Connect with us

News

Tony Blair: For Strengthening WHO & More Central Governance

Published

on

Tony Blair Calls For Stronger WHO & More Global Government

Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair has questioned President Trump’s leadership during the coronavirus pandemic.

Blair’s idea’s echoe those of another former UK PM, Gordon Brown, who recently urged world leaders to create a temporary form of global government to tackle the crisis caused by the coronavirus.

Being concerned about what he called “the absence of global coordination”, Blair harked back to his work alongside, George Bush (his partner in war crimes), Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, as being good examples of how global inter-governmental cooperation can work at winning the day.

Breitbart reports: His remarks in an interview with NBC News last Friday followed an earlier intervention in the crisis when his own globalist think tank claimed it is “embedded in governments around the world,” as Breitbart News reported.

In his most recent observations, he told NBC News he was worried about the lack of global coordination in tackling the crisis.

“The worry I have that an absence of global coordination and global leadership that’s necessary for it is a huge problem,” he said.

“When I think back to the times when I’m dealing with American presidents whether it’s Bill Clinton or George Bush, Barack Obama as well, the most important thing at a time like this is to say, ‘How do you bring the world together?”

By building more and bigger global government, Blair believes leaders could find a vaccine together, accelerate the development of therapeutics and testing capability, while keeping the international economy afloat.

“It’s that global coordination, the absence of which means that each individual country’s less effective at dealing with the disease. That’s the thing that worries me,” he stated.

The left-wing former Labour leader was asked his opinion on Trump’s suggestions on fighting the epidemic, he said: “I think most people would understand what I would think, but it’s probably better sometimes not to say it.”

Earlier this month the Tony Blair Institute announced it has “teams” advising world governments “to keep their people safe during this pandemic — not just in respect of Covid-19 itself but also the political and economic collateral damage.”

It also echoed his own personal call for more resources to be poured into the World Health Organization:

google news

Rajesh is a freelancer with a background in e-commerce marketing. Having spent her career in startups, He specializes in strategizing and executing marketing campaigns.

Advertisement
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

News

Sick St. Paul students still face 10-day isolation as CDC calls for 5

Published

on

US officials recommend shorter COVID isolation, quarantine

In a break with new federal guidelines, St. Paul Public Schools will continue to require coronavirus-infected students to isolate at home for 10 days after a positive test or first sign of illness.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Dec. 27 shortened its recommended isolation time from 10 days to five. After that, the recovering person can leave isolation, as long as they’re not experiencing symptoms and agree to wear a well-fitting face mask for five days.

Since their release, the guidelines have been adopted by at least a dozen of Minnesota’s largest school districts — but not St. Paul.

“SPPS is taking a more conservative approach to isolation periods for students than the CDC recommendation because of the need for students to be unmasked during meals and other implementation challenges at school,” the district said in a message to families Friday.

Spokesman Kevin Burns did not respond Monday to a request for more information about “implementation challenges.”

10 DAY ISOLATION

The St. Paul Federation of Educators had encouraged the district to stick with 10-day isolation for students and staff – or to require two negative rapid diagnostic tests for those returning sooner.

Although the St. Paul district kept the 10-day rule for students, staff now are to return after five days. That should help with staff shortages that have caused several metro school districts to move temporarily to distance learning.

St. Paul teachers union President Leah VanDassor did not return a phone message Monday.

The Elk River school district was among those adopting the new five-day isolation protocol for students and staff.

“We know this news will bring relief to many of our families as it reduces the amount of instruction time our students will miss,” the district said in a message to families. “However, we must continue to move forward with caution and to refrain from sending students to school while sick (even if they have passed the five-day quarantine period).”

COMPETING GOALS

The CDC said in its announcement that the change to shorter isolations was “motivated by science demonstrating that the majority of SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs early in the course of illness, generally in the 1-2 days prior to onset of symptoms and the 2-3 days after.”

The agency also acknowledged that taking sick people out of society for 10 days is hard on individuals and society, especially at a time when the highly contagious omicron variant is taking over.

