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American jobless claims are dropping, as pandemic rages remain at 847,000

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There were 847,000 Americans who dropped last week but stayed historically strong, which indicates that layoffs are still continuing, considering the coronavirus pandemic.

The Labor Department announced Thursday that the claims fell by 67,000 last week, from 914,000 the week before. Prior to last March’s infection in the United States, the weekly demand for unemployment benefits had never passed 700,000.

The four-week moving average – that ease week after week – increased by over 16,000 last week to 868,000 – the highest since September. Tempering in the previous week’s biggest decline in claims was more than anticipated.

In total the conventional state unemployment insurance earned by nearly 4.8 million Americans during January 16. This is down from almost 5 million the week before and well below an amazing high of almost 25 million in May when the epidemic almost halted economic growth. The decline means that some of the unemployed find new employment and others have depleted public benefits.

There is hope about the end of the health crisis and the recovery of the economy of vaccine COVID-19, but the initiative is making strides and the labour market is under pressure right now.

Today, fewer than 150,000 new coronaviral cases are registered every day in the USA. That’s down from almost 250,000 daily at the start of this month, but still more than double that in late October from March to a revival. More than 425,000 Americans have been killed in the pandemic, and health officials fear that the United States will lose 500,000.

The epidemic also pressured state and local government to ban restaurant, bar and other business activities and stopped Americans from leaving home.

The US has lost 9.8 million jobs since February, including 140,000 in December.

Americans who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic which receive help from expanded relief schemes currently providing a maximum of 50 weeks of benefits or from a new initiative targeted at contractors and independent employees. The week of January 9th, the latest time available for results, 18.3 million individuals received certain forms of unemployment insurance.

A proposed state financial incentive programme includes a federal unemployment aid of $300 a week, in addition to existing state unemployment assistance. Mid-March will be the latest profit.

When vaccines are more popular, analysts predict growth will rise in the second half of the year, when Americans are unleashing an increasing market for travel, restaurants, and cinema and concert halls. Such investment could improve recruiting.

The economy is floundering right now, though. Retail revenue declined three successive months. Restrictions on pubs, bars and some shops along with most Americans’ unwillingness to eat, ride and drink, have contributed to dramatic cuts in spending.

Ultimate Kronos Group, a small-scale tech firm, said the amount of improvements made to its customers decreasing 2.5 percent from the previous month during the second to the third week of January. The decline in the south-east was the highest — 4.3 percent. “As we reach January’s end, it’s evident that the national revival of labour, the UKG’s vice-president David Gilbertson, also fails to rebound from the sluggish holidays.

Womply announced that local corporations invested 23% on January 21 of their previous year, with 26% closed with 30% of restaurants and 42% of bars listed. The income in hotels has dropped by 51 percent.

President Joe Biden announced a coronavirus initiative of $1.9 trillion that would provide $1,400 monitors, for the bulk of the Americans, and other items which would add up to a total of $2,000 per adult, in addition to the checks currently being issued.

The proposed proposal will also include federal compensation for displaced Americans with $400 a week and prolong the ban on evictions and forfeitures until September. The plan for Biden would require the consent of the congress and the Republicans of Congress are already bulging at its size.

The economists Nancy Vanden Houten and Gregory Daco of Oxford Economics wrote in a research note “Additional fiscal stimuli and wider delivery of vaccine was expected to encourage an improved labour market in the spring. “But in the short term it is predicted that claims remain high, as the pandemic continues to limit operations, with the new virus strains a problem.

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

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Collierville, TN Kroger shooting kills 2, including shooter, injures 12 more

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Collierville, TN Kroger shooting kills 2, including shooter, injures 12 more

COLLIERVILLE, Tenn. (WREG) — Multiple people were injured Thursday in a shooting inside the Kroger on Byhalia and Poplar Avenue in Collierville, a Memphis suburb, after an active shooter incident.

Collierville Police Chief Dale Lane confirmed 13 people were shot, and one person killed. The suspected shooter also is dead, possibly from a self-inflicted gunshot, Lane said. See the press conference with details below.

