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After Winery Fiasco, Gov Newsom is making a joke of its own COVID laws again by hosting a major birthday bash

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After Winery Fiasco, Gov Newsom is making a joke of its own COVID laws again by hosting a major birthday bash

Californians should ask Gov. Gavin Newsom if they have a proper Thanksgiving dinner if they have it at The French Laundry, Michelin’s three-star restaurant.

Much of the state can’t bear the restaurant’s $350-a-person price tag to get it to Napa Valley—after all the state of California has issued a non-essential travel warning. The California Department of Public Health also restricted private meetings of three or more households.

However, the governor of Newsom is not the majority of the territory. On Nov. 6, when lobbyist and long-time Newsom advisor Jason Kinney celebrated his 50th birthday, the governor, “first partner” Jennifer Siebel Newsom, and 10 others—representing three or more families, of course—meeting at The French Laundry in Yountville, California. The restaurant is still functional, even though it has outdoor seating.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Kinney representative Molly Weed said that the dinner followed all the state guidelines, but did not address why more than three households attended.

“This was a tiny, casual, 12-person dinner with family outdoors and a couple of close friends to celebrate their 50th birthday,” Weed said in a statement.

In his own speech, the governor insisted that the dinner did not violate any of the state’s rules, but that he was also disappointed that he (sigh) did not set a better example.

“While the First Partner and I followed the health guidelines of the restaurant and took safety measures, I was expected to model better conduct and not attend the dinner,” Newsom said in a tweet, according to Politico.

Yes, because we’re really disappointed that the multimillionaire governor wasn’t a better role model for us. I’m not a Californian, but I know the only reason I was wearing my mask, using a hand sanitizer, and avoiding meetings with three or four households was that some oleaginous wine magnate-turned-politician, who still thinks that Pat Riley’s 1992 hairstyle is the epitome of coolness, said I should.

Then I pointed out that Newsom was not modeling the kind of conduct that I was emulating—so I made a reservation at the nearby Michelin star-rated restaurant, along with 15 people from several households, and we continued to breathe heavily on each other for two hours over roasted cauliflower velouté and an antelope of Broken Arrow Ranch sampling, just as The French Laundry is serving this Sunday.

Do you think Gavin Newsom seems like a hypocrite?

I’m hoping to do the same thing for Thanksgiving.

So, as to how Newsom attended the meal, neither of the state rules broke—according to Politico, restaurants live in a kind of grey region.

The operative guidelines for private parties at the time of Newsom’s birthday dinner, released Oct. 9, describes such gatherings as ‘social circumstances that put together individuals from different households at the same time in a single room or location.’ Nevertheless, the July CDPH guidance for restaurants merely notes that they can imitate the number of patrons at a single table to a household unit or household unit.

However, if you have a private affair—which is somehow meant to be more troublesome than dining in a restaurant—the CDPH notes, “[t]he parties with more than 3 households are forbidden. This encompasses anyone present, including hosts and visitors. Know, the lower the number of individuals, the better they are.”

It’s not about “modeling” behavior, it’s about hypocrisy. No one decides whether to mix with three or more families in a restaurant (or privately, since the CDPH rules are nearly unenforceable) on the grounds of whether to let Gavin Newsom down.

Instead, it’s about the fact that Newsom’s government is predisposed to teach the Californians how to live their lives, while the man at the top seems to have no trouble making a joke of the laws he’s making for everybody else.

During the summer, Newsom was hot when it was revealed that the winery he owns in Napa Valley was still open during the fourth weekend of July, amid the state demanding wineries shutting down in other counties.

Yes, Newsom’s winery wasn’t in one of those counties, and he turned over power to another faction as he went into politics. However, though he did not interfere personally, the present president’s proactive thought about his company concerns—his sister, Hilary Newsom Callan—may have “modeled” any good conduct for the Californians.

The scab has been cured for a long time. One who did not have the idea, though, that the CDPH recommendations were to extend to Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas meetings on October 9.

In addition to the three-house limit, the guidelines also specified that meetings must take place outside, guests should only use the bathrooms if they are “frequently sanitized” and have to sit six feet away from those not in their home.

This sparked the kind of backlash on social media that you would expect:

Don’t worry, however, Newsom insisted—not that’s the Thanksgiving advice.

