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Hillary Clinton A ‘Skank’ Trump Shares Tweet

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Hillary Clinton A 'Skank' Trump Shares Tweet

President Trump gained insults from prominent women Democrants such as Hillary Clinton, Stacey Abrams and Nancy Pelosi during a weekend series of tweets.

The original tweets of failed conference candidate John K Stahl, named “Skank” Hillary Clinton, show that the mouth of NancyPelosi has been closed and the psychic appearance of former Georgian governor Stacey Abrams has been mocked.

The president recently reported that a few hours after another Scarborough murder allegation, the country closes with the 100 K dead coronavirus, called the first woman to be nominated from either of the major political parties in the United States “a skank.” Pic.twitter.com/4H3E5KVE

— May 24 , 2020, Maggie Haberman (@maggieNYT).

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Independent reports: The President posted a number of tweets criticizing missing voters and spreading unfounded conspiracy theories regarding MSNBC-hoster Joe Scarborough, and a death count of around 100 , 000 people. The President claimed that John K. Stahl – who also named Abrams “Shamu” and the President of the House “Mega Skank” – published 8 posts. “Mega Skank”

In addition , Mr. Trump spent part of the weekend at his Trump National Golf Club in Virginia on the Memorial Day.

One of the posts criticizing former Clinteon Secretary of State and Bidden as “Malarkey, nazis,” says: “I ‘m thinking I have to call the same 1,000 HRC people as in 2016 who have said that Skank is 6–8% higher when I see one of those polls that have Malarkey the Racist 6–8 points everywhere.”

Mr Stahl said in a post with two photoshopped images of Trump’s branded face and canvas wrappings, “She is going to tongue and adjust her dental skin easier. You can’t drink booze on the job with duct tape.

Mr Stahl, whose prolific Twitter amplifies right-wing Democratic troops in 2012, ran as a Republican for a California congressional seat, but was defeated when he captured less than 4 percent of the vote. How Mr. Stahl ended up on the president’s radar is unclear.

He also kept pushing a conspiracy to suggest that former MSNBC host Joe Scarboough and the 2001 death of a former intern working for him. Scarborough was a former congressman.

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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A growing wave of New Zealand companies are landing on Denver shores

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A growing wave of New Zealand companies are landing on Denver shores

More than two dozen New Zealand firms, many startups, have set up shop in metro Denver and Boulder in recent years, making the region a launching pad for their American ambitions.

New Zealand has about 900,000 fewer residents than Colorado, leaving it with a limited domestic market even when adding in customers from nearby Australia. Though small, the country is a hotbed for innovations with a global reach. Increasingly, those startups are choosing Denver over Silicon Valley and other rivals when it comes to setting up U.S. operations.

“The mindset in Colorado suits New Zealanders very well,” said Andy Burner, vice president of people and business operations at Xero, a provider of cloud-based business accounting software. “I was blown away by how welcoming and open the city is.”

Xero, a rapidly growing competitor to QuickBooks, relocated its Americas headquarters from San Francisco to metro Denver in 2017. From about 80 local employees before the move, Denver is now home to more than 200 of the company’s 300 U.S. workers.

The company is a leader in New Zealand’s tech community, and its decision to leave northern California, the typical landing spot for tech transplants, helped put Colorado on the map. Burner and other Xero executives actively promote Denver, making their compatriots more comfortable with landing here.

Most of the New Zealand companies coming to Colorado are tech-focused, and some focus on aerospace, an industry where Colorado is a leader. Agriculture and energy are other areas of overlap. Among the Kiwi companies setting up operations in Colorado are AD Instruments, Adeption, Auror, Cin7, FileInvite, Fingermark, Holmes Solutions, Medtech Global, TracPlus and Vend.

Burner and other New Zealand executives listed similar reasons for why they chose Denver over northern California, and why Denver beat out rivals like Salt Lake City, Austin and Chicago.

