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Pam Bondi uses the Own Slogan of Biden to expose his hypocrisy

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Pam Bondi uses the Own Slogan of Biden to expose his hypocrisy

Former Attorney General Pam Bondi (R-Fla.) used the own campaign motto of Joe Biden to expose his hypocrisy in his influential address at the Republican National Convention (RNC) on Tuesday.

“Joe promises that he’s trying to develop Good Home. Hey, better put Bidens again, “whispered Bondi.

She researched Biden’s son Hunter, who was a bank director of the board of crooked Ukrainian gas giant Burisma, while his dad forced the Ukrainian president to dismiss a prosecutor who prosecuted Burisma. The Democrats accused President Donald Trump of telling Ukraine’s new president to look into the crisis.

In China, Hunter Biden also raked, while Biden went to the middle of the empire quietly. Hunter Biden broke his promise that by 31 October 2019 he would leave the board of the Chinese corporation while his dad was vying for the chair.

Bondi also shared the story of Joe ‘s brother James Biden, who had been hired to build house in Iraq by a building company costing more than a billion dollars and Joe Biden was in charge of the US invasion. The contract was signed by a corporation operated by “the nearest family friend of Joe Biden who, you guessed, had no business background and no Iraq background.”

The former Attorney General found that Biden has a “deliberate behavioural pattern” which he uses to enrich his family members. Nonetheless, in 2008, the FBI prosecuted Joe Biden’s “Delaware Way” movement for wrongdoing, a “system of favour and cronyism.”

Bondi finished her speech with a clear question. “Why would the elite class have one standard and the rest of us another standards? The full remarks of Pam Bondi at @GOPConvention#RNC2020 pic.twitter.com/nHed8bsJst

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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

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Jamaica Plain public housing development targeted for big investments this year

A large Jamaica Plain public housing complex is in for a big year, as Mayor Michelle Wu is looking to put $50 million toward capital improvements to the Mildred C. Hailey apartments — which already are set as the site of a big project this year.

Wu swung by the 766-unit Hailey complex — named after a longtime housing activist who lived there — on Thursday to make the announcement alongside residents and other officials.

“These funds will go toward improving plumbing and ventilation, renovating windows, kitchens and bathrooms across 526 units of housing,” Wu said.

She added that the money, which requires the approval of the City Council to go forward, would come from a combination of federal recovery funds and the city’s capital budget.

“When we make an investment in public housing, we are making an investment in the working class people of the city,” new City Councilor Kendra Lara said.

The Mildred C. Hailey apartments were built in stages — one chunk in 1941, another 1952 and a third in 1964. People in the apartments — officials said about 50% of residents are seniors and 30% children — generally pay 30% of their income as rent.

“The only thing pulling the median income down from being stratospherically high is the public housing that we built in the 1940s,” said Kenzie Bok, a city councilor who formerly worked on policy for the Boston Housing Authority. “It is the only way that we are keeping low-income people in many of the neighborhoods of the city including JP.”

This is actually just one of two big changes coming to the Hailey apartments starting this year. The BHA is entering into a public-private partnership that would result in a developer knocking down and rebuilding 253 public housing units, and adding about 435 new “affordable and upper middle-income apartments,” according to the Boston Planning & Development Agency’s summary of the project.

The BHA is working with The Community Builders, the JP Community Development Corp. and Urban Edge — for the purposes of this project they’re all are coming together as Centre Street Partners — who all are developers that focus on affordable housing.

This overhaul didn’t come up much at the press conference, but construction is expected to start this fall. It’s the latest of various versions of this approach. The BHA has similar plans on deck at the Mary Ellen McCormack development in Southie and Bunker Hill in Charlestown.

“These renovations combined with the new housing plan with Centre Street Partners will really bring this site forward to serve generations of families,” Bennett said at the press conference.

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Lydia Edwards sworn in as state senator

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Lydia Edwards sworn in as state senator

State senators welcomed their newest member, former City Councilor Lydia Edwards of East Boston, into the chamber Thursday after she was elected in a special ballot where she was unopposed.

Edwards, the first Black woman to serve the First Suffolk and Middlesex district, was sworn in wearing suffragette white on Thursday afternoon.

In her inaugural speech, Edwards thanked her “four mothers” and spoke directly to her biological mother, Bridget Edwards.

“I hope you know the reason why I won was because of you. Your story — you’re more popular than I am, mom,” the senator said.

