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Walter Bloc: The Economic Fascists of Bernie, Warren and ‘The Squad’

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Walter Bloc: The Economic Fascists of Bernie, Warren and 'The Squad'

Brittany Greeson, Senator of Democratic Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, then President’s nominee, addresses supporters in Ann Arbor, Michigan, on 8 March 2020, during a Democratic Sen. (Greeson / Getty Pictures of the British Republic)

Good-bye, goddamn, Bernie. While it lasted, it was lovely.

Bernie is no longer a Democratic presidential nominee, but his ideas sadly continue. The better then, some of them to explore.

For most people, the racists who wear jackboots and kill Jews and members of other minority groups are known by their fascist views.

Despite becoming the head of the National Socialist Workers Party of Germany , Hitler was also a fascist.

I’m not claiming that the Democratic Party’s far-right wing fits this bill. I maintain instead that former President Barack Obama, AOC and their colleagues are fascist in business.

What is the distinction?

The system of government owns the major means of production is socialism from an economic standpoint, which includes mines, manufacturing, forests, agricultural land, etc. Examples of this system include the former Soviet Union, Cuba and North Korea.

But the nationalization of aircraft manufacturers and computer companies, lorry companies, and Silicon Valley are not demanded from Sens. Sanders and Warren and their ilks. No, they just want to check them out.

This is exactly the economic fascist programme. Barack Obama has the same thing to do. His key economic strategy was restricting not nationalizing, excluded from taking partial ownership by the government of various Detroit automotive producers.

Hitler was an economic fascist’s paradigm case.

The following is a very part of the company ‘s list, which has remained, officially, in private hands and not in public, under the aegis: The Allgemeine Elektrizitäts Gesellschaft (AEG); Adlerwerke AG (formerly the Heinrich Cleyer AG). Bayerische Motorenwerke AG (BMw); Berger, Bergwerks Industrie AG.

This Nazi Party leader had more than sufficient political power to nationalize the whole of it. He chose very heavy regulation instead. Instead.

It is commercial nationalism rather than socialism.

Any bells ringing in the United States context? Has Bernie requested U.S. nationality? Steel? Steel? General Motors seizure Pocahontas? AOC for Microsoft’s government takeover? Biden for Boeing’s federal property?

You have to answer these questions.

To emphasize this point, here are some economic quotations from Adolf Hitler:

“In practice, the government protects the German people’s economic interest not by taking the roundabout through the state-sponsored economic system, but by the utmost protection of private initiative and the recognition of property rights.”

“We National Socialists see higher levels of human economic development in the field of private property that regulate reward administration in proportion to the differences in performance but that generally enable and safeguard all benefits of a higher living standard. Not only private property, but also private initiative and a will to personal responsibility is being destroyed by the Bolsheviks. So in Russia, the world’s largest agricultural state, it has failed to save millions of people from hunger. It is unimaginable the results of such a disaster in Germany.

Hitler, of course, was not a free organization. Only as a thin veneer did he advocate privacy rights. In the Third Reich there were several “private” businesses, but they were all under the government’s strong regulatory thumb.

The USSR’s economic structure, in very sharp contrast, had no space for private corporations, although superficially. The farms all belonged to the state and have been collectivized. The same goes for factories, factories, mines, all sorts of manufacturing and varieties.

The leaders of the Democratic Party’s extreme left wing are fascists rather than socialists.

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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How will the vaccine mandate impact local hospitals?

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How will the vaccine mandate impact local hospitals?

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — New York state’s vaccine mandate has reached its deadline. For local hospitals, that means terminating or suspending staffers who won’t get the shot.

Many are concerned about possible staffing shortages in the wake of the mandate. State-wide only 84 percent of hospital workers are vaccinated. However, the Capital Region could be in a better position than most regions with 91 percent of hospital workers vaccinated.

“It’s really hard,” Hannah Hulett, Labor and Delivery Nurse at St. Peter’s Health Partners, said. “Then already lose more nurses on top of it? It’s just unethical overall.”

Hulett said she’s disappointed to be losing some “good nurses” on her team.

