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Sign letter to over 500 physicians warning of the silent victims of Shutdown

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Sign letter to over 500 physicians warning of the silent victims of Shutdown
  • Do you remember the ridicule and the disdain of those who said that shutdown deaths were be as troublesome as COVID-19 deaths?
  • We don’t laugh more – it’s probably not about 20 percent real unemployment and the death rates of despair go up with each number we see.

And, if you are one of those who want to listen to facts, listen to the more than 500 physicians, who have signed a letter to President Donald Trump calling “a mass-victim accident” the shutdown.

Dr. Simone Gold, a specialist in emergency medicine in Los Angeles, wrote the letter.

“There are thousands of stories of patient injury from lock-down,” said Gold, in an interview with Fox News on Thursday, saying “America’s Newsroom.”

Gold compared the condition with triage in the text.

“The patients are trialed directly as black, purple, yellow or green in a mass casualty case. The first group, the black triage level, includes those who require too many resources to save during a mass crisis.

“There are major injuries in the red group that can be treated; moderate injuries in the yellow group that are not risking life immediately; and minor injuries in the green Group.”

She wrote that the red group receives the greatest attention.

Do you believe that the lockdowns in coronaviruses will cost more lives than they save?

“There are already millions of Americans at triage red. These include 150,000 Americans a month who routinely detected a new cancer.
Screening that did not occur, millions who missed routine dental care to address heart disease / death problems and preventable stroke , heart attack, and child abuse problems. Suicide hotline calls have risen by 600%, “she said.

“A triage yellow is tens of millions. Prices of liquors rose from 300 to 600 percent, tobacco sales rose, debt went unpaid, family bonds split up and millions of child checks were missed.

“The triage level is green for hundreds of millions. These are people who are solvent today, but who are at risk should worsen the economic situation. Poverty, financial uncertainty and poor health are closely linked to.

Gold wrote, it’s not only abstract theorisation. Rather, she offered details that her colleagues or she saw.

“There is E.S. user. It’s a mom with two children with a part-time job in their office and the husband’s furlough. The dad is smoking more, the mom is stressed and her diabetes is not well handled, and the children will not go to school, “she said.

“The A.F. resident. Medical conditions are chronic but usually stable. Her possible reconstruction of the hip was delayed, contributing in April to a pulmonary embolism.

Another nursing home patient suffered from a stroke and received no rehabilitation, leading to heavy loss and improvement. Another college student cannot return to normal life and is vulnerable to alcohol and to substance misuse, stress and ‘economic financial instability.’

“We are alarmed by the lack of consideration for our patients’ future health. There are massively underestimated and underreported downstream health effects of a deteriorating level. This is a magnitude mistake. The short , medium and long-term risk to human wellbeing can not be over-represented with a constant shutdown.

“To leave work is one of the most stressful events of life and it does not decrease the effect on one’s health because 30 million people have also suffered. Closing schools and universities is incalculably harmful in future decades to children, teens and young adults. The millions of victims of a continuous shutsdown will be hidden from the naked eye, but alcohol, unemployment, suicide, cardiac attack , stroke and kidney failure are called. It is called financial instability, unemployment, despair, drug dependence, unexpected pregnancies, poverty and abuse in youth, “Gold wrote.

Gold said the reality of the situation is overwhelming in her interview with Fox News.

“I was able to read you a heartbreaking tale following a disastrous tale sent me by doctors of patients who died or had serious harm for fear of visiting a hospital, while shutting down their own doctorate,” she said.

The same point was made by social media users. One used to highlight the issue with a photo of the beaches of Los Angeles County closed by the pandemic but re-opened for the day of memorials.

This (the shelter directive) was first introduced in order to flatten the curve and ensure that hospitals have the money to take care of COVID patients. We now have the means to do so, and our other wellbeing is deteriorating.

— VindiciaeContraTyrannos, May 25 , 2020.

California Public Radio another doctor said delays in regular care might mean that cancer patients are going down the highway on a “massive wave.”

