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Louisville declares emergency in anticipation of the decision of Breonna Taylor

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Louisville declares emergency in anticipation of the decision of Breonna Taylor

In Louisville, Kentucky, a state of emergency was declared in anticipation of demonstrations following the imminent decision of the grand jury to assassinate Breonna Taylor by police.

Taylor, a 26-year-old working as an emergency technician, died in an inquiry into an ex-boyfriend on 13 March by a police department serving a no-knock warrant.

Taylor was with her boyfriend Kenneth Walker at her apartment when police barged in. Walker, who said no cops, shot his gun, thinking that the police were intruders. One officer was shot in the leg and in response, the police fired.

There was no money or drugs in the apartment. One of the three officers involved in the shooting was shot for firing his weapon “willful and blindly,” but no charges against him or the rest of the officers were laid.

The reports showed that Daniel Cameron, the Kentucky Attorney General, submitted evidence to a grand jury that would eventually determine whether to charge each of the three shooting officers. Cameron will also present the findings of his investigation of the case through his office.

When he will make an announcement or whether the Grand Jury has begun proceedings is not entirely clear.

Early in the morning, Louisville Police announced it would reduce downtown car traffic “due to heightened scrutiny and activity in anticipation of an announcement” and “ensure that the area is as safe as possible for downtown tourists to voice their first amends.”

The department has also declared a state of emergency, meaning that every off-day or holiday is terminated and officers are expected to work 12-hour shifts. According to WAVE 3, a local news channel, the federal buildings in downtown Louisville closed and federal forces were summoned to secure federal buildings.

In a tweet on Tuesday morning, the mayor of Louisville Greg Fischer said: “We don’t know when or what an announcement the Attorney General is going to make. Our aim is for potential demonstrators to assemble and express their first right of amendment and brace themselves for any possible eventuality, to keep everyone safe.

Protests in Louisville and across the USA have spread as the investigation by the Attorney General has progressed. Arrest calls for Taylor killing officers have been common, with high-profile individuals, such as singer Beyoncé, who wrote an open letter to Cameron, calling for arrest.

Legal experts have indicated that whether officials are to be charged is unknown but, considering the immunity provided to the police, it may be doubtful.

In most states, including Kentucky, self-defense laws allow an individual to use deadly force against intruders. But security in Kentucky does not allow an individual to injure police officers if they know or can reasonably believe they are in their homes.

Chief of the Interim Police Robert Schroeder said the town has been in contact with Cameron’s office and wants to be informed of any decisions in advance.

“As we all know, with everyday circumstances in mind, the plans often go awry and we need to prepare ahead of time,” Schröder said. He said the attorney general’s office “was confident they will try to give us notice to the best of their capacity.”

Officers who entered their house using a no-knock warrant during a narcotics investigation shot Taylor, a Black emergency physician, eight times the 13 March. The warrant used was related to a suspect who did not live there and no drugs were contained inside it. Louisville Metro Council has since prohibited the use of no-knock warrants.

Wide demonstrations over the death of Taylor at times broke out in the city in May, but the majority of demonstrations have been peaceful since, including a large march outside the Kentucky Derby earlier this month. Actors, athletes, advocates, and the family of Taylor have been urging Cameron, for many months, to sue suspects involved in the raid for criminal reasons.

“We don’t know once again when the announcement will come, but we have to get ready for it,” said Mayor Fischer. “Our aim is to give future manifestors the ability to assemble and express their rights in the First Amendment after the announcement. At the same time, we plan for every eventuality to ensure that everyone is secure.”

Last week, Louisville settled a 12 million dollar lawsuit from Taylor’s family and implemented numerous policy changes as part of the deal.

On Monday, the police said that the department had canceled its holiday and set up barricades to brace for the decision.

The federal courthouse and other federal buildings have been closed for a week by federal authorities.

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Woodbury man charged in fatal shooting of man outside Como bar

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Woodbury man charged in fatal shooting of man outside Como bar

A Woodbury man is accused of fatally shooting a Minneapolis man in the parking lot of a bar in the Como neighborhood in August.

Kenwan Deshawn Hunter, 27, was charged Friday in Ramsey County District Court with two counts of second-degree murder (with intent and while committing a felony) and one count of illegally possessing a firearm.