“And they are leaving because they don’t want to have something forced upon them,” Hulett said.

As of Monday, just under 400 SPHP employees have not yet submitted their proof of vaccination. Overall, 96 percent of “eligible employees” have been vaccinated.

“The pandemic itself is a significant stressor. This vaccine mandate is just one more stressor on that system,” Chris Jordan, Chief Nursing Officer for Acute Care and VP of Patient Services, said.

St. Peter’s told NEWS10 that any employee who does not comply with the state mandate will be suspended without pay. They will have until October 8, to “become compliant” or they will be terminated.

Glens Falls told NEWS10 they’ve been combatting staffing shortage for over a year.

“It’s difficult. Our hospitals are busier than they’ve ever been,” Ray Agnew, VP Hospital & Community Management, said. “But still come to the hospital if you need care. We are ready to help.”

Agnew added that the staff has been working extra shifts and stepping up wherever they can. Glens Falls Hospital has also utilized agency staff to help fill the gaps.

By noon, 64 of Glens Falls employees were not in compliance with the vaccine mandate. They will be placed on a 90-day unpaid administrative leave beginning at midnight on September 28.

Albany Med said like most hospitals, they are experiencing increased wait times due to the staffing shortages felt nationwide. When it comes to the total workforce, 97.6 percent is vaccinated.

“Our staff has demonstrated such strong leadership throughout the pandemic,” Albany Med stated in a response to NEWS10. “We are hopeful that the 272 members of our staff who are unvaccinated will become vaccinated for the safety of our community. “

Albany Med added that they are working to develop “thoughtful solutions” to keep cancellations and postponements of surgeries to a minimum.

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NYS begins Pfizer booster shot rollout

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NYS begins Pfizer booster shot rollout

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — New York State has announced that it supports the CDC’s recommendation for the COVID-19 booster shot.

If you received your first two doses of the Pfizer vaccine six months ago, Governor Kathy Hochul said you shouldn’t put off getting a COVID-19 booster shot since it will help provide additional protection against the virus.

“We’re not necessarily seeing people becoming acutely ill and dying, but we are seeing a lot more hospitalizations,” explained Dr. Jim Saperstone, a local pediatrician. “So that tells us that in addition to people who are not being vaccinated, some of it is wearing off.”

 New Yorkers who received the Pfizer vaccine should receive their booster dose if:

  • They are 65 years and older or residents in long-term care settings
  • If they are between the ages of 50 – 64 with underlying medical conditions. 

Additionally, New Yorkers who received the vaccine may get their COVID-19 booster dose if:

  • They are in the 18-49 age group with underlying medical conditions
  • Those between the ages of 18 – 64 years old and have a high risk of COVID-19 exposure because of where they work.

As of right now, booster shots are only available for the Pfizer vaccine.

“The booster shot is very essential,” said Dr. Nosa Lebarty, who is the Chief Medical Officer of Central Med Urgent Care.

Appointments are now available at all New York State mass vaccination sites.

“I suspect within a couple of weeks, we will see Moderna on board, too, with that,” explained Saperstone.

Besides getting a COVID-19 booster vaccine, state and local health care providers recommend getting the flu shot as well.

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Nationwide alcohol shortage impacts Capital Region

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Nationwide alcohol shortage impacts Capital Region

LATHAM, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The pandemic caused shortages of items like chicken wings and toilet paper. Now, you can add alcohol to the list. And the issue may have you sipping soda instead of Chardonnay the next time you go out to dine or make yourself a cocktail.

Craig Allen owns All Star Wine and Spirits in Latham, one the largest alcohol retailers in New York’s Capital Region. He says, after news reports of an alcohol shortage last week, it was like 2020 all over again.

“Kind of reminiscent of the toilet paper rush back last year with people coming in and buying spirits. Mostly liquor. [People] worried that it’s going to be gone for the holidays,” said Allen.

He says folks have been driving up to his store from downstate and even New Jersey to buy in bulk. Most looking for higher priced selections of wine and liquor.