The suspect’s vehicle is still parked and is being investigated.

Lane said officers entered the store just after 1:30 and found multiple people shot, and employees in hiding. He could not comment on whether the shooter was an employee, saying it was under investigation.

Lane called it “the most horrific event that’s occurred in Collierville history.”

Multiple witnesses report hearing at least a dozen shots. Some customers made it out of the store. Employees had others take shelter in the cooler, witnesses said.

One employee, who says she’s worked at the Kroger for 32 years, told WREG she hid with her coworkers and several customers when they heard the gunshots.

Collierville High School was briefly sheltering in place.

Multiple ambulances were seen entering Regional One Hospital in Memphis. The hospital reported it saw nine patients, four in critical condition and five non-critical.

Details are still coming in. WREG will update this page as more information becomes available.

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Missouri on pace for 20% drop in reported COVID cases month-to-month

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Missouri on pace for 20% drop in reported COVID cases month-to-month

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Missouri is on pace to record approximately 48,000 COVID cases in September, a 20.4% drop from last month.

According to the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, the state has recorded 667,829 cumulative cases of SARS-CoV-2—an increase of 1,615 positive cases (PCR testing only)—and 11,314 total deaths as of Thursday, Sept. 23, an increase of 24 over yesterday. That’s a case fatality rate of 1.7%.

Please keep in mind that not all cases and deaths recorded occurred in the last 24 hours.

State health officials report 53.3% of the total population has received at least one dose of the vaccine. Approximately 64.6% of all adults 18 years of age and older have initiated the process.

The state has administered 60,729 doses of vaccine in the last 7 days (this metric is subject to a delay, meaning the last three days are not factored in). The highest vaccination rates are among people over 65.

Boone County, the city of Joplin, St. Louis County, and St. Charles County are the only jurisdictions in the state with at least 50% of its population fully vaccinated. Eighteen other jurisdictions in the state are at least 40% fully vaccinated: Atchison, Cole, Jackson, Franklin, Greene, Jefferson, Cass, Nodaway, Andrew, Cape Girardeau, Ste. Genevieve, Carroll, Callaway, Gasconade, and Christian counties, as well as St. Louis City, Kansas City, and Independence.

Vaccination is the safest way to achieve herd immunity. Herd immunity for COVID-19 requires 80% to 90% of the population to have immunity, either by vaccination or recovery from the virus.

(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

The Bureau of Vital Records at DHSS performs a weekly linkage between deaths to the state and death certificates to improve quality and ensure all decedents that died of COVID-19 are reflected in the systems. As a result, the state’s death toll will see a sharp increase from time to time. Again, that does not mean a large number of deaths happened in one day; instead, it is a single-day reported increase.

At the state level, DHSS is not tracking probable or pending COVID deaths. Those numbers are not added to the state’s death count until confirmed in the disease surveillance system either by the county or through analysis of death certificates.

The 10 days with the most reported cases occurred between Oct. 10, 2020, and Jan. 8, 2021.

The 7-day rolling average for cases in Missouri sits at 1,492 yesterday, it was 1,545. Exactly one month ago, the state rolling average was 1,917. 

Approximately 49.4% of all reported cases are for individuals 39 years of age and younger. The state has further broken down the age groups into smaller units. The 18 to 24 age group has 82,807 recorded cases, while 25 to 29-year-olds have 57,110 cases.

People 80 years of age and older account for approximately 43.7% of all recorded deaths in the state.

Month / Year Missouri COVID cases*
(reported that month)
March 2020 1,327
April 2020 6,235
May 2020 5,585
June 2020 8,404
July 2020 28,772
August 2020 34,374
September 2020 41,416
October 2020 57,073
November 2020 116,576
December 2020 92,808
January 2021 66,249
February 2021 19,405
March 2021 11,150
April 2021 12,165
May 2021 9,913
June 2021 12,680
July 2021 42,780
August 2021 60,275
September 2021 36,802
(Source: Missouri Dept. of Health and Senior Services)

Missouri has administered 6,949,404 PCR tests for COVID-19 over the entirety of the pandemic and as of Sept. 22, 16.9% of those tests have come back positive. People who have received multiple PCR tests are not counted twice, according to the state health department.