Access to capital, clients and talent are the fundamental reasons why Denver won out over the alternatives, said Ky Hacker, vice president of revenue and operations at FileInvite, a document sharing platform that chose Denver for its North American base in June, a decision that should eventually bring about 140 jobs to Denver.

Denver and Boulder have a strong base of tech expertise, and skilled workers are willing to move here, which is helpful to foreign companies trying to figure out U.S. labor markets. Denver’s interior location and the variety of domestic flights make it easy to reach other markets.

When it comes to connecting with the home office in New Zealand, the Mountain time zone also works. And entry costs are lower than in more expensive coastal markets.

“What really sealed the deal for Denver for us was a quality of life and a culture that meshes well with our business and with New Zealand culture,” Hacker said. “We both want to work hard and grow things fast, but do it in a human way.”

A concerted effort

Although recruitment efforts have now gained a momentum of their own, a key accelerator was an active outreach by  Denver Economic Development and Opportunity and the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, which led a trade mission to New Zealand and Australia two years ago.

Stephanie Garnica, global business development director at DEDO, said Denver recruited foreign companies via trade offices until the Great Recession forced it to scale back. In 2018, the city relaunched its international outreach with Garnica and two other employees, reaping a big payback in interest and relocations.

“New Zealand and Australia are big standouts. They are two of our target markets because of the success we have had and because of the existing community here,” she said.

Programs like Denver Startup Week and Global Landing Pad help both established and startup companies from other countries get connected to the local business community. New Zealand and Australia have become so important as sending countries that DEDO dedicated an entire Global Landing Pad program to them in the spring.

“We also know that a positive experience with Colorado, starting with a company’s early investigation and continuing through groundbreaking and hiring here in the state will lead to introductions to other companies. We’ve seen a good deal of that recently with companies from New Zealand and Australia referring companies in their networks to us to explore how they too can successfully grow their business in the state,” said Michelle Hadwiger, the state’s deputy director of global business development, in an email.

Hadwiger said Australia ranks as the third-largest source of foreign direct investment in Colorado, tied with Germany. Despite its small size, New Zealand is the sixth-largest provider of foreign direct investment, alongside France and Switzerland.

A cultural fit

Although the Bay Area represents a mecca for technology startups, doing business there is expensive and the competition for talent is fierce, Garnica said. And with so many options available, employees tend to be less loyal.

“You want to do interesting work and you want to work hard, but you want to enjoy the outdoors too,” said Tom Batterbury, co-founder and co-CEO of Auror, pronounced “ora,” of the shared ethic that aligns New Zealand more closely with Colorado than the hard-driving Silicon Valley culture.

Oceans aside, New Zealand and Colorado both share majestic landscapes and plenty of opportunities for recreation.

“There is the cliché location, San Francisco, and we quickly ruled that out. We had looked at Portland, (Ore.) but it didn’t feel right for us,” he added. Chicago, another city on the shortlist, lacked the outdoor vibe, leaving Denver and Austin.

Auror provides crime intelligence software that helps retailers track and report cases of theft to authorities, leaving them better equipped to capture repeat offenders and bust up crime rings. Early on the company realized it needed to work with retailers globally to succeed. Although the Denver operations consist of six people right now, including Batterbury, the expectation is for rapid growth as the North American market opens up.

“Realistically, 90% of our business is likely to be out of North America over the new few years, and we will expect we will have over 100 people on that team,” he said.

One thing that helped sway Batterbury was a conversation he had with Burner about the merits of Denver over other cities. Now Batterbury recruits other executives from New Zealand. And there are small changes he is noticing that have made life more comfortable here.

“There are a few places that serve New Zealand and Aussie style meat pies and there are now two New Zealand-style ice cream shops, including one next to Sloans Lake,” he said, noting that English meat pies are no substitute. “It makes you feel close to home.”

Another confirmation he made the right choice came when he and his wife had their second child and neighbors came out to support them, acting as surrogates for the family and friends they had left behind.