The pandemic certainly caused an unprecedented rise in alcohol demand. Pair that with a dash of importing problems and a twist of shortages in labor and bottling materials, and the result is a cocktail that’s ultra dry and bound to leave you parched! 

But the issue goes beyond your nearest liquor store.

After labor shortages, restaurants are now facing a sober reminder that their businesses are not out of the woods just yet.

NEWS10’s Anya Tucker visited several area bars and restaurants with managers and owners telling her that they are facing intermittent shortages in deliveries of wine, liquor and beer.

And it’s unclear how long the shortage will last, especially as we enter the holiday and season.

Craig Allen’s advice?

“Buy more than one of your favorite because it may not be available for a couple of months.”

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Freedom of life on the road continues to attract people, despite Petito case

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Freedom of life on the road continues to attract people, despite Petito case

FILE – In this Monday, Sept. 28, 2020 filer, a logo of a smartphone app TikTok is seen on a user post on a smartphone screen, in Tokyo. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File)

(NewsNation) — So-called “van life” picked up steam during the pandemic, when people packed up their lives and hit the road for freedom, nature, and fresh air. To some, it’s seen as a referendum on materialism and the status quo.

The minimalistic lifestyle is now being talked about across the country in the wake of the Gabby Petito case.

Six months ago, Quin Gable, 29, quit her corporate job and converted a van to become a nomad with her two cats. “You can do whatever you want, wherever you want,” Gable said. “You can choose to be with people who are like-minded; you can choose to be with people who maybe put you outside of your comfort zone.”

Gable, now a brand ambassador, is part of the growing trend: people who can work remotely and see the natural wonders of the country. While there are no exact numbers as to how many people choose to live in their vans, there have been more than 2.1 billion TikTok views under the hashtag #vanlife.

“We’re kind of following each other throughout the state or the national parks, or by myself, you know, alone, just going from place to place,” Gable said.

Gable focuses on teaching others, especially women, how to live her lifestyle safely.  “I will text my family my coordinates every single night,” she said. “I also have a satellite GPS phone, which lets me breathe so well there’s an SOS button, I can text outside of service.”

For her and her fellow van lifers, Gabby Petito has been top of mind. Gable said she’s now traveling in a caravan, instead of solo. “It just really hurts my heart that this happened to Gabby. I don’t think van life is to blame for this or the safety of Van life,” Gable said.

Still, the enchantment of America’s natural wonders and a life free of constructs and constraints continue to draw in Gable and others. She said she doesn’t see herself living in an apartment anytime soon. “I don’t know where I’m going to be tomorrow,” she said. “I would say a couple of years, I love it. It just really pushes you to grow as a human and what I love about the van life community is everyone is incredibly self-aware.”

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Biden gets booster, urges unvaxxed to get dosed

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Biden gets booster, urges unvaxxed to get dosed

CDC said 25% of eligible Americans have not received any doses

WASHINGTON (Nexstar) — “I am over 65,” President Joe Biden said, laughing, as he publicly received his COVID-19 booster shot Monday morning.

Biden, 78, rolled up his sleeve for the booster. He’s one of the millions of Americans now eligible for the additional dose of the Pfizer vaccine.

Anyone 65-and-older or with underlying health risks is eligible, along with those in high-risk jobs like first responders, health care workers and grocery store employees — as long as it’s been more than 6 months since their second Pfizer vaccine shot.

But Biden said there’s something more important than booster shots, and that is convincing the unvaccinated to get the initial immunization.

The CDC said 25% of eligible Americans have not received any doses.

“We know that to beat this pandemic and to save lives, to keep our children safe, our schools open, our economy going, we need to get folks vaccinated,” Biden said in remarks before he received the booster.

Unvaccinated Americans put others at risk, the president said. “That’s why I’m moving forward with vaccination requirements wherever I can.”

However, there is still no date for when Biden’s vaccine mandate for employees of large businesses will take effect.

“We knew it would take a little bit of time, given there are some very understandable and good questions by the business community,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said. “We want to ensure there’s clarity when they do put out the rules.”

