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Russia claims it approved a Coronavirus vaccine,Fauci claims the vaccine is ‘seriously doubtful’ for widespread use

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Coronavirus vaccine

Russia said it approved a vaccine for coronavirus, but sceptics claim that it was not tested for protection and efficacy. Experts on vaccination say this is a potentially risky political act.
Russia’s President Vladimir Putin today announced that his country is the first country to authorize a COVID-19 vaccine. He called Sputnik-V vaccine, a node to the world’s first artificial satellite launched over 60 years ago by the Soviet Union. The Russians state that in October they will begin the vaccine, even though they have not performed testing to see if it is safe and reliable.

And that day is today, according to Russia. Over the past 24 hours, the world’s first coronavirus vaccine was seemingly approved by Vladimir Putin. Good news. Great news indeed.

Yet many people at this event are understandably puzzled. For months we have been advised that the race to find a vaccine is more a marathon than a sprint. Also, the ambitious goals of the most successful vaccine initiatives will only start dosing by the end of 2020. Why has Russia been able to get the final blow and finish developing a vaccine months before everyone else?

Fauci, the U.S. director National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases reported on the exclusive event for air August 13, via National Geographic, as part of a keynote interview to stop pandemics.

“I hope the Russians have proved the vaccine safe and successful, in reality,” Fauci told ABC News reporter Deborah Roberts, who moderated the case. “They did that, I seriously doubt.”

Russia indicated during the summer that it is working quickly on its vaccine candidate, Sputnik V after the nation’s breakthrough rocket, launched in 1960. In May, the Director of the Gamaleya Epidemiology and Microbiology Research Institute in Moscow where the vaccine is under production, and other researchers started evaluating the drug by themselves, with seventy-six subjects beginning a month later, in the first step of human studies.

Nonetheless, Gamaleya has not yet reported any human test results, usually requiring three phases for testing the health, efficacy and dosage of a drug. The Institute has also not conducted preclinical work involving animal models or experiments in Petri plates with cells.

Despite this public insufficiency, Russian President Vladimir Putin says the health authorities in Russia are able to allow the widespread use of the vaccine. “We will thank those who took this very critical first step for Russia and the world,” said Putin in a statement released today by the Kremlin.

The approval comes even though other Russian officials state that the trials are still in progress. step three. Kirill Dmitriev, Chief Executive Officer of the vaccine sponsored Russian Direct Investment Fund, told the Associated Press that the advanced trials in many nations, including Russia, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, the Philippines, and probably Brazil are scheduled for starting August 12. But the AP did not locate any documents in the records of the Russian Ministry of Health citing such trials approved.

Phase three trials are crucial to confirm whether a large-scale vaccine is safe. The final test phase is intended to define the best dosage for the general public, which can only be decided by the delivery of vaccines to a number of thousands of people. The degree to which a vaccine works also decides this stage of the vaccine production.

According to a 2018 report by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, one vaccine in three trials consists of a prescribed dose and complies with proven safety and efficacy requirements. The US Food and Drug Administration has confirmed that a coronavirus vaccine would be approved only if it had a minimum efficacy of 50%.

“We’ve got half a dozen or more vaccines,” Roberts told Fauci. “We will begin to do this, you know, next week if we want to take the risk to hurt other people or give them something not working. Yet it doesn’t work that way.

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My self Eswar, I am Creative Head at RecentlyHeard. I Will cover informative content related to political and local news from the United Nations and Canada.

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Heavy police presence as protesters trickle in for DC rally

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Heavy police presence as protesters trickle in for DC rally

By COLLEEN LONG, MICHAEL BALSAMO and ASHRAF KHALIL

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fence around the Capitol is back up. The District of Columbia’s police department is at the ready. The U.S. Capitol Police have requested assistance from nearby law enforcement agencies including the National Guard.

The Capitol Police have taken no chances for Saturday’s rally at the Capitol in support of rioters imprisoned after the violent Jan. 6 insurrection. They’re working to avoid a repeat of the pre-inauguration attack.

An hour before the event was to begin, as music started blaring from the speakers, the few demonstrators in place were vastly outnumbered by the media and a heavy police presence.

A permit for the protest allows 700 people, but police were concerned about violent protesters and counterprotesters. Police were also preparing for the possibility that some demonstrators may arrive with weapons, though backpacks were allowed into the area and there were no checkpoints.