“These updated recommendations also facilitate individual social and well-being needs, return to work, and maintenance of critical infrastructure,” the CDC said on its website.

The change alarmed some health experts, who said it seemed driven less by science than practicality.

Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Joe Biden, told ABC News on Jan. 2 that the CDC was considering adding the requirement that recovering people test negative before they leave isolation. But the CDC update ultimately did not include that requirement.

Besides the shorter isolation period for infected people, the CDC also shortened its recommended quarantine to five days – from 10 – for unvaccinated or partially vaccinated people who come into close contact with an infected person.

DISTRICTS MOVE TO 5 DAYS

Since the CDC’s announcement, many large Minnesota school districts have adopted the five-day isolation for sick students and staff. They include Anoka-Hennepin, Rosemount-Apple Valley-Eagan, Osseo, Elk River, Robbinsdale, Wayzata, Mounds View, Lakeville, Bloomington, St. Cloud and Eastern Carver County.

google news
Continue Reading

News

Forget the play-in, Timberwolves have wide open path to top-six seed

Published

on

Forget the play-in, Timberwolves have wide open path to top-six seed

A play-in tournament appearance seemed like a reasonable goal for the Timberwolves at the season’s outset.

The Western Conference is often deep and talented, with eight-plus good teams in any given season. But finishing among the top 10 given the team’s talent level was a fair expectation. If the Wolves could make the jump to win approximately half their games, that would equal a successful season they could build off of moving forward.

But as seasons progress, so too do circumstances. The Timberwolves are about where many pegged them to be at this point, just a breath below .500 and competitive on a nightly basis. But so much of the Western Conference has folded around them.

Minnesota’s 21-22 mark would’ve placed it 12th in the Eastern Conference as of Monday afternoon, yet it stood in seventh place in the West. Suddenly, a top-six seed that would allow the Wolves to bypass the play-in tournament and move directly into the playoffs looks not only feasible, but likely?

Currently in sixth is a Denver team that’s missing two of its top three players. The Nuggets still have reigning MVP Nikola Jokic, but Jamal Murray and Michael Porter Jr. are likely out until at least April.

Minnesota entered Monday tied with a Lakers team that could be without Anthony Davis for two more weeks.

The Clippers have fallen to ninth in the conference without Paul George, whose elbow injury situation appears rather ominous with a still to-be-determined return date. That’s not to mention Kawhi Leonard, who still has yet to play this season after having surgery in July to repair his torn ACL.

The middle of the Western Conference pack is bruised and battered, with the exception of Minnesota. The Timberwolves, to this point, have avoided major injuries. Sure, Patrick Beverley and D’Angelo Russell missed a few games here and there with bumps, bruises and soreness, and Minnesota, like many teams, endured its own COVID crisis.

But sans reserve guard Jordan McLaughlin, who is currently in health and safety protocols, the Timberwolves are otherwise at full strength, with all traditional rotation players available. All hands are on deck. After the healthy Wolves routed short-handed Golden State on Sunday, Timberwolves coach Chris Finch noted now is the time for Minnesota to make a charge.

“This is the time for us to start putting it together and start stacking some really good performances on top of each other and avoid the slip ups that we’ve had,” Finch said. “Through the last couple weeks, we’ve talked about getting everyone back healthy and what that could look like, and now it’s time to go, make a push between here and the all-star break. It’s always a tough time in the season, but we’ve got a lot more games piling up, most of them on the road, so we have to be ready to go.”

The runway has cleared for Minnesota to make an expedited push up the Western Conference ladder, now it’s up to the Wolves to prove they’re serious about doing so. The next two road games in consecutive days against middling Eastern Conference opponents in New York and Atlanta provide the perfect opportunity for the Wolves to establish themselves as playoff-worthy.

“We don’t just want be in the play-in game, we want to be set in the playoffs,” Malik Beasley said. “We’re trying to figure out how to get a nice little win streak to get us above the hump and take us to where we need to go.”