When it does take effect, Republicans — including a group of 24 state attorneys general — are threatening to sue the administration.

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Poestenkill men arrested for burglary after car gets flat tire

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Albany man arrested for drugs, stolen handgun

MOLINE, Ill. (AP) — An Illinois man unexpectedly won the Quad Cities Marathon this weekend when the two Kenyan runners who had far outpaced him were disqualified after being diverted off the course by a race volunteer bicyclist.

Tyler Pence crossed the finish line in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 6 seconds to become the first U.S. runner since 2001 to win the race through the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River in Illinois and Iowa. Pence, the head track and cross-country coach at the University of Illinois-Springfield, logged his fastest time ever with the win and took the first prize of $3,000.

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Artist chosen to replace Confederate windows in Washington National Cathedral

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Artist chosen to replace Confederate windows in Washington National Cathedral

Posted: Updated:

WASHINGTON (NXSTTV) — Washington National Cathedral announced Thursday it has chosen contemporary artist Kerry James Marshall, renowned for his wide-ranging works depicting African American life, to design new stained-glass windows with themes of racial justice that will replace a set with Confederate imagery that was removed in 2017.

The landmark sanctuary said in a statement that the four windows will tell “a new and more complete” story of the nation’s racial history. Poet Elizabeth Alexander will write a poem to be inscribed in stone tablets alongside the windows, overlaying older ones that venerated the lives of Confederate soldiers.

The project is expected to be completed by 2023.

The windows will replace a set that honored two Confederate generals, Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, with saint-like reverence and had included a Confederate flag. The cathedral removed them in 2017, prompted by a larger national reckoning over Confederate imagery and white supremacy in the wake of deadly right-wing attacks in Charlottesville, Virginia, that year and in Charleston, South Carolina, in 2015. The window openings have been covered with plywood since 2017.

The setting is particularly significant in the massive neo-Gothic cathedral, which is filled with iconography depicting the American story in glass, stone, and other media, with images ranging from presidents to famous cultural figures and state symbols.

The cathedral, also the seat of the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop and Diocese of Washington, regularly serves as the setting for ceremonies tied to major national events. In replacing the windows, the cathedral acknowledged a need to correct what it called a “false narrative of what America once was.”

The old windows “were a barrier to our mission and impediment to worship in this place, and they had no place being in sacred space,” the Very Rev. Randolph Marshall Hollerith, dean of the cathedral, said in a Thursday news conference. “This is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for the cathedral to not only create beautiful art but to stake a claim about what and who we value,” he added.

Marshall, who made his first visit to the cathedral this week, said it’s too soon to say what the new windows will look like. “It was really important for me to come here and really get a sense of what the place is, what’s already here, what the mission they’ve tried to accomplish is, and then how I might be able to fit whatever it is the cathedral needs in order to fulfill its ambition for these windows … into that space,” he said at the news conference.

He noted that the cathedral set a “monumental” goal of having the windows depict the pain as well as the dignity of “the African-American struggle for justice and equality.” He said, “This is something that’s actually going to take a lot of time, because history itself, as most people know, is a very complicated narrative.”

Hollerith called Marshall “one of the greatest artists of our time” and praised Alexander as “one of our nation’s most eloquent and compelling voices.”

This will be Marshall’s first work in the stained-glass medium after a long and acclaimed career using a variety of media to create portraits and other works depicting Black life. Marshall was a MacArthur Fellow in 1997.

Alexander, president of the Mellon Foundation, recited one of her poems at the 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama and has published multiple books including Pulitzer Prize finalists. She said in a statement that she was honored to be part of the cathedral’s “effort to ensure that those who worship within its sanctuary know that it is truly a space for all people, and that the stories relayed through its sacred walls, windows, and other iconography represent the truth of our nation.”

The cathedral has loaned the Robert E. Lee window to the National Museum of African American History and Culture for a new exhibit, “Make Good the Promises: Reconstruction and Its Legacies.” The museum said the window represents the “myth-building and the nationwide intimidation of African Americans through the embrace of Confederate symbols.”