According to the charges, Hunter shot and killed Glenn Danen Smith, 27, after Smith and another man had been fighting.

About 12:50 a.m. Aug. 16, St. Paul police officers responded to Ted’s Recreation at 1084 Larpenteur Ave. and found two people attempting to help Smith who was in the back seat of a Buick LaCrosse. Smith was unresponsive and was pronounced dead at the scene.

From multiple witnesses and video, police pieced together the following events:

Smith and a friend drove to Minneapolis earlier that night to buy marijuana. Smith asked his friend to drop him off at Ted’s. When the friend returned to pick Smith up, Smith was drinking with Hunter and another man identified as Tae Loc.

Smith and Tae Loc went outside to fight. When Smith’s friend tried to intervene, Smith told him Tae Loc was his cousin and to let them fight.

When they finished fighting, Smith got into the Buick to leave, then began yelling to Hunter to give him back something that belonged to him. Smith went to Hunter’s car and retrieved a gun. As Smith’s friend was backing the car out of the parking space, gunfire erupted. Smith yelled that he was hit and climbed into the backseat. Smith’s friend got out of the car and fled the scene, taking Smith’s gun with him. He later turned it in to police.

Witnesses told police they believed Smith and Hunter were shooting at each other. According to the Ramsey County medical examiner’s office, Smith died from a gunshot wound to his chest. Smith had two felony convictions for illegally possessing a firearm.

Hunter has seven prior felony convictions for robbery. On Feb. 5, 2016, he was convicted of aggravated second-degree robbery after he stole items from a Menards on University Avenue and then fought the security guard who tried to stop him. In March 2016, he was convicted of five counts of aggravated second-degree robbery in Hennepin County District Court after he and an accomplice approached five different victims in Minneapolis, held a gun to them and robbed them.

According to that complaint, authorities found him to pose “an obvious danger to public safety if he is out of custody.”

According to the plea agreement for the 2016 convictions, Hunter was sentenced by Hennepin County Judge Hilary Caligiuri on Feb. 16, 2017, to 64 months in prison (or a little over five years) with 379 days credited for time served.

As of Friday evening, Hunter was in custody at the Ramsey County Detention Center. He was being held on a $1 million bond. No attorney was listed for him.

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Food Network star Alton Brown coming to Proctors

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Food Network star Alton Brown coming to Proctors

SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – Food Network star Alton Brown is making his way to the Electric City on his “Alton Brown Live – Beyond The Eats” tour. He will be at Proctors on April 8, 2022. 

Brown says fans can expect, “more cooking, more comedy, more music and more potentially dangerous science stuff.” He warns, “Prepare for an evening unlike any other and if I call for volunteers… think twice.”

“Plus, you’ll see things I’ve never been allowed to do on TV,” Brown added.

Tickets are on sale now for “Alton Brown Live – Beyond The Eats” at Proctors. They are available online at proctors.org or by phone Monday-Friday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at (518) 346-6204.

Critics and fans have raved about the interactive components of Brown’s shows.

Alton Brown has been on the Food Network for over 20 years and is best known as the creator, writer and host of Good Eats, Good Eats: Reloaded, and Good Eats: The Return. He also hosted Cutthroat Kitchen and served as the culinary commentator on Iron Chef America.

There are two James Beard awards with Brown’s name on them in a drawer in his office, and somewhere in the world there’s a coveted Peabody awarded for Good Eats that was stolen out of his car back in 2013. In his spare time, he’s working on his ninth book on food and cooking.

Those with an appetite for more Alton Brown can find additional show and ticketing information at www.altonbrownlive.com

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5A football: Douglas County blanks Castle View for first “Battle of the Rock” win since 2014

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5A football: Douglas County blanks Castle View for first “Battle of the Rock” win since 2014

CASTLE ROCK — The drought is finally over for Douglas County football.

For the first time in seven years, the Huskies defeated crosstown rival Castle View, 16-0, on Friday night in their annual “Battle of the Rock” rivalry game with citywide bragging rights on the line.

Douglas County senior quarterback A.J. Jackson completed two touchdown passes to junior wide receiver Chase Nelson while the Huskies’ defense forced multiple turnovers. Douglas County remains unbeaten (4-0) as a surprise Class 5A contender this season.