Police warned demonstrators ahead of time no weapons were allowed, and they were not to swim in the reflecting pools.

On Saturday morning, police were already working to separate the handful of Trump supporters and counterprotesters who had arrived hours before the rally was supposed to kick off. Law enforcement officers geared up at a staging area as large dump trucks and cement barricades lined the streets around the Capitol, outside of the fenced area.

Persistent attempts to rewrite the narrative of the violence and panic of Jan. 6, and the increasing volatility behind the lie that the 2020 election was stolen, have made it impossible to predict what may happen this weekend. After all, law enforcement was only expecting a free speech protest the day Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in an effort to disrupt the certification of Joe Biden’s victory.

Capitol Police Chief Tom Manger said at a news conference Friday it was difficult to say whether threats of violence at the event were credible, but “chatter” online and elsewhere has been similar to intelligence that was missed in January.

The rally, organized by former Trump campaign staffer Matt Braynard, is aimed at supporting people who were detained after the Jan. 6 insurrection — about 63 people held behind bars out of the more than 600 charged in the deadly riot. It’s just the latest attempt to downplay and deny the January violence.

Intelligence collected before the rally has suggested that extremist groups such as the Proud Boys and Oath Keepers will turn up. But some prominent members of the groups have sworn they aren’t going and have told others not to attend. Far-right online chatter has been generally tame, and Republican lawmakers are downplaying the event.

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin approved a request for about 100 members of the D.C. National Guard to be stationed at a city armory near the Capitol, to be called if needed as backup. They’ll be without firearms, but will be equipped with batons and protective vests for self-defense.

Congress is out of session and no lawmakers were expected to be in the building Saturday. Biden was in Delaware for the weekend.

Many commenters on online platforms like Telegram that are popular with the far right disavowed the rally, saying they believed law enforcement was promoting the event to entrap Trump supporters. Some urged their followers not to attend an event they said was secretly organized by the FBI.

At the same time, however, some commenters continued to promote rallies planned in cities and state capitals across the country.

Meanwhile, Donald Trump is still using his platform as the most popular leader in the GOP to express sympathy for those who were arrested and continue spreading election misinformation, ratcheting up his attacks as the week wore on.

The Associated Press reviewed hundreds of court and jail records for the Capitol riot defendants to uncover how many were being detained and found roughly 63 held in federal custody awaiting trial or sentencing hearings. Federal officials are still looking for other suspects who could also wind up behind bars.

At least 30 are jailed in Washington. The rest are locked up in facilities across the country. They have said they are being treated unfairly, and one defendant said he was beaten.

Federal authorities have identified several of those detained as extremist group leaders, members or associates, including nine defendants linked to the Proud Boys and three connected to the antigovernment Oath Keepers. Dozens are charged with conspiring to mount coordinated attacks on the Capitol to block Congress from certifying the 2020 Electoral College vote, among the most serious of the charges.

Some jailed defendants are charged with assaulting police officers, others with making violent threats. A few were freed after their arrests but subsequently detained again, accused of violating release conditions.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has set standards for judges to apply in deciding whether to jail a Capitol riot defendant. A three-judge panel of the appeals court ruled in March that rioters accused of assaulting officers, breaking through windows, doors and barricades, or playing leadership roles in the attack were in “a different category of dangerousness” than those who merely cheered on the violence or entered the building after it was breached.

But it’s unclear how the cases for the majority of those charged will end. On Friday, a California woman who joined the mob avoided a prison term when a federal judge sentenced her to probation, an outcome fitting an early pattern in the Jan. 6 riot prosecutions.

___

Associated Press writers Michael Kunzelman, Mary Clare Jalonick, Jacques Billeaud, David Klepper, Lisa Mascaro, Jake Bleiberg, Amanda Seitz, Nathan Ellgren and Robert Burns contributed to this report.

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Will the Patriots-Jets rivalry get a needed reboot soon?

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Will the Patriots-Jets rivalry get a needed reboot soon?

The last time the Jets beat the Patriots in regulation, Ke$ha topped the charts.

President Obama was midway through his first term. The Social Network rolled in theaters. And former Jets linebacker Bart Scott famously celebrated the win, a 28-21 divisional-round playoff stunner in Jan. 2011, by giving ESPN a soundbite that lives loudly to this day.

“Can’t wait!” he shouted.

