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Georgia Dem Nominee Jon Ossoff’s Financial Ties to the Pro-CCP Chinese Media Firm

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Georgia Dem Nominee Jon Ossoff's Financial Ties to the Pro-CCP Chinese Media Firm

The twin Jan. 5 runoffs in Georgia that will determine the balance of the Senate will be any of the most costly, if not the most expensive, congressional elections of all time.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the National Republican Senate Committee, in conjunction with Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, raised more than $32.6 million in the six days leading up to Thursday. The Democratic Senate Campaign Committee did not have their fundraising figures, but the PAC run by Georgia Democrat Stacey Abrams raised $9.8 million.

Also before it became clear that Perdue had not secured 50% of the vote and would face Democrat Jon Ossoff in January, CNBC estimated that both parties would spend more than $100 million on the race. Ironic, then that a decent amount of the campaign drive on the Democratic side would be spent on a $5,000 gift of wallpaper.

According to National Analysis, Ossoff obtained $5,000 from PCCW Media Limited, Hong Kong’s largest telecommunications firm. PCCW is run by Richard Li, an avowed foe of “democracy” for his hometown, who goes so far as to call the contemplation of the matter “a misuse of the energy of civilization.”

The money paid to Ossoff by PCCW over a period of two years was not listed in his first set of financial disclosure papers and was not declared until May. Payments were discreetly revealed during the amended filing in July and were first recorded by the National Review in September.

So where were the fees coming from?

Ossoff has political experience—according to Business Insider, he spent five years writing bills for Georgia Democratic Rep. Hank Johnson (the idea that Guam could capsize if too many Marines were stationed there). However, Ossoff came to Georgia politics with his most recent background as a documentary filmmaker.

According to the National Analysis article, Ossoff’s campaign said the money came from the broadcast of “Two Inquiries by Jon’s ISIS War Crimes Against Women and Girls Company” by his London-based company, Insight TWI, adding that it was one of the hundreds of TV stations and distributors in more than 30 countries that broadcast Jon’s work.”

“Jon fully supports the pro-democracy struggle in Hong Kong and opposes the violence and authoritarianism of the Communist Party of China,” the spokesperson added.

Should this preclude the electorate from sending Jon Ossoff to the Senate?

You wouldn’t believe why, given the Nationwide Overview of his campaign speeches, there was no talk of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement.

Li, also a consultant at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, a think tank located in Washington, D.C., has a lot to say about it.

In 2019, at the height of the protest movement in Hong Kong, Li called for the “social order under the rule of law” to be preserved through the Hong Kong CCP and the Macau State Council Office.

In 2016, when Li’s media empire faced a boycott for providing life-long jobs to pro-democracy singer Denise Ho Wan-see, according to National Analysis, Li said he was “strongly opposed to the independence of Hong Kong.”

“Oh, Mr. Richard Li and MOOV would like to say explicitly that the company and Mr. Li value freedom of speech,” said his company in a statement.

“However both Mr. Li and the Company are deeply opposed to Hong Kong’s independence, and they conclude that Hong Kong’s independence will not be possible, and debating Hong Kong’s independence is a waste of society’s money.”

During a bitter debate in October between the contestants, Ossoff railed at Perdue for raising the issue.

At one point during the discussion, Purdue drew out a paper which he said showed that Ossoff was attempting to conceal his ties to PCCW, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“He has to own it because sooner or later, we need someone in the U.S. Senate who can stand up to Communist China,” Perdue said.

Ossoff answered that Perdue had “continued to demean himself.”

“Second of all you’ve been lengthening my nose in attack advertisements to show people that I’m Jewish. And when that didn’t succeed, you started to call me some sort of Islamic terrorist. Then when that didn’t succeed, you started calling me a Chinese Communist,” said Ossoff.

By way of clarification, the first incident concerned a Perdue commercial, which the campaign said was “handled by an outside seller” in which the skewed image of Ossoff seemed to have a bigger nose, according to The Forward. And after the company repudiated the commercial, Ossoff proceeded to single out the Perdue campaign, claiming that the enlargement of the Jewish people’s nose “is the oldest, most blatant, least original anti-Semitic trope in history.”

The second included payments earned by Ossoff from Al Jazeera, as stated by the Washington Free Beacon.