“The last couple years have been historically low in terms of volume, in terms of screening for the treatment of cancer operations , mainly because the patients are concerned, and very keen on going to a clinical environment and hospital environments, because of their concerns about COVID-19 …

“Aren’t there patients who don’t want to come in at this time, not only for lung cancer, but also for all cancers, since they are afraid of COVID-19? Then we have been hit in two years with the massive wave of people, all in a future stage of essentially incurable cancers.’ And so they have to avoid mammography, avoid cat scans, prevent colonoscopies, etc.

DiPerna was not a Silver letter signatory.

Indeed, there are large numbers of people infected by the coronavirus. However, it is still unknown how many people will die from a complete shutdown — and it could end up just as difficult.

There is a significant issue with stroke tests that dropped by 40 percent after the COVID-19 outbreak. It’s not that we had too many stroke assessments before the virus came across. Instead, it caused people either to postpone the medical care needed due to fears or the lack of that care.

Don’t be wrong: it’s a disaster. It is too late to save the deaths caused by depression and health negligence. How deep it goes now is the question.

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Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

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Battenfeld: Democrats desperate to revive Donald Trump slime Annissa Essaibi-George

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Battenfeld: Democrats desperate to revive Donald Trump slime Annissa Essaibi-George

Like CNN on a slow news day, Boston Democrats and the media are desperate to revive Donald Trump — this time sliming one of the mayoral candidates who has no connection at all to the former president.

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Indianapolis holds Saints to three hits in 2-0 victory

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Indianapolis holds Saints to three hits in 2-0 victory

Miguel Yajure pitched six scoreless innings, and Bligh Madris and Ethan Paul each drove in a run as host Indianapolis rebounded from an 8-0 loss on Thursday with a 2-0 victory over the St. Paul Saints on Friday at Victory Field.

The victory snapped the Saints’ three-game winning streak. Four Indians pitchers held the Saints to three hits by Jose Miranda, Damek Tomscha and Drew Stankiewicz.

Edgar Garcia (4-1) surrendered both runs on three hits and three walks in two innings to earn the loss. Jason Garcia started for the Saints and pitched four scoreless innings, surrendering four hits and a walk. He struck out one.

Tyler Bashlor walked two and fanned two in the ninth inning to earn his seventh save. Bligh doubled home Michael Chavis in the bottom of the fifth inning. Paul singled home BJ Boyd in the sixth inning.

The teams meet Saturday at 6 p.m. for the fifth game of the six-game series.

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Pandemic led to ‘alarming’ increase in obesity in kids, study finds

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Pandemic led to ‘alarming’ increase in obesity in kids, study finds

(Getty Images)

NEW YORK (AP) — A new study ties the COVID pandemic to an “alarming” increase in obesity in U.S. children and teenagers.

Childhood obesity has been increasing for decades, but the new work suggests an acceleration last year — especially in those who already were obese when the pandemic started.

The results signal a “profound increase in weight gain for kids” and are “substantial and alarming,” said one of the study’s authors, Dr. Alyson Goodman of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It’s also a sign of a vicious cycle. The pandemic appears to be worsening the nation’s longstanding obesity epidemic, and obesity can put people at risk for more severe illness after coronavirus infection.

The CDC on Thursday released the study, which is the largest yet to look at obesity trends during the pandemic.

Findings:

—An estimated 22% of children and teens were obese last August, up from 19% a year earlier.

—Before the pandemic, children who were a healthy weight were gaining an average of 3.4 pounds a year. That rose to 5.4 pounds during the pandemic.

—For kids who were moderately obese, expected weight gain rose from 6.5 pounds a year before the pandemic to 12 pounds after the pandemic began.

—For severely obese kids, expected annual weight gain went from 8.8 pounds to 14.6 pounds.

The rate of obesity increased most dramatically in kids ages 6 to 11, who are more dependent on their parents and may have been more affected when schools suspended in-person classes, the researchers said.