“I read somewhere that some people say we’ve set out holiday guidance,” Newsom said last month, according to Deadline. “They were actually fooled or, deliberately deceived them. We haven’t laid out the Thanksgiving Rules.”

Conveniently, the Newsom administration released the instructions on Friday, the same day that the French Laundry storey broke. It’s hardly a positive omen that a little fanfare is issued at the end of the week but California health secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly has been trotted out to announce the update. Not everybody who freaked out last month will be relieved.

A touch of background: California actually has four stages of COVID-19 management: purple, red, orange and yellow, in decreasing order of intensity.

The good news is that now everybody doesn’t have to eat outside All events must be held outdoors in the Purple Tier, and indoor gatherings are strictly prohibited in the Red, Orange, and Yellow Tiers.” Bad news: according to Politico, more than half of the state’s population is actually in the Purple Tier, and more counties likely to be added next week.

There is also a mandated six-foot seat difference for diners that are not in the same household and “face coverings must be worn in compliance with the CDPH Guide to the Use of Face Coverings, unless an exception is available.”

Ghaly was asked about Newsom’s visit to the French laundry during the media conference. According to KABC-TV, “he said that his attention was on reducing the spread of COVID-19 in the state and referring reporters to Newsom’s comment.”

However, Robert Salonga in the San Jose Mercury News astutely observed that for the 20 minutes or so of the news conference leading up to that issue, Ghaly repeated a variety of health and safety advisories that effectively instructed Californians not to do what Newsom did.”

If only the governor has modeled better conduct for all of us. Now if you’re going to forgive me, I’m going to have to cook a pearl tapioca sabayon with Island Creek oysters and Regiis Ova caviar as they sell at The French Laundry. I’m getting 12 households over for dinner, and I’m going to be spoiled if keeping those ingredients fresh for a lot of people isn’t hard, particularly if you’re serving such a fragrant dish in an unventilated room.

Plus, I need to google what the “sabayon” is like. He led me down the primrose road to the ruin of COVID, that of Gavin Newsom.

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Avalanche begins training camp with heralded MacKinnon line intact

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Avalanche begins training camp with heralded MacKinnon line intact

Day 1 of on-ice Avalanche training camp identified what coach Jared Bednar and his staff are thinking with forward lines and defensive combinations.

Call it a road map to scoring and defending for a team that is replacing five forwards and defensemen who played in the June 10 season-ending loss to the Vegas Golden Knights in Round 2 of the playoffs.

The lines and pairings are bound to change throughout 2021-22, but it looked familiar at the top Thursday.

The so-called MGM Line (or Money Line?) — center Nathan MacKinnon and wingers Gabe Landeskog and Mikko Rantanen — remained intact. And sans Brandon Saad, who was lost to St. Louis in free agency, five of the top-six forwards from last year remain in the same role.

Bednar said Landeskog and second-line left winger Andre Burakovsky will again be interchangeable, with Landeskog dropping down to play with second-line center Nazem Kadri and Valeri Nichushkin on occasion.

But the plan again is to ride the heralded MGM/Money Line until it fails or Bednar sees a need to tinker.

“I really like what Landy provides to that line, but I also like what he’s able to give Naz, for instance, in support,” Bednar said. “A lot of that, for me, doesn’t just depend on how the top line is playing or the other lines are playing. It’s like if Burky’s playing real well, he’s an obvious fit to go up with Mac and Mikko. If he’s playing real well and their line isn’t doing a lot but he seems dangerous, it’s an easy move to slide him up to the left wing and move Landy down to play with Naz and Nichushkin.

“If anyone else can elevate their game to a point where we feel like they can help Mikko and Mac, we’ll get other options to give us a little more depth.”

MacKinnon and Landeskog, who sat side-by-side at the speaker podium after the first session, are proponents of sticking together with Rantanen.

“We’ve been together for four or five years now (and) today, first day back, there’s no rust, the chemistry is there — it’s easy reading off each other,” MacKinnon said. “It’s a lot of fun. We’re lucky that we have that. I feel like a lot of players on teams have to kind of go through that process but it’s easy for us.”

Added Landeskog, “We know each other very well now and we continue to build off of each other on the ice and, even our chemistry off the ice. We’re all kind of similar in age and I think we complement each other. I think every good line says that about one another but for us, we’re three guys that play a little bit differently, all three of us. But it comes down to hard work and that’s where it starts for us.”