“I’m still letting it sink in right now. I’m trying to warm up because I’m frozen with the ice bath that I just got,” Douglas County coach Eric Rice said. “The thing about winning a game like this that is so important is because they’ve beaten us so many years in a row. I know it means so much to this whole community.”

Roughly 3,500 people filed into a sold-out Douglas County Stadium on Friday with the crowd visibly split down the middle between fans in purple and red. Both teams entered undefeated. But the Sabercats were riding high with six consecutive rivalry wins in the series.

The Huskies didn’t need reminding of that losing trend. They were intent on changing it.

Douglas County sprinted out to a 16-0 advantage in the first half with big-play offense and opportunistic defense.

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Hundreds protest in front of the State House over vaccine, mask mandates

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Hundreds protest in front of the State House over vaccine, mask mandates

Hundreds of protestors gathered in front of the State House Friday afternoon, armed with signs, American and “Thin Blue Line” flags and petitions, to protest causes including COVID-19 vaccine and masking mandates.

“I am a health care worker, and I’m losing my job in physical therapy, even though I worked through the whole pandemic,” said Mary Taylor, an attendee from New Bedford, citing both religious and medical exemptions to the mandate. “I am going to fight this tooth-and-nail along with all my other friends that are pro-choice.”

The event was organized over Facebook by an organization called The Freedom Family Endeavor which, according to its website, is a non-profit that advocates for “the civil rights of families across the U.S.,” and especially against government restrictions.

The crowd sang the “Star-Spangled Banner” several times, and yelled chants including “We will not comply!” Attendees included several members of the Massachusetts Correction Officers Federated Union, student representatives from libertarian-leaning college groups, and a slew of health care workers nervous about losing their jobs over refusing the COVID-19 vaccine.

Another woman who attended the rally with her children who only wanted to be identified as Erica said she was there to protest because her daughter, who attends a state university, was “forced” to be vaccinated to attend, she said. The Athol resident added that she was also opposed to mask mandates for school-aged children.

Ryan McLane, the chief attorney for The Freedom Family Endeavor, said he had helped “hundreds” of people fight for religious exemptions to vaccine mandates, and added that he is currently appealing a verdict from a federal lawsuit in which a UMass Boston student was denied a religious exemption from the school’s vaccine mandate. The group’s other federal lawsuit was denied.

Gov. Charlie Baker did not respond to a request for comment on the rally.

The Herald has reached out to the Massachusetts Correction Officers Federated Union for comment, but the union has publicly slammed the vaccine mandate for their group, along with all state executive branch employees, in the past.

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Lynx dominate Fever, secure first-round playoff bye

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Lynx dominate Fever, secure first-round playoff bye

The Lynx dominated the Fever, 92-73, in Indianapolis on Friday night to secure a first-round bye in the playoffs.

“There just was no quit. They played as hard as they could,” Lynx head coach Cheryl Reeve said. “Everything we got we had to really earn. Coming here and getting this win was obviously something that was important to us. So, mission accomplished.”

Despite battling injuries all year, the Lynx secured a top-4 seed in the playoffs — and the first-round bye that goes with it — with the win.

“That’s what we came here to do,” Reeve said. “We wanted to make sure that we could control our own destiny. We were the first of the games tonight that had implications on seeding.”

Because the Las Vegas Aces beat the Chicago Sky on Friday night, the Lynx can no longer reach the second seed. But the current fourth seed Seattle trails Minnesota by one game in the standings with two games left this season, one of them being late Friday night.

Sylvia Fowles led the Lynx with a double-double (21 points and 10 rebounds). Napheesa Collier and Crystal Dangerfield scored 17 and 15, respectively. Natalie Achonwa added 11 points off the bench.

“[I’m] extremely proud of these young women,” Fowles said. “I’m happy with where we are. I feel like we still have a few things that we can clean up. To now see what we’ve come from to where we are now, I’m very excited and I’m very proud of [the] things we’ve done this season.”

The Fever came out strong in the first quarter, taking a 5-1 lead, but it would be their largest and last lead of the game.