The research was based on a review of the medical records of more than 432,000 kids and teens, ages of 2 to 19, who were weighed and measured at least twice before the pandemic and at least once early in the pandemic.

Some limitations: It only included children who got care before and during the pandemic, the researchers said. And it also did not offer a look at how obesity trends may have differed between racial and ethnic groups.

Earlier this week, the CDC said the number of states in which at least 35% of residents are obese increased last year by four.

Delaware, Iowa, Ohio and Texas joined the list. In 2019, there were 12 states — Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and West Virginia.

Those results was based on surveys where adults described their own height and weight, and are not as accurate as medical records.

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Balloon Glow lights up in Forest Park

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Balloon Glow lights up in Forest Park

ST. LOUIS– The Balloon Glow will take place this evening at the recently renovated Emerson Central Fields in Forest Park.

The balloons will glow from dusk to 9 p.m. Fireworks cap off the night at 9:15 p.m. Bommarito Automotive Skyfox will be over the scene.

The festival and race of 50 balloons are on Saturday. Central Fields opens at Noon with live music, great food, the Purina Pro Plan Performance dogs, and family activities. Skydivers perform at 3 p.m. The race is on at 4:30 with the launch on the “hare” balloon. The hound balloons give chase at 4:45 p.m.

Where the balloons will end up depends on the weather, which looks great for the weekend. Winds on Saturday are expected out of the northeast, so look for the balloons to drift south and west of Forest Park.

FOX 2 and News 11 are proud sponsors of the event.

Learn more: www.greatforestparkballoonrace.com

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Second STEM School shooter sentenced to life without parole for murder of Kendrick Castillo

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Second STEM School shooter sentenced to life without parole for murder of Kendrick Castillo

The schoolchildren who walked into STEM School Highlands Ranch on May 7, 2019, fled the school later that day with night terrors, anxiety and panic attacks.

Provided by Maria Castillo via Instagram

Kendrick Castillo

Because two students opened fire in room 107 that day, there are 20-year-olds who are afraid of the dark. It reminds them too much of the dark classrooms they huddled in and listened to gunfire as high school students.

Some never returned to school, or are afraid to leave their houses.

“I know what it’s like to get phantom pains in your leg because you were shot,” Joshua Jones, one of the students in room 107 that day, said during his attacker’s sentencing Friday. “I know so much more than I should for someone my age.”

After more than two years of court proceedings, a judge in Douglas County on Friday sentenced Devon Erickson, the second of two gunmen, to a mandatory sentence of life without parole for killing 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo and wounding eight others in the school shooting that traumatized a community.

Kendrick’s father, John Castillo, said the final court proceeding has provided a little bit of closure.

“It’s bittersweet,” he said. “It’s cathartic. But when we go home the house will still be empty.”

For more than three hours Friday, the students, teachers and parents traumatized that day told Douglas County District Court Judge Theresa Slade how the two shooters irrevocably change their lives.

Students spoke of passing pools of blood on the floor and stepping on shattered glass as they fled. Some still feel guilt that they survived while Castillo did not, or felt that they should’ve done more to save him. Even though they recognize it’s not rational, it’s still there.

Students recalled texting and calling their mothers to tell them they loved them and that they might die. Mothers remembered the blind panic that followed those messages and, in some cases, waiting hours before knowing their child was alive.

“There will never be an easy way to say the words: I was in a school shooting,” one former student wrote in a letter read by her mother.

One student said he has flashbacks when doing quadratic equations because that’s what he was doing as an eighth-grader when the gunfire began. Lauren Harper, the teacher in the room where the shooting happened, said she still has two nightmares from that day — one of the shooters pulling out the guns and one of learning that Kendrick was dead.

“I have seen the holes not only in my classroom but also in the bodies of my students,” she said. “I see a grave where I should see a young engineer.”

