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Coronavirus Lockdown may lead to increase in Depression and other Mental Health Problems

Let’s create a reality at the very beginning: the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have long-term effects on the global economy, politics, environment, culture and the way of life of everyone, and these effects would have an enormous impact on the mental health of nearly everyone living through thes

Depression
Depression

Let’s create a reality at the very beginning: the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have long-term effects on the global economy, politics, environment, culture and the way of life of everyone, and these effects would have an enormous impact on the mental health of nearly everyone living through these days. There’s no escape from this fact, especially now that this highly contagious viral infection has raged across the globe for well over six months while infecting over seven million people, claiming the lives of lakhs and making billions of others feel restrained and insecure.

Notably, it describes loneliness as a state of loneliness and feeling alone. It can leave you feeling empty and unwanted. People who suffer from loneliness are anxious for human attention and communication but have difficulty forming connections. There is a whole range of reasons why you might feel lonely. It can be due to a loved one’s loss, divorce, financial loss, move to a new place, professional or household pressure, or low self-esteem.

If loneliness persists for a long time, it can lead to alcoholism, antisocial behavior, reduced memory, altered brain function, and depression. That’s why you’ve got to take this psychological issue seriously and reach out to people for help. Your life is untold, and you are meant to live.

Mental Health:

A research published at the New UK Journal of Medicine in April 2020 shows that emergencies of this magnitude can lead both individuals and societies to elicit a variety of emotional responses and unhealthy behaviors. Yet it can also give rise to resilience at the same time, and help people discover new strengths during a crisis. However, many people are more prone than others to pandemic’s psychological effects.

The following are some of the most common diseases of mental health that appear following the COVID-19 pandemic. The long-term effects that this can have on the overall health and the day-to-day functioning of people should be taken very seriously. You should contact a mental health provider immediately if you notice the signs of either of them.

Depression:

By the results of the same study, depression symptoms among certain groups of people appear to be increasing. An additional May 2020 research in the areas of brain, comportment, and immunity highlights the specific incidence of insomnia and anxiety and depression among health workers. In most persons under quarantine or lock-down, social isolation, cabin fever, and limited mobility also produce depressing symptoms.

Although the COVID-19 pandemic has affected much of the world’s population, its potential effects on mental health are relatively unknown.

In the context of additional evidence, all studies and preprint articles (data reporting on suspected or laboratory-confirmed coronavirus infections (SARS, MERS, or SARS-CoV-2)) have been systematically reviewed and metaphorical by the authors of the new study[2]

In all, the analyses included the reports of the results for the patients who were admitted to a hospital upto 65 peer-reviewed studies up to 18 March 2020 and seven pre-prints between 1 January to 10 April 2020. The meta-analysis was based on a pooled point prevalence of seven articles (a percentage of people affected at a given time).

Data from two studies systematically evaluating the symptoms common to SARS and MERS hospitals showed that 28% (36/129) of patients suffered from confusion, indicating a prevalence of delirium in acute illness (Table 2). Low mood reports (42/129, 33%), fear (46/129; 36%), impaired memory (44/129, 34%) and insomnia (34/208; 12%) were also frequent at acute stage. There is a high level of insomnia.

Twelven COVID-19 studies appear to have shown the same picture, with evidence of delirium (26/40 patients, 65% confusion; 40/58 ICU patients, 69% agitated; then-deadly altered consciousness, 21%) and acutely ill (Table 5). Six studies looking at SARS and MERS patients after recovery from initial infection found frequent reports of low mood (35/332 patients, 11%), insomnia (34/208, 12%), anxiety (21/171, 12%), irritability (28/218, 13%), memory impairment (44/233, 19%), fatigue (61/316, 19%), and frequent recall of traumatic memories (55/181, 30%) over a follow-up period ranging from 6 weeks to 39 months (table 2). The researchers estimated the prevalence of PTSD among SARS survivors and MERS 33% in the 34-month average after the acute disease stage (121/402 cases in 4 studies), whereas the rates of depression and anxiety disorders averaged approximately 15% at 23 months (77/517 in 5 trials) and 1 year (42/284 in 3 trials) after the acute phase of respect.

The authors note, however, that such outbreaks may overestimate the actual burden of mental health. ‘It is likely,’ says co-lead author Dr. Edwy Chesney, from King’s College London, UK,, “that the apparently high rates of anxiety , depression and PTSD in SARS and MERS patients overestimate the actual burden.

‘The absence of adequate comparison groups or evaluation of patients’ previous psychiatric history means that the effects of coronavirus infection on the entire population or that of an epidemic (the possibility that patients have been recruited into study on the basis of the factors associated with a later epidemic) can not be divided between pre-existing conditions.

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