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Biden is looking for the most aggressive US climate change effort

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climate change

President Joe Biden intends to minimize oil, gas, and coal emissions and double electricity generation from offshore wind farms by executive orders on Wednesday, in what will be the most ambitious U.S. initiative ever to stave off the worst consequences of climate change.

The directives pending his signature target federal oil and other fossil fuel subsidies and halt the new leasing of oil and gas on federal lands and waters. In the coming 10 years, they also plan to protect 30 percent of the ground and ocean waters of the nation and switch to an all-electric federal vehicle fleet.

Biden has set a goal of removing emissions from fossil fuels in the power sector by 2035 and from the U.S. economy as a whole by 2050, speeding up the growth of solar and wind energy already powered by the demand and reducing the reliance of the world on oil and gas. The ambitious strategy seeks to slow global warming caused by human beings, which magnifies severe weather incidents such as deadly wildfires in the West and drenching rainfall and hurricanes in the East. But for the president and Democrats as a whole, the accelerated speed of transition needed to stave off global warming still brings political danger.

Biden also guides organizations to concentrate assistance and funding on the low-income and minority populations that reside nearest to polluting refineries and other risks, and the oil and coal-patch cities that experience employment cuts as the U.S. continues to sharply expand its reliance on wind, solar, and other electricity sources that do not emit climate

The actions make it clear that “the White House said in a statement before Biden signed the orders, both significant short-term global emission reductions and net-zero global emissions by mid-century or before are needed to avoid setting the world on a dangerous, potentially catastrophic, climate trajectory.”

The directives are targeted at “revitalising the U.S. energy industry, conserving and leveraging our natural resources to help drive our nation towards a future of clean energy,” the White House said, while “creating well-paying jobs…” and the provision of justice for populations vulnerable to environmental damage.

Biden is now considering climate change a priority for national security. As part of Biden’s campaign promise for a $2 trillion initiative to slow global warming, the restoration plan will set aside millions of acres for tourism, biodiversity and environment efforts by 2030.

President Donald Trump, who mocked climate change research, withdrawn the U.S. from the global climate deal in Paris, opened more federal lands to the development of coal, gas and oil, and weakened fossil fuel pollution legislation. Experts warn these pollutants dangerously fuel the Earth’s atmosphere and cause flooding, droughts and other natural hazards worse.

For the week-old Biden administration, Georgia Tech climate scientist Kim Cobb called the executive orders a “excellent start”.

If this energy of Day 7 is reflective of the four-year term of this administration, there is every reason to expect that we will reach carbon neutrality faster than 2050,” Cobb said, even as key roadblocks lie ahead.”

Investment in renewable energies would net millions of jobs, Biden and his backers claim. But it would undoubtedly take years to happen, and the directives will meet strong resistance from the oil and gas and power plant sectors, as well as from many politicians, both Republican and Democratic.

The executive order is designed to postpone fracking on federal property to the point that it is no longer feasible, said Kathleen Sgamma, chair of the Western Energy Alliance, which serves oil and gas drillers in Western states. A legal challenge was promised by her party.

“The environmental left, when it comes to energy and environmental issues, leads the White House agenda,” she said. She found that in states such as Wyoming, North Dakota, Texas, and Louisiana, all won by Trump, the freeze would be felt more acutely.

Last week, a 60-day moratorium on new drilling permits was declared on U.S. lands and waters.

After the Trump administration slowed the permit review of several giant offshore wind turbine projects, Biden is aiming to double offshore wind energy output.

Significantly, it orders the reduction of expenditures by organizations that serve as subsidies to the fossil fuel industries.

The fossil fuel industry has caused enormous harm to the earth. If done right, the administration’s analysis would show the dirty fracturing and exploration must stop anywhere for good,’ said Kierán Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity, an environmental organization that has advocated for the drilling pause.

Oil industry groups blasted the move, arguing that by killing the Keystone XL oil pipeline on his first day in office, Biden had already killed thousands of oil and gas workers.

“It’s only the beginning. It would get worse,’ said Brook Simmons, president of Oklahoma’s Petroleum Alliance. The rules of physics, chemistry, and supply and demand, meanwhile, remain in place. Prices of oil and natural gas are growing, and so are home heating bills, consumer prices, and gasoline costs.

