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President Trump ‘s effort to weaken democracy is a “accomplice” in US Says Pelosi

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President Trump 's effort to weaken democracy is a "accomplice" in US Says Pelosi

President Trump is a ‘accomplice’ to President Vladimir Putin ‘s efforts, according to Nancy Pelosi, to weaken America’s democracy.

When Pelosi talked to MSNBC on Sunday, he was asked whether Trump was involved in manipulation of the vote.

Reports from Breitbart: Pelosi said, “Of course, yes. I believe that’s what his intention is exactly. It’s to say that if you vote, your vote won’t be counted. This is a tactic which needs to be overlooked. Leader Schumer and I are writing to our fellow Members on this very subject which once again undermines our election legitimacy and is in Putin’s style, and Putin likes to discredit democracy, our own or others around the world. The president is a complice in this and in what he says.

She added, “We will have the elections and the results in less than 60 days, and we want people to know that they can vote and that they do not need to risk their health in order to vote. Everybody should know that’s true, regardless of what the president is telling us about voting twice, and he was told that. Once again his attorney general is a president’s henchman in this area. I’m sorry to say that the truth must be questioned on a prayerful Sunday morning.

She added, “I do not know politically , socially or financially what Putin has on the president. We’ll know when we see the President’s tax returns, but I know that he’s engaged in certain practises in other countries to discredit democracy to undermine democracy. And it also poses so many concerns why our own President could be an accomplice.

My self Eswar, I am Creative Head at RecentlyHeard. I Will cover informative content related to political and local news from the United Nations and Canada.

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Charges: Shooter told dad he ‘snapped,’ killed 4, drove around with bodies for hours before leaving them in a Wis. cornfield

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2nd suspect linked to quadruple homicide investigation turns himself in

After he shot four people inside an SUV, authorities say Antoine Darnique Suggs drove around St. Paul for hours, stopped to talk with his mother, got gas and a drink, and asked his father to follow him to Wisconsin where he dumped the vehicle in a cornfield.

He was in and out of the car containing the bodies for about seven hours, according to a timeline police put together using video footage, cellphone data and witness reports that is laid out in criminal charges.

So much blood had pooled in the SUV that police found puddles of it at different places where he had parked.

Antoine D. Suggs (Courtesy of the Maricopa County, Ariz., Sheriff’s Office)

“Suggs told his father that he snapped and shot a couple of people,” is all the criminal complaint offers as a motive for the quadruple homicide.

Suggs, 38, was charged Tuesday in Ramsey County District Court with four counts of second-degree murder with intent in the fatal shooting deaths of siblings Jasmine Christine Sturm, 30, and Matthew Isiah Pettus, 26, both of St. Paul; and friends Nitosha Lee Flug-Presley, 30, of Stillwater; and Loyace Foreman III, 35, of St. Paul.

POLICE TIMELINE OF EVENTS

Events leading to their deaths unfolded over a two- to three-hour time period in the early morning hours of Sept. 12, according to the police investigation:

  • 1 a.m. — Witnesses told police Sturm and Foreman, who were dating, and Pettus were hanging out on the patio at Shamrocks bar at 955 W. Seventh St. in St. Paul.
  • After 1 a.m. — An employee at the White Squirrel Bar, located at 974 W. Seventh St. in St. Paul, told police that Sturm came in and that Flug-Presley was with a man who looked like Suggs.
  • 1:38 a.m. — Investigators found a receipt for the White Squirrel from a purchase by Foreman. A witness told police the group got into a black SUV, a Mercedes.
  • 2:50 a.m. — Suggs returns to the White Squirrel.
  • 3:08 a.m. — Foreman creates a phone contact for Suggs, according to phone data.
  • 3:30 a.m. — Suggs’ phone and the Mercedes park for a time. This is when police believe Suggs shot the four.
  • 3:48 a.m. — Surveillance video shows the Mercedes drive west on Seventh Street toward the McDonald’s near Madison Street. The SUV then headed toward Shepard Road, but returned to Seventh Street and headed east. Video surveillance captures the passenger side and it appears Flug-Presley is slumped over in the seat.
  • 4:30 a.m. — Suggs places a phone call to his father, Darren Lee Osborne, 56, of St. Paul.
  • 5:00 a.m. — Suggs meets up with Osborne. Suggs tells his father he shot some people and asks him to follow him in another vehicle so he can dump the car and get a ride back.
  • 7:42 a.m. — Surveillance video from University Avenue and Eustis Street shows the Mercedes following a Nissan Rogue. Flug-Presley is seen slumped in the same position she was found dead in hours later.
  • 9:48 a.m. — Video from the Holiday gas station at 281 N. Snelling Ave. shows the Mercedes at a gas pump. Flug-Presley’s body is visible. Suggs entered the store.
  • 10:06 a.m. — Cell tower data show Pettus’ phone in the area of Interstate 94 and Dale Street heading east toward Wisconsin.
  • 10:26 a.m. — Minnesota Department of Transportation video shows the Mercedes and Nissan at the Minnesota and Wisconsin border.
  • 2:18 p.m. — The Mercedes and the four bodies are discovered in a cornfield in Dunn County, Wis.

FOUR VIOLENT DEATHS

The violence of the victims’ deaths can be seen through the Ramsey County medical examiner’s autopsy reports detailed in the complaint.

Flug-Presley had a gunshot wound that entered her mouth and out the back of her head. Pettus had two gunshot wounds to the back of his head and a third gunshot wound to his left arm. Foreman had a gunshot wound to his face and the top of his head. Sturm had a gunshot wound that went through her left palm and into her face.

Last week, Dunn County authorities charged Suggs with four counts of hiding a corpse. Suggs, who had flown back to his residence in Arizona, turned himself in to authorities.

Police are still uncertain what caused Suggs to allegedly kill the four people he had been hanging out with that early Sunday morning. The criminal complaint gives a few clues.

A witness said Suggs was arguing at the White Squirrel and said something to the effect of, “having six children and this happening every time he comes back to Minnesota.”

Osborne told police that Suggs had spoken to him and his mother about taking care of his kids and trying to get along with each other, according to the complaint.

‘HE SNAPPED AND SHOT A COUPLE OF PEOPLE’

When Suggs was alone with his father, Suggs told him that “he snapped and shot a couple of people” and that the “shooting happened in the vehicle on Seventh Street,” the criminal complaint states.

After following Suggs to Wisconsin, Osborne dropped him off in Minneapolis. Osborne denied knowing there were bodies in the SUV. When the two headed for the border, they left their phones in St. Paul, the complaint states.

“The phones never physically moved past the area of Lexington Parkway and Interstate 94,” the complaint states.

Suggs has a prior conviction of being a felon in possession of a firearm. He also has a prior conviction of aggravated domestic assault.

Suggs remains in custody in Arizona awaiting extradition. The Ramsey County attorney’s office is requesting bail be set at $10 million.

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Police search for 2 men charged in connection with infant’s death after not showing up for court

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Police search for 2 men charged in connection with infant’s death after not showing up for court

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – According to Albany County District Attorney’s office, Anthony Ojeda and Neil Garzon have failed to appear for their court dates, and bench warrants have been issued for their arrests.

Anthony Ojeda was charged for the murder of his 6-week-old infant son in December of 2020 after his child ingested meth and Ojeda did not seek proper medical treatment.

Ojeda then pleaded guilty to manslaughter, but then withdrew that guilty plea and has now failed to appear for his trial.

Anthony Ojeda charges:

  • Murder in the Second Degree
  • Manslaughter in the Second Degree
  • Endangering the Welfare of a Child

Neil Garzon is accused of endangering the welfare of a child.

The Albany County District Attorney’s Office tells NEWS10 ABC the men were not subject to wearing ankle monitors. They were being monitored by the Albany County Department of Probation and until last month they were compliant with their release conditions.

The U.S. Marshals Office has been tapped to help track the men down. Anyone with information on their whereabouts is asked to contact the Albany County District Attorney’s Office or the Cohoes Police Department.