In the middle of the first quarter, the Lynx started to find their footing and begin to build momentum. They went on a 15-2 scoring run to take a 22-9 lead. Kayla McBride started the scoring run with a 19-foot pull up jump shot.

However, the Fever quickly responded with a 12-5 scoring run of their own and cut the Lynx’s lead to 27-21 to close out the first quarter. They pulled within 40-38 with a 6-0 run late in the second quarter but the Lynx fought back to extend their lead to 51-44 at intermission.

Indiana only scored 10 points in the third quarter and the Lynx led by 25 points, their largest lead, on a Rachel Banham 3-pointer with 6:37 left in the game.

The Lynx are now 16-3 when scoring more than 80 points in a game, 13-1 when leading after three quarters, and 3-0 this season when their starting lineup consists of McBride, Fowles, Napheesa Collier, Crystal Dangerfield and Aerial Powers.

The Lynx will close out the regular season on the road as they take on the Washington Mystics (12-19) on Sunday, Sept. 19, 2 p.m.

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Gov. Hochul signs parole reform bill into law amid Rikers crisis

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Gov. Hochul signs parole reform bill into law amid Rikers crisis

NEW YORK — Amid calls for action over the crisis at New York City’s Rikers Island, Gov. Kathy Hochul on Friday signed into law the Less Is More Act in a major overhaul of New York’s parole system.

The legislation, which will take full effect in March 2022, will prevent people from being reincarcerated for technical, non-criminal parole violations.

These violations include missing a curfew, arriving late to an appointment with a parole officer, changing a residence without approval and failing to attend a mandated program.

It will also allow for shortened parole sentences due to good behavior, and expedite the time frame in which parole hearings can be held.

Hochul said that 191 inmates would be released from Rikers on Friday who meet the threshold of the new legislation.

Watch Friday’s event and bill signing in full below:

Most of the city’s jail inmates are being held for trial or on parole violations.

According to the Vera Institute of Justice, 274 people in New York City prisons are being detained for a technical parole violation, out of 6,079 inmates.

Supporters say incarcerating people for technical parole violations is costly and fuels recidivism. 

The Republican minority in the Legislature has accused Democrats of focusing more on perpetrators of crimes than victims.

Hochul’s action comes as a spotlight has once again been put on the city’s notorious jail complex, which has spiraled into turmoil during the pandemic.

It’s not just inmates and advocates saying that. City officials, including the mayor, admit there are serious problems.

The growing crisis, brought to light in recent weeks by advocates, news reports and a federal monitor who wrote of “grave concerns” with the city’s jails, has sent officials scrambling for remedies amid plans to close Rikers by 2026.

Mayor Bill de Blasio this week unveiled reforms that include requiring absent guards to get a doctor’s note if they’re out for more than a day, speeding inmate intake procedures and fixing infrastructure problems like broken cell doors.

On Wednesday, the city started suspending jail guards for 30 days without pay if they refused to come to work. Last week, the city said the staffing situation was so dire it was enlisting a telemarketing company to entice recently retired correctional officers to return to work.

Advocates, lawmakers and even the union for jail guards say the measures aren’t enough to fix a system where 10 inmates have died this year, at least five in suspected suicides.

Advocates want inmates released immediately. Some say Rikers should be closed right away.

Lawmakers who toured Rikers complex this week said it’s filthy and inhumane, with overflowing toilets and floors covered in dead cockroaches, feces and rotting food. State Assemblywoman Jessica González-Rojas said inmates told her they felt like they were being treated like slaves and animals.

The union, meanwhile, has said that hiring more guards is the answer and that suspensions will leave remaining officers working “triple and quadruple shifts with no meals and no rest.”

“The mayor cannot discipline his way out of this staffing crisis that he caused by refusing to hire a single correction officer for nearly three years, even as the inmate population doubled,” said Benny Boscio Jr., the president of the Correction Officers Benevolent Association.

In actuality, the city’s jail population has risen by about 58%, topping 6,000 inmates at the end of last week after falling below 3,900 inmates as bail reforms took effect, arrests slowed and some inmates were sent home early in the pandemic.

In addition, city jail Commissioner Vincent Schiraldi said Monday that the city has authorized the hiring of at least 200 correctional officers.

Schiraldi thanked Hochul after she signed Friday’s legislation.

