorado’s Legislative Audit Committee on Tuesday.

The new policy also follows Denver Post reporting that a former top administrator in the office was in 2019 given a $2.5 million contract as she left the agency in order to keep her from speaking out about judicial misconduct. At the time, she faced being fired over financial irregularities, but was instead given the contract when she threatened to file a tell-all sex discrimination lawsuit if she was terminated, the agency’s former chief administrator told The Post.

“The performance audit of the State Court Administrator’s office illuminated a series of critical policy and procedure deficiencies,” Vasconcellos told the committee. “Deficiencies that if left unaddressed would impede SCAO’s ability to carry out its mission… It could also undermine confidence in the judicial department as a whole.”

The 2020 audit found administrators in the office, which manages the state’s courts, approved sole-source contracts worth millions of dollars with little oversight, gave thousands of hours of administrative leave without recording a reason for the leave, and paid hundreds of hours of family medical leave without being able to prove why.

The State Court Administrator’s Office has put in place most, but not all, of the changes recommended by the auditors, Vasconcellos said. The agency has created new rules and procedures around voluntary separation incentives, the use of company credit cards and the way administrative leave can be used.

“We’ve focused on tightening up our controls and policies and procedures related to family medical leave requests, storage of the documentation associated with that and associated security,” he said. The office’s legal team and the Attorney General’s Office now review every request for family medical leave, he said.

One person previously was responsible for handling benefits for the entire judicial branch — 4,000 employees — but the agency now has two people in that job, Vasconcellos said.

“I have some concerns long-term about whether that is an adequate number of people… but we’re trying to address that through our budget request,” he said.

The agency hasn’t yet put in place a new time-and-leave system, Vasconcellos said, which will allow the agency to better track how and why administrative leave is used. That is expected to be up and running by February; the project is about six months behind schedule.

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1,400 tech industry jobs coming to Maryville’s campus

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1,400 tech industry jobs coming to Maryville’s campus

ST. LOUIS – Missouri Governor Mike Parson will help cut the ribbon at Accenture Federal Services Tuesday morning.

The organization is taking over the Advanced Technology Center on Maryville University’s campus. The center will provide federal agencies with IT services including artificial intelligence and cyber solutions.

The project will bring 1,400 hundred tech industry jobs to the St. Louis area over the next five years.

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“Cheugy,” “omicron” among 2021’s most mispronounced words

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“Cheugy,” “omicron” among 2021’s most mispronounced words

“Cheugy” is apparently a lot to chew on. Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Billie Eilish and Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce have something in common — broadcasters butcher their names.

And virtually everyone is having trouble with “omicron.”

All four made it onto this year’s list of most mispronounced words as compiled by the U.S. Captioning Company, which captions and subtitles real-time events on TV and in courtrooms.

The list released Tuesday identifies the words that proved most challenging for newsreaders and people on television to pronounce this year.

The caption company said it surveyed its members to generate the list, which is now in its sixth year and was commissioned by Babbel, a language-learning platform with headquarters in Berlin and New York.

“Newscasters in the U.S. have struggled with 2021′s new words and names while reporting on key sporting events, viral internet trends and emerging celebrities,” said Esteban Touma, a standup comedian and teacher for Babbel Live.

“As a language teacher, it’s always interesting to see that some of these terms are usually new colloquialisms, or are rooted or borrowed from another language,” he said. “As a non-native speaker, I must confess it’s fun to see English speakers stumbling a bit for a change.”

Here’s how Touma breaks down the proper pronunciations for the most commonly misspoken words:

— Cheugy (CHOO-gee): A trendy term popularized by Gen Z and used to mock an outdated and unfashionable aesthetic typically associated with millennials, such as “Live, Laugh, Love” signs.

— Chipotle (chih-POHT-lay): The American fast food chain became the center of a viral trend this year challenging Baby Boomers to pronounce the name.

— Dalgona (tal-goh-NAH): A Korean treat made with melted sugar and baking soda, popularized in Netflix’s “Squid Game.” (Touma notes that some speakers seem to produce a ”K” instead of the ”G” in the middle syllable.)

— Dogecoin (DOHJ-coin): A divisive cryptocurrency that began somewhat ironically before being popularized by Elon Musk, causing its value to dramatically increase.

— Eilish (EYE-lish): The singer Billie Eilish, whose album “Happier Than Ever” was released this year to critical acclaim and nominated for the Grammy Awards’ Album of the Year.

— Ethereum (ih-THEE-ree-um): Another cryptocurrency that skyrocketed in value this year amid the decentralized-currency boom.

— Ever Given (EV-er GIV-en): The name of the ship that blocked the Suez Canal in March, costing billions of dollars in lost trade. Many newscasters mistook the name of the ship as “Evergreen,” the name of the company that owns the vessel, which was printed on its hull.

— Glasgow (GLAHZ-go): The host city of November’s United Nations Climate Conference was mispronounced by both President Joe Biden and former president Barack Obama.

— Kelce (KELs): The Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce revealed on radio this year that his teammates and the media had been mispronouncing his name for years.

— Omicron (AH-muh-kraan / OH-mee-kraan): A new variant of COVID-19 first identified in November, named in keeping with the World Health Organization’s system of identifying variants with Greek letters. (Touma notes it’s pronounced differently in the U.S. and the U.K.)

— Shein (SHEE-in): The Chinese fast fashion company at the center of the “Shein haul” trend, in which participants record themselves trying on numerous different outfits from the company.

— Stefanos Tsitsipas (STEH-fuh-nohs TSEE-tsee-pas): Currently ranked as the world’s No. 4 tennis player, the Greek athlete rose to international prominence when he lost to Novak Djokovic in the final of the French Open in June.

— Yassify (YEAH-sih-fai): A popular trend in which multiple beauty filters are applied to well-known pictures or portraits for comic effect.

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