According to the state health department’s COVID-19 Dashboard, “A PCR test looks for the viral RNA in the nose, throat, or other areas in the respiratory tract to determine if there is an active infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. A positive PCR test means that the person has an active COVID-19 infection.”

The Missouri COVID Dashboard no longer includes the deduplicated method of testing when compiling the 7-day moving average of positive tests. The state is now only using the non-deduplicated method, which is the CDC’s preferred method. That number is calculated using the number of tests taken over the period since many people take multiple tests. Under this way of tabulating things, Missouri has a 9.7% positivity rate as of Sept. 20. Health officials exclude the most recent three days to ensure data accuracy when calculating the moving average.

The 7-day positivity rate was 4.5% on June 1, 10.2% on July 1, and 15.0% on Aug. 1.

As of Sept. 20, Missouri is reporting 1,762 COVID hospitalizations and a rolling 7-day average of 1,863. The remaining inpatient hospital bed capacity sits at 22% statewide. The state’s public health care metrics lag behind by three days due to reporting delays, especially on weekends. Keep in mind that the state counts all beds available and not just beds that are staffed by medical personnel.

On July 6, the 7-day rolling average for hospitalizations eclipsed the 1,000-person milestone for the first time in four months, with 1,013 patients. The 7-day average for hospitalizations had previously been over 1,000 from Sept. 16, 2020, to March 5, 2021.

On Aug. 5, the average eclipsed 2,000 patients for the first time in more than seven months. It was previously over 2,000 from Nov. 9, 2020, to Jan. 27, 2021.

The 2021 low point on the hospitalization average in Missouri was 655 on May 29.

Across the state, 470 COVID patients are in ICU beds, leaving the state’s remaining intensive care capacity at 18%.

If you have additional questions about the coronavirus, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services is available at 877-435-8411.

As of Sept. 22, the CDC identified 42,363,951 cases of COVID-19 and 677,086 deaths across all 50 states and 9 U.S.-affiliated districts, jurisdictions, and affiliated territories, for a national case-fatality rate of 1.6%.

How do COVID deaths compare to other illnesses, like the flu or even the H1N1 pandemics of 1918 and 2009? It’s a common question.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), preliminary data on the 2018-2019 influenza season in the United States shows an estimated 35,520,883 cases and 34,157 deaths; that would mean a case-fatality rate of 0.09 percent. Case-fatality rates on previous seasons are as follows: 0.136 percent (2017-2018), 0.131 percent (2016-2017), 0.096 percent (2015-2016), and 0.17 percent (2014-2015).

The 1918 H1N1 epidemic, commonly referred to as the “Spanish Flu,” is estimated to have infected 29.4 million Americans and claimed 675,000 lives as a result; a case-fatality rate of 2.3 percent. The Spanish Flu claimed greater numbers of young people than typically expected from other influenzas.

Beginning in January 2009, another H1N1 virus—known as the “swine flu”—spread around the globe and was first detected in the US in April of that year. The CDC identified an estimated 60.8 million cases and 12,469 deaths; a 0.021 percent case-fatality rate.

For more information and updates regarding COVID mandates, data, and the vaccine, click here.

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Federal arrest warrant issued for Brian Laundrie following the death of Gabby Petito

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Police look for Laundrie in reserve; Petito still not found

A federal arrest warrant has been issued in Wyoming for Brian Laundrie following the death of Gabrielle “Gabby” Petito.

The warrant, issued by the U.S. District Court of Wyoming, following a federal grand jury indictment, is for violation of “Use of Unauthorized Access Devices” related to the suspect’s activities following Petito’s death, according to a U.S. Department of Justice and FBI news release.

