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What Is Vocational Adjustment & How Does It Affect My SSD Claim?

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What Is Vocational Adjustment & How Does It Affect My SSD Claim?

Did you know that it is easier to qualify for Social Security disability benefits as you get older? It is true—and the primary reason is because of something called a vocational adjustment. Here, you will find a brief overview of vocational adjustment and an explanation as to how it can affect your SSDI or SSI claim.   

Social Security Disability Vocational Adjustment: Understanding the Basics

To be eligible for Social Security disability benefits, an applicant must prove that they are no longer reasonably able to work on a full-time basis. In reviewing a claim, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will consider not just your ability (or lack thereof) to return to your previous position, but also your suitability to successfully transition into a new workplace or into a new field entirely. In assessing your ability to “adjust” to a new position, the SSA considers an applicant’s:

  • Ability to perform physically taxing work;
  • Level of education; 
  • Work history and previous job experience; 
  • Transferable skills; and
  • Age. 

How a Vocational Adjustment Affects Your SSD Claim 

An applicant who is deemed reasonably able to adjust to a new position can have their disability claim denied on those grounds alone. Generally speaking, vocational adjustment works in favor of older applicants. If an applicant is approaching 60, the SSA views in-depth job retraining as, largely, unreasonable. That being said, workers who are nearing retirement age may be expected to make “slight” adjustments in order to find a new position. This could mean using skills that have not previously been used. 

On the other hand, younger workers—most notably, those below the age of 50—are viewed as ‘adjustable’. The SSA considers comprehensive job retraining reasonable. In fact, if an applicant who is under 50 and is deemed capable of performing any kind of work—even if that work is quite different from their previous employment history—they will be expected to make a vocational adjustment. 

If you have questions about vocational adjustment or if you believe that the agency is handling your claim improperly, an experienced lawyer, such as the ones at the Social Security Law Group, can help. 

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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The Rolling Stones kick off ‘No Filter Tour’ in St. Louis on Sunday

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The Rolling Stones kick off ‘No Filter Tour’ in St. Louis on Sunday

ST. LOUIS – The Rolling Stones begin their  “No Filter Tour” in St. Louis on Sunday. 

The stage at the Dome at America’s Center is set for the Stones concert. That concert launches their 13-date tour. It will be the band’s first St. Louis show since 2006 when they performed at the Savvis Center, now known as Enterprise Center.

The band’s “No Filter Tour 2020” was going to include a June 2020 show at the Dome at America’s Center, but because of the pandemic, they had to take an unscheduled break and relaunch the tour. After the unscheduled break, the tour relaunches this weekend at the Dome at America’s Center.

The Rolling Stones have been touring since 1964, and this is the Stones first tour without late drummer Charlie Watts. The band announced this summer that the longtime drummer was ill and would be sitting out the tour. He died last month, not long after the announcement. Watts is being replaced on this tour by Steve Jordan, known for his role in the John Mayer trio.

The St. Louis City ordinance requires wearing a mask indoors. However, proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test is not required to enter the Dome at America’s Center. The concert begins Sunday at 7:30 p.m.

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Contact 2: Illinois Supreme Court ruling could put money back in homeowners’ pockets

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Contact 2: Illinois Supreme Court ruling could put money back in homeowners’ pockets

SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – “I think the court got it right and this is a case that’s going to affect tens of thousands of people,” attorney Chris Roberts said.

Roberts is talking about the decision handed down by the Illinois Supreme Court Thursday in the case of Jarret Sproull vs. State Farm. Roberts’ firm represents Sproull.

“If people have a homeowner’s loss within the last year or they’re a business owner with a loss in the last two years, they may have a potential case to pursue and get additional money from the insurance company,” Roberts said.

The issue before the court is whether an insurer may depreciate labor costs the same way it depreciates the cost of the roof you’re replacing when determining the actual cash value of a covered loss.

“It’s not just State Farm,” Roberts said. “There’s a lot of other carriers out there that engage in the same practice.”