Well since then, the Jets have done a lot of waiting, and even more losing, topping the Patriots just twice in 20 ensuing meetings. Heading into Sunday’s showdown at MetLife Stadium, a suddenly critical game for the 0-1 Pats, this rivalry needs a clear and obvious reboot.

The head coaches fueled the Pats-Jets rivalry as it was once known.

Bill Parcells sparked the feud by switching sides in 1997. Bill Belichick flipped back in 2000. Then Eric Mangini was lured south in 2006. Lastly, Rex Ryan burst through the door in 2009, bombast and all, refusing to kiss rings, pulling off upsets and putting his foot in his mouth.

But eventually, Ryan’s act wore out. His failures ushered in a more mild-mannered era of losing led by Todd Bowles and Adam Gase. Belichick bulldozed them both. Gase’s floundering steered the Jets back to a fiery defensive coach in Robert Saleh, their new headman.

This week, Belichick said he knows Saleh “a little bit.” Saleh said it would be an honor to share the same field with Belichick, hardly the type of venom their teams used to trade publicly; let alone what Belichick said about leaving the Jets last November: “Not only one of the most defining, but one of the great moments of my career,” he told WEEI.

So if not the coaches, maybe the rookie quarterbacks can jumpstart the rivalry’s next evolution. The Patriots’ hopes rest with Mac Jones, and the Jets’ with Zach Wilson. Jones and Wilson are diametrically opposed passers bound only by draft class and right-handedness.

In the pocket, Wilson is daring, part magician and backyard baller who embodies the league’s newfound fascination with off-platform throws and playing outside of structure. Meanwhile, Jones is a technician, ruthlessly dissecting and dicing defenses in the same way the game’s greats have for decades. Like their head coaches, Wilson and Jones are unfamiliar to one another, but friendly.

“Mac’s a cool dude. We ran into each other at the combine stuff and the draft night,” Wilson said Thursday. “I was excited for him and his opportunity. Super cool.”

“We talked for a little bit, and he’s a great player,” Jones said of Wilson. “Makes a lot of really cool and different plays. He’s a really good quarterback.”

For now, both sound too cool for conflict. And barring a brawl on Sunday, there’s little hope for bad blood further down the Pats roster.

Former Jets defensive lineman Henry Anderson, now in New England, bears no ill will toward his old team.

“That’s just part of the business. It happens all the time,” Anderson said of being released last offseason. “I still keep in touch with those guys. A couple of them live down in Atlanta, and we see each other in the offseason and stuff like that, so still, even though we’re on different sides of the ball, you still have relationships with dudes around the league.”

Pats wide receiver Kendrick Bourne should have garnered interest from New York in free agency. The Jets needed wideouts, and Bourne knew their coaching staff well, having played for Saleh and Co. over four years in San Francisco. In fact, Bourne credits new Jets offensive coordinator Mike LaFluer for molding him into the player he is today.

But the phone never rang in March, with New York instead opting for former Titans receiver Corey Davis. And somehow, at least publicly, that’s OK by Bourne.

“Nah, not a bummer for me,” he said Friday. “I had to go to the best opportunity, so it was really about what was best for me and my future, and here was just the best opportunity for me to grow and expand my career. That was just how it worked out.”

Like any rivalry, restoking the fires of Pats-Jets must happen organically. New York will need to win more consistently. And healthy hate has to flow sometime.

But if not Sunday, or Oct. 24 when the Patriots will host the Jets, when? On Friday, Belichick, who famously hates the franchise and left it at the altar when he resigned as the “HC of the NYJ,” likened the Pats-Jets rivalry to any other divisional series in football.

“You prod and poke and look for areas to attack and exploit based on almost an intimate knowledge of your opponent,” he said. “And they do the same.”

At this rate, Pats-Jets may not feel like Pats-Jets for another 10 years. And in the words of Bart Scott, the rest of the NFL “can’t wait.”

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

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Minnesota Children’s Museum exhibit is a trip through some favorite stories

Peter Rabbit, a missing puppy named Spot and a cookie-loving mouse are among the stories in a new exhibit opening Sept. 25 at Minnesota Children’s Museum.

“Storyland: A Trip Through Childhood Favorites” is described as an immersive exhibit for children 8 and younger. It was originally created by MCM.

