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Ahmaud Arbery Prosecution Arrested Cameraman

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Ahmaud Arbery Prosecution Arrested Cameraman

Stephen B. Morton / AP PhotoMalik Muhammad, right, leads a group of people marching from the Glynn County Courthouse to a police station during a demonstration to protest the death of Ahmad Arbery on 16 May 2020 in Brunswick, Georgia. (Stephen B. Morton / AP Photograph)

The Georgian man whose cellphone video of Ahmad Arbery’s fatal shooting helped reopen the case was charged with murder, making him the third person to be arrested more than two months after the murder.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation said that 50-year-old William “Roddie” Bryan Jr. was arrested on Thursday on charges of felony murder and a criminal attempt to commit false imprisonment. Agents searched Bryan’s home later, several TV stations reported.

Arbery was killed on Feb. 23, when a white father and a white son armed themselves and pursued him after seeing a 25-year-old black man in their neighborhood.

More than two months have passed before the authorities arrested Gregory McMichael, 64, and his friend, Travis McMichael, 34, on charges of felony murder and aggravated assault. Gregory McMichael told the police that he believed Arbery was a burglar, and that Arbery had threatened his son before he was shot.

Bryan lives in the same subdivision just outside the port city of Brunswick, and the video he took from his vehicle’s cab helped stir up a national outcry as it leaked online on May 5.

The video quickly drew a strong response from Georgian governor Brian Kemp, a Republican who called it “absolutely horrible.”

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation soon took over the case from the local police, followed by the arrests of McMichaels on 7 May.

Under Georgia law, a person can be charged with a felony murder for committing any crime that causes someone else to die. This does not require an intention to kill, so it carries an automatic life sentence.

In the Glynn County Police incident report of the shooting, Gregory McMichael told the officer that at one point Arbery “went back in the direction from which he came and ‘Roddy’ attempted to stop him, which was unsuccessful.”

Do you believe that Arbery was murdered?

It is the only mention in the police report of any possible involvement of Bryan.

Bryan ‘s attorney, Kevin Gough, did not return a phone message on Thursday immediately. Previously, he insisted that Bryan did not play a role in Arbery ‘s death.

“Roddie Bryan is not, and has never been, anything than a witness to the shooting,” Gough said in a statement on Monday ‘s trial. “He’s not a watchman. Roddie did not take part in the horrific murder of this young man. Mr. Bryan did not commit a crime and bears no criminal responsibility for the death of Ahmad Arbery.

Meanwhile, Arbery’s parents’ attorneys cheered on Bryan’s arrest reports.

“We have been calling for his arrest from the very beginning of this operation,” Attorneys S. Lee Merritt, Benjamin Crump, L. Chris Stewart said that in a statement. “His role in the murder of Mr. Arbery was evident to us, to everyone across the world, and after their extensive investigation, it was also clear to the GBI.”

Bryan’s video of the shooting was taken from the driver’s seat of a vehicle that followed Arbery as he walked along a residential path. A pick-up truck is parked on the road ahead of Arbery, with one man in the truck bed and another standing next to the driver’s side door.

The video shows Arbery running around the truck to the right until he cuts it back in front of him. Then a shot can be heard, followed by a second shot.

Arbery could be seen kicking a man with what appears to be a shotgun, who would then fire a third shot point-blank. Arbery stumbles and falls face down the driveway.

Gregory McMichael retired last year after more than two decades as a local prosecutor’s investigator.

Brunswick Judicial Circuit District Attorney Jackie Johnson withdrew from the case because of those ties. Two special lawyers named to the case have also stepped aside.

McMichaels remain in prison in Glynn County waiting for a preliminary hearing and for a judge to determine whether to release them on bail awaiting trial.

Attorneys for the father and the son advised people not to jump to a decision in the event.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Voorheesville man arrested after attempting to meet teen for sex

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Rochester man charged in hatchet murder back in custody after ‘Less is More’ release

MOLINE, Ill. (AP) — An Illinois man unexpectedly won the Quad Cities Marathon this weekend when the two Kenyan runners who had far outpaced him were disqualified after being diverted off the course by a race volunteer bicyclist.

Tyler Pence crossed the finish line in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 6 seconds to become the first U.S. runner since 2001 to win the race through the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River in Illinois and Iowa. Pence, the head track and cross-country coach at the University of Illinois-Springfield, logged his fastest time ever with the win and took the first prize of $3,000.

