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Tearful Video Shares of Nick Cordero ‘s Wife Condition Is ‘Going Downhill’

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Tearful Video Shares of Nick Cordero 's Wife Condition Is 'Going Downhill'

Broadway star Nick Cordero has had a rough time since being admitted to the hospital in late March. Initially suspecting pneumonia, his family was shocked to hear that he’d actually caught COVID-19.

Cordero is known for his roles in “Blue Bloods,” “Going in Style” and “A Stand Up Guy.” His wife, Amanda Kloots, has been keeping fans updated on his status fighting the virus through her social media accounts. Since the start of his stay at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, Cordero has suffered a variety of setbacks, including mini-strokes, a leg amputation and an infection that stopped his heart. There have been moments of promise, too, and Kloots has been sure to share those bright spots. “We had some great news this morning,” she posted on May 11.

Nick is starting to follow commands and doing simple tracking!!!!! “He is very weak so even just opening his eyes is a struggle, but it is happening. He is starting to wake up!! We are by no means out of the woods yet, there are still concerns with other things, but this news today on his mental status is a win!! “We are still dealing with this lingering infection in Nick’s lung,” she told fans via an Instagram story on Friday, according to People.

“This infection that is leftover from when he went into septic shock the last time is still in his lungs and just kind of sitting there. They are doing everything they can to clean it out every day but it’s just not getting better.” She emphasized that her husband is a fighter and that they’re remaining positive through the long battle.

“I really miss this guy,” she shared on Sunday. “It’s day 49 in the hospital for Nick. We have a new hashtag #offthevent because our new goal for Nick is for his lung infection to clear up so that we can start breathing trials and get him off the ventilator! These are big goals, but I BELIEVE! We have an army behind him that cheered, sang and prayed for him to wake up so now we need to believe that this to can happen! He’s not done.”

“Nicks right lung is looking better,” she wrote in a story on Tuesday, according to People. “For two days it’s been clear! The left lung is the same. So the left lung is still causing issues that we need to get clear. [PRAYERS] FOR LEFT LUNG CLEARING! But by Wednesday, the updates weren’t so positive anymore.

Kloots backed out of her normal daily live video on Instagram, instead sharing a tearful request. “Nick has had a bad morning.

Unfortunately, things are going downhill at the moment, so I am asking again for all the prayers, mega-prayers, right now.” “Please cheer and please pray for Nick today, and I know that this virus is not going to get him down. It’s not how his story ends, so just keep us in your thoughts and prayers today. Thank you.”

“Mega prayers for this special man right now,” she posted on Wednesday, along with a photo of her husband. “God continue to grant miracles.” Many have expressed their support for the couple and pledged to pray for Cordero. Only time will tell if this beloved actor will pull through.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Broncos vs. Jets live blog: Real-time updates from the NFL Week 3 game at Empower Field at Mile High

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Broncos QB Teddy Bridgewater goes from steady to heady, joins Aaron Rodgers, Drew Brees in NFL record book


Joe Nguyen

| Digital Sports Strategist

Digital sports strategist for The Denver Post. Previously he was the online prep sports editor. Prior to that, he covered Adams County and Aurora in the YourHub section. He also writes about beer, professional wrestling and video games.

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The Taliban Is Reportedly Seeking Afghanistan’s Bactrian Treasure

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The Taliban Is Reportedly Seeking Afghanistan’s Bactrian Treasure
A folding gold crown from Tillya Tepe at the British Museum on March 1, 2011. BEN STANSALL/AFP via Getty Images

New reports indicate that the Taliban’s leaders are actively searching for a cache of “Bactrian Treasure,” a series of largely gold artifacts which were discovered at a site called Tillya Tepe in northern Afghanistan in 1978. Although the Bactrian treasure was reportedly last put on display in Afghanistan’s presidential palace in February 2021, its present location is unknown. Additionally, since the Taliban successfully usurped the existing Afghanistan government and assumed control of the country, many questions have arisen regarding the future of Afghanistan’s cultural heritage, museums and other antiquities that communicate narratives essential to the country’s national identity.

The primary object amongst the Bactrian treasure is a 5 inch tall crown made of gold leaf and which, in an ingenious flourish of design, folds in order to be transported more easily. However, the treasure also includes daggers, gold belts, Roman coins, and a medallion bearing a depiction of Buddha. The Bactrian Treasure has traveled the world over the years, but more recently the collection has been much less public facing.