“Eliminating non-criminal, technical parole violations is the decent, humane thing to do and it will only increase public safety by disrupting the incarceration cycle at a critical point, when people are reintegrating into the community,” Schiraldi said.

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Pilot of single-engine biplane dies in Western Slope crash

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Pilot of single-engine biplane dies in Western Slope crash

A pilot died Friday morning in a single-engine plane crash on the Western Slope.

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Kim Janey thanks supporters, does not endorse either finalist for mayor

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Kim Janey thanks supporters, does not endorse either finalist for mayor

Acting Mayor Kim Janey made her first campaign appearance following a fourth-place finish of five major candidates in the mayoral preliminary, and after skipping her own election-night party.

“I don’t want people to walk away without hope,” she said Friday afternoon, addressing a packed room of purple-clad supporters at her Centre Street headquarters. “This is a great day. This is a joyous day. We will continue to be intentional about creating space for joy.”

Janey made her “Joy Agenda” central to both her campaign and her speech Friday. She previously told the Herald that this agenda, which included moves like waiving late fees at the city’s libraries and funding public events, “comes out of a tradition (of) being a Black woman — being the granddaughter of a Black preacher.”

At least a couple of supporters wiped tears from their eyes as Janey spoke, thanking her family, her pastor and her staff for their hard work.

Janey’s only child, her daughter Kimesha Janey whom she had when she was a teen, admitted that she didn’t even want her mother to run for office in the first place.

“I didn’t want her to run — it was selfish of me,” she said, explaining that she knew her mother “was going to be the one that everybody was going to attack, and I didn’t want that for my mom. But she wanted to put the city on her back.”

Kim Janey thanked her daughter for getting her politically involved, explaining that she inspired her to become a community organizer and to advocate for education and family issues.

“I’m not supposed to be here,” she said of her rise to the top job in Boston from being a teen parent who grew up in the projects. Referencing the “seeds” she planted in her term so far as mayor, she reminded the audience that “it’s up to us to make sure we see that harvest, this work is not done,” she said. “I want people to leave here encouraged. I want people to leave here committed to doing the work moving forward.”

Janey has not yet endorsed a candidate for mayor out of the two finalists, Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi-George, and has said she is not sure if she will make an endorsement at all. All she said about her former competitors is that she “(takes) comfort in knowing that there will be a woman leading our city.”

Along with Janey’s votes from Tuesday’s primary, votes from Andrea Campbell and John Barros, the three Black candidates in the race, are up for grabs.

Among chatter in the crowd, at least two supporters were overheard saying they’d support Wu, but one supporter said he’d vote for Essaibi-George.

“I don’t know who’s listening in Boston — I’m a Republican, not very popular here,” said Javier Lopez, 24, who attended Janey’s gathering. He said he supported Janey for her religious grounding and her stance against vaccine passports like New York has. “And I know this city, my views aren’t very popular in the city. But again, she shared some of those views,” he added,

Finally, he said, he’s disappointed Janey won’t be the first elected Black and female mayor of Boston. “She would have been an inspiration to young girls everywhere.”

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High school football: St. Thomas Academy runs past Cretin-Derham Hall

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High school football: St. Thomas Academy runs past Cretin-Derham Hall

The first battle in 17 years between two longtime rival East Metro powers went the way of St. Thomas Academy.

It was all Cadets all night at TCO Performance Center in Eagan, as St. Thomas Academy topped Cretin-Derham Hall 41-14 in the first meeting between the two schools since 2004.

The rivalry, which dates even further back than the two schools’ time together in the St. Paul City Conference in the late 1970s and early 1980s, renewed this season as the Raiders moved down from Class 6A to Class 5A.

The matchup drew thousands of patrons to the Vikings’ practice facility, including the likes of Cretin-Derham Hall and Minnesota Viking alums Matt Birk and Michael Floyd.

St. Thomas Academy coach Dan O’Brien said both schools had alumni functions before the big showdown. Raiders coach Chuck Miesbauer noted what helps make the rivalry special is that the kids get to know one another growing up, and on Friday, they got to meet up once again on the gridiron.

