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Soulful Lyrics, Moving Beats, And Undying Passion- TR3AL, The Rising Music Star

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SOULFUL LYRICS, MOVING BEATS, AND UNDYING PASSION- TR3AL, THE RISING MUSIC STAR

Writing, painting, drawing, sculpting, conversing, singing, dancing- there are billions of forms of expression throughout the world. And every language, every form of art has its own importance and its own intensity. But there is no other language and form of expression that a person is more eloquent in that music.

One of the best things that come along with music is that it brings out the “real” self of an individual, and for everyone, it hits differently. Some people get inspiration from music, some use it as an escape from everything else, some people make music a form of expression to their partners, while for some people, it is the sole purpose of living, and they don’t want to keep it to themselves, instead share it with everyone around the world.

Among those who have gained immense love from people because of their determination, passion and love for music, the name of Terrel Williams shines the brightest. Even though the name of Terrel, better known by his stage name, TR3AL, is known throughout the world, the story of how he stepped into music is known by very few people.

Born Terrel Williams, TR3AL opened his eyes on April 28, 1983, in Santa Clara, California. The young boy, from a very young age, developed a growing fondness for music. TR3AL listened to various artists including Steve Aoki, and Don Diablo, whenever he felt mellow, or just needed a little inspiration to carry through. Growing up in California instilled the thought of doing “something different” in TR3AL’s heart.

But the direction TR3AL took for his own musical journey was a whole lot different than the artists he had spent his childhood listening to. And that is up until he saw Tiesto perform on stage that TR3AL was hit by a realization  to create his own music.

“You might find it strange that a Californian is so passionate about EDM, a rare thing to see, no? Well, TIESTO happened to me. The moment I saw him perform, I could feel my soul leave my body to dance on his amazing tracks and mixes.”

That one performance was all he needed to recognize his burning love for making EDM music, something that was poles apart from what the audience in California expected from a music artist. But his love for making himself known in the EDM genre was too powerful, and he was motivated and encouraged to take his next step and be a part of the music industry.

TR3AL started his music journey by listening to more EDM tracks, and with every song, his love grew stronger, and he became headstrong. Even though TR3AL credits Tiesto for helping him find his true calling, he never stopped listening to Steve Aoki, and Don Diablo. He says, “By listening to them you can tell they have their own sound, so for me finding my sound was very important. I give a lot of credit to those three.”

In 2017, started DJing at local clubs. He spent elaborate hours giving people what they loved and making the dance floor rock.

At the same time, TR3AL decided to work on his craft as well, because he was aware that he couldn’t make his mark until he gave the world something they would love. For almost a year, TR3AL worked hard and created something that the people would like as well. In March of 2018, he had finished the production of his track.

He decided to launch his own record label, XPERIENCE R3AL R3CORDS, in 2018. Under the label, he released his first song, Oh Yeah. The song was no less than any other song that he had released, only better, and its funky beats gave even more recognition to TR3AL.

On March 27, 2019, he released his first track, Forever. The song gained attention; everyone across the globe fell in love with the track. The song’s melodies, eccentric tunes and exotic notes made the song exceptionally great, and that’s how TR3AL began earning a stream of fans.

TR3AL has also planned to release his first EP, My Story. The first song for his EP was released on July 3, 2020, Quarantune. The song received more love than any other track, and TR3AL was more motivated to work on his next tracks.

Besides working on more singles, all of which will be released this year, TR3AL also has a Virtual Laser Show scheduled for November 14th. His talent is exemplary, his love for music is exceptional, and his songs are proof that he deserves all the success!

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‘Nine Days’ Is About You

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‘Nine Days’ Is About You

Nine Days takes place in the bardo before a soul is given life. Neo-souls are tested in various arbitrary trials during which they must prove to an arbiter that they are worthy of living on Earth. It’s easy to say Nine Days is about what it means to be alive, the nature of empathy, and the reasons that people have to live, but more specifically, Nine Days is about film itself. Nine Days is about watching movies. 

In the film, over a period of nine days, an arbiter named Will (Winston Duke) interviews people for the opportunity of life. The questions he asks are about empathy and feeling, decision-making, situational understanding, learning, and adaptation. It’s a strange thought experiment where these half-formed potential creatures take on the challenge of understanding life, while having never actually been alive. 

Will has been doing this for a while. The reason he’s interviewing all these people now is because one of the souls he previously selected for life has died. Amanda, a violin prodigy, took her own life on the morning of her debut concerto. 

As Will questions the neophyte souls over nine days, he begins to obsess over Amanda’s life, reviewing the tapes he’s recorded during her time on Earth. He attempts to discover hints or clues that would indicate when she began to feel suicidal. The only way in which Will (and the other arbiters) can see their wards is through a wall of televisions; each screen showing a different soul they’ve chosen. The arbiters can also choose to manually record portions of these soul’s lives on VHS, creating a catalog of lived experience. 