“Storyland” features seven beloved and award-winning picture books: “The Tale of Peter Rabbit” by Beatrix Potter, “The Snowy Day” by Ezra Jack Keats, “Where’s Spot?” by Eric Hill, “If You Give a Mouse a Cookie” by Laura Numeroff, “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom” by Bill Martin Jr. and John Archambault, “Abuela” by Arthur Dorros and “Tuesday” by David Wiesner.

According to MCM, each story is transformed into a three-dimensional play space where children walk into and interact with the story and its characters. Here are some highlights:

Seven favorite children’s books are featured in “Storyland.” (MCM/Bruce Silcox)

Children explore Peter Rabbit‘s world while searching for the rabbit’s lost belongings, harvesting vegetables and playing in Peter’s burrow.

“The Snowy Day” is a wintry world after a fresh snowfall.

“Where’s Spot?” is a board book about the search for Spot the dog. This exhibit features sounds and images through busy wall interactives.

In “Chicka Chicka Boom Boom,” children sort and match letters and send them up the coconut tree, dip a paintbrush into a water-filled well to write letters and beat out rhythms with steel drums while singing along with the story.

The exhibit will run through Jan. 2. Tickets are $14.95, available at mcm.org/tickets. Masks are required for all visitors 5 and older. Check the website for more COVID-19 restrictions.

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

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Police: Albany man arrested with loaded gun, cocaine

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — The Albany Police Department reports arresting Corey Foster, 29, of Albany on Thursday. They say he was carrying cocaine and a loaded handgun on Sherman Street.

At about 10:45 a.m., detectives stopped Foster on Sherman Street between Robin Street and North Lake Avenue. They say it was part of an ongoing investigation.

Police say Foster was holding cocaine in both hands. They also say that he was carrying a bag with a 9mm handgun. He’s charged with:

  • Second- and third-degree criminal possession of a weapon
  • Seventh-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance

Police say they also arrested Foster on the strength of an April bench warrant issued from Albany City Criminal Court for failure to appear on previous arrests.

More from NEWS10

  • Pentagon reverses itself, calls deadly Kabul drone strike an error
  • Albany County coronavirus update, September 18
  • 9/18/2021: One last cloudy, humid day
  • Brian Laundrie missing as search for his fiancé Gabby Petito continues
  • Shenendehowa defense brings the juice in revenge win over Guilderland

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

Associated Press

NORTH PORT, Fla. (AP) — Police in Florida on Saturday searched a vast wildlife reserve near the Gulf Coast for 23-year-old Brian Laundrie, a person of interest in the disappearance of his girlfriend, Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.

Dozens of North Port police officers, FBI agents and members of other law enforcement agencies searched the 24,000-acre (9,712-hectare) Carlton Reserve in the Sarasota, Florida area.

“His family says they believe he entered the area earlier this week,” North Port Police tweeted Saturday.

Laundrie’s family earlier told officers that they haven’t seen him since Tuesday. Police said the conversation Friday evening was the first time they’d spoken with the Laundries in detail about the case, and that the meeting came at the family’s request. An attorney for the family called FBI investigators and said they wanted to talk about Laundrie’s disappearance, police said.

Laundrie and Petito, 22, left in July on a cross-country trek in a converted van to visit national parks in the U.S. West. Police said Laundrie was alone when he drove the van back to his parents’ home in North Port, Florida, on Sept. 1. Petito’s family filed a missing persons report Sept. 11 with police in Suffolk County, New York.

Laundrie has been identified as a person of interest in the case.

“It is important to note that while Brian is a person of interest in Gabby’s disappearance, he is not wanted for a crime,” North Port police said in Friday’s statement. It added that the investigation is now a “multiple missing person” case.

An attorney for Brian Laundrie, Steven Bertolino, did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press on Friday night.

Attorneys for the Petito family released a statement saying that Laundrie was not “missing.”

“All of Gabby’s family want the world to know that Brian is not missing, he is hiding. Gabby is missing,” the statement from the law office of Richard B. Stafford said.

Earlier in the week, Petito’s family pleaded for the Laundrie family to tell them where their son last saw her. Petito and Laundrie were childhood sweethearts who met while growing up on Long Island, New York. His parents later moved to North Port, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Sarasota.

Police video released by the Moab Police Department in Utah showed that an officer pulled the van over on Aug. 12 after it was seen speeding and hitting a curb near the entrance to Arches National Park. The body cam video showed an emotional Petito, who sat inside a police cruiser while officers also questioned Laundrie.