Bednar also came up with the following in the first of four on-ice camp days:

— The third line consists of three natural centers from the NCAA development route — rookie Alex Newhook (Boston College) and Tyson Jost (North Dakota) and J.T. Compher (Michigan). Newhook centered the trio.

— The fourth line has two newcomers, Darren Helm and center Mikhail Maltsev, playing with Logan O’Connor.

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Wainwright reaches 2,000 strike-out milestone

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Wainwright reaches 2,000 strike-out milestone

MILWAUKEE, WI – Pitcher Adam Wainwright just hit another milestone. He is the second Cardinals player to reach 2,000 strike-outs. The other player is Bob Gibson.

The Cardinals are currently playing the Brewers in Milwaukee. The team has been on a winning streak with 11 games. That is the most the team has won in a row over 20 years.

The Cards current lead in the NL wild-card race is four and a half games over both the Reds and Phillies with 11 games to go in the regular season.

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Hell’s Kitchen winner dishes on life after finale

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Hell’s Kitchen winner dishes on life after finale

ST. LOUIS– Maplewood Chef Trent Garvey is joining FOX2Now for a Facebook live after winning this season of Hell’s Kitchen: Young Gun. He will be taking your questions and discussing what he’s been up to since he won the show.

He is now the head chef at Gordon Ramsay Steak at the Paris hotel in Las Vegas.

“Trenton is everything I could want in a protege,” said Ramsay after announcing Garvey won.

Chef Garvey, 25, is from Union, Missouri. He is the executive chef at The Blue Duck in Maplewood.

After he was chosen as the winner, Trent proposed to his girlfriend Macee. She and Trent’s dad were on hand for the finale.

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Nuggets Podcast: Michael Malone and Tim Connelly talk MPJ, Jamal Murray, Nikola Jokic and Nuggets’ upcoming season

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Nuggets Podcast: Michael Malone and Tim Connelly talk MPJ, Jamal Murray, Nikola Jokic and Nuggets’ upcoming season

In the first Nuggets Ink podcast of the 2021-22 season, head coach Michael Malone and team president Tim Connelly join beat writer Mike Singer and columnist Mark Kiszla for a discussion before the start of training camp. Among the topics discussed:

  • Where are things at with Michael Porter Jr.’s potential contract extension? Is the team optimistic something can get worked out prior to the season? How has the young forward developed within the Nuggets’ team-first culture? How has Malone’s relationship with Porter grown through the years?
  • How is rehab going for Jamal Murray? Is the team hopeful he will be able to see the floor by the end of the season? What was the scene like in the locker room in the immediate aftermath of Murray’s season-ending ACL injury last spring?
  • What more can be asked of Nikola Jokic after he just submitted the first NBA MVP season in franchise history? What has his mindset been during this offseason? Time to relax or push even harder?
  • How important was it to the team to sign Aaron Gordon to a long-term contract? What did he show Malone and Connelly during his brief time in Denver last spring that convinced them he was an important piece of the Nuggets’ future?
  • What do Malone and Connelly see as the formula to the team’s unprecedented success during the past three seasons? How much of that can be attributed to luck? And how much is it about the franchise’s strong organizational structure?
  • During a live question-and-answer session, one audience member asks: What does Bol Bol have to do to get on the floor more consistently.

Subscribe to the podcast
SoundCloud | iTunes | Stitcher | Spotify | RSS

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Tennessee grocery store attack: ‘He kept on shooting’

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Store attack: ‘He kept on shooting, shooting, shooting’

By JONATHAN MATTISE

A gunman attacked a grocery store in an upscale Tennessee suburb on Thursday afternoon, killing one person and wounding 12 others before the suspect was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound at the store, authorities said.

Collierville Police Chief Dale Lane said the shooting broke out at a Kroger grocery in his suburban community about 30 miles (50 kilometers) east of Memphis. He said the gunman shot 13 others and himself, and that 12 of the victims were taken to hospitals, some with very serious injuries.

One Kroger worker, Brignetta Dickerson, told WREG-TV she was working a cash register when she heard what at first she thought were balloons popping.

“And, here he comes right behind us and started shooting,” Dickerson said. “And, he kept on shooting, shooting, shooting. He shot one of my co-workers in the head and shot one of my customers in the stomach.”