The Illinois Supreme Court ruled both the plaintiff and State Farm offered reasonable interpretations of “actual cash value” and “depreciation.” But because the court found State Farm’s policy ambiguous, it ruled the policyholder can recover depreciated labor cost.

“When both sides have a reasonable interpretation, the tie goes to the consumer,” Roberts said. “The tie goes to the person that holds the insurance policy and that’s what the Illinois Supreme Court said.”

In a statement, State Farms said:

“We are disappointed by the Illinois Supreme Court’s ruling in the Sproull case, and its conclusion that certain language in our older insurance policies was ambiguous. Beginning in Feb. 2016, State Farm changed the policy language to provide a definition and outline the components of actual cash value to include materials, labor, and tax. The Sproull case concerns claims made only under the old policy language. We remain committed to paying our customers what we owe on their claims.”

“The next step, because we’re in a class action, is we have to certify the case as a class action,” Roberts said. “If the case eventually resolves, payments can be made from that case to the policyholders or business owners.”

FOX 2 will keep you posted as this case continues through the courts.

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Kiszla: With Coors Field awash in Dodger Blue, we’re reminded why Our Scrappy Lil Rox will never be perennial contenders

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Kiszla: With Coors Field awash in Dodger Blue, we’re reminded why Our Scrappy Lil Rox will never be perennial contenders

It took four agonizing hours and one painful minute on a September afternoon in Coors Field to remind us why they’re the Dodgers and the Rockies never will be, so long as franchise owner Dick Monfort makes a major-league mockery of baseball in Colorado.

After Our Scrappy Lil Rox blew a late lead Thursday and lost 7-5 in 10 innings, the ballpark was awash in Dodger Blue, transplants from the West Coast partying in LoDo like they owned the joint. If championship contention can be bought with a $261 million payroll, maybe if Dodgers offered to a $20 tip to Monfort, he’d also agree to play “I love L.A.” by Randy Newman so they could properly celebrate a victory in Denver.

“Their team travels well, wherever they go. Dodger fans are everywhere. Something you’ve got to deal with. But at the same time, it makes it that much more sweet when you take them down,” said Rockies pitcher Kyle Freeland. He’s a Colorado native who grew up watching fans of the St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and the Evil Blue Empire stage unfriendly takeovers of Coors Field in a great sports town that deserves winning baseball.

The Rox rocked high-priced Dodgers ace Max Scherzer, who had allowed only five earned runs in 58 innings since being hoarded by L.A. in trade, for five runs before he could record his 13th out Thursday.

Freeland, who called home-plate umpire Ed Hickox names that no mother would approve, battled for six solid innings despite being squeezed with a strike zone smaller than the Grinch’s heart.

And Raimel Tapia hit his first home run since before Memorial Day to put Colorado ahead 5-3 in the fifth inning.

It all made the audience of Big Blue transplants, who accounted for at least 50% of the 22,356 tickets sold, as miserable as if they were stuck in traffic on the 405 freeway back in LaLa Land. It was a beautiful thing.

“We enjoying creating that pressure and watching a little bit of panic on the other side of the field,” Freeland said.

Maybe playing spoiler in September is as good as Our Scrappy Lil Rox can do.

“This isn’t the situation we want to be in,” Freeland said. “We want to be one of the teams that is going for a playoff spot.”

Isn’t that why Nolan Arenado wanted out of this dusty old cow town? Isn’t the lack of ownership commitment to fielding a competitive team in Colorado the reason shortstop Trevor Story will soon pack up his glove and bat and seek happiness elsewhere?

Even when the Dodgers were down to their last strike, reliever Carlos Estevez was unable to hold a one-run lead in the ninth inning. A two-run homer by Max Muncey in the 10th turned LoDo into the farthest eastern suburb of Los Angeles.