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  • Mingle meets the moment with late winner for Columbia over Burnt Hills
  • Tahoe tucks two for Shaker in win over Niskayuna
  • Albany notches shutout win over Averill Park
  • Local organizations helping hundreds of Afghan refugees coming to Capital Region

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Caretaker’s sister, mother die after he chokes to death

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Caretaker’s sister, mother die after he chokes to death

NORMAL, Ill. – Twenty-five-year-old Jelani Day is a graduate student studying to get his master’s in speech pathology at Illinois State University. He was last seen Aug. 24 and hasn’t been heard from since. 

Police found his car, a 2010 White Crysler 300 with a blacktop, in a wooded area in Peru, Illinois, a few days later. 

“Nothing is more important to me than getting Jelani back,” Carmen Bolden Day, Jelani’s mother said. “I need help to find my son, it’s been 28 days.”

Jelani’s family from Danville and a faculty member reported Jelani missing after he did not show up for class for several days. Bloomington police said they need tips from the public in their ongoing search.

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Receiver Brenden Rice confident in CU Buffs’ offense: “We’ll get it together”

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Receiver Brenden Rice confident in CU Buffs’ offense: “We’ll get it together”

University of Colorado Boulder’s Brenden Rice makes a catch in front of Minnesota’s Jordan Howden during the Colorado Minnesota NCAA football game on September 18, 2021. (Cliff Grassmick/Staff Photographer)

Brenden Rice had high expectations for himself and the rest of the Colorado receivers this year.

Three games into the season, it’s been a difficult road for that group, as the Buffaloes’ offense has gone through some struggles.

“Very frustrating,” Rice said. “But we’ll get it together. I’m still proud of this offense. I can’t wait to show the world what we can do and what we are able to do. It’s only a matter of time.”

CU (1-2) is looking to get its offense on track as it visits Arizona State (2-1) on Saturday (8:30 p.m., TV: ESPNU) in the Pac-12 opener for both teams.

Freshman quarterback Brendon Lewis has struggled through the first three starts of his career and the Buffs have just 273 passing yards. Navy is the only one of the 130 FBS teams averaging fewer yards through the air than CU’s 91.0 per game. CU and the three service academies – Army, Air Force and Navy – are the only teams averaging less than 100 passing yards.

Tight end Brady Russell leads the Buffs with six catches, while Rice leads the receivers with five catches for 35 yards.

Rice said it’s important for the playmakers, who all want the ball more, to focus on what they can do to help the struggling offense, rather than hang their heads.

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Transgender cosmetics entrepreneur wanted in Malaysia for wearing feminine clothing is arrested in Thailand

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Nur Sajat arrested

Transgender cosmetics entrepreneur Nur Sajat Kamaruzzaman has been arrested after an eight-month search, Malaysian authorities confirmed on Monday.

The arrest: Nur Sajat, 36, was detained by Thai immigration authorities at a luxury condominium in Bangkok along with a man and a Thai woman, Malay Mail reported.

  • She was charged in an Islamic court near Kuala Lumpur for dressing up in feminine clothing, a baju kurung, while attending a religious event in 2018. 
  • The baju kurung, which originated from the Malay peninsula, is traditionally worn by women in Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and southern Thailand.
  • An arrest warrant was issued in February after Nur Sajat failed to show up to a hearing.
  • She faces up to three years in prison or 5,000 Malaysian Ringgit (about $1,200) in fines, or both, if convicted.
  • Under Section 10(a) of the Shariah Crimes (State of Selangor) Enactment 1995, insulting Islam and related practices either by mocking or blaspheming through writing, drawings or photos is subject to punishment. 

Other offenses: Authorities said in a statement that Nur Sajat was arrested and charged with immigration offenses on Sept. 8 for carrying an invalid passport. She was released on bail for that case.