In February, the Taliban released a statement saying that the group had an “obligation to robustly protect, monitor and preserve” items that were culturally relevant to Afghanistan, but the Taliban’s track record when it comes to safeguarding precious items isn’t the best. A study found that Afghanistan ultimately lost around half of its cultural heritage during the time in which it was last controlled by the Taliban.

In a particularly noteworthy incident, the Taliban destroyed two enormous, 1,500-year-old Buddha statues in Bamiyan in March of 2001. It’s not known what the group’s plans for the Bactrian treasure involve. “The situation for culture heritage is not OK, because right now no one is taking care of the sites and monuments,” archaeologist Khair Muhammad Khairzada told LiveScience. “All archaeological sites in Afghanistan are [at] risk….[there is] no monitoring, no treatment and no care, all departments in all provinces [are] closed, without money and other facilities.”

The Taliban Is Reportedly Seeking Afghanistan’s Bactrian Treasure

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This Fall Black Theater Takes New York City

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This Fall Black Theater Takes New York City

As in-person theater stages a careful but eager re-entrance following eighteen months of lockdown, the season seems pretty diverse. There are buzzy imports from London (The Lehmann Trilogy, Six); a gender-flipped revival of a Broadway classic (Company); and a splashy new musical about a global icon (Diana). But what about real diversity? Black-authored shows about Black subjects that could bring in new audiences? This season delivers. We’re highlighting a few works opening on Broadway and Off this fall — all different — but each exploring inequity and structural racism in American society and theater. (It’s not even a complete list for this fall; there’s the already opened Pass Over, as well as Chicken and Biscuits and Clyde’s.) The shows are listed in order of the year the story is set. As a movement Black Lives Matter may have arisen in recent years, but the theatrical conversation around systemic racism has been going on much longer.

Trouble in Mind at the American Airlines Theatre (Oct 29–Jan 9)

Originally performed Off Broadway in 1955, actor and playwright Alice Childress’ exposé of racism in theater finally arrives on Broadway. Set in the mid-’50s, this backstage drama centers on a group of actors rehearsing a new play by a white writer about sharecroppers in the South. Veteran performer Wiletta Mayer (the incandescent LaChanze) is excited to finally make her Broadway debut, but how much dignity will she surrender to an overbearing white director and the acting conventions of the stage? Produced by the Roundabout Theatre Company and directed by Charles Randolph-Wright, the play was way ahead of its times in charting micro-aggressions in the theater world, and the hypocrisies of white liberals. 

Caroline, or Change Roundabout Theatre Company

Caroline, or Change at Studio 54 (Oct 8-Jan 9) 

While the creative team behind this 2003 musical — book writer Tony Kushner and composer Jeanine Tesori — are white, this groundbreaking work deserves a place on this list. Set in 1963 right around the time of JFK’s assassination, the story follows a Black maid in Louisiana who works for a Jewish family that has relocated from the north. Caroline (the acclaimed Sharon D. Clarke in this revival) develops a wry, maternal-like bond with Noah, the Gellmans’ eight-year-old son, until money found in dirty clothes bound for washing — the “change” of the title — tears them apart. A sung-through work of intense beauty and complexity, the piece shows a strong Black woman who is not a cardboard saint or avenging angel; she’s angry and tired but won’t let the world’s injustice warp her soul. Tesori embraces blues, R&B, and art song — it’s one of the best scores of the past 20 years. Set at the height of the Civil Rights Era (a vandalized Confederate statue figures in), Caroline is heartbreaking and a call to allyship. 

Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992 at Signature Theatre Company (Oct 12–Nov 14)  

The title alone may give you a clue as to the subject: the L.A. riots that followed the not guilty verdict in the trial of cops who savagely beat Rodney King. To create this fast-moving panorama of the five days of looting, burning, shooting, and its aftermath, Smith spoke to 350 residents of the Los Angeles area. She impersonated about four dozen of them — with astonishing precision and accuracy — in her solo docudrama, which premiered in 1994 at the Public Theater. Now Smith remounts her iconic exploration with director Taibi Magar for an ensemble cast of five actors: Elena Hurst, Wesley T. Jones, Francis Jue, Karl Kenzler, and Tiffany Rachelle Stewart. If you weren’t around in the ’90s to witness the riots, just imagine what might have happened in Minneapolis had the murder of George Floyd gone unpunished. 