1631941214 507 Second STEM School shooter sentenced to life without parole for

Andy Cross, The Denver Post

STEM School Highlands Ranch teacher Lauren Harper talks to the press after STEM School shooter Devon Erickson was sentenced to life in prison without parole at the Robert Christensen Justice Center Sept. 17, 2021. Erickson and a co-conspirator opened fire in the STEM School in May of 2019, killing student Kendrick Castillo and wounding several others in Harper’s classroom. Castillo died trying to protect other students in the shooting.

Kalissa Braga, a mother of two of students, said she was in the school volunteering when the shooting happened. She hid in a bathroom with an infant she was nannying and her 5-year-old child, wedging the children between the toilet and the sink in hopes they would offer protection in case bullets pierced the walls.

For weeks after the shooting, her 5-year-old would repeat the school’s lockdown announcement — “locks, lights, out of sight” — without knowing what it meant. On a later trip to Home Depot, the little girl saw broken glass on the floor and hid because she’d walked through broken glass the day of the shooting and thought it meant there had been another one.

A jury in June convicted Erickson of nearly four dozen charges, including three counts of first-degree felony murder for killing classmate Castillo. He was also convicted of 31 attempted-murder charges, along with a variety of lesser charges including arson, theft, possessing a weapon on school grounds, criminal mischief, burglary, and reckless endangerment.

In addition to life without parole, Slade on Friday sentenced Erickson to 1,282 years in prison.

George Brauchler, former district attorney for the 18th Judicial District and special prosecutor on the case, said the sentence is likely the longest ever recorded in Douglas County. Every year is warranted, he said.

“There is no regret, there is no sadness, no sorrow,” he said of Erickson.

Erickson’s parents, sister, grandfather and girlfriend told the judge that the now-20-year-old was not the monster he seemed and that he was deeply loving and loved. Erickson’s parents, Jim and Stephanie, apologized to the victims and everyone affected by their son’s crimes, which they said they still could not explain.

Though Erickson did not show emotion during the victims’ testimony, he sobbed while his family spoke.

“We pray for these people every day,” Jim Erickson said. “We hope they can find peace. And we also hope they can find forgiveness — I know that’s a hard ask.”

All of Erickson’s family said he was sorry for the terror he wreaked. But Erickson chose not to speak when offered the chance.

Slade, the judge, noted the lack of apology while handing down her sentence. She said she received letters about the sentencings from all over the world and from survivors of other school shootings, as well as many STEM School students and families.

“They were exposed to a war zone in their own school,” she said.

1631941214 186 Second STEM School shooter sentenced to life without parole for

Andy Cross, The Denver Post

John Castillo, father of Kendrick Castillo, talks to the press after STEM School Highlands Ranch shooter Devon Erickson was sentenced to life in prison without parole at the Robert Christensen Justice Center Sept. 17, 2021.

May 7, 2019, also showcased remarkable heroism from teenagers barely old enough to vote — Jones and Brendan Bialy bolting from their seats to help Castillo take down a shooter before he could do more harm. English teacher Lauren Harper, student Jackson Gregory and IT director Mike Pritchard risked their own lives to disarm the other gunman.

During Erickson’s three-week trial, prosecutors used more than 60 witnesses to describe how Erickson and his co-conspirator, Alec McKinney, planned the horrific school shooting in advance — and then carried out their mission on May 7, 2019.

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Apple, Google remove opposition app as Russian voting begins

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Apple, Google remove opposition app as Russian voting begins

MOSCOW — Facing Kremlin pressure, Apple and Google on Friday removed an opposition-created smartphone app that tells voters which candidates are likely to defeat those backed by Russian authorities, as polls opened for three days of balloting in Russia’s parliamentary election.

Unexpectedly long lines formed at some polling places, and independent media suggested this could show that state institutions and companies were forcing employees to vote. The election is widely seen as an important part of President Vladimir Putin’s efforts to cement his grip on power ahead of the 2024 presidential polls, in which control of the State Duma, or parliament, will be key.