The Interior Department’s 60-day suspension order would not affect current oil and gas activities under legal licences, ensuring that activity will not come to a complete halt on the millions of acres of western and offshore land in the Gulf of Mexico where heavy fracking is concentrated. It’s also doubtful that the freeze would hit current rentals. Companies that stockpiled enough fracking licences in the final months of Trump to allow them to keep pumping oil and gas for years may further blunt the impact.

The delay in onshore exploration is limited to federal property and does not concern private land drilling, which is primarily state-regulated.

It will exclude tribal lands that are used for energy development, mostly in the West. “In accordance with the trust obligations of the U.S. government, the Interior Department will continue to consult with tribes on both renewable and conventional energy resources,” the White House said.

Around a quarter of annual U.S. output is compensated for by oil and gas produced from federal lands and waterways. The U.S. produces the equivalent of almost 550 million tonnes (500 million metric tonnes) of greenhouse gases annually from the extraction and combustion of those fuels. The Geological Survey said in a report in 2018.

Under Trump, according to an Associated Press review of government records, authorities approved approximately 1,400 licenses on federal property, mostly in Wyoming and New Mexico, during a three-month stretch that included the presidency. Those licenses that remain valid would allow businesses to continue fracking for years, effectively undercutting the environmental agenda of Biden.

On Earth Day, April 22, Biden will direct all U.S. agencies to use research and evidence-based decision-making in federal rule-making and announce a U.S.-hosted summit of climate leaders.

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Forecast: High winds and hail are possible during today’s unsettled weather

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Forecast: High winds and hail are possible during today’s unsettled weather

St. Louis Weather:

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Showers and storms with a risk for severe weather today. Damaging wind gusts will be the primary threat.

The National Weather Service reports that storms are expected until this afternoon. Some of them may not last long and most of them are not severe. But, a few of them will be strong enough to produce damaging winds, hail, and possibly a tornado. They will only impact a small part of the area. Be prepared before you head out for the day.

Check the radar to see where the storms may be forming. The weather situation appears to be an evolving situation.

The weather will be dryer tonight with more sunshine tomorrow.

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Kenyans Kipruto, Kipyogei sweep in Boston Marathon return

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Fall in: Pandemic-delayed 125th Boston Marathon returns

By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) — Kenya’s Benson Kipruto won the pandemic-delayed Boston Marathon on Monday when the race returned from a 30-month absence with a smaller, socially distanced feel and moved from the spring for the first time in its 125-year history.

Although organizers put runners through COVID-19 protocols and asked spectators to keep their distance, large crowds lined the 26.2-mile course from Hopkinton to Boston as an early drizzle cleared and temperatures rose to the low 60s for a beautiful fall day.

They watched Kipruto run away from the lead pack as it turned onto Beacon Street with about three miles to go and break the tape in 2 hours, 9 minutes, 51 seconds. Diana Kipyogei won the women’s race to complete the eighth Kenyan sweep since 2000.

A winner in Prague and Athens who finished 10th in Boston in 2019, Kipruto waited out an early breakaway by American CJ Albertson, who led by as many as two minutes at the halfway point. Kipruto took the lead at Cleveland Circle and finished 46 seconds ahead of 2016 winner Lemi Berhanu; Albertson, who turned 28 on Monday, was 10th, 1:53 back.

Kipyogei ran ahead for much of the race and finished in 2:24:45, 23 seconds ahead of 2017 winner Edna Kiplagat.

Marcel Hug of Switzerland won the men’s wheelchair race earlier despite making a wrong term in the final mile, finishing the slightly detoured route just seven seconds off his course record in 1:08:11.

Manuela Schär, also from Switzerland, won the women’s wheelchair race in 1:35:21.

Hug, who has raced Boston eight times and has five victories here, cost himself a $50,000 course record bonus when he missed the second-to-last turn, following the lead vehicle instead of turning from Commonwealth Avenue onto Hereford Street.

“The car went straight and I followed the car,” said Hug, who finished second in the Chicago Marathon by 1 second on Sunday. “But it’s my fault. I should go right, but I followed the car.”

With fall foliage replacing the spring daffodils and more masks than mylar blankets, the 125th Boston Marathon at last left Hopkinton for its long-awaited long run to Copley Square.

A rolling start and shrunken field allowed for social distancing on the course, as organizers tried to manage amid a changing COVID-19 pandemic that forced them to cancel the race last year for the first time since the event began in 1897.