Jaylen Nowell was asked about Minnesota’s potential after Sunday’s win. He wasn’t sure how to answer the question. For years, potential has been the word used to describe this roster — which, yes, does still feature a number of “young” players.

Potential is usually a word used to discuss those who have yet to achieve.

Now is the time to ditch the inconsistencies that have plagued Minnesota all season and left it swimming just under the .500 mark for much of the season. There are no excuses present at the moment to do anything other than win.

“Potential — I’ve always heard that the longer you do something, you actually want to hear that word less, and you actually want to start doing,” Nowell said. “I mean, we’re gonna get to that point where we’re doing this consistently. Once that happens, it’s gonna be great.”

google news
Continue Reading

News

Labor dispute continues as King Soopers, union remain at bargaining table

Published

on

Labor dispute continues as King Soopers, union remain at bargaining table

As Denver-area King Soopers workers walked the picket lines for a sixth day, negotiators for the union and Colorado’s largest grocery chain met Monday in contract talks that have been marked by each side accusing the other of unfair labor practices and refusing to bargain in good faith.

Heading into the fourth straight day of talks, union representatives said there had been little progress even though they “moved more than 12 offers back and forth” with the company. Company representatives said the Union of Food and Commercial Workers Local 7 hadn’t offered any new proposals on wages, health care or pensions Friday.

The meeting Friday lasted 68 minutes. It was the first bargaining session since Jan. 6 when the union rejected a proposal it described as “riddled with concessions” that King Soopers wants from workers.

“We spent the first day in negotiations listening to corporate executives scream, yell at the members and show utter disdain and disrespect for the workers,” Kim Cordova, union president, said in a video on the UFCW Local 7 Facebook page.

King Soopers spokeswoman Jessica Trowbridge said in an email Monday that the union “continues to choose rhetoric and confusion to distract from their failure to represent their members and allow the company to put more money in their paychecks.”

The company wants the union to let its members vote on the offer turned down by the union’s bargaining committee.

The strike involving more than 8,000 employees at 68 stores in Boulder, Parker and the metro area started Wednesday, a day after the union rejected King Soopers’ “last, best offer.” The proposal included $170 million in wage increases, health care benefits and bonuses ranging from $2,000 to $4,000 upon ratification of the contract.

King Soopers’ contracts with the stores on strike expired Jan. 8. Other contracts with King Soopers and City Market, both owned by Cincinnati-based Kroger, expire later in January and in February.

The UFCW Local 7, which represents 17,000 grocery workers in Colorado and Wyoming, agreed to extend contract talks with Albertsons, which owns Safeway and Albertsons grocery stores.

King Soopers has proposed increasing its starting pay to $16 an hour. The union called the proposal inadequate, saying it’s only 13 cents above Denver’s minimum wage. The union’s offer includes starting pay of $18.56 and the restoration of “hazard” pay that the company gave when the coronavirus pandemic began and ended a couple of months later, in May 2020.

Wages are important to Jay Burnham, a King Soopers employee for nearly 30 years.

“But the main issue right now, the reason we voted to strike, is because of unfair labor practices,” said Burnham, who works at a Glendale store. “They’re bringing people to stock shelves who are not part of the union.”

The UFCW Local 7 filed a lawsuit in federal court in late December that said King Soopers is using third-party staffing services to do union-covered work.

King Soopers filed a complaint with the National Labor Relations Board on Jan. 10 that accuses the union of bargaining in bad faith.

“This is a real test of, not just wills, but market power,” Jeffrey Zax, an economics professor at the University of Colorado in Boulder, said of the strike. “In the pandemic environment, the question of whether either party has an accurate assessment of their relative market power is an interesting one because market power has shifted.”

Worker shortages have given labor more leverage in the market, Zax said. Millions of people haven’t returned to their pre-pandemic jobs or quit because of concerns about COVID-19, lack of child care or the desire to find different work.

google news
Continue Reading

Trending