“It’s fun. It was great. Our kids were excited about it all week. Both teams had great crowds,” O’Brien said. “To be able to play in this venue, the tailgating, I think it was great for both communities, not just the player. But I think the experience for the fans, the alumni. … It was great to have a rivalry back.”

The Cadets have been one of Class 5A’s elites for years, and a consistent state title contender under the watchful eye of O’Brien. Nothing from Friday’s contest suggests that will be any different this season.

Cretin-Derham Hall (0-3) looked to get on the board on its first drive of the game, but it turned the ball over on downs inside the Cadets’ 10-yard line. That seemed to set the tone for the night. After that, the Raiders struggled to muster much offensively until the final frame.

St. Thomas Academy (3-0), meanwhile, scored early and often. Sophomore running back Savion Lopez ran in a 44-yard touchdown late in the first quarter to make it 7-0. St. Thomas Academy then recovered the ensuing onside kick and scored another touchdown — a 9-yard rush from Love Adebayo.

“We come out and we score right away. We get a stop. We get a play on special teams, any number of things could’ve created a more favorable opening to the game,” Raiders coach Chuck Miesbauer said. “When that stuff happens, you never know what can happen. But we didn’t make some of the plays and maybe we didn’t have some of the right calls on. … We didn’t make big plays across the board, and they did.”

A 52-yard rushing touchdown from Grady O’Neill made it 21-0 Cadets later in the second. Adebayo tallied another rushing touchdown — the second of three rushing scores for him on the night — in the third quarter, and O’Neill scored again — this time, a 7-yard scoring strike from Maximus Sims — early in the fourth to extend the Cadets’ lead to 34-0 — its largest advantage of the game.

O’Neill, who took snaps at quarterback and receiver, also played defensively for the Cadets as part of a package to help contain Cretin-Derham Hall star Tre Holloman, who started at quarterback for the first time this season.

O’Brien said the Cadets’ offensive line — a unit O’Neill called “ridiculous” — “had a nice night.” St. Thomas Academy ran 38 times for 292 yards Friday. O’Neill had 118 yards on the ground, while Lopez had 91 and Adebayo had 61.

“Our offensive line got rolling,” O’Neill said. “Then obviously we’ve got our two running backs that are really good players. That set it up to get me the ball, get other guys the ball and get the offense going.”

The Raiders’ offense got things going in the fourth quarter, thanks to a pair of touchdowns from quarterback Luke Floysand, who came on in relief in the final frame to run for a score and pass for another. Cretin-Derham Hall running back Will Haider tallied 108 yards of total offense.

Cretin-Derham Hall is winless through three weeks but has endured a brutal early-season schedule. The Raiders’ three losses have come to three teams ranked in the top six in the state in Class 5A, and they played Mahtomedi and Spring Lake Park tough.

“We’ve got to stay at it. It’s been a heck of a three-game stretch for us, and man, tooth-and-nail in the first two, and I wish I could say the same about tonight,” Miesbauer said. “All we can do is come back. We can learn from this and see what the next team has in store and try to right the ship. This is a good football team. I believe that to my core. Not reflected tonight. I think reflected in the previous two games. We’ve got five to go, and there’s no reason we can’t play off some of that momentum … and get everything rocking and rolling into the section time.”

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North Country Weekend Calendar: Smooth jazz and local history in Lake George

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North Country Weekend Calendar: Smooth jazz and local history in Lake George

LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – There’s music and history in Lake George this weekend, with jazz in Shepard Park and reenactments of the French and Indian War just down the lake at Battlefield Park.

It’s a partly cloudy weekend in the 70s this weekend, with a weekend high of 79 on Saturday.

Friday, Sept. 17, 2021

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

Edward M. Bartholomew Jr. Fund Disc Golf Tournament 

  • What: Disc golf tournament benefitting the Edward M. Bartholomew Jr. Fund, which helps Warren County EDC create job and internship opportunities locally.  
  • When: 11 a.m. learn to play; noon player check-in; 1 p.m. games start, Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: Crandall Park, Fire Road, Glens Falls 

Apple Festival at the Warrensburg Riverfront Farmers Market 

  • What: Apple-themed festival at the Warrensburgh Riverfront Farmers Market featuring a long list of vendors. Apple recipes and growing tips, apple dessert contest, children’s craft workshop, face painting, live music, free local coffee and a chance to win $20 in farmers market credit. 
  • When: 3-6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: 176 River St., Warrensburg 