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‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’ Is in Search of Salvation But Finds Oscar-Worthy Performances

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‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’ Is in Search of Salvation But Finds Oscar-Worthy Performances
Andrew Garfield (L) and Jessica Chastain (R) in ‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’ Searchlight

Praise be, Jesus. That’s one of the watchcrys of the world of rich, successful and often dishonest televangelists like Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker, whose exploits are now captured, warts and all, in The Eyes of Tammy Faye. Like Respect, the recent biopic about Aretha Franklin, it’s another elaborate, truncated, always colorful (yet not entirely convincing) attempt to legitimize controversial public figures by making them sympathetic. And like Jennifer Hudson, whose dynamic performance camouflaged the flaws in Respect, two powerhouse stars turn Tammy Faye into a triumph. With outrageous costumes, grotesque hairdos, a Betty Boop voice and trademark eyelashes like hungry caterpillars, Jessica Chastain delivers an Oscar-worthy performance in the title role, and Andrew Garfield is nothing less than sensational as her soft-spoken, indifferent, and cloyingly ambitious preacher husband Jim. You can’t take your eyes off them when they’re on screen, which, fortunately for the film, is all the time.


THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE ★★★
(3/4 stars)
Directed by: Michael Showalter
Written by: Abe Sylvia
Starring: Jessica Chastain, Andrew Garfield
Running time: 2 hours, 6 mins.


Unfortunately, the film leaps around in time frames like a bouncing ball, resulting in confusion as it unmasks the show business of saving souls to reveal the hypocrisy of get rich moral and political monkey business beneath and behind the pulpit. You start in Palm Springs in 1994, with a terminally-ill Tammy at the end of her career and dying of cancer, then switch back to her college days in Minnesota where Jim Bakker, a rabid Christian, was an early influence — much to the dismay of Tammy’s strict mother Rachel (Cherry Jones in another of her great performances; she’s one of the few consummate actors who can be subtle and titanic at the same time). Early signs of larceny surface when they team up to preach the gospel on a tour of the South and Jim becomes less concerned with the Bible and more obsessed with the material possessions it could bring. Cut to their earliest television appearances on the Christian Broadcasting Network where Jim’s good looks and smooth sermons earned him sudden popularity as “a kind of Johnny Carson for Christians.” While competitive religious evangelicals vied for viewers—Jerry Falwell screaming challenges about homosexuality, the women’s movement and other “sins” and Pat Robertson showing off his country estate replete with swimming pools and solid gold toilets—Jim and Tammy Faye raised millions of donations to build one of the largest religious networks on the planet. She made hit records while he diverted ministry funds into his own personal coffers. The disgraced minister was eventually convicted of stealing $92 million from his worshippers and sent to prison for fraud, while Tammy went on to salvation as a talk-show star immersed in liberal causes like LGBT rights and the fight against AIDS.

As vulgar and absurd as she was, the movie tries to humanize Tammy Faye as an innocent, but when she addresses her viewers with a line like “Double your pledge and give the Devil a black eye” it’s difficult to grant her a free one-way ticket to salvation. The movie is full of gaps. Tammy turns to drugs to kill her pain, but the movie barely mentions her plunge into self-delusional misery. By the same token, Jim’s homosexuality is cautiously avoided, and it’s not certain who the father (or fathers) of the couple’s two sons really are.  He’s cruel and mocking one minute, blubbering like a baby and praising the Lord the next without ever intimately showing how he really feels about his secret sexual desires. The movie ends when he goes to jail and she pounds the pavement looking for another job in television, meeting rejection on the other side of every Hollywood door knob, but fails to show her new career as a TV talk show star. Nor does it show her second, happier marriage to her financial advisor Roe Messner (attractively played by Sam Jaeger.) Too many unanswered questions, to be sure, as evidenced by director Michael Showalter and screenwriter Abe Sylvia’s aborted attempts to condense decades of events into two hours of playing time. The result lacks focus and feels pruned away in the editing room

Still, in spite of its flaws, I liked The Eyes of Tammy Faye a lot—mainly because of its dedication to period accuracy in every visual detail, and Jessica Chastain’s baptism by fire in the complex leading role. Cemented in makeup that took 4 to 7 hours a day and fully determined to make Tammy fragile and three-dimensional, her intensity and conviction almost make you believe she was what her followers described as “divinely inspired.”