Lane said police received a call about 1:30 p.m. about the shooting and arrived within minutes, finding multiple people with gunshots when they entered the building.

He said a police SWAT team and other officers went aisle to aisle in the store to find people who sought cover or were in hiding, taking them to safety. He said the shooter, whom he described as male, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“We found people hiding in freezers, in locked offices. They were doing what they had been trained to do: run, hide, fight,” the chief said without elaborating.

Dickerson, the employee, said her co-worker, who is in his 20s, was shot in the head and said he wanted his mother to be notified.

“I left her a voicemail that he was alert and talking,” Dickerson said, adding that she was still trying to reach her.

Another employee, Glenda McDonald, described the chaotic scene to WHBQ-TV.

“I was walking back towards the floral department and I heard a gunshot,” she said. “It sounded like it was coming from the deli. And I ran out the front door and they had already shot the front door.”

Lane briefed reporters at the scene afterward, calling it a sad day for his department.

“I’ve been involved in this for 34 years and I’ve never seen anything like it,” he said.

The identities of the shooter and the victims were not immediately released. The suspect’s vehicle was in the store’s parking lot and remained there as part of the investigation, the chief said.

He added that investigators were seeking to piece together how the shooting unfolded, adding, “It’s going to take a little bit before we know what happened.”

“Let’s get through the investigation,” Lane said. “Remember, we’re two hours away from the most horrific event that’s occurred in Collierville history.”

Collierville is a growing suburb of more than 51,000 people with a median household income of about $114,000, according to U.S. census figures. Set in a rural and historic area, the town square has largely become known for its boutiques and bed and breakfasts.

Earlier this year, Tennessee became the latest state to allow most adults 21 and older to carry handguns without first clearing a state-level background check and training. The measure was signed into law by Republican Gov. Bill Lee over objections from some law enforcement groups and gun control advocates concerned the measure would possibly lead to more gun violence.

The Kroger Co., based in Cincinnati, Ohio, issued a statement that it was “deeply saddened” by the shooting and was cooperating with law enforcement. The company in 2019 asked its customers not to openly carry guns while visiting its stores.

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Rockies can’t close the deal, lose to Dodgers in 10 innings

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Rockies can’t close the deal, lose to Dodgers in 10 innings

The big stage proved too big for the Rockies.

With a chance to throw a gut punch to the Los Angeles Dodgers’ chance for their ninth straight National League West title, the Rockies blew a 5-3 lead and ultimately lost, 7-5, in 10 innings Thursday afternoon at Coors Field.

With Justin Turner on second base to open the 10th, Max Muncy ripped a two-run homer to center off Rockies’ rookie Lucas Gilbreath. The lefty entered the 10th inning having pitched 17 scoreless outings dating back to Aug. 8. But Muncy ambushed Gilbreath’s first-pitch fastball for his 35th homer of the season.

Colorado took a 5-3 lead in the fifth on a two-run homer by Raimel Tapia off Dodgers ace Max Scherzer and held a lead until the ninth. Tapia’s blast off the second-deck facade in right field was his first home run since May 21. Tapia connected on Scherzer’s full-count cutter.

The Dodgers took two of three games in the crucial series as they attempt to keep pace in the National League West with San Francisco. Los Angeles entered the game trailing the Giants by two games with 10 games left in the season.

L.A. put the Rockies on edge in the eighth against reliever Jhoulys Chacin. Trea Turner tagged Chacin for a single and scored on Pollock’s double, but Chacin got pinch-hitter Will Smith to fly out to center, preserving Colorado’s 5-4 lead.

But in the ninth, the Dodgers tied the game, 5-5, on three consecutive two-out singles off closer Carlos Estevez. Seager’s hard comebacker ricocheted off Estevez’s right leg for a hit, advancing Mookie Betts to second. Estevez, though limping, stayed in the game but gave up the game-tying single to Turner.

Colorado starter Kyle Freeland’s performance wasn’t always pretty, but the lefty hung tough for six innings and he outpitched Scherzer, a leading candidate for the National League Cy Young Award.

Freeland, who engaged in an animated debate with home-plate umpire Ed Hickox over balls and strikes, gave up three runs on eight hits. He walked one and struck out five.