Laundrie says on the video the couple got into a minor scuffle that began when he climbed into the van with dirty feet, and said he didn’t want to pursue a domestic violence charge against Petito, who officers decided was the aggressor.

Ultimately Moab police decided not file any charges and instead separated the couple for the night, with Laundrie checking into a motel and Petito remaining with the converted sleeper van.

The official conversation with the family Friday came shortly after the North Port Chief Todd Garrison had publicly vented frustration over Brian Laundrie’s lack of help on Wednesday, pleading for Laundrie’s lawyer to arrange a conversation. “Two people left on a trip and one person returned!” an earlier tweet by the police chief had said.

Their trek in the Fort Transit van began in July from Long Island. They intended to reach Oregon by Halloween according to their social media accounts, but Petito vanished after her last known contact with family in late August from Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, authorities said.

In other developments, a sheriff in Utah said Friday that detectives have determined there is no connection between Petito’s disappearance on the trip and a still-unsolved slaying of two women who were fatally shot at a campsite near Moab, Utah. The bodies of the two women, Kylen Schulte, 24, and Crystal Turner, 38, were found six days after the traffic stop involving Laundrie and Petito.

Utah’s Grand County Sheriff Steven White said without elaboration in a news release the two cases were unrelated.

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

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How Mac Jones can lead the Patriots to first win of the season against the Jets

While Mac Jones looked good in his debut, 16 points isn’t going to cut it.

In the big picture, Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels can only take a conservative game plan so far, especially in a passing league.

At some point, he really has to loosen the reins on Jones and open up the playbook. Sunday against the Jets figures to be the day for that with Jones dueling fellow 2021 first-round pick Zach Wilson.

The Jets’ soft secondary sets up as an ideal opponent should McDaniels decide to get a little more creative with his play-calling.

Though Jones only scored one touchdown, he still impressed with his ability to handle a variety of blitzes, along with his accuracy, decision-making and toughness in the wake of getting popped while delivering passes.

He went 29 for 39 for 281 yards and a touchdown with no interceptions in the Miami loss.

Still, there’s progress to be made.

“I think we’re moving in the right direction,” Jones said Wednesday. “We just got to focus on what we need to get better at. That’s kind of, for me, just fundamentally, what can I do each day extra, or whatever, just to improve so that when I get to the game, we play fast, and we play better than we did last week.”

Here’s how Jones can earn his first win against the Jets:

1. Exploit corners

Unlike Miami the week before, the Jets don’t boast a couple of Pro Bowl corners out on the boundary.

Brandin Echols and Bryce Hall aren’t exactly household names. Echols is a rookie out of Kentucky, and Hall is a second-year player. During Week 1, Sam Darnold burned them for two touchdowns, including a 57-yard-bomb to Robby Anderson.

While Jones put the ball up 39 times last week, many were check-downs. He should be able to air it out a little more, and test the Jets’ young cornerbacks.

With the Jets employing a Cover-3 zone defense, Jones might also be able to utilize his tight ends more on seam routes, or with deeper routes. Whatever the case, the makeup of the Jets defense allows for Jones to take more chances, especially targeting the corners.

Said McDaniels: “There’s certain things he could do and there’s certain things that he’s not ready to do and hopefully we make the right choices each week based on what the opponent does, how they play and what we need to be able to do at the line of scrimmage as well.”

2. Convert in the red zone

Jones had no problem sustaining drives, converting 11 of 16 third-down chances against the Dolphins, which sported the NFL’s best third-down defense last year.

He authored three drives of 14 plays or more. The issue was converting those red-zone possessions into touchdowns, as the Patriots were just 1-for-4 in the money area.

Part of that was due to untimely penalties, fumbles, and poor execution.

Field goals are no longer going to cut it against most opponents. The Patriots can’t think the Jets will be the exception. Field goals will allow them to hang around in the game. Touchdowns should bury them early.

“It’s something we’ve been working at, and something we’ll continue to work at,” said wide receivers coach Troy Brown, asked this week about the red-zone woes. “We have to get better at that part of the game. We’ve all gotta fix things that we didn’t do great in the game and obviously, continue to get better.

“I think it’s just an issue across the entire unit,” he went on. “It’s just about scoring points, and putting points on the board. And, obviously, when you’re in the red area, you’d prefer to have touchdowns and not field goals. We’re 1-for-4. It’s below our expectations.”