Russian authorities have sought to suppress the use of Smart Voting, a strategy designed by imprisoned opposition leader Alexei Navalny, to curb the dominance of the Kremlin-backed United Russia party.

Apple and Google have come under pressure in recent weeks, with Russian officials telling them to remove the Smart Voting app from their online stores. Failure to do so will be interpreted as interference in the election and make them subject to fines, the officials said.

Last week, Russia’s Foreign Ministry summoned U.S. Ambassador John Sullivan over the issue.

On Thursday, representatives of Apple and Google were invited to a meeting in the upper house of Russia’s parliament, the Federation Council. The Council’s commission on protecting state sovereignty said in a statement afterward that Apple agreed to cooperate with Russian authorities.

Apple and Google did not respond Friday to a request from The Associated Press for comment.

Google was forced to remove the app because it faced legal demands by regulators and threats of criminal prosecution in Russia, according to a person with direct knowledge of the matter who also said Russian police visited Google’s Moscow offices Monday to enforce a court order to block the app. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Friday the presidential administration “definitely, of course” welcomes the companies’ decision, because the app was “outside the law” in Russia.

In recent months, authorities have unleashed a sweeping crackdown against Navalny’s allies and engaged in a massive effort to suppress Smart Voting.

Navalny is serving a 2½-year prison sentence for violating parole over a previous conviction he says is politically motivated. His top allies were slapped with criminal charges and many have left the country. Navalny’s Foundation for Fighting Corruption and a network of regional offices have been outlawed as extremist organizations in a ruling that exposes hundreds of people associated with them to prosecution.

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José Berríos adjusting to new life, new team in Toronto

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José Berríos adjusting to new life, new team in Toronto

TORONTO — It looked as if José Berríos was going to miss the chance to start against his former teammates this time around, and he would’ve preferred it that way.

“It’s bad. I don’t want to. I don’t want to,” Berríos said. “They used to be my guys, but now, they’re in a different dugout and team. That’s what it is.”

But Berrios warmed to the idea quickly, joking that he’d like to face Willians Astudillo. He might get that chance. At the very least, he’ll face plenty of his other former teammates when he takes the mound for the Blue Jays on Sunday against the team that drafted and developed him.

Berríos has been a member of the Blue Jays for nearly two months. It took him the first month to get settled with housing and adjusting to new teammates and a new country. But things are getting easier for him now, he said.

And, he’s pitching in the middle of a postseason race, which certainly helps.

“It’s special. Obviously, the postseason, that’s what every player wants,” Berríos said. “But I’d been having fun with the (Minnesota) group. … I had people that I met in 2012 and knew through this year. But here, they have a lot of fun, too, so they made it easier for me to get here and try to get used to it. … I’ve enjoyed it so far.”

There has been plenty for him to enjoy between his own personal success — in nine starts, Berríos has posted a 3.31 earned-run average with the Blue Jays — and his new team’s success — the Blue Jays are half a game back from a Wild Card berth.

With Berríos now lined up to start on Sunday, his next two starts are now likely to come against his former team, as the Blue Jays travel to Minnesota next weekend. Twins manager Rocco Baldelli, who had a chance to catch up with Berríos before the series opener, said he thought Sunday was going to be fun and that he was glad the Twins would have a chance to face their former ace.

“I think he misses everybody, but I do think that he’s adjusting well to being in Toronto. I think he’s enjoying his teammates and playing playoff competitive baseball at the end of September,” Baldelli said. “He’s a competitive guy, and there’s nothing better than being able to go out there and help pitch his team into October and that’s what he’s all about.”

While Berríos said he once thought he was going to be a Twin for life, he said he understands the business decision the Twins made, swapping the pitcher, who is a free agent at next season’s end, for a pair of prospects ahead of the July 30 trade deadline.

“I respect and I’ve got my heart with all the people … that Minnesota gave me,” he said.

SIMMONS STAYS BACK

Starting shortstop Andrelton Simmons was placed on the restricted list on Friday, unable to join the Twins in Toronto. Simmons, who hails from Curacao, is in the process of applying for his permanent residency card in the United States.