Scherzer entered the game looking invincible, carrying a 7-0 record with 0.78 ERA in nine starts with Los Angeles since he was acquired from the Nationals at the trade deadline. In 58 innings with the Dodgers, he had given up just five earned runs.

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Store attack: ‘He kept on shooting, shooting, shooting’

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Store attack: ‘He kept on shooting, shooting, shooting’

By JONATHAN MATTISE

A shooter attacked a grocery store in an upscale Tennessee suburb on Thursday afternoon, killing one person and wounding 12 others before the shooter was subsequently found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound at the store, authorities said.

Collierville Police Chief Dale Lane said the shooting broke out at a Kroger store in his suburban community about 30 miles (50 kilometers) east of Memphis. He said the shooter shot 13 others and himself, and that 12 of the victims were taken to hospitals, some with very serious injuries.

One Kroger worker, Brignetta Dickerson, told WREG-TV she was working a cash register when she heard what at first she thought were balloons popping.

“And, here he comes right behind us and started shooting,” Dickerson said. “And, he kept on shooting, shooting, shooting. He shot one of my co-workers in the head and shot one of my customers in the stomach.”

Lane said police received a call about 1:30 p.m. about the shooting and arrived within minutes, finding multiple people with gunshots when they entered the building.

He said a police SWAT team and other officers went aisle to aisle in the store to find people who sought cover or were in hiding, taking them to safety. He said the shooter, whom he described as male, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“We found people hiding in freezers, in locked offices. They were doing what they had been trained to do: run, hide, fight,” the chief said without elaborating.

Dickerson, the employee, said her co-worker, who is in his 20s, was shot in the head and said he wanted his mother to be notified.

“I left her a voicemail that he was alert and talking,” Dickerson said, adding that she was still trying to reach her.

Another employee, Glenda McDonald, described the chaotic scene to WHBQ-TV.

“I was walking back towards the floral department and I heard a gunshot,” she said. “It sounded like it was coming from the deli. And I ran out the front door and they had already shot the front door.”

Lane briefed reporters at the scene afterward, calling it a sad day for his department.

“I’ve been involved in this for 34 years and I’ve never seen anything like it,” he said.

The identities of the shooter and the victims were not immediately released. The suspect’s vehicle was in the store’s parking lot and remained there as part of the investigation, the chief said.

He added that investigators were seeking to piece together how the shooting unfolded, adding, “It’s going to take a little bit before we know what happened.”

“Let’s get through the investigation,” Lane said. “Remember, we’re two hours away from the most horrific event that’s occurred in Collierville history.”

Collierville is a growing suburb of more than 51,000 people with a median household income of about $114,000, according to U.S. census figures. Seet in a rural and historic area, the town square has largely become known for its boutiques and bed and breakfasts.

Earlier this year, Tennessee became the latest state to allow most adults 21 and older to carry handguns without first clearing a state-level background check and training. The measure was signed into law by Republican Gov. Bill Lee over objections from some law enforcement groups and gun control advocates concerned the measure would possibly lead to more gun violence.

The Kroger Company, based in Cincinnati, Ohio, issued a statement that it was “deeply saddened” by the shooting and was cooperating with law enforcement. The company in 2019 asked its customers not to openly carry guns while visiting its stores.

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Christian school must comply with Jeffco’s mask mandate, judge rules

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Jeffco public health director spars with Christian school attorneys in court over mask mandate

A judge issued a temporary injunction Thursday requiring Faith Christian Academy to comply with Jefferson County’s mask mandate for students and ordering the school to allow inspection by county public health officials.

District Judge Randall Arp ruled that the county’s mask mandate didn’t violate the constitutional right to freedom of religion, and that Gov. Jared Polis allowing the state declaration of emergency to expire does not mean that local public health agencies can’t impose orders on their own.

“The court will note that the health order was not faith-based or designated at religious practice,” he said. “It was designated to apply to schools, which then also include religious or church schools.”

The temporary injunction, which had been sought by Jefferson County Public Health, will remain in place until the end of the school year or May 31 at the latest, unless another resolution is reached before then.

The ruling follows a three-day hearing that began Tuesday, the courtroom overflowing with school supporters.

The health department sought the judge’s order last week to compel three private Christian schools to both follow the county’s mask mandate and to allow immediate access to health inspectors to conduct compliance checks in their facilities.