“It’s a great feeling to be out on the road,” race director Dave McGillivray said. “Everyone is excited. We’re looking forward to a good day.”

A light rain greeted participants at the Hopkinton Green, where about 30 uniformed members of the Massachusetts National Guard left at 6 a.m. The men’s and women’s wheelchair racers — some of whom completed the 26.2-mile (42.2 km) distance in Chicago a day earlier — left shortly after 8 a.m., followed by the men’s and women’s professional fields.

“We took things for granted before COVID-19. It’s great to get back to the community and it puts things in perspective,” said National Guard Capt. Greg Davis, 39, who was walking with the military group for the fourth time. “This is a historic race, but today is a historic day.”

Kenya’s Lawrence Cherono and Worknesh Degefa of Ethiopia did not return to defend their 2019 titles, but 13 past champions and five Tokyo Paralympic gold medal winners were in the professional fields.

Held annually since a group of Bostonians returned from the 1896 Athens Olympics and decided to stage a marathon of their own, the race has occurred during World Wars and even the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. But it was first postponed, then canceled last year, then postponed from the spring in 2021.

It’s the first time the event hasn’t been held in April as part of the Patriots’ Day holiday that commemorates the start of the Revolutionary War. To recognize Indigenous Peoples Day, race organizers honored 1936 and ’39 winner Ellison “Tarzan” Brown and three-time runner-up Patti Catalano Dillon, a member of the Mi’kmaq tribe.

To manage the spread of the coronavirus, runners had to show proof that they’re vaccinated or test negative for COVID-19. Organizers also re-engineered the start so runners in the recreational field of more than 18,000 weren’t waiting around in crowded corrals for their wave to begin; instead, once they get off the bus in Hopkinton they can go.

“I love that we’re back to races across the country and the world,” said Doug Flannery, a 56-year-old Illinois resident who was waiting to start his sixth Boston Marathon. “It gives people hope that things are starting to come back.”

Police were visible all along the course as authorities vowed to remain vigilant eight years after the bombings that killed three spectators and maimed hundreds of others on Boylston Street near the Back Bay finish line.

The race started about an hour earlier than usual, leading to smaller crowds in the first few towns. Wellesley College students had been told not to kiss the runners as they pass the school’s iconic “scream tunnel” near the halfway mark.

___

Associated Press writer Jennifer McDermott in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, contributed to this report.

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Snowmaking begins at three Front Range ski resorts, and the forecast is promising

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Snowmaking begins at three Front Range ski resorts, and the forecast is promising

The countdown to ski season in Colorado is officially on as wintry weather inspired several Front Range resorts to begin making snow over the weekend.

Snowmakers at Arapahoe Basin, Keystone Resort and Loveland Ski Area fired up the guns on Saturday after a storm dropped several inches on the mountains overnight. A-Basin received about 5-6 inches of natural snow Saturday, Chief Operating Officer Alan Henceroth reported, adding crews were still making snow through Sunday.

While the ski areas have yet to set official opening dates, the promise of a snowstorm to come this week certainly bodes well for snowmaking conditions.  “We should be able to make good progress over the next few days,” Loveland spokesperson John Sellers said.

RELATED: Colorado 2021-22 ski season: Here’s when resorts are planning to open

A-Basin, Keystone and Loveland annually race to be the first Front Range ski areas to start the chairlifts, often earning the title of first ski area to open for the season in the United States. All hope to open in October this year, after unusually warm temperatures pushed back the start of ski season to November in 2020. Keystone Resorts was first to open on Nov. 6 last year, taking the title for the first time since 1997.

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More Southwest flights canceled at Denver airport on Monday

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More Southwest flights canceled at Denver airport on Monday

Southwest Airlines canceled hundreds more flights Monday, including many in Denver, following a weekend full of travel pains.

According to Flightaware, the airline has canceled 360 flights Monday and delayed another 587 flights nationwide. In Denver, there have been 42 flight cancelations and 57 flights with delays.

On Sunday, Southwest canceled more than 1,124 flights nationwide, including 155 flights into or out of Denver, according to the same flight-tracking website.

In social media posts the carrier blamed, “air traffic control issues and disruptive weather.”

This is not the first time Southwest has struggled in the past few months with a high number of delayed and canceled flights. Nearly 100 flights were canceled in one day this June at DIA due to a “network connectivity issue.”

In August, Southwest announced it was cutting back on its September schedule by 27 flights a day and 162 flights a day, or 4.5% of the schedule, from early October through early November.