3. Eliminate turnovers

The Patriots fumbled too many times, and had too many costly penalties during the loss to the Dolphins last week. So it behooves them to clean it up against the Jets, particularly on offense.

Rhamondre Stevenson and Damien Harris fumbled. Left tackle Isaiah Wynn was called for an offensive holding penalty with the Pats facing a 2nd-and-10 from the Miami 14. That triggered settling for a field goal during that red-zone try. Shaq Mason’s illegal blindside block in the third quarter negated a 17-yard completion to Kendrick Bourne.

“One thing we used to take pride in was not giving the game away. And we gave the game away. We took away our chance to win the game, and we can’t do that,” said running backs coach Ivan Fears. “There’s no way you feel good about that. We gotta play again. That’s the only good thing we got going here, we get to play again, and again and again, and hopefully we get to put this one behind us with some doggone solid play and dependable play.”

Running back James White said, with the Patriots putting the ball on the ground four times, with two charged fumbles, teams will be looking to further test them by punching the ball out. He’s right.

That’s why the team spent considerable time with the backs, receivers and tight ends on ball security in preparation of the Jets.

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Readers and Writers: Wolves, war and words in a notebook — a look at three new novels

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Readers and Writers: Wolves, war and words in a notebook — a look at three new novels

Today’s novels range from wolf poaching to a notebook that draws people together to a war between Mother Nature and the Gods.

“Wolfman” by Stanley Trollip (White Sun Books, $13.95)

She wondered whether she was interpreting the gift properly. Whether it was from LUPUS or someone different calling himself Wolfman, it seemed she was being encouraged to shoot poachers. No matter how she twisted her mind, she couldn’t come up with any other possibility. He wanted her to take the hunt-the-hunter idea to the next level. — From “Wolfman”

Crystal Nguyen is dressed in all-white ski clothing as she flattens herself against the snow and watches the wolf poachers. When they leave their snowmobiles, she quickly throws the keys far into the snow and skies away.

Meet the protagonist of Stanley Trollip’s first solo novel and second in the series featuring Vietnamese refugee Crystal Nguyen, a woman who takes too many chances when her heart leads her somewhere.

Trollip and his friend Michael Sears, writing as Michael Stanley, wrote four Botswana-set police procedurals featuring Detective Kubu. Then they wrote a thriller about rhino poaching, “Shoot the Bastards,” that introduced Nguyen. Her background: her father kicked her out of their house after seeing her holding hands with a young man, because he wanted her to stay home and learn to be a wife and mother. Her hobby, for which she’s training in “Wolfman,” is participating in biathlons, a Nordic skiing event in which competitors combine cross-country skiing and rifle shooting.

1631980672 4 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebook
Stanley Trollip (Courtesy photo)

In “Wolfman,” a prequel to “Shoot the Bastards,” Crystal is a reporter at a Duluth television station. She loves wolves and ecology in general, and she’s furious when two poachers are found not guilty and leave the courthouse smiling.

When Crystal gets untraceable messages from someone called LUPUS, she realizes she can harass the poachers because LUPUS gives her the places where they will be and the times. Although she knows she’s endangering her career, she harasses the poachers by disabling their snowmobiles and, later, setting fire to the cabin where they keep their snowmobiles and wolf pelts.

Reporting on these incidents, Crystal keeps her involvement a secret, speculating on-air that the perpetrators might be part of the hunt-the-hunter movement, or someone working alone whom she calls Wolfman.

Crystal’s Wolfman reporting goes viral and the station’s ratings skyrocket. But it also bitterly divides residents of Northern Minnesota, where hunting is a religion. She is physically threatened in a bar and she realizes she has put herself in danger. Then two poachers are shot by someone calling himself Wolfman. Now Crystal has to backtrack and urge this mysterious copycat to stop killing in the name of animals.

With help from DNA conservation officer Chuck Gustafson, to whom she’s sort-of attracted, Crystal tries to stay ahead of the men who blame her reporting for creating anti-hunter sentiment in the community.

Can she stay safe, save wolves and learn the identity of Wolfman? Before any of this happens, she becomes Wolfman’s kidnapping target.

Trollip keeps the tension high, with Crystal in almost constant danger. The chapters about her biathlon training nicely fit into the plot when she skis through the woods after the poachers.

Trollip will virtually launch “Wolfman” at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 21, presented by Once Upon a Crime. To register: crowdcast.io/e/stanley-trollip-wolfman/register.