Over the course of the movie Will is preoccupied by these films. Will has an empty room in his house dedicated to projecting people’s lives on the wall, and he often immerses himself in the filmed experience. The wall of televisions is an ever-present set piece, taking up most of the living room, a focal point for both Will and the neo-souls. Will watches and records his chosen lives from his little house in an expansive never-where, observing all the people he’s chosen go forth as they attempt to survive in the real world.

The arbiters are angels of the exterior. They only see what happens to their souls when it happens on screen. They only see what’s in front of them, and even then Will and the other arbiters can’t watch everything. While these screens are like a first-person POV CCTV, recordings are intentional, and must be an active choice. Arbiters can only observe these people, obsessively cataloging the minutiae of lives through recordings. But, like in the movies, these arbiters don’t know what’s going on in their souls’ heads, what they’re thinking, or what they want. Just like a film audience, the arbiters have to assume, infer, and interpret. 

As Will prepares his selections for life, he learns from his experiences with these other lives, comparing what he saw in the bardo to what he sees on screen. Will wants his selection process to give him insight into the kind of person he’s sending out into the world, trying to understand just what kind of movie he’ll watch once the soul is born, hoping to find a hint at the motivations that will end up hidden behind a television screen.

Many of the tasks that the neo-souls are asked to complete take place while watching the wall of televisions. During one of the souls’ first tasks, Will leads them to the televisions and hands them a notebook; “Write down what makes you happy,” he says. They sit and watch. Out of this they pull moments of joy, taken piecemeal from others’ lives. Like an editor cutting to the quick of a scene, each of these souls finds the parts of these movies that they love in flashes of inspiration and loveliness. Televisions become the only way that these souls learn about the ‘real’ world. 

One of the souls, Emma (Zazie Beetz), fills up the entire notebook, citing things like laughter, sunshine, feet, grass, and buildings arranged in a row. Another candidate, Mike (David Rhysdahl) doesn’t write anything. Instead, he draws a picture of a beach scene he saw on one of the televisions. The script reads early on, “this woman knows things, but she’s never experienced them.” They are asked to learn how to live through these films. They learn how to vicariously imitate experiences, even giving themselves a glimpse of what they could have outside the bardo. Film becomes a window into possibility, a form of hope, and a method of inspiration.  

The souls are given other assignments. In one interrogation, he projects images on a wall; a spider on an arm, a wallet on the ground, a kid being bullied, and he asks these souls… what would you do? Through these assignment the souls experience life through the movies. Over and over, film is central to the emotional development of these characters and Will uses film to help determine who they are and how they might act on earth. Even when the souls are answering Will’s questions in his office, without any televisions around, Nine Days will often intercut to the grainy VHS footage of what they’re describing. There are flashes of people at barbecues, riding a bike, putting brownies in a box in a production line. Again and again, the importance of film is all-encompassing. Watching film is literally the difference between life and… whatever else is out there. 

Will is deeply attached to the VHS tapes he makes of his lives and views them as more than just tools for instruction. Getting VHS tapes to use in recordings is a process—Will and his constant companion in the bardo, Kyo (Benedict Wong), often go on foraging expeditions to a massive junkyard, collecting tapes for Will to use. The moments that Will captures on these tapes provide triggers for his emotional changes within Nine Days, giving us insight into what Will actually feels. We rarely get any indications of Will’s own emotions because of his position as a professional performing a job and for the audience, as well as the neo-souls, we are often left guessing about what he’s thinking. His emotions are clearest when he’s watching film, when he’s re-viewing these tapes. 

His obsession over Amanda’s death is shown through a constant rewatching of her life. Will replays the recordings he’s made, trying to parse through what he sees now that she’s dead and what he thought he knew. His entire purpose hinges on finding answers in film. 

For all the characters, finding meaning through film is an essential action. In every moment there is something to find. Something under the surface. There are things unsaid, unanswered, unasked. Finding what isn’t captured on film is part of deciphering what has been filmed.

A moment where Will gets real answers about Amanda’s death is when another Kyo invites another arbiter into his home. This arbiter sent one of Amanda’s cousins down to live, and this cousin received a suicide note from Amanda before she died. As Will watches this recording, he sees what he missed earlier. He sees what he couldn’t find in his own films. He gets angry, for the first time really angry, not just faking it to get a reaction from the neophyte souls. Seeing this suicide note laid out on the table, he sees his own failure. He didn’t see this. He didn’t figure it out. This particular moment captured in film is a culmination of all his fears, and even though the other arbiter tries to comfort him, her small offering, “sometimes, it’s hard to keep track of all of them,” does nothing for Will. 