Observer Reviews are regular assessments of new and noteworthy cinema.

‘The Eyes of Tammy Faye’ Is in Search of Salvation But Finds Oscar-Worthy Performances

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Lowry: Elder loss reflects Republican candidates’ Trump conundrum

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Lowry: Elder loss reflects Republican candidates’ Trump conundrum

The best indication that Larry Elder was going down hard in the California recall wasn’t the polling, although that all swung the wrong way in the final weeks, but his suggestion late in the campaign that Democrats were going to steal the election.

Pre-emptive excuse-making isn’t a sign of great confidence — the winning side never complains of cheating.

Sure enough, incumbent Gov. Gavin Newsom cruised to a victory made a little easier, as it happens, by Elder’s insistence that Republicans were robbed in 2020 and about to be robbed again.

To his credit, Elder graciously conceded on Tuesday night, but his talk of stolen elections was arguably his biggest misstep of the campaign.

His landslide defeat is the latest evidence that the idea the 2020 presidential election was stolen is toxic for Republicans.

It’s not as though Elder, a talk radio host with no political experience who was running in a deep blue state and got massively outspent, was going to have an easy time regardless. But when he got pushed by Trump supporters into endorsing the stolen election narrative, he ran directly into a Newsom political buzzsaw linking him with Donald Trump and the Jan. 6 riot.

In the Georgia special Senate elections earlier this year, Trump himself divided the party and suppressed GOP turnout at the margins by trying to make the election about November 2020 as much as possible and accusing Republicans who didn’t go along with his allegations of partisan treason.

There may be other costs to come, perhaps up to and including the 2024 presidential election if Trump is the nominee again.

The odds were always stacked against Elder. Still, there was a chance he could define himself as an outsider worth taking a flier on, so long as he never lost sight of the fact he was running in a strongly anti-Trump state with an enormous Democratic registration advantage.

In an interview with the Sacramento Bee editorial board in August, Elder seemed aware of his situation. Asked about the 2020 election, he said Biden had won “fairly and squarely.”

Then, Elder got some pushback on Twitter and couldn’t withstand it. Shortly thereafter, he appeared on a conservative talk radio program and said he needed “a mulligan,” and related a variety of complaints about the 2020 election.

Although Elder didn’t deserve the abuse he endured during the campaign — getting smeared as an alleged tool of white supremacy and even physically assaulted at a campaign stop — here, he’d given his opponents unnecessary ammunition.

If Elder had been running in a Republican primary in a red state, he would have secured his position nicely with his do-over, but he’d driven a nail in his own coffin in the recall.

It’s one thing to complain about last-minute changes in voting procedures in 2020 and to advocate for a system that is secure and tilts toward in-person voting; it’s another to repeat unproven allegations that, for most people, will always be associated with Trump’s worst excesses and the rioting at the U.S. Capitol.

The choice that was forced on Elder — to admit that Biden won the election and alienate MAGA voters, or to say it was stolen and alienate voters in the middle — will be faced by Republican candidates around the country for the duration.

That won’t change as long as Trump has an outsize influence on the party. He’s not letting 2020 go, rather is bent on vengeance against those Republicans he believes betrayed him.

Since he never admits the fairness of any loss, the number of rigged and stolen elections will only increase — the recall, Trump said in a statement, is “just another giant Election Scam, no different, but less blatant, than the 2020 Presidential Election Scam!”

This is a cynical and corrosive view of American democracy that, to the extent it becomes GOP orthodoxy, can only contribute to further Republican frustration.


Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review.

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Warren County confirms six more school COVID cases in Sept. 17 update

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Warren County finds new school COVID cases in Sept. 14 update

JEFFERSON COUNTY, N.Y. (WWTI) – A disease deadly to deer is spreading throughout New York State.