“A Matter of Course” by Jody Wenner (Independently published, $11.99))

1631980672 599 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebookIt was an ordinary day on the Orange Line train in the Twin Cities.

Marigold (Mari) Winter, who thinks shoes tell you everything about a person, is taking her dying mother, Zi, to the hospital. Lark Brooks is a nervous man going to an interview for a job he thinks will solve his problems. Octogenarian Norma, former head librarian at the St. Paul Public Library, writes in a little notebook vignettes of life she observes. For some reason, she gives her notebook to Lark. Jason is a 17-year-old skateboarder skipping school. Jeannine is with her useless husband, Dean, who she’s thinking of divorcing.

When the man in black motorcycle boots boards the train, talking to himself, everyone knows he’s “off.” And when he accidentally trips over Jason’s legs and falls into Norma’s tote bag, he pulls out his gun and kills Norma and Zi. (This is not a spoiler; it’s the catalyst for the rest of the story.)

The killer is Bobby Davis, a house painter who’s tired of taking orders from homeowners and his boss. His has recently found a big wad of cash on a job site, but the money has made him unhappy and paranoid.

Told in the voices of all the central characters, plus a dogged detective, the story continues as everyone who was in that Orange Line car comes together and their lives are changed. Dean, Jeannine’s depressed husband, somehow comes out of the shooting as a hero, much to his wife’s aggravation because she knows he didn’t do anything heroi.. And Lark and Mari seem to be headed for romance.

What’s wonderful about this book is its tender heart. These are such likable people, even sullen teen Jason, that the reader longs for them to be happy. And it’s not giving anything away to say that Norma’s little notebook, published by Lark and Mari, is the instrument of a perfect ending.

“A Matter of Course,” the author’s 11th book, is as good as any novel from mainstream publishers. It’s a perfect read for those who need an affirmation of humanity’s goodness in these hard days.

“All the Blues Come Through” by Metra Farrari (Wise Ink, $19.99).

1631980672 726 Readers and Writers Wolves war and words in a notebookRyan is a botanist who accidentally created a species of flower that sucks up pollution, leaving the air clear. But she can’t grow them fast enough to fill orders. Then she gets an invitation from a mysterious group of scientists who live on an island off the coast of Athens.

When Ryan arrives, she discovers these are oddly-dressed people who know little about science. That’s because they aren’t scientists. They are descendants of the Gods.

That’s the premise of Metra Farrari’s debut, “All the Blues Come Through,” Book One in her Heir to a Myth series.

Once Ryan gets over her shock at seeing an entire city carved out of a mountain, she’s even more shocked to learn her hosts are demigods battling Mother Earth, who is holding the Gods hostage on a mountain and that she, Ryan, is a descendant of the goddess Artemis. The other Descendants want her to rescue the Olympians.

This mix of mythology and contemporary life (the Descendants know some modern phrases) is a lot of fun. There are centaurs, a hundred-eyed monster awakened by Ryan’s powers, and a very hunky dem-god who certainly captures Ryan’s interest. The battle is joined on top of the mountain, where Ryan confronts Mother Nature and Artemis.

Farrari is a first generation Persian American who grew up n Eagan. She was on the production team for the last three seasons of “The Oprah Winfrey Show.”

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FDA advisory panel rejects widespread Pfizer booster shots

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FDA advisory panel rejects widespread Pfizer booster shots

WASHINGTON (AP) — An influential federal advisory panel has soundly rejected a plan to offer Pfizer booster shots against COVID-19 to most Americans.

The vote Friday, 16-2, was a blow to the Biden administration’s effort to shore up people’s protection against the virus amid the highly contagious delta variant.

Over several hours of discussion, members of the Food and Drug Administration panel of outside experts voiced frustration that Pfizer had provided little data on the safety of extra doses.

And they complained that data provided by Israeli researchers about their booster campaign might not be suitable for predicting the U.S. experience.

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CU Buffs vs. Minnesota live blog: Real-time updates from the college football game at Folsom Field

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CU Buffs vs. Minnesota football: 4 things to know, key matchups and predictions


Joe Nguyen

| Digital Sports Strategist

Digital sports strategist for The Denver Post. Previously he was the online prep sports editor. Prior to that, he covered Adams County and Aurora in the YourHub section. He also writes about beer, professional wrestling and video games.