“Along with that comes a lot of different paperwork and stuff, restrictions, and that’s why he’s not going to be available for the series,” Baldelli said. “Apparently, there was not much we could to do get around this. Obviously, some energy was spent trying to avoid it but we couldn’t avoid it so he’ll be down for three days.”

Simmons will rejoin the team in Chicago when the Twins head there next to take on the Cubs. In his place, Jorge Polanco started at shortstop on Friday and Baldelli said Nick Gordon would likely play there for a game or possibly two.

BRIEFLY

Catcher Mitch Garver (back) began a rehab assignment with the Triple-A Saints in Indianapolis on Friday. … The Twins reinstated Brent Rooker from the paternity list and optioned pitcher Andrew Albers. They also selected reliever Nick Vincent’s contract. … The Twins have not named a starter for Sunday, but Baldelli said it could possibly be a bullpen day. The Twins also have Charlie Barnes with them in Toronto on the taxi squad, who could potentially be an option. … Infielder Drew Maggi also traveled with the team on the taxi squad. … Baldelli said the Twins were not concerned about Joe Ryan, who was hit in the wrist with a pitch by a batted ball during his last start. He suggested Ryan’s next start might come on Wednesday in Chicago.

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FDA, CDC debate if third COVID-19 booster shot is needed

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FDA, CDC debate if third COVID-19 booster shot is needed

WASHINGTON (Nexstar) — The White House plans to start rolling out COVID-19 vaccine booster shots on Monday, but two federal health agencies are urging the administration to rethink its plan.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are meeting Friday to debate if there is enough proof a booster shot is safe, effective and necessary.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki says rollout won’t happen until those agencies give the green light.

“Based on their recommendation, we’re prepared to operationalize our plan,” Psaki said.

The FDA and CDC will specifically discuss a request by Pfizer to approve a third booster shot six months after the second dose. Dueling data submitted ahead of the meeting suggests not everyone is on the same page.

FDA staff say they have yet to verify some data to support the need for a third shot, saying, “There are known and unknown biases that can affect their reliability.”

“It’s a public health crisis everywhere in our country,” said U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio).

Brown says the top priority right now needs to be convincing many Americans to get the first dose.

“I think the effort aimed for everybody needs to be whatever we can do to get people vaccinated,” he said.

Still, the White House says it is ready to activate its booster plan as promised.

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Boeing to build first of its kind aircraft in Metro East, project to boost economy

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Boeing to build first of its kind aircraft in Metro East, project to boost economy

ST. CLAIR COUNTY, Ill. – Boeing announced that it is investing over $200 million in the MidAmerica St. Louis Airport. The new project is bringing a lot of money and jobs to the Metro East. 
 
Boeing is expanding their aerospace footprint in the Metro East at the Mid-America Airport. They will be adding a new $200 million, 300,000-square-foot state-of-the-art facility where the new MQ-25 stingray will be manufactured. 

That means more jobs and more commerce.  

“I think this will be the largest manufacturing facility, employing at 300 people, making close to $100,000 a year, along with all the construction jobs in monumental for this county, it will be great for MidAmerica Airport,” St. Clair County Board Chairman Mark Kern said.  

The Navy’s newest carrier-based aircraft is a first of its kind, unmanned refueling instrument. It marks Boeing’s second major investment in the Mascoutah-based Mid-America airport in the last 10 years.

Boeing currently produces components CH-47 chinook, FA-18 Super Hornet, and other defense products. 

“Just the way this community came together, the way this base works, it just matched our needs and the availability of space. It was just the perfect match. And our team is very excited,” Director for Boeing Dave Bujold said.
  
Several political figures from the state of Illinois were on hand for the monumental announcement including Dick Durbin and Illinois Gov. JB Pritzker. They say the state is committed to the Metro East.   

“I want to thank Boeing, for its vote of confidence in our progress, as well as st. Clair county’s leadership and the MidAmerica airport team for paving the way for companies to choose Illinois,” Pritzker said.
 