He failed to see this clue. His films don’t mean anything if he didn’t understand what they were showing him. 

Later that night, Will takes the VHS tapes of Amanda’s life, all of them, and burns them. This is pure catharsis, a symbolic and actual letting go. The grief, the confusion, the hurt, all of it goes up in flames. Amanda’s life is not contained in the VHS tapes, but they are a key to understanding Will’s perspective on the world—to him, those VHS takes are Amanda. Film becomes something mythic, legendary, preservative. These films are everything he has of her, and he’s letting them go. 

Even Kyo, who is not an arbiter, puts heavy emotional weight on film. In the beginning of Nine Days he shows up at Will’s house and asks if anything new has happened. He’s there to watch Amanda’s concerto. As he sits down and watches the televisions he sees another soul that Will has sent to earth—Louiza—trying on her wedding dress. He asks when the date is, and when Will responds, Kyo makes a note in his notebook, clearly planning to show up for the event. Will and Kyo plan their lives around these films. They mark ‘release dates’ and make sure to show up dressed correctly— Will even changes into a suit before Amanda’s concerto. Film is central to their existence, creating moments of anticipation and community in the bardo. 

Nine Days doesn’t just focus on the act of watching film, but also on the act of recreating moments. Even if the characters can’t experience the world itself, the fantasy of experience is repeated. Under Will’s house is a basement that has been turned into a sort of soundstage. When he goes to souls and tells them that they have not been selected for life, he asks them to write down a moment that made them feel the most alive while watching the televisions and he says that he will work to recreate that moment for them. A goodbye. A simulacrum of a simulacrum. 

When Mike — the man who drew the beach scene—asks to go to that beach, Will creates a beach in his basement. He builds a sandbox, finds a way to make a pool that leads up to the sands, and uses a projector and a recording to simulate the feeling of being at a beach. He leads Mike up to the fake-beach, and tells him to take his time. As Mike stands there, Will uses a paddle to simulate waves, and turns a spotlight on Mike, as if he were standing in the sun. Mike disappears while in the fantasy of an experience. Immersed in the ‘what could be’ of life, Mike returns to the bardo, having had at least a taste of what he imagined while watching television. 

The second time we see Will do this it’s for a woman who wants to go on a bike ride. This time Kyo helps him out, and with the use of multiple projectors, a fan, a stationary bike mounted on an axis, and even set pieces, Will recreates an actual bike ride. It’s hard to explain the sheer emotion of this scene. The entire movie has been rendered in dull colors but this scene is full of vibrancy and wonder. It’s pinks and blues, it’s overwhelmingly lovely, and it’s entirely fake. Much like movies are made on soundstages, where clever effects can fool the audience into thinking that these characters really are in Paris or on Mars, this woman’s bike ride is completely fabricated. 

But that doesn’t matter. To this woman, to Mike, to Will, and Kyo, this is the experience. It doesn’t matter if it’s real or fake or projected, it’s about how it makes these characters feel. This scene is almost identical to Oda’s short, A Sensorial Ride, which delivers the technical details of the scene but can’t compare to the rising emotion and craft of Nine Days. The experience is important, but it’s the emotions, reactions, and growth that gives the recreated moment meaning. 

Towards the end of the film there’s a dinner with Will, Kyo, Emma, and the another candidate, a man named Kane (Bill Skarsgård). Each of the characters takes time to recount a funny story, but… none of these characters have ever been alive. They’re telling stories from the television, recreating the experience through their own lenses. Will doesn’t tell a story, and instead lets these souls, who have never experienced any of this, recount the stories as they know them, each of them adding in their own commentary, comedic timing, and even impressions. Much like a film will always editorialize what is being shown, all these characters are doing the same, reminding the audience that stories will always be filtered, that film will only ever be part of the story, that it’s how we react to it and what we remember that’s important. 

Performance itself becomes a defining trait of Nine Days. Will is especially concerned with performance, both the evaluation of actions and the moments of acting. His first emotional trigger is, in fact, Amanda’s upcoming performance, which she never attends. He is constantly thinking about how people will perform on earth, as well as what their actions reveal while in the bardo. 

All the recreations Will does are performative. There is a layer in between what is real and what is experienced. But it’s the performance that sells the story. Like movies, it’s about how committed the actor is to the part. 

Will is also a performer. During one of the first evaluations, he tells the souls a story about a man in war camp threatening to kill their child. He stands and yells at the souls, becoming that evil man. It’s a shocking turn, and Winston Duke is exemplary, turning from mild-mannered into ferocious and dangerous in an instant. This is the first time we see Will performing, acting intensely to immerse the souls in simulated situations in order to evaluate their reactions.