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How the Patriots defense can shut down the Jets and rookie QB Zach Wilson

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How the Patriots defense can shut down the Jets and rookie QB Zach Wilson

Chum in the water.

That’s how Jets quarterback Zach Wilson was jokingly described to a few Patriots defenders this week during their afternoon press conferences at Gillette Stadium. Like every joke, there was a kernel of truth to how the kid was portrayed.

Wilson will be making his second career start against a multiple-veteran defense known for its ability to confuse quarterbacks. Just ask his predecessor, ghost-seeing Sam Darnold. Though naturally, when asked to pounce on Wilson’s inexperience, none of the Pats took the bait.

Instead, safety Adrian Phillips, cornerback Joejuan Williams and others described him as talented and aggressive. His physical talent is rare, just as you’d expect from a former second overall pick. Like Wilson, the Jets are a work in progress, now under first-year head coach Robert Saleh and new offensive coordinator Mike LaFleur, a branch off the Mike Shanahan coaching tree.

Despite their flaws, Gang Green can threaten a fortified Pats defense. Wilson’s unpredictability as a rookie cuts both ways, and his receiving corps is formidable enough. Not to mention, a LaFleur-led 49ers offense rang up 467 yards and 33 points on the Pats less than a year ago.

Here’s how the Patriots defense can ground Wilson and the Jets this weekend:

1. Shadow Corey Davis with J.C. Jackson

Jets wideouts Jamison Crowder and Keelan Cole are both expected to play Sunday after missing the team’s season opener, a solid boost for their offense.

There’s no doubt New York is better off with those two players. But it should be said with the same certainty that neither Crowder or Cole can beat the Patriots. The only Jets receiver capable of that is Corey Davis.

“Tough. He’s an outstanding player,” Bill Belichick said of Davis this week. “Catches the ball and makes a lot of contested catches. Tough guy to tackle, good blocker. He really competes hard, does everything well. He’s a key guy for them.”

Davis caught five passes for 97 yards and two touchdowns in his Jets debut last week at Carolina. He was one of the more coveted wideouts in free agency, after starting his career with a four-year stint in Tennessee. The former fifth overall pick was slow to blossom with the Titans, but now ranks among the NFL’s better receivers.

The simplest solution is to shadow Davis with Jackson, just as Stephon Gilmore would have if available. If Jackson can shut Davis down, the Pats won’t have to bother with double-teams on third down or in the red zone and can allocate extra resources to keep Wilson in the pocket or another defender deep. Without his top receiver or the ability to scramble, the kid will be boxed in.

2. Deny Zach Wilson the deep ball

Between the rookie quarterback and suspect offensive line — which lost stud left tackle Mehki Becton Sunday — this version of the Jets offense is not built to sustain long drives.

Both of New York’s touchdown drives against the Panthers were sustained by two explosive passing plays. Every other series resulted in a punt or a turnover. Wilson wants to get yards in chunks, not patiently march downfield.

“He’s a guy that’s going through each progression, and he wants to throw the ball downfield,” Phillips said this week. “He wants to make that play.”

To generate chunk plays, the Patriots can expect the Jets to dial up deep play-action shots on early downs; plays designed to target the soft zone coverage NFL defenses most often employ on first and second downs. According to Pro Football Focus, the Pats played more single-high coverage last week than any other defense in the league. By calling more two-high coverage and prioritizing pass defense over stopping the run on 1st-and-10, the Patriots should force Wilson to be patient and inevitably reap the benefits of facing a young, overaggressive QB.

3. Tackle well

Aside from allowing Davis to run free in the secondary and Wilson to drop bombs, the Pats’ surest way to another loss Sunday is poor tackling.

New York will scheme its running backs and wide receivers into open space on the edge, just as the Dolphins game-planned last week. The Patriots only missed six tackles versus Miami, a palatable number, but most led to big gains. Here were the top offenders in Week 1: Jackson 2, Ja’Whaun Bentley, Kyle Dugger, Jalen Mills and Davon Godchaux.

Last season, the Pats missed 11 tackles against the 49ers, who successfully exploited their slow linebacking corps on virtually every drive. The Patriots have since received reinforcements, with the return of Dont’a Hightower and arrival of Matt Judon, but they aren’t any faster. The Jets know this.

But if the Pats can anticipate these plays, and wrap up 1-on-1 or gang tackle, it won’t matter. Force the Jets to earn their yards, instead of giving them away, and they’ll stumble into trouble soon enough.

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