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What to know from Fort Edward and South Glens Falls’ merger info meeting

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What to know from Fort Edward and South Glens Falls’ merger info meeting

SOUTH GLENS FALLS, N.Y. (NEWS10) – The merger being eyed between Fort Edward Union Free School District and South Glens Falls Central School District has been the subject of a lot of community feedback; some supportive, some confused, and some outright concerned.

On Thursday night, South Glens Falls Superintendent Kristine Orr led a public information session, which Fort Edward has been pushing as a place to find answers and share dialogue, especially to concerned parents who have attended recent school board meetings with comments on why they disagree with the merger.

Making sure both communities know the score was a top priority.

“I think one thing that’s important is we did this study to find out exactly what’s going to happen for both communities,” Orr said at the start of Thursday night’s meeting.

The merger study has been the subject of extensive work by firm Castallo & Silky, who presented a finished report earlier this year. The merger has been explored as both districts have faced enrollment decline. Fort Edward has also been experiencing financial issues that led to the elimination of some positions and extracurriculars during the 2020-21 school year.

Earlier this month, community concerns about how the merger would affect the lives of Fort Edward children led to a 61-page petition against the merger being presented to the school board. The board is set to vote on whether to bring the merger before a public vote next month.

Statements of assurance

Orr started off by running through a list of assurances agreed to ahead of time by both districts. Fort Edward would essentially be absorbed by South Glens Falls, keeping its existing building for Kindergarten through to 5th grade.

Assurances, Orr explained, simply refer to agreements between parties who would be affected by a potential change – such as a merger – before the point where that action happens.

The Fort Edward and South Glens Falls school boards agreed to four assurances:

  • That the merger will be approached in such a way to enhance student opportunities, including adding programs and learning avenues to the lives of Fort Edward students that they had not had before. Also included in this assurance are decisions on how best to spend the over $6 million in federal aid the new district would qualify for.
  • That the South Glens Falls School District would incorporate the existing Fort Edward K-12 building, rather than sending all Fort Edward students to other buildings. Parent concerns were cited in describing this assurance, with Orr saying that she and both boards understood the need to bring Fort Edward kids up with the same hometown feel that their area-local parents once had. Kindergarten through 5th grade would be held at the Fort Edward building, with middle and high school students attending at South Glens Falls buildings.
  • That as many Fort Edward school employees would be kept on as possible after the merger. Orr said that both districts are aiming to not have to lay anyone off, with the exception of one Fort Edward superintendent post, which would be closed as the school joins the district. Orr herself is superintendent for all buildings.
  • That board membership would be open to all. South Glens Falls operates a nine-person student board, and three of those seats would be open if the merger was finalized in 2022, allowing several opportunities for Fort Edward representatives to step into the bigger ecosystem.

Reccomendations from consultants

Upon completing their formal merger study, representatives from Castallo & Silky made a list of recommendations for the operation of the new district, which would be made official for the 2022-23 school year if approved.

Orr laid those recommendations out in detail.