There are a lot of problems with the Qatari-backed news agency. Among them, uh, is the history of anti-Semitic media. It’s also known for its strong anti-American slant. And then, as the Washington Free Beacon points out, this is still a change from the days when the network was dubbed (not without reason) “a mouthpiece for terrorists” to air the flattering cover of Osama bin Laden in the immediate aftermath of 9/11.

And last, of course, we’ve got the PCCW Media.

In any case, Ossoff’s response is just the sort of propaganda that makes the liberals steam, and I’m sure it’s been whipped up into a post-haste donor shot. In a matter of minutes, his people were presumably busy plugging the video into Final Cut Pro, adding some stirring music in as a backing track, and getting the sucker out.

But it doesn’t justify why Ossoff’s organization took funds from a company that was staunchly opposed to Hong Kong’s independence at the same time that it was seeking to jumpstart its political career.

According to National Analysis, Ossoff’s campaign “has refused to comment about whether he condemns Li’s hostility to the island’s pro-democracy movement.”

Nor does it justify why Ossoff continued to create material for Al Jazeera until 2018, according to the Washington Free Beacon. That will be a full year after his first run for Congress, a failed special election campaign against Republican Karen Handel that gained national coverage, if only because it was the first Congressional race after President Donald Trump’s election.

Ossoff has a good piece of money to deal with. Undoubtedly, some of the $100 million would be used to continue to give people amnesia about PCCW and Al Jazeera.

However, both Georgia and America deserve more than a candidate who wants us to forget things like this.

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Should I get a flu shot if I’m getting a COVID vaccine booster?

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Should I get a flu shot if I’m getting a COVID vaccine booster?

ST. LOUIS – COVID-19 booster shots could become more widely available right as doctors recommend that people get their flu shots. But is it okay to get both vaccines at the same time?

The flu season is upon us at a time when the country already is battling a resurgence of the coronavirus. Doctors are urging Americans to avail themselves of any and all vaccines they are eligible for.

An FDA advisory panel is endorsing the Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccines for people 65 and older and those with certain health conditions that compromise their immune systems. The CDC says, yes, you can get the COVID vaccine and the flu shot at the same time and one won’t interfere with the other.

“Flu vaccine influenza vaccine has been co-administered with other vaccines for decades people needed their tetanus or some other vaccine at the same time we always did that we do them in separate arms because if you have redness or a reaction you want to know which one it was,” said Dr. Peter Montgomery, a physician with SSM Health Family Medicine.

Montgomery says the flu shots are available now.

“We want to get people vaccinated hopefully by Thanksgiving and it will take a while to get everybody in to get that done, ideally for the whole population around Halloween, so I would say if you can get it now, get it now,” he said.

The flu season can run from now until spring. SSM Health is reporting zero flu cases throughout its system so far this flu season. Last year, there were few flu cases reported. That is attributed to widespread mask use and social distancing.

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Two suspects arrested for shooting death of Denver man in Adams County

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Two suspects arrested for shooting death of Denver man in Adams County

Two suspects have been arrested in the shooting death of a Denver man in an Adams County apartment complex parking lot.

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Oldest human footprints in North America found in New Mexico

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Oldest human footprints in North America found in New Mexico

WASHINGTON — Fossilized footprints discovered in New Mexico indicate that early humans were walking across North America around 23,000 years ago, researchers reported Thursday.

The first footprints were found in a dry lake bed in White Sands National Park in 2009. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey recently analyzed seeds stuck in the footprints to determine their approximate age, ranging from around 22,800 and 21,130 years ago.

The findings may shed light on a mystery that has long intrigued scientists: When did people first arrive in the Americas, after dispersing from Africa and Asia?

Most scientists believe ancient migration came by way of a now-submerged land bridge that connected Asia to Alaska. Based on various evidence — including stone tools, fossil bones and genetic analysis — other researchers have offered a range of possible dates for human arrival in the Americas, from 13,000 to 26,000 years ago or more.

The current study provides a more solid baseline for when humans definitely were in North America, although they could have arrived even earlier, the authors say. Fossil footprints are more indisputable and direct evidence than “cultural artifacts, modified bones, or other more conventional fossils,” they wrote in the journal Science, which published the study Thursday.

“What we present here is evidence of a firm time and location,” they said.

Based on the size of the footprints, researchers believe that at least some were made by children and teenagers who lived during the last ice age.

David Bustos, the park’s resource program manager, spotted the first footprints in ancient wetlands in 2009. He and others found more in the park over the years.