On Thursday, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation confirmed that Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease has spread to Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Nassau, Oswego, Suffolk, and Ulster counties. The DEC is also tracking suspected cases in Albany, Jefferson, Oneida, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Sullivan, and Westchester counties.

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A nick to Apple’s profits could be a windfall for app developers

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A nick to Apple’s profits could be a windfall for app developers

By Jack Nicas and Kellen Browning, The New York Times Company

Apple has taken to calling its iPhone App Store an “economic miracle,” and it has pointed to developers like Zach Shakked as proof.

Shakked created an iPhone app that helps companies find trending hashtags on social media. Over the past 12 months, his sales have topped $5 million.

But one of Shakked’s largest expenses is paying a cut to the world’s richest company. In his case, Apple took nearly $1.5 million — its fee for letting him run his app on its devices.

Now, Shakked has hope that he could soon keep at least some of that money. On Friday, a federal judge ordered Apple to allow developers to steer their customers off their iPhone apps to pay for their goods or services, which Apple had banned. That is big news for developers like Shakked, because sales completed outside Apple’s payment systems are not subject to its commission of up to 30%.

“It finally feels like the small guys got a win,” Shakked, 25, said. “There’s a sense of justice.”

The ruling in Apple’s yearlong legal fight with Epic Games, maker of the popular video game Fortnite, set off celebrations among app developers. From one-person startups to Fortune 500 companies, they have long complained about paying hefty cuts of their businesses to Apple.

The impact of the decision will be most felt by the smallest developers like Shakked. He said the change could save him hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, which would allow him to hire more employees.

“It’s a very big deal,” said Denys Zhadanov, a board member at Readdle, which makes five productivity apps for tasks like email that together have been downloaded roughly 175 million times. The change could save his company millions of dollars each year, he said.

The court fight has often been framed as a battle between industry heavyweights: Apple, which is worth $2.5 trillion, versus Epic, a far smaller company but still one of the few app makers capable of taking on the Silicon Valley titan.

Friday’s verdict is not expected to be a big hit to Apple’s bottom line. In fact, the company declared victory, since Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers, of U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, ruled that Epic had failed to prove that Apple had a monopoly in the mobile gaming market — which would have had a much more serious consequence.

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King: Cash is disappearing and the unbanked are stranded

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King: Cash is disappearing and the unbanked are stranded

An assuring legend is printed on U.S. bills: “This note is legal tender for all debts, public and private.” I have always been glad to know that Uncle Sam is there for me.

But for 14.1 million American adults, that statement is a lie because bills are being pushed aside by bank cards, credit cards and online payment systems like PayPal. The stranded are the unbanked, the unplasticized.

The unbanked aren’t axiomatically the homeless, the undocumented immigrants or those who have fallen through the cracks. They are also people with jobs who pay their taxes, and many of whom live exemplary lives but don’t have bank accounts.

That may be because they don’t trust banks or — and this is a big factor for the working poor who are unbanked — they feel having a bank account is too expensive. They have been charged disproportionate fees for bouncing a check, for late payments or for any of the other ways banks go after fees to enhance their earnings, like the high ones for using an ATM.

However, if you choose to keep your money under the mattress, you elect to be the financial equivalent of undocumented. Essentially, you are immobilized.

All this came to mind while I was checking in online for a recent United Airlines flight. I learned that I would need to save a form of payment for boxed meals and snacks before I boarded because I wouldn’t be able to use credit cards while in flight. United maintains, “We are working to make your trip more enjoyable while maintaining a safer and more touchless travel experience.” In the time of COVID-19, that’s fine with me. But the corollary is they don’t take cash — no credit card, no snack.

Most airport eateries are going to ordering by computer — again, no credit card, no food. I went to one of those wired restaurants at Newark Liberty International and wondered about the unbanked: How would they feed a child if they didn’t know cash wasn’t accepted?