Cullud Wattah at the Public Theater (Nov 2–Dec 5) 

The year is 2016 and the tap water in Flint, Michigan is undrinkable. The electrifying young playwright Erika Dickerson-Despenza sets her “Afro-surrealist” drama 936 days into the Flint Water Crisis, as an embattled family seeks justice from both General Motors and the city government, fighting for their very survival. BLM is often cited in cases of police violence, but here, Dickerson-Despenza dramatizes a social travesty where the white power structure (and infrastructure) literally acted as if Black lives were worthless. (In 2017, a Michigan Civil Rights Commission report concluded that decades of systemic racism allowed the lead contamination of the water.) Using a fluid and poetic approach, the author blends ideas of poison, contamination and filtering.  

1632678918 312 This Fall Black Theater Takes New York City
Playwright Erika Dickerson-Despenza Erika Dickerson-Despenza

Thoughts of a Colored Man at the John Golden Theatre (opens Oct 31) 

After regional runs in Baltimore and Washington, D.C. two years ago, this new play — written by Keenan Scott II and directed by Steve H. Broadnax III — takes its Broadway bow. Thoughts, set on a single day in Brooklyn, lets us eavesdrop on the inner lives of seven Black men mulling over joys and sorrows, as well as their gentrifying community. Scott employs a range of rhetorical styles suited to each character — spoken word, slam poetry, rapping — creating a kind of Under Milk Wood for BK. In the allegorical conception of the piece, characters represent major human traits: Wisdom, Depression, Passion and so forth. (In case you’re worried this world has too much testosterone, there are two women in the cast!)

What to Send Up When It Goes Down at Playwrights Horizons (Sept 24–Oct 17) 

We could put a date on this cathartic piece written by Aleshea Harris and directed by Whitney White — if Black people weren’t being shot every day by police. A fusion of ritual, protest, exorcism, and funeral rite, What to Send Up When It Goes Down has been presented before, most recently this summer at BAM, but until there’s justice, it will exist in past, present, and future. A seven-member ensemble welcomes the audience and makes clear the event they’re about to share is for the healing and reflection of Black audiences. White spectators are welcome — as witnesses to a tragedy in which they are complicit. Playwrights Horizons presents this re-mount of the interactive work, updated with the pictures and names of victims of racist violence. 

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Inside the “What To Send Up When It Goes Down” rehearsal at the Fishman Space in the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Saturday, June 19, 2021 in Brooklyn, New York. Playwrights Horizons

This Fall Black Theater Takes New York City

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Harry and Meghan visit UN during world leaders’ meeting

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Harry and Meghan visit UN during world leaders’ meeting

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, met Saturday with a top U.N. official amid the world body’s biggest gathering of the year.

The royals came to U.N. headquarters to speak with Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed. All three appeared later Saturday at the Global Citizen Live concert in New York’s Central Park.

“It was a lovely meeting,” Meghan said as the couple left the U.N. headquarters.

The U.N. said Mohammed commended the couple’s efforts to promote vaccine equity worldwide and hailed priorities they and the U.N. share, including climate, women’s economic empowerment, youth engagement and mental health.

Meghan and Harry pressed for vaccine equity during the star-studded, 24-hour concert. It features performances staged in locations from New York to Paris to Lagos, Nigeria, and Seoul, South Korea.

The United Nations is in the midst of the annual General Assembly gathering of world leaders, though the couple didn’t participate in the speeches in the assembly hall.

The former Meghan Markle has been involved with the U.N. women’s agency, becoming an “advocate for political participation and leadership” several years ago. Harry visited the children’s agency UNICEF at in New York in 2010.

Earlier this week, Harry and Meghan visited a New York City school, the World Trade Center’s centerpiece tower and the Sept. 11 museum, among other stops in New York.

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Lines of mourners form for Gabby Petito funeral home viewing

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Lines of mourners form for Gabby Petito funeral home viewing

HOLBROOK, N.Y. — Mourners began arriving at a Long Island funeral home viewing on Sunday for Gabby Petito, whose death on a cross-country trip has sparked a manhunt for her boyfriend.