Southwest released a news statement Sunday, pinpointing the beginning of the issue in Florida.

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Kenyan Kipruto wins pandemic-delayed 125th Boston Marathon

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Fall in: Pandemic-delayed 125th Boston Marathon returns

By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) — Kenya’s Benson Kipruto won the pandemic-delayed Boston Marathon on Monday as the race returned from a 30-month absence and moved to the fall for the first time in its 125-year history.

Kipruto waited out an early breakaway by American CJ Albertson and took the lead as the race turned onto Beacon Street at Cleveland Circle. By the time he approached the 1 Mile to Go marker in Kenmore Square, he was in front by 12 seconds.

A winner in Prague and Athens who finished 10th in Boston in 2019, Kipruto finished in 2 hours, 9 minutes, 51 seconds to claim the $150,000 first prize. Lemi Berhanu, the 2016 winner, was second, 46 seconds behind; Anderson was 10th, 1:53 back.

Marcel Hug of Switzerland won the men’s wheelchair race earlier despite making a wrong term in the final mile, finishing the slightly detoured route just seven seconds off his course record in 1:08:11.

Manuela Schär, also from Switzerland, won the women’s wheelchair race in 1:35:21.

Hug, who has raced Boston eight times and has five victories here, cost himself a $50,000 course record bonus when he missed the second-to-last turn, following the lead vehicle instead of turning from Commonwealth Avenue onto Hereford Street.

“The car went straight and I followed the car,” said Hug, who finished second in the Chicago Marathon by 1 second on Sunday. “But it’s my fault. I should go right, but I followed the car.”

With fall foliage replacing the spring daffodils and more masks than mylar blankets, the 125th Boston Marathon at last left Hopkinton for its long-awaited long run to Copley Square.

A rolling start and shrunken field allowed for social distancing on the course, as organizers tried to manage amid a changing COVID-19 pandemic that forced them to cancel the race last year for the first time since the event began in 1897.

“It’s a great feeling to be out on the road,” race director Dave McGillivray said. “Everyone is excited. We’re looking forward to a good day.”

A light rain greeted participants at the Hopkinton Green, where about 30 uniformed members of the Massachusetts National Guard left at 6 a.m. The men’s and women’s wheelchair racers — some of whom completed the 26.2-mile (42.2 km) distance in Chicago a day earlier — left shortly after 8 a.m., followed by the men’s and women’s professional fields.

“We took things for granted before COVID-19. It’s great to get back to the community and it puts things in perspective,” said National Guard Capt. Greg Davis, 39, who was walking with the military group for the fourth time. “This is a historic race, but today is a historic day.”

Kenya’s Lawrence Cherono and Worknesh Degefa of Ethiopia did not return to defend their 2019 titles, but 13 past champions and five Tokyo Paralympic gold medal winners were in the professional fields.

Held annually since a group of Bostonians returned from the 1896 Athens Olympics and decided to stage a marathon of their own, the race has occurred during World Wars and even the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. But it was first postponed, then canceled last year, then postponed from the spring in 2021.

It’s the first time the event hasn’t been held in April as part of the Patriots’ Day holiday that commemorates the start of the Revolutionary War. To recognize Indigenous Peoples Day, race organizers honored 1936 and ’39 winner Ellison “Tarzan” Brown and three-time runner-up Patti Catalano Dillon, a member of the Mi’kmaq tribe.

To manage the spread of the coronavirus, runners had to show proof that they’re vaccinated or test negative for COVID-19. Organizers also re-engineered the start so runners in the recreational field of more than 18,000 weren’t waiting around in crowded corrals for their wave to begin; instead, once they get off the bus in Hopkinton they can go.

“I love that we’re back to races across the country and the world,” said Doug Flannery, a 56-year-old Illinois resident who was waiting to start his sixth Boston Marathon. “It gives people hope that things are starting to come back.”

Police were visible all along the course as authorities vowed to remain vigilant eight years after the bombings that killed three spectators and maimed hundreds of others on Boylston Street near the Back Bay finish line.

But the crowds lining the course as it wends through eight cities and towns were expected to be smaller. Wellesley College students have been told not to kiss the runners as they pass the school’s iconic “scream tunnel” near the halfway mark.

___

Associated Press writer Jennifer McDermott in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, contributed to this report.