For the unbanked, travel is nearly impossible. First, you would have to go to the airport and buy your ticket with cash. But would they take it? Airline offices are no longer scattered about, and most travel agencies are now virtual. To get to and from the airport, you may have to take an expensive taxi — if one can be found, as you won’t be riding with Uber or Lyft.

Want to stay in a hotel when you arrive at your destination? You won’t have a reservation because you can’t make one without a credit card. Then you must beg the hotel to let you stay.

Once in San Francisco, I had to pay cash for a hotel room because I had lost my wallet. They gave me a room (I was in their guest file because I had stayed there on a previous trip); took a cash deposit for the room, which my office had sent through Western Union; and instructed me not to charge any items to it, not a drink, a meal or a phone call.

Who would have thought that your freedom was linked to a small, plastic card?

The road from being unbanked to being banked is littered with obstacles and it takes years to build credit for, say, a new car or a mortgage. The person who has no bank account has no credit history — and that means has little official existence.

There are hidden costs for being unbanked. Your paycheck will have to be cashed somewhere and check-cashing services, like payday lenders, charge fees that can be as high as 3% of the check.

The burden of being unbanked is limitless.


Llewellyn King is executive producer and host of “White House Chronicle” on PBS. This column provided by InsideSources.

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Governor Hochul signs of on “Less Is More” legislation

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Governor Hochul signs of on “Less Is More” legislation

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Governor Kathy Hochul signed off on the “Less Is More” Act in New York City this morning. The legislation aims to reduce the number of people who are behind bars due to “technical” parole violations. 

“Today we’re taking on an aspect of our criminal justice system that’s too often overlooked. The antiquated system of the parole system,” Hochul said.

Supporters say too many New Yorkers are incarcerated for “technical” parole violations like consuming alcohol or missing a curfew, and that this will change that. It will also reward those who don’t violate conditions of supervision with “earned time credits.”

“It’s a bill that now incentivizes success and what we’ve done for I think far too long in our state is work with a punishment model,” said All of Us Community Action Group Co-Founder Shawn Johnson.

The bill was carried in the Senate by now Lieutenant Governor Brian Benjamin. “When you look at how we incarcerate in New York State, I believe we incarcerate way beyond the need for public safety and a lot of it is fear-driven and based in old models and tactics,” Benjamin said.

Meanwhile, in a statement, Senate Republican Leader Rob Ortt who voted against the bill said, “Under One-Party Rule, violent crime has been on the rise across the state. It began with Democrats’ so-called “bail reform” in 2019 – and it will undoubtedly become worse with this new law signed today.”

The bill takes effect in March of 2022. The Governor also announced today that almost 200 people serving time at Rikers Island for “technical” parole violations will be released. 

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Recovery loans available to small businesses hurt by Glenwood Canyon disaster

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Recovery loans available to small businesses hurt by Glenwood Canyon disaster

Businesses hurt by natural disasters and the subsequent closures of Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon are eligible to apply for disaster relief loans.

Gov. Jared Polis, the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, and the Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness announced the loans Friday in a news release.

The governor’s Aug. 3 disaster declaration for the area prompted availability of the loans through the U.S. Small Business Administration’s (SBA) Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program.

“The closure resulted in loss (of) revenues between 50% and 75% for hundreds of small-town businesses; and reduced outdoor recreation business due to the closure of Glenwood Canyon and resultant loss of access to portions of the Colorado River,” Polis said in a Sept. 10 letter to the SBA.

The loans are for businesses in Garfield, Eagle, Mesa, Pitkin, Rio Blanco and Routt counties that have suffered because of flooding, mudslides, rockslides and the summer traffic closures through Glenwood Canyon.

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Dear Abby: Couple’s communication lines are crossed

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Dear Abby: Social skills are ‘rusty’ after pandemic lockdown

Dear Abby: I love my wife very much, but we are, unfortunately, having a communication/interpretation issue. She is inquisitive and asks a lot of questions. I become defensive when I’m questioned. Sometimes I feel it shows a lack of confidence or trust in me. My wife says I am being too sensitive.