A line had formed outside the funeral home in Holbrook, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) east of New York City, by noon, and groups of firefighters were seen filing past. A fire truck sat on each side of the building, each with its ladder raised.

Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito

Across the street from the funeral home, a chain link fence was adorned with posters featuring Petito’s image and messages such as, “She touched the world.”

Petito was reported missing Sept. 11 by her parents after she didn’t respond to calls and texts for several days while she and Brian Laundrie visited parks in the West.

Her body was discovered last Sunday in a remote area in northwestern Wyoming. Laundrie and Petito grew up on Long Island but in recent years moved to Florida.

Petito’s death has been classified as homicide, meaning she was killed by another person, but medical examiners in Wyoming haven’t disclosed how she died pending further autopsy results.

The couple posted online about their trip in a white Ford Transit van converted into a camper. They got into a physical altercation Aug. 12 in Moab, Utah, that led to a police stop for a possible domestic violence case. Ultimately, police there decided to separate the quarreling couple for the night. But no charges were filed, and no serious injuries were reported.

Lines of mourners form for Gabby Petito funeral home viewing
Memorials for Gabby Petito are scattered across her hometown of Blue Point, New York on Sept. 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman)

Investigators have been searching for Laundrie in Florida, and searched his parents’ home in North Port, about 35 miles (56 kilometers) south of Sarasota.

On Thursday, federal officials in Wyoming charged Laundrie with unauthorized use of a debit card, alleging he used a Capital One Bank card and someone’s personal identification number to make unauthorized withdrawals or charges worth more than $1,000 during the period in which Petito went missing. They did not say who the card belonged to.

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My AP top-25 ballot: Alabama remains No. 1 while Notre Dame climbs, Arkansas soars

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My AP top-25 ballot: Alabama remains No. 1 while Notre Dame climbs, Arkansas soars

Highlights from the ballot …

— No changes at the top with Alabama, followed by Georgia, Penn State, Iowa and Oregon.

— Notre Dame climbed seven spots after trouncing Wisconsin at Soldier Field to improve to 4-0.

(For loose context on an upcoming matchup, consider: The Irish beat Purdue soundly; Purdue beat Oregon State; and Oregon State just smashed USC. Could be a lopsided affair when the Trojans visit South Bend next month.)

— Arkansas was the big mover of the week, jumping to No. 9 (from No. 25) after beating Texas A&M and completing a sweep of the top Lone Star State programs. (Two weeks ago, the Razorbacks hammered Texas.)

Admittedly, we undervalued the Hogs until now but are endeavoring to rectify the situation with the 16-position jump.

The opening month is all about ridding AP ballots of inevitable preseason bias; major moves are the best way to create a ballot that accurately reflects the results.

— Fresno State entered the ballot following yet another win … but not entirely because of the victory over UNLV.

Rather, LSU was the key to configuring the bottom of the ballot.

We aren’t completely sold on the Tigers. But their win at Mississippi State added some credibility to UCLA’s head-to-head victory over LSU. And that, in turn, increased the legitimacy of Fresno State’s head-to-head win at the Rose Bowl.

As a result, all three teams are included on the ballot.

1. Alabama
2. Georgia
3. Penn State
4. Iowa
5. Oregon
6. Notre Dame
7. Florida
8. Ohio State
9. Arkansas
10. Oklahoma
11. Michigan State
12. Oklahoma State
13. Texas A&M
14. Cincinnati
15. Auburn
16. Brigham Young
17. Michigan
18. Mississippi
19. Coastal Carolina
20. Wisconsin
21. Baylor
22. Fresno State
23. UCLA
24. Kansas State
25. LSU

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After years of blight, Boulder’s Diagonal Plaza could finally be redeveloped

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After years of blight, Boulder’s Diagonal Plaza could finally be redeveloped

Boulder City Council soon will have the chance to kickstart the redevelopment of Diagonal Plaza, the run-down strip mall at the southeast corner of 28th Street and Iris Avenue. With its numerous vacant storefronts and acres of empty parking lots, the nearly 60-year-old plaza is an eyesore and one of the few blighted areas in the heart of Boulder.