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California’s ‘Surf City USA’ beach reopens after oil spill

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Southern California beach set to reopen after oil spill

By AMY TAXIN

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. (AP) — A Southern California beach that was closed more than a week ago because of a leak of crude oil from an undersea pipeline reopened on Monday, far sooner than many expected,

City and state beaches in Huntington Beach reopened after water quality tests revealed no detectable levels of oil associated toxins in the ocean water. Early Monday morning, surfers bobbed in the waves and people walked along the shoreline, some with dogs jumping and playing in the water.

The reopening came after weekend visitor Richard Beach returned to the waves in Huntington Beach with his bodyboard — until lifeguards on jet skis chased him out on Sunday. He trekked back across the beach, passing workers in hazmat suits tasked with clearing the sand of sticky, black blobs that washed ashore after the spill.

“The water’s perfect,” said Beach, 69. “Clear all the way to the bottom.”

Huntington Beach and nearby coastal communities have been reeling from last week’s spill that officials said sent at least about 25,000 gallons (95,000 liters) and no more than 132,000 gallons (500,000 liters) of oil into the ocean. It was caused by a leak about 5 miles (8 kilometers) off the coast in a pipeline owned by Houston-based Amplify Energy that shuttles crude from offshore oil platforms to the coast.

The spill was confirmed on Oct. 2, a day after residents reported a petroleum smell in the area. The cause is under investigation and officials said they believe the pipeline was likely damaged by a ship’s anchor several months to a year before it ruptured. It remains unknown when the slender, 13-inch (33-centimeter) crack in the pipeline began leaking oil.

On Sunday, there was no smell of oil and the sand looked largely clear by the Huntington Beach pier, where workers combed the sand for tar.

But local officials worry about the environmental impact of the spill on wetlands, wildlife and the economy. With the ocean off limits in the community dubbed Surf City USA, relatively few people were at the beach and shops that cater to them have been hurting.

Officials in the city of 200,000 people have been testing the water to ensure it’s safe for people to go back in the water and said they’ll continue the testing for at least two more weeks.

Before Monday, residents were allowed to walk on the sand in Huntington Beach but were prohibited from the shoreline and the water. Popular surfing and swimming spots in Newport Beach and Laguna Beach were also closed.

In Huntington Beach, shops selling everything from bikinis and stars-and-stripes boogie boards to sand toys and fishing gear took an economic hit during the closure. Marian Johnson, who owns “Let’s Go Fishing” on the pier, said sales have been halved since the spill.

Mike Ali, who owns the nearby shop Zack’s, said he had to close three of his four locations and reduce workers’ hours. People were still renting bikes and buying food at his one store that remained open, but he said business dropped 90% without surf lessons, event catering and beach bonfires.

“It could be a year to two years to get the tourism to come back,” Ali said, adding that a 1990 oil spill wound up diverting would-be visitors to beaches south and north of the city.

Rich Toro, 70, still took his regular 25-mile (40 kilometers) bike ride down to Huntington Beach on Sunday.

But he said he wouldn’t race to get back into the water because of the spill and worries about the impact on wildlife. Since the spill, officials have reported 38 dead birds and nine dead fish, while 27 oiled birds have been recovered and are being treated.

On Sunday morning, only a handful of people played beach volleyball on Huntington Beach while a few others exersized or laid on the sand.

But the water closures didn’t deter everyone. While fishing was prohibited along the shore of almost all of Orange County, Michael Archouletta, 29, said he came down from East Los Angeles and saw no signs on the pier preventing him from dropping a line. A school of fish swam beneath the pier nearby.

“If this was so dangerous, the fish would be dead,” Archouletta said.

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Tornadoes cause damage in Oklahoma; storms rock central U.S.

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Tornadoes cause damage in Oklahoma; storms rock central U.S.

COWETA, Okla. — Several reported tornadoes ripped through Oklahoma late Sunday into early Monday morning, causing damage but no immediate word of deaths or injuries.

The severe weather system also brought heavy rain, lightning and wind to parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri and Texas, and more stormy weather is predicted for later this week in parts of the central U.S.

Severe weather is not unusual in the Southern Plains in October, said Chuck Hodges, senior meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Tulsa. But Sunday’s storm “was kind of more of a spring setup,” he said.

“We had unusually high moisture and a very, very strong weather system that came through,” he said.