As die-hard Rockies fans in attendance filed out in the street, I felt like the Red Hot Chili Peppers should’ve been playing on the loudspeakers. Some song about California and the sad pursuit of hollow happiness. Sing along, if you know the lyrics: “Tidal waves couldn’t save the world from …”

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Parkway School District launches investigation after racial remarks found at another high school

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Parkway School District launches investigation after racial remarks found at another high school

ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Mo. – Racial slurs were found in another Parkway high school after similar verbiage was found at Central High School.

Parkway School District announced that racial slurs were found in bathrooms at Parkway North High School in addition to Central High School.

Parkway Superintendent Keith Marty said the district launched a police and school investigation, and whoever is responsible will be disciplined and could possibly face legal consequences.

A letter that he sent to parents reads in part, “students and staff are hurt, angry and feeling outnumbered by those willing to stand by and watch without taking action to stop it.”

In protest against the hate speech, hundreds of Parkway Central High School students walked out of class Thursday.

“It makes me sad to think that anybody would be in a class with someone where they feel unsafe and know someone said this about people. I don’t like the feeling,” student Olivia Saphian said.

Students said the racist slurs are hurtful to all students and they are demanding to know what school officials will do to help change the culture.

“It’s honestly so upsetting, and it’s not surprising. We have had issues for the last five years. It’s just frustrating, it’s still happening here at Parkway, and they are not meeting us with the action we are trying to bring,” student Grace Bauer said. 
  

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Colonie PD attempting to ID subject in larceny investigation

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Colonie PD attempting to ID subject in larceny investigation

COLONIE, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Colonie Police Department needs help identifying a subject.

Police are looking for the person captured on surveillance footage in regard to a larceny investigation.

If you have information, you’re asked call (518) 783-2754.  Colonie Police Case # 21-037391 & 21-037392.

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Ask Amy: A father’s memories don’t admit flaws

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Ask Amy: Woman should leave abusive relationship

Dear Amy: My father has realized his memory is failing and is using this to whitewash his questionable parenting skills.

Now I have no closure or recourse on events like his racist outburst of 2012 that led me to a very awkward Thanksgiving in a house full of people I did not know.

My dad will even see if his partner remembers an incident, and if she doesn’t remember, then it definitely didn’t happen; but she is apt to ignore it like it didn’t happen just to move off the subject.

I don’t need an apology (not that it would come), but it is just a new insult on top of an old one.

It makes me resentful when he literally says I must be wrong because:

1. Both of them don’t remember.

2. One of them doesn’t remember.

or

3. Both remember, but act like they don’t.

My past has been check-mated by insecure septuagenarians. There is nothing I can do, is there?

— Manipulated S

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Petito case a reminder of ‘so many Indigenous women’ missing, Interior Secretary Haaland says

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Petito case a reminder of ‘so many Indigenous women’ missing, Interior Secretary Haaland says

FILE – In this April 23, 2021, file photo Interior Secretary Deb Haaland speaks during a press briefing at the White House in Washington. Haaland said extensive news media coverage of the death of Gabby Petito while on a cross-country trip should be a reminder of hundreds of Native American girls and women who are missing or murdered in the United States. Haaland, the first Native American Cabinet secretary, said her heart goes out to Petito’s family, but said she also grieves for “so many Indigenous women” whose families have endured similar heartache “for the last 500 years.” (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Speaking in personal terms, Interior Secretary Deb Haaland said extensive news media coverage of the disappearance and death of 22-year-old Gabby Petito while on a cross-country trip should be a reminder of hundreds of Native American girls and women who are missing or murdered in the United States.

Haaland, the first Native American Cabinet secretary, said that her heart goes out to Petito’s family, but that she also grieves for “so many Indigenous women” whose families have endured similar heartache “for the last 500 years.”

The search for Petito generated a whirlwind of news coverage, especially on cable television, as well as a frenzy of online sleuthing, with tips, possible sightings and theories shared by the hundreds of thousands on TikTok, Instagram and YouTube.