  1. A merged Fort Edward/South Glens Falls school district should annually update enrollment projections to accurately monitor student population.
    • Currently already in practice in both districts
  2. If the merger happens, a committee of elementary teachers and an administrator should be convened as soon as possible to review the existing curriculum and make recommendations for a common core curriculum for grades pre-K-5, including special subjects. Committee should have representatives in both districts.
    • Currently already a common practice for both districts
  3. All middle/high school courses now being offered in both districts should be offered in a merged district, assuming enough enrollment. Course catalogs would be reviewed and the creation of a new one would be a proprity. 
    • This would be a year-2 priority for the 2023-24 school year
  4. More electives should be developed at middle and high school levels in a merged district.
  5. All existing extracurricular activities already offered to South Glens Falls students should be provided to Fort Edward students, and more should be developed.
    • This would be a priority for the 2023-24 school year
  6. New committees on special education and preschool special education would be appointed, with representation from committees of both previous districts. Philosophy and priorities for special education at new district should be identified by new committee. 
  7. All existing elementary school buildings, including current Fort Edward building, should continue operating; all middle and high students would go to South Glens Falls middle and high schools.
    •  “I can tell you, no matter which way I run the numbers, there is not a possibility that the Fort Edward school is closed for kindergarten through 5th grade,” Orr commented on this point, making reference to concerns from the Fort Edward community. She also said that there is presently no reason for either district to believe that fact would change after the 5 years that the merger study projects out to.
  8. If the merger occurs, a transportation plan must be finalized that would incorporate Fort Edward students into the South Glens Falls bus routing system.  
    • Fort Edward Interim Superintendent Mark Bessen commented that transportation options are not currently running at the district, due to staff and budget shortages.
  9. Bus maintance would be completed at South Glens Falls transportation center. 
  10. Soon following a merger, the new school board should negotiate a new collective bargaining agreement to determine terms and conditions of employment for all teachers, including those at Fort Edward. All Fort Edward teacher salaries would be leveled up to meet South Glens Falls salaries in each bargaining unit. South Glens Falls’ Diredctor of Personnel Development would meet with Fort Edward staff members individually to review changes. 
  11. Staffing structure post-merger should be defined at the earliest possible date. South Glens Falls staff recieve tentative assignments on June 10, 2022, which would be the earliest possible completion date. 
  12. If merged, the board of education should closely scrutinize its first budget to ensure that the projected efficiencies are actually achieved following the merger, thus ensuring the local tax relief described in this report. 
    • All towns currently part of South Glens Falls Central School District would be part of all budget votes.
  13. If merged, the new school board should develop a financial plan to ensure long-term fiscal stability for the newly-merged district. That plan should give consideration to the amount of incentive aid used to reduce the tax burden, especially in the first five years after the merger. This should also ensure long-term fiscal stability. 
    • The merged district would receive $49,626,450 in incentive aid over 14 years, $5,223,837 for each of the first five years.
    • South Glens Falls would take on Fort Edward’s capital debt, but changes in tax ratio would cause the new district to see $6 million in savings towards paying that debt off.

What the people want to know

In advance of Thursday night’s meeting, the districts created an online thought exchange, where, interested parties could submit questions and rate questions submitted by others.

As of the meeting, the thought exchange had 137 participants, 125 questions, and 2,880 ratings across them.

The three highest-rated questions were brought up first:

  • “Board meetings that include both districts board members would be useful”
    • Presidents of both school boards were on the meeting, and are both part of the conversation at large.
  • “What expanded opportunities will be provided to the children of Fort Edward?”
  • “I would like to see the long-term plan. 10, 15, 20 years from now, if we were to have the merger? Taxes would be astronomical.”
    • Orr clarified that the 5-year plan outlined in the merger study sets a precedent. Every year, a new projection for the next five years from that point on would be created.

That led to other questions to be selected and discussed.

  • “How many students can be absorbed per grade before the need for more Fort Edward teachers becomes necessary?”
    • Orr explained that South Glens Falls has class averages. Right now, they fall under the maximum in almost every section in the district. The merger study talks about those numbers more than the school district does, and Orr didn’t know whether absorption would happen between buildings. “Yes, the study talks about moving students and things like that, but that’s not a wise move for the students.” A severe shift would be needed to justify any change that drastic, like a drop from 30-40 students to 12.
  • “Will Fort Edward be reevaluated each year? Will Fort Edward elementary school?” 
    • With the current number of students between K-5, that building has to stay open; South Glens Falls’ other elementary buildings wouldn’t have the space to take the community’s students, even if they wanted to.

A number of questions also came in from those worrying about job loss at Fort Edward.

  • “How many FE teachers will lose their jobs?” 
  • “How many staff, not just teachers, will lose their jobs” 
  • “If you consider adding more sections to each grade, you could retain more FE staff if the annexation were to happen. Is this a possibility? Our community would not only be losing our school identity, but also potentially a number of the teachers our kids know and love.”

Other than the interim superintendent, no position at Fort Edward is being marked for absolute elimination. The plan and priority are to keep every teacher, with senior staff getting first priority and any not kept put on a priority hire list for 7 years.