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North Country family seeks support after losing home to ‘devastating’ fire

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North Country family seeks support after losing home to ‘devastating’ fire

HARRISVILLE, N.Y. (WWTI) — A family from the North Country is asking the community for support.

At the end of August, the family of Bob and Laurie Cowles got a call that many dread: their parent’s home in Harrisville was on fire. After an investigation, the incident was deemed an electrical fire that started in the walls and quickly spread throughout the house.

Because the fire was during the day, both Bob and Laurie were able to escape to safety. However, their home and many of their belongings were destroyed. As devastating as this was, the family then found themselves without insurance.

At the same time, Bob has been battling Stage Four Carcinoid Cancer. However, Bob’s treatment has now been put on hold.

“It’s been tough,” Laurie Cowles said. “The stress has had a lot on him. I try to take the impact of a lot of stuff for him. And we’ve been trying to raise money to send him to New York City, to see his carcinoid team down there, which now was on hold because we are living in a camper in the front yard.”

The Cowles’ son recently set up a GoFundMe with a goal of $10,000. However, as of now, most of this has been used to take down the remaining structure. The family is now seeking community donations, both monetary and including building supplies.

Funds raised will specifically be used to hire a company to sanitize and the family’s clothing and bedding. It will also be used to clear debris and start rebuilding a structure ahead of the winter months. But Laurie shared that the amount of support neighbors, businesses, friends and the community has given has been overwhelming.

She said that it’s been bizarre being on the other side as she and her husband are always trying to support their own neighbors. “The people that supported us and stopped by, it’s been great,” Laurie expressed. “It’s really nice to know that. Cause usually we’re the people helping, we’re not the people asking for help. And I don’t like being on the side. But, we’re very appreciative.”

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Monday is the deadline for health care workers to get first COVID-19 vaccine dose

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Monday is the deadline for health care workers to get first COVID-19 vaccine dose

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Monday is the deadline for health care workers in New York State to receive their first vaccine dose. With the health care industry already dealing with staffing shortages, some are uncertain what tomorrow will look like. 

“We are taking all the steps preemptively in anticipation of what I call a preventable staffing shortage,” said Governor Kathy Hochul who is signing an executive order that will allow her to deploy medically trained National Guard members, retired health care workers, recent grads, and those licensed in other states and countries to step in over the health care worker vaccine mandate. 

She’s also working with the federal government to try to “expedite visa requests” for medical workers as well. 

New York State Public Employees Federation President Wayne Spence says while he hopes the Governor’s plan is sufficient, he doesn’t think it will be. “I don’t think there are enough people to go around to plug the holes because a lot of nurses have left New York State as of last year,” Spence said.

United University Professions President Fred Kowal says when it comes to tomorrow’s potential impacts, there are a lot of unknowns. “We support the Governor’s mandate. The vaccine mandate I think is an appropriate step and a necessary one in the fight against COVID. At the same time, what we are looking at is potentially hundreds and hundreds of health care professionals and support staff not being at their workstations starting tomorrow,” Kowal said.

After a legal challenge, a judge put a temporary restraining order on the mandate in place for those claiming a religious exemption. 

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Vermont nonprofit ships bikes, sewing machines to developing countries

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Vermont nonprofit ships bikes, sewing machines to developing countries

BURLINGTON, Vt. (WFFF) — A Vermont nonprofit is collecting bikes and sewing machines to send to developing countries. Pedals for Progress Vermont has already shipped some 4,200 bikes.

That’s according to volunteer Paul Demers. “Vermont bikes have gone to Tanzania and Nicaragua,” he says. “Sewing machines have gone to Fiji and Albania.” He has volunteered with the group for 20 years, and says the goal of each shipment is “to ship as many as you can.”

“We flip the bike over, turn the handlebars, so they take up as little space as possible,” Demers says. “Tighten the seat, and it’s ready to go.”

Demers said the bikes can help in many ways. “If you are a health care worker—if you are going from a village and you can get on this mountain bike,” Demers said. “Suddenly your capabilities to reach out to people are not doubled, but they are quadrupled.”

Pedals for Progress Vermont also plans to send sewing machines to help provide economic opportunities. “If you can imagine a sewing machine for a struggling family can help provide an income, otherwise they are struggling to feed themselves,” says Bob Thompson, another volunteer and former Peace Corps volunteer.

“I have seen the conditions that they have to live in and transportation is something that we take for granted here,” Thompson said. “And it’s not something that is always available there.”