The investment will only add more revenue to MidAmerica Airport, which is the fifth busiest airport in Illinois right now. 

The project is scheduled for completion in 2024.  

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Northern Colorado alumni, longtime football supporters excited for home opener

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Northern Colorado alumni, longtime football supporters excited for home opener

It’s supposed to be a party in the parking lot and the stands Saturday at Nottingham Field. Several longtime season ticket holders plan to tailgate and have fun together at the University of Northern Colorado’s home opener.

The game represents so much more than just football for these supporters. It’s about family, friends and spending time together.

A number of supporters attended the season opener at the University of Colorado, and a handful went to Houston Baptist, but it’s different when the game is on local turf.

“We’ve scheduled (our tailgate) with about four other families, but we’ll see 100 people that we know, easy,” Larson said. “The social thing is the big part of it. And, as a small business person, I’d rather spend my money here with the community.”

Several of their friends have similar ties to UNC as well. Attending games together is a way of supporting their alma mater, local students and maintaining friendships as busy adults. Larson and several families attend football, basketball and volleyball together as much as possible, he said.

In fact, Larson said, those in his friend group want UNC to succeed. But if the teams lose, it doesn’t matter much. They’ve stuck with the program through good, bad and ugly, and plan to keep it that way.

“The teams are going to have their ups and downs, so we’re not fair-weather fans,” Larson said. “We’re going to support the teams no matter what.”

The Larson family has a long history with UNC with family members attending the school as far back as the 1930s. Larson and his son participated on the track and cross country teams, while his wife, Maureen, also earned her degree through the university.

Additionally, Larson sponsors the new football coaches show that airs every Tuesday on KFKA and a scholarship for track and field athletes.

“There are just so many people that we see up there and good people from the community that have been around a long time,” Larson continued. “You develop those friendships, so it’s not for us all about winning or losing. It’s about the people we see, and supporting the UNC community.”

Former UNC athlete, administrator and public address announcer Tom Barbour will be at the game as well.

Barbour attended UNC back when it was still called Colorado State College. He was a freshman in 1969 and spent one season as a football walk-on. Ultimately, Barbour decided football wasn’t for him, but stuck around the program.

In fact, Barbour spent time as the lead communications manager for the athletic department until 1983, before taking a few other central administration roles. He left the university as a full-time employee in 2000.

Even after spending more than three decades on campus, Barbour — a UNC Hall of Famer — came back to call football and basketball from 2006 to 2016.

“More than half of my life has been spent on the UNC campus. It’s just been part of me,” Barbour said. “I grew up in Denver, and most people ask me how I came to Greeley. I tell them, ‘I came to Greeley to come to school, and I haven’t gone home yet.’ Greeley is my home. And the university is the biggest reason for that.”

Barbour has been a season ticket holder since Nottingham Field opened in 1995 with the same tailgating spot, B3, since 2011.

Like Larson, Barbour is excited just to be back after nearly two years. He expects to do a lot of catching up with friends he hasn’t seen in a while. Plus, they’re all looking forward to finally seeing UNC coach Ed McCaffrey on the sideline in Greeley … with the new turf.

McCaffrey was hired in 2019 but didn’t make his debut until Sept. 3 due to COVID-19. The team planned to play in the spring, but concerns about health and safety ultimately led to the season’s cancelation.

Now, the Bears are 1-1 with two good performances, and people are anticipating good things.

“This place really does have a wonderful football history of conference championships and great players,” Barbour said. “It kind of lost some of its luster there for a while, but in naming Ed the head coach, it almost immediately put them back on the map. It’s going to be a lot of fun to see what he does with his program.”


UNC will face FCS opponent Lamar at 2 p.m. Saturday. As of Friday afternoon, tickets were still available for the game. If fans cannot attend, the game will be broadcast on ESPN+.

Face masks must be worn in all public indoor spaces on campus.

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