Tornado warnings and reports of damage popped up across Oklahoma beginning Sunday afternoon, and survey crews with the weather service will head out Monday to determine how many tornadoes struck, Hodges said.

A possible tornado hit the Tulsa suburb of Coweta late Sunday causing significant damage to a high school, homes and a gas station, news outlets reported, and Coweta Public Schools classes were canceled Monday.

Earlier, baseball-sized hail shattered windows and dented cars in Norman, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of Oklahoma City.

No deaths or injuries were immediately reported.

Oklahoma Gas & Electric said in a statement that crews were actively working to restore power outages.

Lightning that appeared to be from the same line of storms delayed an NFL game between the Buffalo Bills and the Chiefs in Kansas City, Missouri, for about an hour Sunday night.

On Monday, severe storms are possible in parts of Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan while another round of storms is predicted Tuesday in Kansas and Oklahoma, the Storm Prediction Center said.

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Police stop man firing shots at a St. Charles County trailer park

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Police stop man firing shots at a St. Charles County trailer park

O’FALLON, Mo. – There is a large police presence at the Glen Gate Mobile Home Park in O’Fallon, Missouri. Officers were called to the area at around 6:30 am because of many 911 calls describing an active shooter.

They found a man firing shots from a handgun into the air when they arrived. He is now in police custody.

Police say the man was under the influence of narcotics. He has been taken to the hospital for treatment.

It is not clear what led up to the shooting. The incident is still under investigation.

The main scene is on Heather Drive. Officers also appear the be searching on Millcreek Parkway. This is just west of Highway k, and south of Mexico Road.

This is a developing story and details are still coming into the FOX 2 Newsroom. This story will be updated with the latest information.

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St. Louis regional economy threatened by politics of stalled convention project

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St. Louis regional economy threatened by politics of stalled convention project

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – The regional economy could face a loss of more than $100 million if a stalled expansion project at the America’s Center doesn’t move forward, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. The warning about the major economic loss is coming from the head of the tourism office in charge of the $210 million project. It appears there could be some politics at play.

An email from Kitty Ratcliffe, the President of The St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission, obtained by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch says the economic losses would reach more than $100 million in six months. The email says that the numbers represent the bare minimum and certain loss to the businesses in the region, the workforce of those businesses, and the overall health of the economy of the region and the state.

Ratcliffe’s email also warns that the city will lose major conventions if the expansion isn’t approved quickly. She listed in general terms 11 conventions that could be in jeopardy. But she did not name any specifically.

The expansion at the America’s Center was first pitched in 2018. The Post-Dispatch reports that the plans call for a new ballroom, pavilion, and 92,000 square feet of new exhibit space. It’s supposed to be done in 2023 but political infighting and the COVID pandemic have caused delays.

A spokesperson for St. Louis Mayor Tishaura Jones says the city has closed on its bonds for the project and now it’s up to St. Louis County to approve its part of the funding. The head of the county council Rita Heard Days is accusing Ratcliffe of reneging on a deal to build a north county recreation center in exchange for the county’s support of the convention center expansion.

Days says the county won’t be persuaded by bad press and that county is committed to getting the biggest bang for its buck. We will see what happens in this apparent political stalemate.

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Airline issues: 25% of Southwest flights canceled this weekend

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Airline issues: 25% of Southwest flights canceled this weekend

ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Some Southwest passengers faced a nightmare over the weekend. The airline was forced to cancel more than 1,800 flights over the weekend. This is around 25% of all of their flights. The company blamed the cancellations on air traffic control problems and limited staffing in Florida as well as bad weather.

The airline released a statement on social media saying: “We experienced a significant impact in the Florida airports Friday evening after an FAA-imposed air traffic management program was implemented due to weather and resulted in a large number of cancellations.”

The Federal Aviation Administration said there have been no air traffic-related cancellations since Friday. The agency said that airlines are experiencing delays because of aircraft and crews being out of place.

Other airlines did not appear to be as severely impacted by weather. On Sunday, American Airlines canceled 2% of its flights and low-budget Spirit Airlines also canceled 2%, according to Flight Aware. As of this morning, nine departures were canceled, three were delayed.

One traveler told us he had to make last-minute arrangements to get home to St. Louis.

“When we got to the Southwest gate and talked to them, we found out that the flight that they put us on, we were not going to be on a flight until Tuesday,” said Mike England.

Six flights due to arrive this morning are canceled, and one is delayed.

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