“We knew they were old, but we had no way to date the prints before we discovered some with (seeds) on top,” he said Thursday.

Made of fine silt and clay, the footprints are fragile, so the researchers had to work quickly to gather samples, Bustos said.

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Carolina RB Christian McCaffrey out at Texans with hamstring injury

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Carolina RB Christian McCaffrey out at Texans with hamstring injury

HOUSTON — Carolina running back Christian McCaffrey left Thursday night’s game against the Houston Texans with a hamstring injury and will not return.

McCaffrey had a 2-yard run early in the second quarter and went to the medical tent on the sideline soon after that. The team announced he was out for the rest of the game later in the second quarter.

McCaffrey had seven carries for 31 yards and two receptions for nine yards before he was injured.

McCaffrey has been great in the first two games for the Panthers. He entered the game with 45 carries for 170 yards and 14 receptions for 154 yards.

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MLB, union send notices of intent to seek labor changes

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MLB, union send notices of intent to seek labor changes

NEW YORK — Major League Baseball and the players’ association sent the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service letters of intent to seek new labor terms as the Dec. 1 expiration of the sport’s collective bargaining agreement approaches.

The notices, a formality under federal labor law required during every negotiation, were exchanged Aug. 26 by Deputy Commissioner Dan Halem and Ian Penny, the general counsel of the Major League Baseball Players Association.

Under federal labor law, a collective bargaining agreement may not be modified or terminated unless a side seeking to make changes notifies the other side more than 60 days in advance of expiration and tells the mediation service within 30 days of giving notice.

Baseball has not had a work stoppage since the 7 1/2-month strike that wiped out the 1994 World Series. The sides reached agreements without work stoppages in 2002, 2006, 2011 and 2016, but the relationship has become more strained in recent years as the salary escalation has slowed.

The average salary rose from $3.97 million in 2016 to just under $4.1 million in 2017, according to union figures, then dropped to $3.9 million in 2020 before accounting for a shortened season caused by the pandemic that reduced the figure to about $1.6 million.

Based on opening day figures, the 2021 final average is likely to be in the $3.6 million to $3.7 million range.

Negotiations have proceeded slowly, and both sides appear to be bracing for a lockout that could start either on Dec. 1 or when players are scheduled to report to spring training in February.

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House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Trump advisers, associates

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House Jan. 6 panel subpoenas Trump advisers, associates

WASHINGTON -- A House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol has issued its first subpoenas, demanding records and testimony from four of former President Donald Trump’s close advisers and associates who were in contact with him before and during the attack.

In a significant escalation for the panel, Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., announced the subpoenas of former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, former White House Deputy Chief of Staff for Communications Dan Scavino, former Defense Department official Kashyap Patel and former Trump adviser Steve Bannon. The four men are among Trump’s most loyal aides.

Committee Chairman Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., wrote to the four that the committee is investigating “the facts, circumstances, and causes” of the attack and asked them to produce documents and appear at depositions in mid-October.

The panel, formed over the summer, is now launching the interview phase of its investigation after sorting through thousands of pages of documents it had requested in August from federal agencies and social media companies. The goal is to provide a complete accounting of what went wrong when the Trump loyalists brutally beat police, broke through windows and doors and interrupted the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory — and to prevent anything like it from ever happening again.

Thompson says in letters to each of the witnesses that investigators believe they have relevant information about the lead-up to the insurrection. In the case of Bannon, for instance, Democrats cite his Jan. 5 prediction that ”(a)ll hell is going to break loose tomorrow” and his communications with Trump one week before the riot in which he urged the president to focus his attention on Jan. 6.

In the letter to Meadows, Thompson cites his efforts to overturn Trump’s defeat in the weeks prior to the insurrection and his pressure on state officials to push the former president’s false claims of widespread voter fraud.

“You were the president’s chief of staff and have critical information regarding many elements of our inquiry,” Thompson wrote. “It appears you were with or in the vicinity of President Trump on January 6, had communication with the president and others on January 6 regarding events at the Capitol and are a witness regarding the activities of the day.”

Thompson wrote that the panel has “credible evidence” of Meadows’ involvement in events within the scope of the committee’s investigation. That also includes involvement in the “planning and preparation of efforts to contest the presidential election and delay the counting of electoral votes.”