Demers says it’s fulfilling to know household items we may take for granted will make a difference elsewhere. “Sometimes just doing a little bit over years, really adds up to a lot.”

Pedals for Progress Vermont collected bikes on Friday and Saturday in Montpelier and Burlington. Everyone who donates a bike or sewing machine was asked to give $15 to help pay for shipping.

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Cohoes police searching for missing man

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Cohoes police searching for missing man

COHOES, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Cohoes police are investigating a missing person’s complaint concerning Ronnie Chaput, 51. Police say he was last seen in Cohoes on September 8.

Police say Ronnie is a white male, 6 feet tall, 200 pounds and has brown eyes.

If you know of Ronnie’s whereabouts or you see him, please contact Albany County Dispatch at 911 or (518) 765-2352.

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R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

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R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

NEW YORK (AP) — After decades of allegations about sexual misconduct with minors, R&B star R. Kelly has been found guilty in his latest trial. Jurors in 54-year-old Robert Sylvester Kelly’s sex trafficking trial in New York said they reached a verdict on Monday afternoon.

Kelly, perhaps best known for the 1996 smash hit “I Believe I Can Fly,” had pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges accusing him of sexually abusing women, girls, and boys for more than two decades.

The judge summoned the parties to a Brooklyn courtroom for the verdict to be read. According to the verdict sheet, he was found guilty of racketeering and several Mann Act charges:

  • Transportation
  • Ccoercion and enticement
  • Coercion of a minor
  • Transportation of a minor

The Mann Act makes it illegal to transport anyone across state lines “for any immoral purpose.” The charges were based on an argument that the entourage of managers and aides who helped the singer meet girls—and keep them obedient and quiet—amounted to a criminal enterprise.

The verdict came after a month of emotional testimony accusing Kelly of locking victims in rooms, subjecting them to degrading rules, and filming sexual encounters as a means of control. Several accusers testified in lurid detail during the trial, alleging that Kelly subjected them to perverse and sadistic whims when they were underage.

Prosecutors in the case said there was ample evidence to prove that the R&B star sexually exploited multiple victims over a period of two decades. Assistant U.S. Attorney Nadia Shihata said Kelly “believed the music, the fame, and the celebrity meant he could do whatever he wanted.”

Prosecutors against R. Kelly arrive at the Brooklyn Federal Court House on Monday, Sept. 27, 2021, in New York. A New York City jury resumed deliberations on Monday at the sex trafficking trial of R&B star R. Kelly. Jurors began the day by sending the judge a note asking for transcripts of testimony by two former Kelly employees and for a legal clarification. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman)

Kelly had continually denied the allegations, and his defense team said Kelly’s accusers were never forced to do anything against their will. Kelly’s defense attorney, Deveraux Cannick, argued that Kelly could not be a predator because of the way he treated his accusers. “He gave them a lavish lifestyle,” he said during closing arguments. “That’s not what a predator is supposed to do.”

The jury resumed deliberations Monday morning, beginning the day by sending the judge a note asking for transcripts of testimony by two former Kelly employees and for a legal clarification. Deliberations first began on Friday at federal court in Brooklyn before the panel of seven men and five women took the weekend off.

The judge set a sentencing date of May 4. Kelly’s next court appearance will be on November 1, when the judge will hear any defense motions in the case. Kelly faces additional sex-related charges in both Illinois and Minnesota.

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Rensselaer County preparing legal action against manufacturers of PFOA

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Meeting in Poestenkill Monday night to discuss PFOA found at local school and homes

RENSSELAER COUNTY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Rensselaer County is preparing legal action against the manufacturers of PFOA after the chemical was found in Algonquin Middle School and local residences in Poestenkill. The county has previously seen a PFOA issue in Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh.

Rensselaer County Executive Steve McLaughlin said he believes the county would have the ability to join with residents in bringing legal action if more PFOA is discovered in Poestenkill or other towns.

“We want to send the very clear message that we take the PFOA issue seriously and will take strong and sustained action to protect the interests of our residents. The health, safety and quality of life for our residents is not up for negotiation,” said McLaughlin.

The county is now working with the New York State Department of Health and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to conduct a second round of testing of residences. No source of the PFOA in Poestenkill has been discovered yet.

The county hosted a virtual meeting to last week to update Poestenkill residents and give them a chance to respond to the PFOA issue. They are hosting another meeting on September 27 to further discuss the issue.