1632479332 945 Petito case a reminder of ‘so many Indigenous women missing
This combo of photos provided by FBI Denver via @FBIDenver shows missing person Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito. Petito, 22, vanished while on a cross-country trip in a converted camper van with her boyfriend. Authorities say a body discovered Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021, in Wyoming, is believed to be Petito. (Courtesy of FBI Denver via AP)

The Florida woman, who disappeared while on a cross-country trip with her boyfriend, was found dead at the edge of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. Authorities have determined she was a homicide victim.

A report prepared for the state of Wyoming found that at least 710 Native Americans were reported missing between 2011 and late 2020. Between 2010 and 2019, the homicide rate per 100,000 for Indigenous people was 26.8, eight times higher than the homicide rate for white people, the report said.

1632479332 11 Petito case a reminder of ‘so many Indigenous women missing
FILE – In this Aug. 29, 2017, file photo Nicole Matthews, second from right, of Minneapolis and her daughter Kiora Burgess-Matthews, attend a prayer circle for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind at the Ramsey County Medical Examiner’s office in St. Paul, Minn. People wore green ribbons to honor Savanna, her favorite color. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland as a former New Mexico congresswoman pushed for a law signed last year to address the crisis of missing, murdered and trafficked Indigenous women. The law, known as Savanna’s Act, is intended to help law enforcement track, solve and prevent crimes against Native Americans, especially women and girls. The law is named for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, a member of the Spirit Lake tribe who was abducted and killed in 2017 near Fargo, North Dakota. (Leila Navidi/Star Tribune via AP, File)

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo Laguna tribe, said she has frequently seen Native American family members posting pictures on fences and the sides of buildings to help locate missing girls or women. When that happens, “you know I see my sisters,” she told reporters Thursday at a news conference. “I see my mother. I see my aunties or my nieces or even my own child. So I feel that every woman and every person who is in this victimized place deserves attention and deserves to be cared about.”

A former New Mexico congresswoman, Haaland pushed for a law signed last year to address the crisis of missing, murdered and trafficked Indigenous women. The law, known as Savanna’s Act, is intended to help law enforcement track, solve and prevent crimes against Native Americans, especially women and girls.

1632479332 569 Petito case a reminder of ‘so many Indigenous women missing
FILE – In this Aug. 29, 2017 file photo, Missy Jackson, 23, of Minneapolis, attends a prayer circle for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind at the Ramsey County Medical Examiner’s office in St. Paul, Minn. People wore green ribbons to honor Savanna, her favorite color. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland as a former New Mexico congresswoman pushed for a law signed last year to address the crisis of missing, murdered and trafficked Indigenous women. The law, known as Savanna’s Act, is intended to help law enforcement track, solve and prevent crimes against Native Americans, especially women and girls. The law is named for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, a member of the Spirit Lake tribe who was abducted and killed in 2017 near Fargo, North Dakota. (Leila Navidi/Star Tribune via AP, File)

The law is named for Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind, a member of the Spirit Lake tribe who was abducted and killed in 2017 near Fargo, North Dakota. Greywind, 22, was pregnant, and her unborn baby was cut from her body. Her remains were found in the Red River.

Haaland said she sees her mission as interior secretary in part as a way to elevate attention on Native American issues.

“I feel like it’s my job to lift up this issue as best I can. And hopefully, the folks who are writing the news, and broadcasting the news will understand that these women are also friends, neighbors, classmates and work colleagues,” she said.

Haaland stressed that her comments were not intended to downplay the pain suffered by Petito’s family.

“Anytime a woman faces assault, rape, murder, kidnapping — any of those things — it’s very difficult and my heart goes out to any family who has to endure that type of pain,” she said. “And so, of course, my heart goes out to the young woman who was found in Wyoming.”

Everyone deserves to feel safe in their communities, Haaland said, but “where I can make a difference in particular is in addressing the missing and murdered Indigenous peoples crisis, which has occurred since the beginning of colonization of Indigenous people on this continent for about the last 500 years and it continues.”

Haaland created a Missing & Murdered Unit within the Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Justice Services earlier this year and has established a joint commission of national tribal leaders and experts, led by the Interior and Justice departments, to reduce violent crime against American Indians and Alaska Natives.