The letter also signals that the committee is interested in Meadows’ requests to Justice Department officials for investigations into potential election fraud. Former Attorney General William Barr has said the Justice Department did not find fraud that could have affected the election’s outcome.

The panel cites reports that Patel, a Trump loyalist who had recently been placed at the Pentagon, was talking to Meadows “nonstop” the day the attack unfolded. In the letter to Patel, Thompson wrote that based on documents obtained by the committee, there is “substantial reason to believe that you have additional documents and information relevant to understanding the role played by the Defense Department and the White House in preparing for and responding to the attack on the U.S. Capitol.”

Scavino was with Trump on Jan. 5 during a discussion about how to persuade members of Congress not to certify the election for Joe Biden, according to reports cited by the committee. On Twitter, he promoted Trump’s rally ahead of the attack and encouraged supporters to “be a part of history.” In the letter to Scavino, Thompson said the panel’s records indicate that Scavino was “tweeting messages from the White House” on Jan. 6.

Thompson wrote that it appears Scavino was with Trump on Jan. 6 and may have “materials relevant to his videotaping and tweeting” messages that day. He noted Scavino’s “long service” to the former president, spanning more than a decade.

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Major Case Squad called to St. Clair County for investigation

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Major Case Squad called to St. Clair County for investigation

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Some Missouri senators want to give the Department of Social Services the ability to block abortion providers from Medicaid funding for unethical behavior. 

After a special session over the summer to renew the Federal Reimbursement Allowance (FRA), the tax from health care providers that funds Missouri’s Medicaid program, Senate leaders formed a committee to address some members’ concerns over Medicaid funds going to abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. 

The Senate Interim Committee on Medicaid Accountability and Taxpayer Protection met for a third time Thursday since July. The focus during the hearing was to discuss a committee report that made changes to the state’s Medicaid system. Sen. Bill White, R-Joplin, is the committee chairman and he read the six-page report. 

“The state has the authority in Medicaid programs to establish qualification standards for Medicaid providers and to take action against providers that fail to meet those standards,” White said.

One of the proposals would allow joint investigations into Medicaid providers from the Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). This regulatory proposal would need to be approved by members of the committee and then sent to the department. 

“The committee urges DSS and DHSS to collaborate in modifying and expanding the existing rules to incorporate consideration by DSS of any state law,” White said.

“These violations of state law may include failure to ensure informed patient consent, failure to retain medical records, failure to cooperate with DHSS during an investigation, failure to ensure adequate facilities and sterilized equipment, and failure to provide required printed materials to women referred to an out-of-state abortion facility.”

White and other members are asking DSS and DHSS to draft emergency rules and put them into effect as soon as possible. Under this change, DSS would be able to consider revoking or denying a license based on DHSS reports. 

Sen. Lauren Arthur, D-Kansas City, is concerned the language could affect more health care providers than what’s intended.  

“If this is a backdoor attempt to defund Planned Parenthood, I do worry about the impact it would have on health care access,” Arthur said. “It doesn’t seem like there’s solution for who would feel that gap.”

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer, told the committee she’s worried the investigations could cause a gap in health care coverage for Missourians. 

“I’m concerned about what we are pushing ahead and trying to move forward quickly in a process that ends up perhaps taking away necessary healthcare from our recipients,” Schupp said.

“I’m not sure how that’s beneficial to the state or to the recipient. I think this has the intention of allowing DSS to have more control without having to do their own investigation.”

One proposed law change in the report allows the state to deny or revoke Medicaid funding to MO HealthNet providers, like abortion facilities which in Missouri is only Planned Parenthood, for unethical behavior. 

“That Missouri has an interest in protecting unborn children throughout pregnancy and ensuring respect for all human life from conception to natural death,” White said. 

This law change would require approval from the General Assembly when members return in January. Arthur said she can’t support the language because she’s worried it could affect the entire state’s Medicaid funding. 

“Until there is that assurance that we are in compliance, I think we are taking a gamble that I’m not comfortable with,” Arthur said.

Planned Parenthood is already prohibited from using Medicaid funds for abortions. Another key part of the proposal means if an abortion facility, like Planned Parenthood, fell out of compliance in another state, Missouri could force the location in the Central West End in St. Louis to close. 

White said members are expected to sign off on the report in the coming days with the report being sent to the departments by early next week.

The committee will meet again Oct. 4 to hear from MO Healthnet about transparency issues. 

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Where do the bulk of Missouri’s medical marijuana Missouri patients reside?