Currently slated for the Council’s Oct. 5 agenda is consideration of a special ordinance that would allow a portion of the run-down Diagonal Plaza strip mall at the southeast corner of 28th Street and Iris Avenue to be redeveloped into a mixed-use commercial and residential district with a community park.

A special ordinance would be an unusual step to spur a redevelopment project. That it is even being considered is a reflection of Diagonal Plaza’s long history of decline, its confusing mess of ownership and the desire of city officials to see the site improved after years of failed attempts.

“This is a very odd, unusual circumstance that we don’t often see,” said Elaine McLaughlin, senior planner for the city of Boulder. “Both the planning board and the City Council wanted this to be resolved because [the site] is essentially a really large parking lot that has been underutilized for years.”

The proposal

If the Council approves the special ordinance on Oct. 5, it would clear the way to redevelop the western portion of Diagonal Plaza and the surrounding parking lots into a mixed-use community featuring 291 residential units and about 27,000 square feet of commercial space. Seventy-three of the residential units would be permanently affordable. The rest would be workforce housing. The buildings would be split between one and four stories, with ground-floor retail space facing 28th Street and residential units up above.

A rendering of the proposed redevelopment at Diagonal Plaza shows the new streets and multi-use path. (Courtesy city of Boulder planning documents)

The project is a partnership between Boulder Housing Partners, which operates the affordable housing development Diagonal Court directly south of the site, Trammell Crow Co. and Coburn Partners.

None of the few remaining businesses in Diagonal Plaza would be displaced by the project. The only occupied space in the western section of the mall is a Walgreens. Its employees and pharmacy will be moved to the Walgreens location at 28th Street and Valmont Road, just a couple blocks south of the plaza. Most of the space that would be demolished is a vacant former Sports Authority. And the majority of the redevelopment would not occur in the footprints of demolished buildings, but in Diagonal Plaza’s endless parking lots to the north, west and south of the mall building.

The project would also add new city streets and a new multi-use path through the plaza. Those would not only facilitate access to the new development, but also increase mobility for the residents of the existing Diagonal Court affordable-housing development, which currently does not have a protected way to drive, bike or walk to a city street or any nearby shops.

The tentative timeline for the project calls for building permits to be secured by the end of 2022.

How did we get here?

If the project goes through, it will be the culmination of years of efforts on the part of city officials to revitalize the plaza.

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Elon Musk and Grimes Have Broken Up After 3 Years Together

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Elon Musk and Grimes Have Broken Up After 3 Years Together

Elon Musk and his girlfriend Grimes head for dinner on May 04, 2021 in New York City. Gotham/GC Images

Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and Canadian singer Grimes (Claire Elise Boucher) have broken up after three years together, Page Six reported Friday.

Musk said he and Grimes remain on good terms and continue to co-parent their one-year-old son, X Æ A-Xii Musk.

“We are semi-separated but still love each other, see each other frequently and are on great terms,” Musk told Page Six. “It’s mostly that my work at SpaceX and Tesla requires me to be primarily in Texas or traveling overseas and her work is primarily in LA. She’s staying with me now and Baby X is in the adjacent room.”

The couple were last seen together at the 2021 Met Gala in New York City earlier this month. Grimes walked the red carpet alone in a 3D-printed gown designed by Iris Van Herpen. Musk didn’t walk the red carpet but joined her in an afterparty backstage.

Musk and Grimes made their relationship public more than three years ago at the 2018 Met Gala. They welcomed their son in May 2020.

Elon Musk and Grimes Have Broken Up After 3 Years
Grimes arrives for the 2021 Met Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on September 13, 2021 in New York.  ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images
1632676187 79 Elon Musk and Grimes Have Broken Up After 3 Years
Elon Musk and Grimes arrive for the 2018 Met Gala on May 7, 2018, at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Getty Images

Elon Musk and Grimes Have Broken Up After 3 Years Together

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LA’s Academy Museum Will Finally Open After Extensive Delays

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LA’s Academy Museum Will Finally Open After Extensive Delays

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures on September 21, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

A museum in Los Angeles dedicated to the cinematic arts sounds like a no-brainer, and now, after years of development and financial woes, it appears that the collective dream of many has come to fruition: the Academy Museum is set to open on September 30, and a media preview took place this week that highlighted the institution’s unique features. Since the movies represent such a popular art form, the Academy Museum has certain bells and whistles that represent crowd appeal; attendees will be able to accept fake Academy Awards within the Oscars Experience.