Live at Argyle Brewing’s Depot: Caity & The Gallaghers 

  • What: Music at the Argyle Brewing Depot. $15 admission, limited table seating. 
  • When: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17 
  • Where: Argyle Brewing at the Depot, 6 Broad St., Cambridge 
1631947713 609 North Country Weekend Calendar Smooth jazz and local history in
Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021 (1 of 2)

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

ADK 5K 

  • What: Closed course 5K race, starting and ending at Adirondack Pub & Brewery. Chip-timed race running through Lake George. Includes a custom glass, food and music and a post-race party with lawn games, music and food trucks. 
  • When: Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Adirondack brewery, 33 Canada St., Lake George 

2021 Freedom Machines golf fundraiser 

  • What: $400 per foursome of attendees, with money raised for Freedom Machines bike charity. Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place, as well as closest to pin and hmost honest. Registration online. Includes lunch and buffet dinner. 
  • When: 8 a.m. – noon with a 9 a.m. start time Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Kingsbury National Golf Club, 111 County Route 41, Hudson Falls 

8th Annual Harry Elkes Ride 

  • What: Annual ride hosted by Adirondack Cycling Advocates in Brant Lake. Choice of three rides; 15, 32 or 50 miles. $25 admission cost with free t-shirt. Maps and route info will be available on arrival. 
  • When: 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. with 9:30 and 10 a.m. start times Saturday, Sept. 18. 
  • Where: The Hub, 27 Market St., Brant Lake 
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Saturday, Sept. 18, 2021 (2 of 2)

15th Annual Fall Mum Festival 

  • What: Over 7,000 garden mums available, locally grown at Binley Florist. Also features pumpkins, corn stalks and other seasonal décor. Warren County K-9 officer will be showing skills with his dog. Petting zoo, pony rides and face painting included. Free admission. 
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Binley Florist, 773 Quaker Road, Queensbury 

6th Annual Boating for Babies Fundraiser by Yankee Boating Center 

  • What: Annual fundraiser for Glens Falls Hospital and local charities. 50% discounts on boat rental, with rentals for the weekend starting at $120 for 2 hours and up.  
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Yankee Boating Center, 3910 Lakeshore Drive, Lake George 

Thistle Day Parade 

  • What: Argyle Thistle Day Parade, celebrating Argyle’s Scottish heritage.  
  • When: 2-3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Argyle 

Live at Hicks Orchard: Whiskey River 

  • What: Local honkey tonk dance band, with craft cider, local beer and food. 
  • When: 5-8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 
  • Where: Hicks Orchard, 18 Hicks Road, Granville 
1631947719 880 North Country Weekend Calendar Smooth jazz and local history in
Sunday, Sept. 19, 2021

Lake George Jazz Weekend 

  • What: Free jazz festival on Lake George, hosted by the Lake George Arts Project. Musicians include Blind Visionaries, Helen Sung Quartet, Dayna Stephens Quartet, Aaron Parks Little Big, Yosvany Terry Quintet, Stephanie Chou, Ingrid Jensen Band, and the Black Art Jazz Collective. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Shepard Park, Canada Street, Lake George 

French and Indian War Encampment and Reenactment 

  • What: Reenactment area open to the public. Military drill and tactical presentations, skirmishes during the day, a look at 18th century camp life and period-appropriate wares for sale. 
  • When: Friday, Sept. 17 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Lake George Battlefield Park, 34 Fort George Road, Lake George 

6th Annual Boating for Babies Fundraiser by Yankee Boating Center 

  • What: Annual fundraiser for Glens Falls Hospital and local charities. 50% discounts on boat rental, with rentals for the weekend starting at $120 for 2 hours and up.  
  • When: 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 18 – Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Yankee Boating Center, 3910 Lakeshore Drive, Lake George 

International Day of Peace Gathering 

  • What: Local celebration of the International Day of Peace. Gathering on the lawn with prayer, meditation and a song of peace. 
  • When: 11:30 a.m. – noon Sunday, Sept. 19 
  • Where: Adirondack Friends Meeting House, 27 Saratoga Ave., South Glens Falls 
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