  • She is also wanted for criminal intimidation and “obstructing a public servant from carrying out his duties.”
  • Nur Sajat is seeking refuge with the UN Refugee Agency (UNCHR), according to Human Rights Watch Deputy Asia Director Phil Roberston.
  • “As a @UNHCRAsia recognized refugee, under no circumstances should Nur Sajat be sent back to #Malaysia,” he tweeted. “She needs to be sent to a country that will offer rights protections, not persecuted for being #LGBT which is what will happen if she is sent to Malaysia.”

Featured Image via The Star (left), tontonMYofficial (right)

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Boston College plans return to passing attack with QB Dennis Grosel against Missouri

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Boston College plans return to passing attack with QB Dennis Grosel against Missouri

Boston College coach Jeff Hafley wants a downfield passing threat regardless of who is throwing the football.

Phil Jurkovec threw for 303 yards and three touchdowns in a 51-0 victory over Colgate in the season opener. A week later, Jurkovec suffered a season-ending right-hand injury on the opening possession of a 45-28 win at UMass. Dennis Grosel came in and threw for 199 yards and a touchdown.

The vertical passing game was nonexistent in the Eagles’ 28-3 victory at Temple. Grosel was 5-of-13 for 34 yards with a pick as BC settled into a power run scheme. But the Eagles need to revive their vertical mojo against SEC opponent Missouri at noon Saturday at Alumni Stadium.

“We are going to be a vertical passing team no matter who is playing quarterback,” said Hafley following Tuesday’s practice. “This scheme is not going to change and we have full confidence in Dennis.

“We went up so fast in that (Temple) game and I felt so good about the way we were playing on defense that we were going to run the ball. Dennis is a confident guy and if we have to throw 50 times to win then we will throw 50. If we have to throw for more than 400 yards to win, we will throw for 400 yards.”

In his only start in 2020 at Virginia, Grosel threw for 520 yards, equaling the single-game record set by Doug Flutie against Penn State in 1982.

“I think the way Temple played we were a little more underneath and stuff like that,” said Grosel. “But we are going to open the playbook back up and we know how to do it and let it fly. We have that mentality coming to this week. We were talking about it in meetings and we showed it in practice. We are going to open it up and let it fly. “

The Eagles got by with “vanilla” game plans because they took convincing early leads in all three games. That’s unlikely to happen against the Tigers, so Grosel is prepared to execute the pass plays BC practiced but left on the table.

“We still have a lot of stuff in our back pocket and plenty of stuff we haven’t even shown yet and it’s good stuff,” said Grosel.

A nickel’s worth

There is more to playing the nickel defensive back than keeping tabs on the slot receiver.

Hafley has entrusted the complex coverage and run-support responsibilities of nickelback to junior veteran Josh DeBerry. DeBerry recorded six tackles against Temple.

“Josh had one of his best tackling days and I thought all our corners tackled really well,” said Hafley. “When he is at the nickel position, sometimes he has an interior gap and sometimes he has an exterior gap. He might be the edge to the defense on some plays or if the ball gets outside, he has to set the edge and essentially be our force player. When he is in the nickel he blitzes, he fills in on run support and sometimes he’s in the box like a linebacker.”

DeBerry showed the versatility to play cover and nickel corner last season when he recorded 44 tackles, 33 solos with two TFL, two forced fumbles and an interception to earn All-ACC honorable mention. In three games this season, DeBerry is tied with linebacker Vinny DePalma for third with 12 tackles and two TFL.

“He is one of our toughest players physically and mentally on the team in my opinion and he is one of our better tacklers,” said Hafley.

Grant’s tomb

Punter Grant Carlson landed two inside the 20 and was named ACC specialist of the week. Carlson averaged 51.4 yards on five punts with a long of 62 against Temple that included a remarkable flip of the field.

With the ball on the BC 14 and his back to the goal line, Carlson launched the ball 59 yards. Jadan Blue retreated six yards to create a seam, but gunner Elijah Jones dropped Blue for a five-yard loss resulting in a flip of the field of 64 yards.

“He had two huge punts that totally flipped the field and Elijah had to run like 70 yards to make that one tackle and he made it immediately,” said Hafley. “Those are game-changers. Those take points away.”