Emma is constantly asking questions about Will’s life on earth, and he reveals that he was in a play when he was fifteen and it changed his life. We never know what Will became, but it’s clear that this performance, this moment of acting, was the singular most impactful moment of his life. 

It’s this performance that Emma asks to be recreated when she’s eventually told that she hasn’t been chosen for life. Will refuses, and asks if she’ll choose something else. She decides to leave instead, heading out into the desert to disappear. 

Emma doesn’t want recreations. Emma doesn’t want to pretend to ride a bike. She doesn’t want to stand by a sandpit and imagine it’s a sunrise. She wants the real thing. She wants emotion without filters. It’s a performance, but unlike the other requests, it’s not performative. Out of all the souls, she found life in the world she was living in, not the ‘real’ world on the screens.

We near the end of the film, the final scenes, the last moments of performance on screen. Will runs through the desert, trying to find Emma before she disappears. He finds her, turns his back, prepares, and this is the last performance, the final moments of Nine Days

He turns and he performs. Will, the actor, embodies the monologue, power and soul. He recites from Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself, and this is the last act of Nine Days, giving us a performance that will move us to tears, that will show off all of Winston Duke’s prodigious skill, that makes us feel, deeply. This is a performance that brings us closer to living. It’s almost as if we were there.

By allowing a performance to be the final moment, Nine Days truly embodies the importance of film, which is what Nine Days has been hinting at the entire time. Nine Days is a meticulous, existential crisis of a movie, a film about film, the wonder of re-creation, the absolute absurdity of absorbing a story in an hour or two when there are whole, entire, beautiful, wonderful lives behind every single story. 

And perhaps that’s what Nine Days is saying; our lives are like movies. Edited down to the core of who we are, spare lines discarded or forgotten, important moments skipped over until it’s too late, until someone points out a different perspective. When we think back on the jumbled mess of our lives, it’s flashing scenes and senses and re-constructed understandings of a moment. Nine Days, at its core, is about how we see ourselves in movies, how we understand living through empathy, and how we relate to the inexplicable act of being alive by watching others live on screen. Nine Days is about film and it’s about you. 

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Kasim Reed says crime and violence are ‘tearing Atlanta apart’

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Kasim Reed said the high level of crime and violence in Atlanta is a “national embarrassment”, and he plans to crack down on crime if he is reelected mayor.

Reed is seeking reelection as mayor of Atlanta on Nov. 2. His first two terms as mayor began in 2010.

The mayoral candidate spoke by phone with Audacity Atlanta’s Maria Boynton during the Grand Opening of his campaign headquarters at 568 14th Street in northwest Atlanta.

Reed says the level of crime and violence is “tearing Atlanta apart”. He added, “right now 20 percent of the citizens of Atlanta want to leave the city.”

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Courtesy, Precious Anderson, Esq.

Reed has raised over $2 million for his campaign so far. His campaign continues hosting high-profile events, including a private reception and fundraiser hosted by attorney Precious Anderson (pictured) at her Atlanta home on Wednesday.

Reed told the invited guests that if he is reelected, he plans to hire 750 new police officers.

He also told the intimate gathering that he is going to make sure women feel safer and that people in general feel safer in Atlanta.

Also, he will reopen City Hall where workers will be accessible to the residents of Atlanta.

He also discussed his plan to make more women millionaires through his Women Entrepreneurship Initiative that he started when he was mayor.

Some Atlantans say they hope Reed will make the Katherine Janness case a top priority when he’s reelected mayor.

Katherine Janness and her dog, Bowie, were brutally stabbed in Piedmont Park on June 28. Their bodies were discovered by Janness’ girlfriend, Emma Clark, about 50 yards inside the 10th Street gate just after 1 a.m.

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“There was a slice on her face, like in an X pattern on her face,” said Clark, pictured right. “And there was a deep cut to her throat; it was cut all the way to the bone.”

Janness, 40, had been stabbed multiple times and a word was carved into her body.

“It’s a very frightening crime,” Fulton County District Attorney Fani T. Willis told The Washington Post.

Evidence suggests the killer spent time with the body after the murder.

“And that is strange,” Willis said. “Most people commit a murder and want to get the hell away because they don’t want to be caught.”

Janness’ killing stood out among the city’s 110 homicides this year. She was Atlanta’s first white homicide victim of 2021.

Willis, who started the job in January, faced a daunting backlog of 12,000 arrests from last year that have not resulted in formal charges.

Most of the city’s homicides are committed by repeat offenders who were released from jail early due to overcrowding and staffing issues.