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Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on contract extension: “When it’s supposed to happen, it’ll happen”

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Nuggets’ Michael Porter Jr. on contract extension: “When it’s supposed to happen, it’ll happen”

Only a few days from the start of Nuggets training camp, Michael Porter Jr. isn’t thinking about anything but basketball.

At least that’s what the Nuggets star forward claimed Thursday, as the deadline for an early contract extension inched closer. The Nuggets have until the start of the season to reach a deal with the 23-year-old or he’ll enter next summer as a restricted free agent.

Porter, fresh off a healthy offseason that featured a week-long workout with Warriors sniper Steph Curry, said he’s leaving negotiations up to his agent, Mark Bartelstein.

“It’s a thing that’s on the radar, but, you know, I try to let my agent do his job,” Porter said. “I’m in the loop. I’m talking with my agent, talking with Tim (Connelly), those guys, but for me, it’s God’s time, and when it’s supposed to happen, it’ll happen. I’m not going to try to rush it. All I’m gonna worry about is getting ready, getting geared up for the season.

“… I love basketball,” Porter added. “It’s not too stressful for me about the money stuff. Of course that’s part of it. I’m just trying to stay in the gym and get better.”

Not coincidentally, Porter’s work ethic is one of the primary reasons the team views him as a fixture of their core moving forward. Both Connelly and Nuggets coach Michael Malone have lauded his commitment in the gym and are both bullish on his future.

In just his second real season in the NBA, Porter averaged 19 points per game on 44.5% shooting from the 3-point line. With a timeframe for Jamal Murray’s return still unestablished, Porter will be featured even more heavily in the Nuggets’ offense than last season, when he burst into the starting lineup and became a mainstay there throughout the playoffs.

Still, perhaps due to any number of reasons, talks between the two sides remain fluid.

“Tim and I talk all the time, we have a great relationship,” Bartelstein told The Denver Post. “Michael is completely focused on getting ready for the season and wants to take his game to a completely different level and help the Nuggets win at the highest level. Tim and I will continue to have conversations on our end.”

Among offseason stops that included Missouri, Washington state and Los Angeles, Porter spent extended time with Curry, whom he knew after attending his camps as a high schooler.

Porter and his brother Coban worked out with Curry in what the Nuggets’ forward described as high-intensity shooting workouts.

“Steph’s biggest attribute is how good of shape he’s in,” Porter said. “So we were running around, game-speed shots … Every shooting drill was a competition as well.”

The sessions, which sometimes meant morning and evening workouts, were meant to replicate the type of shots Porter expects to see in games. He also said he was hoping to work with Curry during future offseasons.

But even outside of the Curry visit, Porter was back in the lab rarely taking any days off. He said his focus was on improving his ball-handling, creating off the dribble and refining his separation moves. There’s a good chance that his 13.4 shots per game last season will tick up as the primary ballast to reigning MVP Nikola Jokic.

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Loveland family nurse practitioner fined $20,000 as part of COVID-19 judgment

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Loveland family nurse practitioner fined $20,000 as part of COVID-19 judgment

A Loveland family nurse practitioner faces a fine after failing to comply with a cease-and-desist order instructing him to stop illegally marketing and overstating the effectiveness of alleged COVID-19 cures and treatments.

Siegfried Emme, owner of Loveland Medical Clinic, will pay $20,000 if he complies with a consent judgment filed with the Larimer County District Court on Thursday, Colorado Attorney General Phil Weiser said in a news release.

“My office will hold accountable those who continue to break the law after they are told to stop — and in so doing continue to place the public at risk,” Weiser said in the release. “Falsely advertising alleged ‘cures’ and providing misleading information about treatments for COVID-19 can cause direct harm to patients and delay them from seeking the care they need.”

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Four patios for a perfect fall in Denver

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Four patios for a perfect fall in Denver

It’s officially fall. That means cooler temperatures, warmer drinks, and perfect patio sitting weather. There’s nothing better than sipping a spiced cider or hot chocolate while the sun sets outside. LIV Sotheby’s International Realty represents some of the best homes in Denver with patios that will make you fall in love with autumn all over again.