What’s next

Fort Edward and South Glens Falls school boards will come together on Oct. 9 to vote on whether or not the school merger plan will go to the public.

If it does, there will be two more votes ahead of it, both for the public of both districts to weigh in on. The first of those votes would be in November.

If that first vote passes, the boards will have more work ahead of them on staffing, busing, special education, and more, and will result in more specific information on things like who will lose a job and who will have the longest bus ride on a school morning. All of that information will go to the public ahead of the second vote.

If voters say yes a second time, then and only then will the merger be made a reality.

In the meantime, a visual walkthrough of the Fort Edward school building will be completed to examine new ways to use the space. No part of the building would be sold or rented off, but the removal of middle and high school classes from it means new potential uses to benefit the elementary school students there.

Students in South Glens Falls high school will be eligible for all scholarships, regardless of where they are from. That said, Orr pointed out that some elementary buildings have scholarships that are, and will continue to be specific to students from those buildings.

The full meeting, and more information on the merger, can be found at the official merger website.

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Warren County COVID update for Sept. 27

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Warren County finds new school COVID cases in Sept. 14 update

Posted: Updated:

Warren County

WARREN COUNTY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Warren County Health Services confirmed 17 new COVID-19 cases and 20 recoveries on Monday.

As of Monday, the county is monitoring a total of 166 active coronavirus cases, including eight hospitalized cases. That number was unchanged from Sunday.

Warren County COVID update for Sept 27

Four new cases on Monday stemmed from local school districts. North Warren and Queensbury school districts saw positive cases.

Warren County Health Services said that several recent cases have stemmed from ill residents putting off seeking out medical care, which has resulted in hospitalization and a death on Friday.

Anyone showing COVID symptoms is urged to seek medical attention at their physician or an urgent care center.

Warren County updated its maps breaking up active coronavirus cases and vaccine distribution by zip code.

1632817414 643 Warren County COVID update for Sept 27
1632817414 116 Warren County COVID update for Sept 27

Six new cases on Monday were among county residents who had been fully vaccinated for coronavirus. To date, there have been 421 confirmed cases among Warren County’s 43,263 fully vaccinated residents.

Warren County has two vaccine clinics set for Tuesday, Sept. 28.

One is from 3-4 p.m., offering third doses to immunocompromised residents. The other is from 4:30-6:30 p.m. for first and second doses. Both will be hosted at Warren County Municipal Center.

Another clinic is set from 4:30-6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 5 at the municipal center.

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Punkin’ chunkin’: Teams launch pumpkins into St. Lawrence River

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Punkin’ chunkin’: Teams launch pumpkins into St. Lawrence River

CLAYTON, N.Y. (WWTI) — The Punkin’ Chunkin’ is an annual event centered around launching pumpkins into the St. Lawrence River and attracts enormous crowds in Clayton. Like many other events, it was canceled in 2020 due to the COVID pandemic, but organizers are excited to welcome people back this year.

David Neuroth, a Rotarian and Punkin’ Chunkin’ volunteer, says the event started approximately eight years ago when local citizens wanted to plan something fun for the community. Organizers of the event were expecting up to 300 people, but at least 2,000 attended.

Along with the main event, there were street vendors, a barbecue, and other activities. Adult teams joined six youth teams from North Country schools to participate this year, competing to see who could launch their pumpkin furthest. Neuroth said they want to give kids “a sense of community and responsibility.”

Each youth team collects food for the food bank, which is weighed prior to the event. The weight of the food is multiplied by the distance their pumpkin travels during the launch, giving them their final score.

Juliana Richardson, a student and Punkin’ Chunkin’ volunteer, said it’s nice to give back while having fun. Money raised during the event is donated to local food pantries. Donna Chatterton, Director of Gwen’s Food Pantry in LaFargeville, said they receive many extra items thanks to the event and monetary donations allow them to purchase extra toiletries.

Neuroth said the event has raised approximately 35,000 pounds of food over the last six years. This year’s event starts at 11 a.m. on October 16 on the Riverwalk in Clayton.

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