The city has convened 2 grand juries to sift through the evidence and return indictments. However, Willis said it could take “years” to clear the backlog of criminal cases.

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Venice 2021 ‘Parallel Mothers’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar Opens the 78th Venice Film Festival with Mothers, Mix-Ups, and Melodrama

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Venice 2021 ‘Parallel Mothers’ Review: Pedro Almodóvar Opens the 78th Venice Film Festival with Mothers, Mix-Ups, and Melodrama

Pedro Almodóvar’s cinematic universe is undoubtedly ruled by women. From the colorful hysterics of his breakthrough feature Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown to the equally theatrical — though more contemplative — intergenerational melodramas All About My Mother and Volver, women are depicted as the custodians of the past, the heroines of the present, and the bearers of the future. But if women dominate the screen in Parallel Mothers, so, too, does the absence of men.

Opening the 78th Venice International Film Festival, Parallel Mothers (Spanish title: Madres Paralelas) is the story of Janis (Penélope Cruz) and Ana (Milena Smit), two expectant mothers who meet in a maternity ward shortly before going into labor. Janis is nearly 40 and works as a professional fashion photographer. Her pregnancy is the result of an affair with married forensic archaeologist Arturo (Israel Elejalde), and although it’s unexpected, she welcomes the chance to be a mother. Ana is seemingly her opposite: a teenager terrified in the face of an unwanted pregnancy and intent on burying the past that led to her current situation. When the identities of their newborn babies are called into question, the sort of campy mix-ups, misunderstandings, and plot twists one would expect from an Almodóvar film ensue. But underneath lies a much more serious story: a reflection on personal and national history that follows in line with Almodóvar’s new era of stylistic and narrative maturity introduced by 2019’s autobiographical Pain and Glory.

Janis’s relationship with Arturo begins not with an affair, but with a request for help: she wants to exhume the bodies of her great-grandfather and 10 other desaparecidos from her town who were shot and buried in an unmarked grave by Falangists during the Franco regime. Her desire is simple: to give her great-grandfather a proper burial and a headstone. The obstacles are more bureaucratic than anything else, and once Arturo agrees, this secondary storyline fades into the background as the two mothers and their ever-shifting relationship take center stage. But the weight of the past gives thematic meaning to the present and the future, implying that historical violence becomes part of our DNA whether we like it or not, and that it must be confronted in order to move forward and create new life.

Having come of age during the Francoist regime, Almodóvar’s work has always been in some way a reaction to the oppressive political environment of his youth. His early films, made during his time as part of La Movida Madrileña (Madrid’s post-Franco countercultural movement), were a rebellious expression of the need for a new, post-Franco identity. Sexuality, pop art, postmodernism, and camp were flung together to tell soap opera-esque stories of desire and betrayal, unfolding in a series of dizzying plot twists.

The styles and themes of his youthful era echo clearly in Parallel Mothers, but at age 71, Almodóvar’s style has become more muted, his themes more reflective. The Douglas Sirk-inspired set design remains present throughout — especially in Janis’s stylish Madrid apartment — but the color-blocked primary hues of the past have been replaced with more naturalistic greens and oranges. At times, the story stops to observe a signature moment of playful postmodern framing: a Blow Up-style fashion shoot, a monologue by Ana’s thespian mother. Moments like these don’t entirely mesh with the mood of the film, just as the campier plot twists never feel wholly necessary amidst the more serious — and ultimately, more interesting —  storylines of birth, death, and remembrance. But they have a nostalgic familiarity to them, the director nodding to the loyal viewers who have followed him into this new chapter.

Of course, the most iconic element that Almodóvar carries over to Parallel Mothers is none other than his trusted lead Cruz, who makes the transition into independent and imperfect single mother Janis with compelling intensity. She finds her foil in the 24-year-old Smit, whose androgynous looks and headstrong desire for autonomy encapsulate the spirit of Gen Z.

The dynamic that develops between their two characters echoes the dynamic Almodóvar seeks to create between himself and his country’s youth: the director imbues Cruz’s character with his own urgent determination to unearth the violence of the past, to make the absence of the thousands of desaparecidos felt. He neither ignores the new generation nor attempts to represent it. Rather, he talks to it through Janis, passing down stories and imparting social responsibility like a cinematic elder. It is a graceful evolution for one of Spain’s most iconic auteurs, one that enables the exploration of new territory without compromising a brand built over the course of 22 feature films.

Janis and Ana, mothers and fathers, new life and remembered death; Parallel Mothers is full of parallel and intersecting lines. The scenes where they cross — a kiss set to the coarse crooning of Janis Joplin or the confused gaze of a baby before a grave — create the kind of wordless power that only masterful filmmakers can achieve. Not every line is followed to its end, and much is left unsaid. But enough is understood to create a warm portrait of motherhood, whose glow nonetheless does not quite cancel out the shadow of missing fatherhood.