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DEA warns of ‘alarming increase’ in fake prescription pills containing fentanyl

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DEA warns of ‘alarming increase’ in fake prescription pills containing fentanyl

FILE – This photo provided by the U.S. Attorneys Office for Utah and introduced as evidence in a 2019 trial shows fentanyl-laced fake oxycodone pills collected during an investigation. (U.S. Attorneys Office for Utah via AP)

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) – A Public Safety Alert issued Monday in Washington, D.C., warns of the “alarming increase” of fake prescription pills containing fentanyl and methamphetamine. The pills are sometimes deadly, and are being mass-produced by criminal drug networks.

The alert, the first issued by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in six years, says 9.5 million counterfeit pills have been seized so far this year, which is more than the last two years combined. The agency warns that the pills have been seized in every U.S. state in “unprecedented quantities.”

DEA testing indicates a dramatic rise in the number of counterfeit pills containing at least two milligrams of fentanyl – which is considered a deadly dose and could fit on the tip of a pencil.

“The United States is facing an unprecedented crisis of overdose deaths fueled by illegally manufactured fentanyl and methamphetamine,” said Anne Milgram, Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “In fact, DEA lab analyses reveal that two out of every five fake pills with fentanyl contain a potentially lethal dose … Today, we are alerting the public to this danger so that people have the information they need to protect themselves and their children.”

According to the news release, the counterfeit pills often look like real prescription opioid medications such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin), and alprazolam (Xanax); or stimulants like amphetamines (Adderall). Fake prescription pills are widely accessible and often sold on social media and e-commerce platforms – making them available to anyone with a smartphone, including minors.

Most of the counterfeit pills brought into the United States are produced in Mexico, and China is supplying chemicals for the manufacturing of fentanyl in Mexico, according to the DEA.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 93,000 people died of a drug overdose in the United States last year. Fentanyl, the synthetic opioid most commonly found in counterfeit pills, is the primary driver of this alarming increase in overdose deaths. Drug poisonings involving methamphetamine, increasingly found to be pressed into counterfeit pills, also continue to rise as illegal pills containing methamphetamine become more widespread.

Drug trafficking is linked to violence. So far in 2021, DEA has seized more than 2,700 firearms in connection with drug trafficking investigations – a 30% increase since 2019.

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Unvaccinated staff at Rensselaer County nursing home no longer working as vaccine mandate goes into effect

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Unvaccinated staff at Rensselaer County nursing home no longer working as vaccine mandate goes into effect

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Rensselaer County Executive Steve McLaughlin says employees not vaccinated at Van Rensselaer Manor Nursing Home are no longer scheduled to work as the state vaccine mandate goes into effect September 27. McLaughlin says 29 out of 434 staff members are not vaccinated or do not have an exemption.

Under the state mandate, employees not vaccinated or declaring a religious or medical exemption will be considered as essentially resigned from their position at care facilities. McLaughlin says he expects at least some of those 29 employees will be vaccinated in the coming hours.

McLaughlin says he hopes the state will allow for a two-week period to allow more employees at care facilities to be vaccinated or declare a religious exemption, if it is decided that such exemptions are allowed.

“This mandate from the previous administration is being implemented as there is no firm plan on how to fill vacancies created by the mandate,” said McLaughlin. “There are already staffing shortages at care facilities across the state, and this will make it worse.”

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo announced this state mandate on July 28. The mandate allows for state employees to get regular testing instead of getting vaccinated. However, health care workers do not have a choice. They need to get vaccinated or have an exemption.

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Vermont monitors spread of disease that often kills deer

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Vermont monitors spread of disease that often kills deer

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department is monitoring the spread of a deadly viral disease in deer in a neighboring state and investigating possible cases in Vermont.

New York has documented cases of epizootic hemorrhagic disease in several counties in the Hudson Valley, including some that border Vermont, the department said Thursday. The disease is spread to deer by biting midges, sometimes called no-see-ums. It does not spread from deer to deer and humans cannot get infected from deer or bites of midges, the department said.

“Vermont Fish and Wildlife is on heightened alert in the Castleton area where several dead deer have recently been reported,” the department said in a release. “Unfortunately, biologists have not been able to examine any of these deer before the samples decomposed.”

Outbreaks can temporarily lower the size of a local deer population but do not have a significant impact regionally on the number of deer, officials said. The disease regularly occurs in southern states and outbreaks happen sporadically in the Northeast where deer have no immunity to this virus. There is no treatment or way to prevent the disease. Midges die in the first hard frost, ending the outbreak.

Vermonters who see sick or dead deer should report them to the Fish and Wildlife department through the local game warden.

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