23870 E Ontario Place

At 23870 E Ontario Place in Aurora, listed by LIV SIR broker Angela Hacker for $850,000, the backyard is more like an outdoor oasis. Set on almost half an acre with beautiful mountain vistas, the home offers plenty of options for enjoying the fresh air all year long. Nothing went overlooked when designing the outdoor space at this residence, from the stone patio with its own gas fire pit and the stone sitting wall for added seating when entertaining, to the ambient landscape lighting carefully selected low maintenance flowers, shrubs, and trees. There’s even a hot tub so soaking and relaxing no matter the season.

48148 Irving Street

For those who refuse to acknowledge that summer has finally come to an end, we have the house for you. 48148 Irving Street, in Denver, is practically made for hosting a barbecue no matter the season. Listed by Connie Kraska for $1,200,000, this home’s backyard and patio offer everything you need to make a day of grilling outdoors. The patio kitchen features a barbecue any grill master would be proud of and plenty of space for savoring your delicious creations amidst the cool breeze. The rest of the back yard is illuminated by the café lights that zig-zag between the covered patio and the detached garage allowing the party to continue even after the sun goes down.

1165 S Grant Street

Who knew a patio could be so cozy? The outdoor living space at 1165 S Grant Street, listed by LIV SIR brokers, Ben and Erin Rule for $950,000, is just as warm and inviting as the inside of this Denver home. In the beautiful, fenced back yard you’ll find a paved patio that has enough room for a dining set, lounge area, grill, and fire pit. The addition of heat lamps makes this area as comfortable as it is cute even as the temperatures drop. Imagine spending a lazy Sunday afternoon out on the patio, soaking in the sun’s rays and reading a book in the tranquility of your own backyard. Now that’s a patio worth falling in love with.

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Broncos eager to return to Empower Field, re-establish home-field advantage against Jets: “We have to go win at home — it’s as simple as that.”

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Broncos eager to return to Empower Field, re-establish home-field advantage against Jets: “We have to go win at home — it’s as simple as that.”

In Teddy Bridgewater’s lone start in Denver in October 2015, the quarterback was sacked seven times in front of a raucous orange crowd as the eventual Super Bowl champion Broncos beat the Vikings by a field goal.

Now, Bridgewater is hoping that same rude reception greets rookie QB Zach Wilson and the Jets on Sunday afternoon. The Broncos’ 2021 home opener will be a sellout, with 76,125 frenzied fans expected to pack Empower Field for the team’s first full-capacity regular-season game since 2019.

“It was loud, and on third downs you just had to buckle down and try to block out the noise,” Bridgewater recalled. “Hopefully, we can make the Jets feel what I felt in 2015.”

The Broncos are double-digit favorites against winless New York, but their home field hasn’t been much of an advantage in recent years. Denver’s 19-21 at home over the past five seasons, a .475 winning percentage tied for fifth-worst in the NFL.

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Denver deputy sheriff receives the department’s Medal of Valor

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Denver deputy sheriff receives the department’s Medal of Valor

A Denver deputy sheriff was awarded the department’s Medal of Valor on Thursday for defusing a violent incident at the downtown jail in which she was allegedly attacked.

Deputy Ida McComb was recognized by Denver Sheriff Elias Diggins who presented her with the prestigious award at a department ceremony. The medal recognizes deputies “who have exhibited exceptional courage, regardless of personal safety, in the attempt to save or protect others,” according to a sheriff’s news release.

While working in a housing unit at the jail McComb was allegedly attacked by an inmate, the release said. Other inmates separated McComb and the alleged assailant, who they in turn attacked in defense of McComb.

“Deputy McComb quickly gained her composure and began to give commands, ordering individuals away from the inmate she believed attacked her and reestablished control of the housing unit while calling for assistance,” the release said. “Her quick thinking and response redirected a situation that could have spiraled out of control.”