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Missouri veterans fund receives $6.8M from medical marijuana

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Some Missouri senators want to give the Department of Social Services the ability to block abortion providers from Medicaid funding for unethical behavior. 

After a special session over the summer to renew the Federal Reimbursement Allowance (FRA), the tax from health care providers that funds Missouri’s Medicaid program, Senate leaders formed a committee to address some members’ concerns over Medicaid funds going to abortion providers, such as Planned Parenthood. 

The Senate Interim Committee on Medicaid Accountability and Taxpayer Protection met for a third time Thursday since July. The focus during the hearing was to discuss a committee report that made changes to the state’s Medicaid system. Sen. Bill White, R-Joplin, is the committee chairman and he read the six-page report. 

“The state has the authority in Medicaid programs to establish qualification standards for Medicaid providers and to take action against providers that fail to meet those standards,” White said.

One of the proposals would allow joint investigations into Medicaid providers from the Department of Social Services (DSS) and the Department of Health and Senior Services (DHSS). This regulatory proposal would need to be approved by members of the committee and then sent to the department. 

“The committee urges DSS and DHSS to collaborate in modifying and expanding the existing rules to incorporate consideration by DSS of any state law,” White said.

“These violations of state law may include failure to ensure informed patient consent, failure to retain medical records, failure to cooperate with DHSS during an investigation, failure to ensure adequate facilities and sterilized equipment, and failure to provide required printed materials to women referred to an out-of-state abortion facility.”

White and other members are asking DSS and DHSS to draft emergency rules and put them into effect as soon as possible. Under this change, DSS would be able to consider revoking or denying a license based on DHSS reports. 

Sen. Lauren Arthur, D-Kansas City, is concerned the language could affect more health care providers than what’s intended.  

“If this is a backdoor attempt to defund Planned Parenthood, I do worry about the impact it would have on health care access,” Arthur said. “It doesn’t seem like there’s solution for who would feel that gap.”

Sen. Jill Schupp, D-Creve Couer, told the committee she’s worried the investigations could cause a gap in health care coverage for Missourians. 

“I’m concerned about what we are pushing ahead and trying to move forward quickly in a process that ends up perhaps taking away necessary healthcare from our recipients,” Schupp said.

“I’m not sure how that’s beneficial to the state or to the recipient. I think this has the intention of allowing DSS to have more control without having to do their own investigation.”

One proposed law change in the report allows the state to deny or revoke Medicaid funding to MO HealthNet providers, like abortion facilities which in Missouri is only Planned Parenthood, for unethical behavior. 

“That Missouri has an interest in protecting unborn children throughout pregnancy and ensuring respect for all human life from conception to natural death,” White said. 

This law change would require approval from the General Assembly when members return in January. Arthur said she can’t support the language because she’s worried it could affect the entire state’s Medicaid funding. 

“Until there is that assurance that we are in compliance, I think we are taking a gamble that I’m not comfortable with,” Arthur said.

Planned Parenthood is already prohibited from using Medicaid funds for abortions. Another key part of the proposal means if an abortion facility, like Planned Parenthood, fell out of compliance in another state, Missouri could force the location in the Central West End in St. Louis to close. 

White said members are expected to sign off on the report in the coming days with the report being sent to the departments by early next week.

The committee will meet again Oct. 4 to hear from MO Healthnet about transparency issues. 

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Home explosion in Cahokia Heights

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Home explosion in Cahokia Heights

CAHOKIA HEIGHTS, Ill.– There was an apparent home explosion in Cahokia Heights with smoke and flames darting out of the roof.

Fire crews worked to knock out the flames and Bommarito Automotive Skyfox is over the scene.

This incident happened on St. Bartholomew Street in Cahokia Heights. Occupants of the home made it out safely with no injuries.

The family’s two cats and hamster are missing.

This is a developing story and we will update this story as new information becomes available.

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Powerball jackpot climbs to an estimated $523 million prize

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Powerball jackpot climbs to an estimated $523 million prize

The Powerball jackpot has climbed to an estimated $523 million, according to Colorado Lottery officials.

The estimated cash value is $370 million and the next drawing is on Saturday. Odds of winning the jackpot prize are 1 in 292 million.

Earlier this week, the Mega Millions jackpot was an estimated $432 million. A jackpot winning ticket was sold in New York for the Tuesday Mega Millions drawing.

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