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New look at retirement living: Co-op owners like their very-low maintenance lifestyle, and social life it fosters

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New look at retirement living: Co-op owners like their very-low maintenance lifestyle, and social life it fosters

Colorado buyers are just getting used to the idea of senior cooperatives—but 700 miles north in Minnesota, age-62-plus co-ops are so well accepted and popular that buyers there focus less on the ownership structure, and more on the results they deliver—VERY low maintenance, and more vivid relationships with neighbors.

You can find out more about how those work at an informational coffee Wednesday, Oct. 6, at The Ranch Country Club in Westminster—a few miles east of where Applewood Pointe will take shape on a ten-acre site wrapped by trails near Standley Lake.

Developer United Properties has done over 30 senior living communities (a mix of rental, assisted living, and cooperatives), 17 of which are cooperatives in the Twin Cities area, with three more there in the works. United Properties has a 100-year reputation in Minnesota.

Director of Sales Molly Goenner says Twin Cities buyers are overwhelmingly lured by a low-maintenance lifestyle (no more shoveling walks, raking leaves, or climbing ladders to change a light bulb); as well as by the intangible feeling of being part of a neighborhood community.

Goenner adds that Applewood Pointe’s concept offers roomier homes (all are 2-bedroom, and some have an option for an added den/sunroom), and a higher level of luxury finishes than other co-ops deliver. Owners also get a wide range of social-nurturing amenities: big great room, club room, and party areas, library, art/woodwork studios, and outdoor living spaces.

On Applewood Pointe’s large site at Wadsworth Parkway at W. 108th, that’s envisioned to include a 3/4-mile trail feeding into Westminster’s Walnut Creek Trail; along with a putting green and bocce ball court, outdoor kitchen, and an RTD stop.

Residents don’t get a pool—an add-on that owners prefer to avoid, particularly with Westminster’s widely regarded rec centers and golf courses close at hand.

Reservation holders earn a priority number that can hold a position in the 85-home community for a refundable $500 deposit, and once 60% of total available sales is reached members can select a home with an initial payment installment of $4,500. Members then choose their share percentage tier—the value of their selected home.

You might choose to invest just 20% (as little as $97,300); or can opt for 40%, 60%, or 80%. A higher investment means a lower monthly co-op fee. Either way, the monthlies cover much more than typical HOA dues do—mortgage, reserves, landscaping, inside/outdoor maintenance, property tax, water, cable TV, dedicated heated parking spot, and storage.

Goenner says that buying into a cooperative is a safe and predictable investment that will earn appreciation each and every year.

“And you’re becoming part of a rich member-run community designed around rewarding social interactions, low maintenance, and easy living.

“Watching the relationships form,” she says, “is the most beautiful part of cooperative living. It just happens and it’s magical.”

Her presentation is Oct. 6 at The Ranch, west of I-25 on 120th Avenue at Tejon Street. Make a reservation at 720-499-1083.

The news and editorial staffs of The Denver Post had no role in this post’s preparation.

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Kevin Strickland appeal: Court rejects Missouri AG’s requests in 1979 killings case

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Kevin Strickland appeal: Court rejects Missouri AG’s requests in 1979 killings case

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Missouri appeals court on Thursday denied the state attorney general’s request to recuse all Jackson County judges from presiding over an upcoming evidentiary hearing for a man who the county prosecutor says was wrongfully convicted in a triple murder more than 40 years ago.

The Missouri Court of Appeals also denied Attorney General Eric Schmitt’s request to cancel the hearing for Kevin Strickland, who has been in prison for the killings since 1979 and has always maintained that he’s innocent.

Schmitt asked the court to recuse all judges in Jackson County, which includes a large part of Kansas City, because he argued that they have shown a bias in favor of Strickland. The court didn’t explain its ruling, which Schmitt plans to appeal to the state Supreme Court, according to his spokesman, Chris Nuelle, KCUR reported.

Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker has said Strickland was wrongfully convicted of the killings, and she and Strickland’s lawyers plan to argue at an Oct. 5-6 hearing that he should be exonerated and freed.

Peters Baker has said two men who admitted to taking part in the shootings said Strickland was not there, and the only witness to identify him as the shooter recanted her statement.

Schmitt, who is seeking the Republican nomination to run for a U.S. Senate seat, has said he believes Strickland is guilty.

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