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Nicki Minaj fans protest outside CDC in Atlanta

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Nicki Minaj fans protest outside CDC in Atlanta

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A small but vocal group of Nicki Minaj supporters protested outside the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta on Wednesday.

According to Yahoo! News, the group was comprised of members of the anti-vaccine Black Hammer organization.

The protesters shouted “Nicki told the truth!” and “Fauci lied to me!” – referring to Dr. Anthony Fauci, Covid-19 adviser to Pres. Joe Biden.

The demonstrators also chanted “down with the CDC, Fauci lies to me.”

A man in a black mask holding a megaphone said, “Nicki Minaj said I’m not going to take your vaccine.”

The activists approached cars leaving the CDC headquarters on the city’s northeast side.

Nicki sparked controversy earlier this week when she tweeted her reason for skipping this year’s Met Gala.

The “Anaconda” rapper told her 22.6 million followers she was unvaccinated and preferred to do her own research before getting the vaccine.

She also claimed a friend of her cousin in her native Trinidad experienced impotency and swollen testicles after getting the shots.

Health ministers in Trinidad held an urgent press conference to deny the claim.

The ministers told the BBC “there is absolutely no reported side effect or adverse event of testicular swelling in Trinidad.”

Watch the video below.

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‘Lady Bird’ and What It Means to Hate Home

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‘Lady Bird’ and What It Means to Hate Home

This piece was originally published in the  Film Daze Digital Magazine, Issue 6: Adolescence. Enjoy! – The Film Daze Team

In Greta Gerwig’s coming-of-age gem Lady Bird, Sacramento is a character. It can’t be heard or spoken to, but the Californian county has its struggles, beauty, and effects. Christine’s (Saoirse Ronan) city decorates her life.

Christine’s setting is a presence in every aspect of her being: her environment, family, schooling, self-perceived lack of culture, it’s all tied to her hometown. Christine — who later chooses the name Lady Bird for herself in a bid to be ‘different’ — dreams of moving to places like New York City, and why wouldn’t she? That’s the kind of place where it’s all happening, the kind of place young girls dream of and adults who have visited miss with an ache. It’s the type of city where you can find romance, art, and yourself. The thought of being one of the many in its bustling crowds is a charming idea for a 17-year-old convinced they’re destined for somewhere bigger and better. So, why at the end of Lady Bird does Christine unravel as soon as she gets her foot in the door of the life she had once envisioned as being perfect?

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In the lottery of birth, we’re assigned a country, a city, and a family, among other things. In an unquantifiable universe where it’s a miracle to have been born as a sentient being on a habitable planet, it seems cruel that we don’t get a say in where we land. The universe sort of just spits us out. Magic happened and now you’re here; you don’t understand any of it and probably never will — deal with it. Like a home hair bleaching gone wrong, the desire for the things we didn’t inherit can be so intoxicating that we end up losing what we had in the first place. We romanticise what we don’t have because what we know is boring, and above all else, a person can’t be boring. Boring is the worst thing you can be. It is to Christine, at least.

Soon after meeting Lady Bird, and seeing her throw herself out of a moving car to the horror of her driving mother, we learn she has set goals for her short-term future: she wants to be more popular, experience romance, and go to an impressive school. The first two points she tries to solve through failed attempts of concealing her personality and life: she ignores her best friend in favour of a wealthy, beautiful classmate, tries to assimilate to Kyle’s (Timothee Chalamet) anti-establishment mumble of a personality, and tries to dress up her reality — the reality of what it’s like to live in a struggling household.

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Her desire to go to a fancy school can be seen as a last-ditch attempt to put her life plan into action and is the driving force behind much of what happens in Gerwig’s story. We see Christine’s principal giving feedback on an essay she wrote — noting that Christine must love Sacramento because of the detail in which she writes about it — and her guidance counselor is visibly amused by the idea of the pink-haired girl applying to Yale. After she stops giggling, she reassures Christine that it’s her job to help students be realistic. Christine, likely having heard this kind of reaction to her liberal arts education dreams before, responds with “Yeah. That seems like everyone’s job.” It’s in these small moments where someone — intentionally or not — punches down at Christine that Gerwig establishes the teenager’s point of view: everyone is against her and doesn’t want her to do better than they themselves did. And while that common opinion among teens is reductive, it’s not baseless. Christine perhaps isn’t old enough to understand the reason behind well-meaning adults squashing youthful whims: they once wanted more, and someone did the same thing to them. After letting an opportunity pass by because the idea of failure stopped the attempt at success in the first place, they convinced themselves it all worked out for the better, because ‘what ifs’ are debilitating and jealously creeps upon us in the ugliest ways — even after high school.