However, there are also extensive archives of memorabilia and cinematic ephemera that will fascinate more seasoned film buffs. The iconic, often-malfunctioning fiberglass shark from Jaws hangs suspended via cables over the visitors, and visitors can also expect to be immersed in exhibitions dedicated to directors like Spike Lee and Pedro Almodóvar. Hollywood heavy-hitters have been clamoring for a museum for decades, but only recently have plans been truly underway in earnest, and the project has also been plagued by roster changes — former director Kerry Brougher vacated his post in 2019 — and budgetary issues.

In 2020, Variety reported that the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures had officially gone $100 million over budget: projected costs for finishing the museum leapt, overall, from $388 million to $482 million. However, it appears that all’s well that ends well.

“Every delay has led to a better product,” Ted Sarandos, the co-CEO of Netflix and the chairman of the Academy Museum’s board of trustees, told the Hollywood Reporter this week. “As frustrating as it was, it has opened up the opportunity to improve to what it ultimately turned out to be. Just as the industry has evolved, people’s view of this museum over 90 years has completely evolved. And I think for the better.”

LA’s Academy Museum Will Finally Open After Extensive Delays

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Here’s Who Should Get a 3rd Pfizer Shot According to the CDC’s Latest Recommendation

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Here’s Who Should Get a 3rd Pfizer Shot According to the CDC’s Latest Recommendation
A nurse prepares a dose of Pfizer vaccine during a vaccination day as part of the vaccination campaign against COVID-19 on August 28, 2021 in Montevideo, Uruguay. Ernesto Ryan/Getty Images

The FDA didn’t think it was a good idea to authorize a third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine for a wide swath of the U.S. population. But the head of the CDC just signed off on an order to recommend the booster shot to millions of Americans, including those in high-risk occupations, despite opposition from the agency’s own advisory panel.

Last Friday, the FDA’s vaccine advisory committee voted against a proposal to authorize a third Pfizer shot for the general population except for people older than 65 and those with underlying medical conditions.

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices met on Wednesday to determine exactly who should get the booster shot and handed their non-binding recommendations to the CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky on Thursday.

The CDC panel endorsed giving extra Pfizer shots to people 65 and older, nursing home residents and adults with medical conditions such as pregnancy, HIV, cancer, diabetes, obesity or heart disease. However, the panel voted 9-6 against giving booster shots to healthy adults who face a high risk of exposure to COVID-19 at their workplace.

On Friday morning, Walensky signed off on a series of recommendations from the CDC panel. And, in an unusual move, she cleared boosters for people in high-risk occupational and institutional settings as well.

“As CDC Director, it is my job to recognize where our actions can have the greatest impact,” Walensky said in a statement on Friday. “At CDC, we are tasked with analyzing complex, often imperfect data to make concrete recommendations that optimize health. In a pandemic, even with uncertainty, we must take actions that we anticipate will do the greatest good.”

Here’s what the CDC recommends:

  • People aged 65 years and older, residents in long-term care settings and people aged 50–64 years with underlying medical conditions should receive a booster shot of Pfizer-BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine at least six months after completing their two-shot series
  • People aged 18–49 years with underlying medical conditions may receive a booster shot, depending on their individual benefits and risks
  • People 18-64 who are at increased risk for COVID-19 exposure because of occupational or institutional setting may receive a booster shot based on their individual benefits and risks

New Pfizer data submitted to the FDA showed that vaccine protection starts to drop about four months after the second dose. Most health care workers and those working at high-risk settings in the U.S. completed their two-shot series in December and January, making them more vulnerable in the latest wave of COVID-19 infection.

However, scientists on FDA’s advisory panel were concerned about Pfizer’s lack of safety data on the third booster shot and the fact that the data had not been peer-reviewed.

“These data are not perfect, yet collectively they form a picture for us, and they are what we have in this moment to make a decision about the next stage in this pandemic,” Walensky told CDC advisors on Thursday before their vote.

She said the CDC will move “with the same sense of urgency” on recommendations for Moderna and Johnson&Johnson booster shots as soon as that data is available.

Here’s Who Should Get a 3rd Pfizer Shot According to the CDC’s Latest Recommendation

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