Carlson is eighth in the nation with a 45.1 net average, with five inside the 20.

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‘Soul-crushing’: US COVID-19 deaths are topping 1,900 a day

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‘Soul-crushing’: US COVID-19 deaths are topping 1,900 a day

By HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH

COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. have climbed to an average of more than 1,900 a day for the first time since early March, with experts saying the virus is preying largely on a distinct group: 71 million unvaccinated Americans.

The increasingly lethal turn has filled hospitals, complicated the start of the school year, delayed the return to offices and demoralized health care workers.

“It is devastating,” said Dr. Dena Hubbard, a pediatrician in the Kansas City, Missouri, area who has cared for babies delivered prematurely by cesarean section in a last-ditch effort to save their mothers, some of whom died. For health workers, the deaths, combined with misinformation and disbelief about the virus, have been “heart-wrenching, soul-crushing.”

Twenty-two people died in one week alone at CoxHealth hospitals in the Springfield-Branson area, a level almost as high as that of all of Chicago. West Virginia has had more deaths in the first three weeks of September — 340 — than in the previous three months combined. Georgia is averaging 125 dead per day, more than California or other more populous states.

“I’ve got to tell you, a guy has got to wonder if we are ever going to see the end of it or not,” said Collin Follis, who is the coroner in Missouri’s Madison County and works at a funeral home.

The nation was stunned back in December when it was witnessing 3,000 deaths a day. But that was when almost no one was vaccinated.

Now, nearly 64% of the U.S. population has received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. And yet, average deaths per day have climbed 40% over the past two weeks, from 1,387 to 1,947, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Health experts say the vast majority of the hospitalized and dead have been unvaccinated. While some vaccinated people have suffered breakthrough infections, those tend to be mild.

The number of vaccine-eligible Americans who have yet to get a shot has been put at more than 70 million.

“There is a very real risk you’ll end up in the hospital or even in the obituary pages,” Dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, chief medical officer for the Ohio Department of Health, said to the unvaccinated. “Don’t become a statistic when there is a simple, safe and effective alternative to go out today and get vaccinated.”

Many low-vaccination communities also have high rates of conditions like obesity and diabetes, said Dr. William Moss of Johns Hopkins. And that combination — along with the more contagious delta variant — has proved lethal.

“I think this is a real failure of society and our most egregious sin to be at this stage where we have hospitals overwhelmed, ICUs overwhelmed and hitting this mark in terms of deaths per day,” Moss lamented.

New cases of the coronavirus per day in the U.S. have dropped since the start of September and are now running at about 139,000. But deaths typically take longer to fall because victims often linger for weeks before succumbing.

In Kansas, 65-year-old cattleman Mike Limon thought he had beaten COVID-19 and went back to work for a few days. But the virus had “fried” his lungs and he died last week, said his grandson, Cadin Limon, 22, of Wichita.

He said his grandfather didn’t get vaccinated for fear of a bad reaction, and he hasn’t gotten the shot either for the same reason, though serious side effects have proved extremely rare.

He described his grandfather as a “man of faith.”

“Sixty-five is still pretty young,” the young man said. “I know that. It seems sudden and unexpected, but COVID didn’t surprise God. His death wasn’t a surprise to God. The God I serve is bigger than that.”

Cases are falling in West Virginia from pandemic highs, but deaths and hospitalizations are expected to continue increasing for as many as six more weeks, said retired National Guard Maj. Gen. James Hoyer, who leads the state’s coronavirus task force.

Dr. Greg Martin, who is president of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and practices mostly at Grady Hospital in Atlanta, said the staff is buckling under the strain.

“I think everyone in 2020 thought we would get through this. No one really thought that we would still be seeing this the same way in 2021,” he said.

Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon activated the state’s National Guard on Tuesday to provide assistance to hospitals dealing with a surge of COVID-19 patients.

In Oklahoma, Hillcrest South Hospital in Tulsa is among several medical centers around the country to add temporary morgues. Deaths are at an all-time high there, at three to four times the number it would see in a non-COVID-19 world, said Bennett Geister, hospital CEO.