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Howie Carr: Maura Healey’s misses as Massachusetts attorney general

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Howie Carr: Maura Healey’s misses as Massachusetts attorney general

Maura Healey enters the governor’s fight as the automatic front-runner, but the larger question lingers: What exactly are the highlights of her seven-plus years as state attorney general?

As her No. 1 accomplishment, I’d list Healey’s measured response to the orgy of looting and violence by armed left-wing mobs that engulfed Boston on May 31 and June 1, 2020. Among other things, a career thug fired 12 shots at Boston Police officers on Tremont Street, some of which penetrated apartments across from the Common.

“Yes, Boston is burning,” the state’s chief law-enforcement officer said the next day as businesses and property owners tried to clean up millions of dollars of damage in the Third World-style mob violence, “But that’s how forests grow.”

At No. 2, I’m going to cite a lesser-known moment that speaks to her stewardship of the AG’s office.

Do you remember Sonja Farak, the drug-addicted hack chemist at the Department of Public Health. For more than a decade, Farak falsified thousands of criminal drug tests because she was ingesting all the contraband?

She was finally busted in 2013, smoking crack in her car outside the Springfield courthouse when Maura was a mere assistant attorney general.

But the cover-up by the AG’s office that began under Martha Coakley (Marsha, as Patches Kennedy called her) continued when she became attorney general.

Everything I’m about to tell you comes directly from a 2017 ruling by Superior Court Judge Richard Carey. When a report was filed showing how multiple assistant AG’s had tried to cover up Farak’s crimes, which resulted in the railroading of hundreds of accused drug dealers (most of them not white), Maura’s office tried to suppress the report.

Judge Carey reported that Healey’s office filed a “Motion to Impound Grand Jury Materials and Report” on the scandal her office had tried to sweep under the rug.

Then Healey filed a second motion — to “impound its request for its Motion for Order of Non-Dissemination of Information.”

In other words, not only did Healey try to bury the shocking evidence, she also tried to make sure her attempt to suppress the evidence of the criminal conduct by her assistant AG’s involving non-white defendants never saw the light of day.

Judge Carey found that Healey’s office had sunk to “a depth of deceptiveness that constitute a fraud upon the court.”

By the way, Farak was represented in court by a female lawyer from Northampton. One of Maura’s minions referred to the Northampton woman in emails as “the gym teacher.”

When the Board of Bar Overseers finally got around to investigating the actions of the attorney general’s office, their report said that Maura’s assistant who called the Northampton lawyer “the gym teacher” had “demonstrated a disturbing attitude toward defense counsel.”

So why have the media given the Farak scandal such a good leaving-alone? Netflix has done more coverage of Sonja Farak than the amen chorus that is the Boston media.

Imagine how differently a Republican politician would have been treated if he’d tried to suppress a report on prosecutors looking the other way as defendants of color were framed with fake evidence. What would happen to a GOP pol who had an underling who referred to “gym teachers.”

It would be treated like Jan. 6, speaking of which, what would have happened if any Republican, let alone an elected prosecutor, had brushed off the much less violent trespassing that day at the Capitol because “that’s how forests grow”?

When you’re in a state like Massachusetts, though, you don’t have to worry about media scrutiny of any kind.

Seldom is heard a discouraging word, at least if you’re a Democrat. Whatever she did, Maura could keep her current job for life, at least as long as she kept filing an endless stream of frivolous anti-Trump lawsuits, while continuing to underperform her real duties in the fashion of the Texas sheriff in Jim Thompson’s novel “Pop. 1380.”

“I had it made, and it looked like I could go on having it made … as long as I minded my own business and didn’t arrest no one unless I just couldn’t get out of it and they didn’t amount to nothin’.”

That’s exactly how MA attorneys general have always operated, which may explain why they practically never win higher office. Since 1953, one AG has died in office, seven have been defeated in primaries, and one (Marsha Coakley) was twice defeated in runs for higher office.

Ed Brooke is the single exception to the rule. While serving as AG, he was elected to the US Senate — 56 years ago.

Maura’s got $3,670,000 cash on hand, but she’ll need more. That’s why she’s putting the touch on such good-government types as Arthur Winn. Remember that greed head developer?

He admitted in federal court to funneling tens of thousands in illegal campaign contributions to such Democrat titans as Eddie Markey, Steve Lynch and Mike Capuano. He also took care of ex-state Sen. Dianne Wilkerson, last seen on an FBI surveillance video stuffing $100 bills into her bra.

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