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Avalanche encounters COVID-19 concerns to begin on-ice training camp

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Avalanche encounters COVID-19 concerns to begin on-ice training camp

Avalanche free-agent depth signings Stefan Matteau and Roland McKeown are in COVID-19 protocol and did not participate in Thursday’s first day of on-ice training camp, which ended with timed end-to-end conditioning drills at Family Sports Center.

Following the two morning sessions, Avs coach Jared Bednar said Matteau, a forward, and McKeown, a defenseman, both tested positive but are near the end of their recovery.

“I don’t like losing those guys, even for a day or two of training camp, but Matteau is cleared but he hasn’t done anything for seven days so we’re just working him out,” said Bednar, who noted Wednesday that the entire camp roster will eventually be vaccinated. “We’ll get him on the ice and get him up to speed. I hate to put him in the first-day skate like that after seven days off and have him pull something. So that’s more precautionary. McKeown is a couple days behind him.”

Matteau and McKeown both signed modest one-year, two-way contracts in July to help complete the Colorado Eagles’ AHL roster and provide depth options for the Avs.

Top pair in red. Devon Toews and Cale Makar, the Avs’ top-pair defensemen last season, were both in red non-contact sweaters Thursday. Toews, who underwent offseason shoulder surgery, skated with a skills coach while Makar, a 2021 Norris Trophy finalist, partnered with Sam Girard in the full 26-man first session.

Bednar said Makar “had a procedure” to his upper body recently but is not expected to miss any practice or his appointed preseason games.

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Haven in the forest: As buyers yearn for elbow room, these custom ranches in the trees are 25 min. from DTC

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Haven in the forest: As buyers yearn for elbow room, these custom ranches in the trees are 25 min. from DTC

Trent Getsch at Timbers at The Pinery near Parker has something that buyers are clamoring for this fall: ranches, custom-built, that have the elbow room people are wanting now, while still remaining reasonably close to the city.

And The Timbers has something else that’s proving attractive, as those Denver shoppers are joined by others coming from out of state: lots of trees.

“The trees are a big deal,” says Getsch, who meets a new wave of buyers at his information center in the ponderosa pine forest along Pinery Parkway South, 25 minutes from the Denver Tech Center.

A sizable share are new arrivals, he says, often from the Bay Area and points north—areas where they’re used to more trees than typical Denver suburbs have.

That includes a couple from Portland, Ore., who homed in on The Timbers after searching other suburban Denver areas.

The pandemic has occasioned a complete turnaround in the trend of U.S. in-migration, says economist Elliot Eisenberg. Rather than pushing in to within 10 to 20-minutes of the city center, Americans are now heading further out.

But 95% of those, Eisenberg adds, still want to stay connected to their metro area.

“The work-from-home idea is no longer a trend; rather, it’s become the future,” says Getsch, who orients buyers to The Timbers—with half-acre and larger sites in Black Forest pines, where a half dozen well-respected custom builders offer a much wider range of architecture than you’re seeing in typical luxury home areas.

Last summer, The Timbers had virtually no remaining inventory that could deliver promptly, but Getsch says that picture is better now.

“People want to avoid a double-move, and we have one custom ranch that could have you moved in for the holidays.”

It’s by Gladstone Custom Homes, a 4-bedroom-plus-study with around 2,600 sq. feet on the main level and another 2,300 feet finished on a walkout. It’s priced from $1.65 million, with time left to pick some finishes. Gladstone has a second ranch set for early 2022 delivery with more custom options.

Sterling Custom Homes has three homes underway for spring-summer delivery, with more custom options available. And The Timbers is just opening a final phase of treed sites, some with mountain views, where any of its builders—JW Luxury Homes, Ashbur Construction, Summerwood Homes, Kopasz Custom Homes, and Stately Custom Homes—could work their magic for you.

All homes get high-speed internet, natural gas lines, and city water and sewer services, and are five minutes from major grocery shopping.

But those will be the very last sites in The Timbers. To see those, from Parker Road, head east on Pinery Pkwy South.

The news and editorial staffs of The Denver Post had no role in this post’s preparation.

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