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Gerwig takes us through both teenaged and adult woes with compassion and understanding, and this is evident in how she composes the tension at the heart of Lady Bird: the complex relationship between mother and daughter. The push and pull between Christine and her mother Marion (Laurie Metcalf) is the emotional foundation of Lady Bird, but to understand their friction is to understand that Marion is an extension of Sacramento; when Christine sees her mother, she sees home. Christine resents Marion because she represents the financial stress they’re under (Marion is often seen rushing around in her scrubs), the lack of opportunity, and she’s everything Christine doesn’t want to be. Marion and Sacramento are the perfect scapegoats.

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In Christine’s eyes, Marion settled. Settled for Sacramento, settled for a low-paying job, settled for less. Christine hasn’t lived alone, she hasn’t had to feed a family (plus a house guest) on low wages, and she’s not lived through the hardships of life and motherhood like Marion has, so she can’t possibly understand — not yet. Christine likely knows that this bitter resentment is unfair, like all kids who grew up in similar circumstances do, but these feelings are just as shameful as they are hard to mask.

Marion’s disappointment in Christine’s behaviour (and chosen name) is just as hard to hide. She loves and wants the best for her daughter, but Metcalf plays Marion with her nose up to most of Christine’s quirks, and Gerwig plants seeds of resentment in Marion too: Marion can’t seem to be happy about Christine getting into a better school than they thought she would. They love each other, but can barely stand to be in the same room.

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Marion is just trying her best and is one of the most real characters to come out of 2017, so her bittersweet reaction to Christine moving across the country to attend college in New York is understandable. She’s done everything she can to make her house a warm place for her family, even if it’s imperfect, but her youngest is ecstatic at the thought of leaving anyway. Lady Bird‘s clever screenplay observes that attention and love can be the same thing. If this is true, Marion showered her daughter with love. By the time she’s writing and rewriting letters addressed to Christine before she leaves — trying to find the right words in a relationship where she’s often said the wrong ones — the viewer understands her pain and inner-conflict to the same degree we understand Christine’s.

Homesickness is described as “A feeling of longing for one’s home during a period of absence from it.” Such a feeling seems an impossibility for those of us who dislike where we’re from, who imagine our better dressed, more sociable future selves serving bite-sized appetizers in our well-decorated apartments during cocktail parties. This version would know what to say, how to act, and be free of anything holding us back or associated with home. Home would be something we mention in passing or visit once or twice a year to leave again with a reenergized understanding of why you moved away in the first place. That’s how Christine probably imagined it. But that’s not her reality by the end of Gerwig’s film, which paints Sacramento as a beautiful antagoniser, a first love you can never get over.

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“Hey, Mom, did you feel emotional the first time that you drove in Sacramento?” Ronan monologues, “All those bends I’ve known my whole life, and stores, and the whole thing.” Gerwig cuts to Christine driving, her face lit gorgeously by warm sunlight, and then seamlessly to Marion — two opposites whose fates were decided in different ways, but are still somehow similar. Metcalf provides Marion with an unforgettable expression; one of happiness, sadness, contentment, and regret all at once. Her daughter is far away, reaching out to her through the telephone. She wants to tell her she loves her and that Christine is a good enough name. Speaking to voicemail, the moment is inscribed with painful disconnect. Marion didn’t pick up, and Christine is upset and alone in a city that ate her up and spat her back out. Once a young girl obsessed with the idea of adulthood, she’s now a distraught young woman with mascara streaking down her cheeks calling her mother for help just as a child would. She misses the attention, and had to leave to realise that we don’t magically transform into our best selves by packing up and leaving. Growth doesn’t stop at adolescence. In fact, most of it is yet to come.

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Women attack restaurant hostess after she asks for proof of Covid-19 vaccine

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A group of women from Texas assaulted a NYC restaurant hostess after she asked them to provide proof of Covid-19 before eating there.

The incident occurred at Carmine’s on the Upper West Side when the hostess asked to see their vaccine cards. The brawl was captured on cellphone video and uploaded to Twitter.com.

Proof of vaccination is required to dine at any New York City restaurant, per mayor Bill de Blasio.

The women took offense when the hostess asked them for proof of vaccines to eat inside.

The unidentified hostess was repeatedly punched by the three women, ages 21, 44 and 49. Bystanders broke up the brawl just as police arrived.

The three women were taken into custody and transported to NYPD’s 24th precinct station, according to NBC News.

It is not clear if they were charged. The women are reportedly tourists visiting from Texas.

New York City is the first major U.S. city to ask residents to show proof of vaccination to enter restaurants and gyms. Any business that fails to comply could face a fine up $1,000 per violation.