He said the staff there, too, is worn out.

“They didn’t sign up to be ICU nurses only to have people pass away on them,” he said. “They signed up to be ICU nurses to take people to recovery and heal people from the brink of death.”

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Pediatrician conducting vaccine trials at Upstate talks about study’s progress

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Pediatrician conducting vaccine trials at Upstate talks about study’s progress

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (WSYR) — Central New York is playing a big part in the Pfizer study of kids and vaccines. Upstate University is one of the vaccine trial sites. Pediatrician Joseph Domachowske, who’s reportedly helping conduct the study, joined NEWS10’s sister station in Syracuse to talk about its progress.

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  • Tahoe tucks two for Shaker in win over Niskayuna
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  • Local organizations helping hundreds of Afghan refugees coming to Capital Region
  • Kansas mom says teacher forced son to tape mask to face

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Jefferson County juvenile claims self-defense after killing man with arrow

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Group honors Missouri officer killed in the line of duty last week

NORMAL, Ill. – Twenty-five-year-old Jelani Day is a graduate student studying to get his master’s in speech pathology at Illinois State University. He was last seen Aug. 24 and hasn’t been heard from since. 

Police found his car, a 2010 White Crysler 300 with a blacktop, in a wooded area in Peru, Illinois, a few days later. 

“Nothing is more important to me than getting Jelani back,” Carmen Bolden Day, Jelani’s mother said. “I need help to find my son, it’s been 28 days.”

Jelani’s family from Danville and a faculty member reported Jelani missing after he did not show up for class for several days. Bloomington police said they need tips from the public in their ongoing search.

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Jeffco public health director spars with Christian school attorneys in court over mask mandate

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Jeffco public health director spars with Christian school attorneys in court over mask mandate

Attorneys for three small Christian schools faced off with Jefferson County Public Health’s executive director Tuesday during a daylong hearing in which the county health department sought to force the schools to follow its COVID-19 mask mandate for students.

The health department sought a judge’s order last week after the agency found that three schools were not properly enforcing mask mandates in their classrooms, according to court filings. The schools objected, saying both that they were following the county’s guidance — which they argued was issued late, lacked legal authority and changed over time — and that the county’s public health order was unconstitutional, among other arguments.

Jefferson County Public Health executive director Dawn Comstock was the only witness to take the stand Tuesday; the hearing did not finish and will continue Wednesday.

Comstock testified extensively about rising rates of COVID-19 infections in the county and particularly among school-aged children, who are not able to be vaccinated if they’re under 12 and have seen significant rates of infection since schools returned this fall.

“For the first time, both the 6 to 11 age group and the 12 to 17 age group have higher incidence rates than adults,” she said. “This is the first time that has been seen in the state of Colorado during the entire pandemic.”

School supporters packed the courtroom Tuesday; some observers in the morning sat shoulder-to-shoulder on the floor and stood in the back of the room. Comstock at one point interrupted her testimony to ask that observers be reminded to wear their masks correctly.

“Your honor, I realize this is irregular but I am concerned we have a very packed courtroom with a number of people not wearing their masks correctly–” she said, before the audience’s derisive laughter drowned her out.

District Court Judge Randall Arp told everyone in the courtroom to wear their masks over their noses and mouths and said those who did not would be removed. Deputies did remove one person from an overflow room who refused to wear a mask.

The school attorneys who cross-examined Comstock on Tuesday focused on arguments the schools had laid out in court filings. Faith Christian Academy argued that it does enforce a mask mandate in its school, but that at the time health inspectors visited there were “some lapses in enforcement as everyone was trying to understand the scope of the public health order while also juggling all of the other responsibilities of starting the school year.”

Beth Eden Baptist School said in a filing that the school had decided last week — hours before the lawsuit was filed — that it would comply with the mandate and allow unimpeded access for inspectors.

“By the time this case was filed, our client was totally in compliance,” attorney Shaun Pearman said about Beth Eden during Tuesday’s hearing. The health department’s attorney, Craig May, disagreed with that characterization.

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