There are times when I infer a negative tone where there is none, and others when I believe my perception is spot-on. Sometimes, I suspect she’s unwilling to accept any answer that does not match her own thinking. She comes from a family where correcting each other, even over the smallest thing, is common. She’s an educator, so in some ways, it’s part of her job.

My wife seems unable to use alternative phrasing that is less likely to trigger a defensive response. When we have conflict over this, it seems I am always the one who has to give ground. When I try to explain my feelings, it only makes things worse. When I choose to be more assertive, it results in more escalation. I am blessed with a spouse who is independent, strong-minded and outspoken. How can I develop a thicker skin so I won’t feel like I am second-guessed at every turn? When should I speak up?

— Misunderstood in Texas

Dear Misunderstood: NOW would be a good time to speak up. When you do, tell your wife — the educator — that you feel second-guessed at every turn, and it’s time to enlist the help of a licensed marriage and family therapist so you two can improve your communication skills. If she’s willing, it could be helpful for your marriage. If she isn’t, then go without her to help you figure out whether you really are “too sensitive.”

Dear Abby: My best friend, whom I’ve known most of my life, has a 7-year-old grandson. The boy, “Cody,” is spoiled, rude and makes obnoxious comments to adults. They’ll make plans to visit us on a weekend evening when my wife and I want to chill out. While they are here, Cody gets loaded up on sugar, snoops through rooms and picks up breakable objects while watching us to see our reaction. He also does calisthenics and runs around while he’s here. He makes snotty comments to us that my friend encourages and thinks are funny. As much as I love my friend, how do I tell him that his grandson is no longer welcome?

— In a Conundrum

Dear In a Conundrum: Has it occurred to you that Cody may have problems more serious than a sugar buzz? The behavior you describe can be symptoms of ADHD and/or learning disabilities. If Cody hasn’t been evaluated by a medical professional, he should be. If you truly love this friend, suggest it and tell him why. If he ends your relationship because of it, you will no longer be subjected to Cody’s unfortunate behavior. On the other hand, if my concern is on target, you could change that boy’s life for the better, because he doesn’t act out only at your house.


Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at DearAbby.com.

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Upstate class disruption caused by social media threat during rally over masking

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Upstate class disruption caused by social media threat during rally over masking

GRANADA, N.Y. (WROC) — The Gananda Central School District sent students home early during a protest or rally outside one of its schools on Wednesday. On Thursday, district officials said a digital threat was to blame.

The school says that someone planning to attend the rally made a social media threat that was intercepted by law enforcement. The district reportedly was not planning an early dismissal, said Superintendent Dr. Shawn Van Scoy, but was forced to take the threat seriously due to “the ever-changing circumstances we continually find ourselves in.”

The protest was organized by the Wayne County Chapter of Moms For Liberty, after a parent, Laine Mulye, was accused of fighting with the district employee. According to Macedon Police, Mulye assaulted a bus monitor during an intense argument over her son trying to get on the bus without a mask, despite district policy. Mulye allegedly encouraged her son to punch the bus monitor during the altercation.

Mulye has been charged with harassment in the second degree and endangering the welfare of a child.

Check out the full statement from the district:

Yesterday, on Wednesday, September 15, 2021, the school day was disrupted when a social media threat was intercepted by law enforcement from an individual that was planning to attend a rally in the community for the support of Autism Awareness. Law Enforcement and the District received this information midday which led to a complete change in plans. In an effort to maintain our student and staff safety, we made the decision to release all students early ahead of the protest.

“As I have stated in the past, the safety of our students and staff is our number one priority,” states Superintendent Dr. Shawn Van Scoy. “I want to thank the quick actions of our local law enforcement, our staff, and our parents yesterday. We were not planning an early dismissal, however, it was the best option we had under the ever changing circumstances we continually find ourselves in. Threats are not tolerated in any way, shape, or form.”

Students returned to classes at all schools as usual on Thursday, September 16, 2021.

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