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Tags: brawl, Mayor Bill de Blasio, mRNA vaccines, restaurant news, vaccine mandates, viral video

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Logan Paul Slams Jimmy Kimmel for ‘Lame’ Trump Joke

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American YouTube star Logan Paul slams the late night television host Jimmy Kimmel after the latter made some inflammatory comments about him on the air. Paul was even hosted by Kimmel earlier where the pair talked about various topics from his growth as YouTuber to his businesses.

However, on the September 10 episode of his show, Kimmel took shots on Logan Paul as well as former United States president Donald Trump about his then-upcoming commentary for the fight between Evander Holyfield and Vitor Belfort on 11th September.

“Between Logan Paul and Donald Trump, boxing is once again the top source of income for the very worst people in the whole world,” Kimmel said.

Unsurprisingly, Paul did not let it slip under. He brought up the issue on his Impaulsive podcast episode of 14th September. “You f**king a**hole, Jimmy Kimmel!” Paul raged. “Honestly Jimmy, f**k you, bro! I’m not — no, f**k that! How are you about to invite me on the show, and have cordial, friendly, familial relationship, and then a year and a half later — when, by the way, I’m doing well… f**k you, Jimmy Kimmel!”

“That is the lamest s**t to me,” he continued. “That is so f**king lame. Your writers were so lacking content and creativity that they had to do some lame-a** Paul joke?”

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Ed Sheeran Says Awards Shows Are ‘Horrible And Full Of Resentment’

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Ed Sheeran has described award shows as a “horrible” experience and said that he often leaves them “feeling sad”.  

Speaking after Sunday’s MTV Awards, the singer revealed that he doesn’t like going to awards shows because they’re “filled with people that want you to fail”.

“The room is filled with resentment and hatred towards everyone else and it’s quite an uncomfortable atmosphere,” he told The Julia Show.

“All the artists are sweet people, but they’re surrounded by entourages that want them to win too, so it’s one artist surrounded by ten people and another artist surrounded by ten people and everyone is kind of giving each other the side-eye,” he added.

Sheeran went on to explain that he much prefers award shows in the UK rather than the US because people are too drunk too care if they win.

“In England, our award shows are just like, everyone gets drunk and no one really cares who wins or loses, it’s just sort of a good night out,” he said.

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Universal Pictures Lands The Rights To Christopher Nolan’s New Feature

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Universal Pictures has secured the rights to Christopher Nolan’s next feature film.

According to Deadline, Universal will now finance and distribute the new film. Nolan will produce the project with his wife, Emma Thomas, and their company Syncopy Inc.

The story will follow J. Robert Oppenheimer – a physicist who would later became a critical figure in the invention of the atom bomb, also known as the Manhattan Project.

Cillian Murphy is rumoured to be considering a role in the film, though no casting choices have been confirmed.

Christopher Nolan’s last feature, ‘Tenet‘, was made in collaboration with Warner Bros. It released in August of 2020, and received generally positive reviews from critics.

Production of the yet-untitled film will begin in early 2022.

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Wendy Williams Hospitalized for Psychiatric Evaluation

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Wendy Williams Hospitalized for Psychiatric Evaluation
Wendy Williams has reportedly been hospitalized for a psychiatric evaluation after suffering a psychotic break.

According to TMZ, the 57-year-old host was voluntarily admitted to a hospital in New York on Wednesday for a psychiatric hold.

Police responded to a 911 call about a “non-violent” 57-year-old woman behaving erratically at Wendy’s luxury high-rise in Manhattan.

She was bundled into an ambulance and transported to a NY hospital where she was admitted for a mental health evaluation.

1632076822 782 Wendy Williams Hospitalized for Psychiatric Evaluation

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Wendy, who is fully vaccinated, was previously hospitalized after she tested positive for a “breakthrough case” of Covid-19. A source told TMZ that Wendy is currently “asymptomatic”, meaning she is showing no symptoms of Covid.

Breakthrough cases occur when fully vaccinated persons are infected with Covid-19.

According to the Centers for Disease Control data on breakthrough cases: “Vaccine breakthrough cases are expected,” and “no vaccine is 100% effective at preventing illness.”

1632076822 940 Wendy Williams Hospitalized for Psychiatric Evaluation

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It’s unclear at this stage when the talk show Diva will be discharged from the hospital. However, the insider told TMZ that her mental health “continues to improve each day”.

It isn’t clear what triggered Wendy’s mental break. She recently began dating again after breaking off a mentally abusive relationship earlier this year.

Due to Williams’ mental and physical health issues, the premiere of the new season of The Wendy Williams Show has been pushed from September 20 to October 4.

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