Haaland also ordered Interior to investigate its past oversight of Native American boarding schools that forced hundreds of thousands of children from their families and communities.

“The primary goal of this work is to share the truth of this dark chapter in our nation’s history, so that we can begin to heal,” Haaland said.

A written report is expected next year.

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Body found in Illinois River is Jelani Day, coroner confirms

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Body found in Illinois River is Jelani Day, coroner confirms

LASALLE COUNTY, Ill. (WMBD) — The LaSalle County Coroner has confirmed the male body found in the Illinois River on Sept. 4 is Jelani Day.

Coroner Richard Ploch said forensic dental identification and DNA testing and comparison helped confirm the identity of the body.

At this time, the cause of death is unknown, and an investigation is ongoing. Toxicology is still testing.

Jelani Day, 25, was last seen Aug. 24. at the Illinois State University campus. His family in Danville and a faculty member reported him missing after he did not show up for class for several days.

His last known location was at Beyond Hello in Bloomington at 9:21 a.m. Aug. 24.

Day’s car was recovered in Peru, IL on Aug. 27 with no license plates in a wooded area south of the Illinois Valley YMCA and north of the intersection of 12th Street and Westclox Avenue.

A Facebook page run and moderated by the family sent out a statement Thursday.

Several agencies are involved in the investigation, including:

  • Bloomington Police Department
  • Illinois State University Police Department
  • Peru Police Department
  • Illinois Emergency Management Agency
  • LaSalle County Sheriff’s and Coroner’s Office
  • LaSalle County State’s Attorney Office
  • LaSalle Police Department
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation Springfield Division, and the
  • Illinois State Police

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Complaint filed against Rensselaer County Jail

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Complaint filed against Rensselaer County Jail

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — A complaint was filed against the Rensselaer County Jail for its alleged handling of women in ICE custody.

The complaint said the women, who were being held in the jail, were subject to medical neglect as well as physical abuse and egregious conditions. The letter also asked the Department of Homeland Security to investigate the conditions at the jail.

NEWS10 ABC reached out to jail officials for comment on the complaint and has not heard back.

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19-year-old man arrested for 4th of July boating fatality

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19-year-old man arrested for 4th of July boating fatality

SARATOGA COUNTY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Blake Heflin is facing additional criminal charges after a boating fatality on Saratoga Lake on the 4th of July.

The Saratoga County Sheriff’s Office says Blake Heflin, 19, has been charged with criminally negligent homicide (a Class E felony) in the death of 20-year-old Ian Gerber.

Heflin was operating a pontoon boat with several young adults. Police say Gerber jumped off a boat that was being operated by Heflin.

“The lives of those families are forever impacted by the conduct and the outcome of the tragedy that occurred that day,” said Saratoga County District Attorney Karen Heggin.

Police say Heflin was drinking alcohol and did not take proper safety precautions.

“There was not a chemical test administered by way of a breathalyzer in a police station that day, but a blood test was taken,” said Attorney Matt Chauvin at Ianniello Anderson, P.C.

Gerber was severely injured by the propeller of Heflin’s boat and then he was hit by a second boat as Heflin was turning around to pick him up.

Heflin’s Attorney Matt Chauvin says they are looking into why the driver of the second boat wasn’t charged.

“We don’t have all the information that the sheriff office has upfront, so they are going to turn that stuff over to us,” said he.

Chauvin says Heflin maintains his innocence and he is mourning the loss of his friend Ian Gerber.

“No one ever intended for that young man not to be with us today, and Blake feels that. It’s hard for him having to see the potential of his life being destroyed for something that he very much maintains he did not do,” said he

“There are a variety of factors which we believe this case will bring forth why the charges are appropriate here,” said Heggin.

Heflin was arraigned on September 23 in Malta Town Court and released. He did not have to pay bail.

The next court appearance has not been set, but News10 will continue to follow the case.

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