Connect with us

News

Pakistani court: Release man charged in the death of Daniel Pearl

Published

on

pakistan court

The Supreme Court of Pakistan ordered Thursday’s release of a Pakistani-British man accused and later acquitted in the 2002 beheading of American journalist Daniel Pearl.

The court also rejected an appeal lodged by Pearl’s family and the Pakistani government against Ahmad Saeed Omar Sheikh’s acquittal.

The government had exhausted all options to keep him locked up, an indicator that Sheikh could be released within days, a minister in the Sindh province where Sheikh is being held said. Murtaza Wahab, Sindh’s law minister, told The Associated Press that the “Supreme Court is the court of last resort.”

“With the majority decision of the Supreme Court of Pakistan to acquit and release Ahmed Omer Sheikh and the other accused who kidnapped and killed Daniel Pearl, the Pearl family is in complete shock,” the Pearl family said in a statement issued by their counsel, Faisal Siddiqi.

In 2002, years before the Islamic State party started publishing footage of their beheadings of journalists, the violence of Pearl’s killing surprised many. An autopsy report spoke of the horrific descriptions of the murder and dismemberment of the Wall Street Journal writer.

Sheikh was accused of helping attract Pearl to a meeting at which he was abducted in the southern Pakistani port city of Karachi. After his attempt to blow up a flight from Paris to Miami with explosives concealed in his shoes, Pearl had been investigating the connection between Pakistani militants and Richard C. Reid, nicknamed the ‘shoe bomber’.

Soon after a video of his beheading was delivered to the U.S. consulate in Karachi, Pearl’s body was found in a shallow grave.

Sheikh has long denied any complicity in Pearl’s murder, but on Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard that he admitted writing a letter acknowledging a minor part in 2019, raising expectations for some that he would keep behind bars.

After his arrest, Sheikh has been on death row, even after his eventual acquittal, and is currently being held in a Karachi prison. According to the Pearl family counsel, a three-judge supreme court ruled 2 to 1 to uphold Sheikh’s acquittal and ordered him released.

Sheikh’s counsel said that the court had ordered the release of three other Pakistanis who had been sentenced to life in jail for their role in the abduction and death of Pearl. The three, Fahad Naseem, Sheikh Adil and Salman Saqib, all played smaller positions, such as having a laptop or internet connection to give Pearl’s photographs, with a gun to his head, insisting that all inmates be released at Guantanamo Bay prison in the U.S. prison. Even then, the four were charged with the same offences at the initial trial.

Mehmood A. Sheikh, who is not linked to his lawyer, said, “These individuals should not have been in jail for even one day.”

He cautioned the provincial government of Sindh against delaying their release, as his client has done in the past, even after being slapped with a charge of contempt.

I hope that by proceeding… the Sindh government will not make a mockery of justice For no reasonable cause whatsoever, to not release them,” he said.

Washington had previously said that, if the acquittal was upheld, it would seek Sheikh’s extradition to the United States to be prosecuted there. It is not clear whether Pakistan will accept his extradition or under what conditions it would be allowed to continue.

In a statement earlier this month, acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen said, “The United States is prepared to take custody of Omar Sheikh to stand trial here.” “We can not permit him to evade justice for his role in the abduction and murder of Daniel Pearl.”

It seems certain that the case would test the willingness of the current Biden administration to negotiate with Pakistan, deemed a crucial ally in achieving stability in neighbouring Afghanistan. The U.S. did not have any direct response. Thursday at the Embassy.

Both the US and Pakistani governments were encouraged by the Pearl family to take steps to “correct this injustice.”

“The decision today is a complete travesty of justice and the release of these killers puts journalists and the people of Pakistan at risk everywhere,” the family’s statement said.

The only legal option open now is to call for a trial of the court’s decision to uphold Sheikh’s acquittal, Siddiqi, the Pearl family counsel, said. He said, however, that the analysis will be carried out by the same court which made the decision. “In practical terms,” that means the case in Pakistan is closed, he said.

On Wednesday, after he had denied any involvement for 18 years, the Supreme Court heard Sheikh confess to a minor role in Pearl’s abduction, a dramatic turn of events. The Pearl family lawyer, Siddiqi, had hoped that his prosecution would be advanced. Still, recently, Siddiqi had said winning was an uphill battle.

Sheikh and the other three men ordered released on Thursday were all acquitted by the Sindh High Court in April on the grounds that the testimony of the original prosecution was insufficient. Siddiqi sought to persuade the Supreme Court of Sheikh’s guilt during the appeal of the acquittal on at least one of the three charges he faced, namely the charge of kidnapping, which also carries the death penalty in Pakistan.

Mahesh is leading digital marketing initiatives at RecentlyHeard, a NewsFeed platform that covers news from all sectors. He develops, manages, and executes digital strategies to increase online visibility, better reach target audiences, and create engaging experience across channels. With 7+ years of experience, He is skilled in search engine optimization, content marketing, social media marketing, and advertising, and analytics.

Advertisement
Click to comment

News

Truck driver shortage existed before COVID, says Trucking Association of New York

Published

on

Truck driver shortage existed before COVID, says Trucking Association of New York

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Come Monday, it’s either vaccination or termination for those who work in state run hospitals and nursing homes. Security officers are among those who work at state hospitals who are being forced to make that decision. The lawsuit claims that the vaccine mandate goes against their constitutional rights.

In a newly filled lawsuit against Governor Kathy Hochul, Heath Commissioner Howard Zucker, and the New York State Health Department, 10 individual state hospital security officers are fighting for the option to have regular COVID tests instead of being mandated to get the vaccine. They say it’s unfair that teachers would have the option for regular testing, but they won’t.

“Students who are 12 years or younger can’t be vaccinated,” said Dennis Vacco. “Inherently, the population in schools is less vaccinated than the population in hospitals or in health care facilities. To say nothing of the fact that health care facilities are constructed to prevent the spread of illness within the facility.”

Continue Reading

News

Colorado high school football scoreboard: Week 5

Published

on

Colorado high school football scoreboard: Week 4


Jeff Bailey

| Digital Sports Producer — The Denver Post

Jeff Bailey joined The Denver Post in 2013. Prior to his time at The Post he spent a year and a half with MediaNews Group. Before MNG, he spent time working as a clubhouse assistant for the Colorado Rockies. He graduated from Metropolitan State University of Denver with a degree in journalism.

Continue Reading

News

Inflation adjustments will mean higher deductions for 2021 tax year: What to know

Published

on

Inflation adjustments will mean higher deductions for 2021 tax year: What to know

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) — Changes in tax deductions due to inflation adjustments are coming to 2021 taxpayers, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

“They are not major changes, but taxpayers will notice them,” said Linda Troyer, Tax Pro from Jackson Hewitt. “Mostly it’s just updated limitations.”

The standard deduction for married couples filing jointly for the tax year 2021 rises to $25,100, up $300 from the prior year. For single taxpayers and married individuals filing separately, the standard deduction rises to $12,550 for 2021, up $150. For heads of households, the standard deduction will be $18,800 for the tax year 2021, up $150.

Other changes include an increase in limitations and in the contribution you can make to your retirement accounts.

Even though the filing season for your 2021 taxes is still months away, Troyer said it is smart to start tracking down your documents now. She recommends you start collecting your documents throughout the year, and begin placing items like check stubs and receipts in a folder.

“Don’t wait until next year when you go to file and you’re asked where is this,” Troyer said. “That’s why some people had to have extensions filed because they waited for the very end of the tax season and then realized they didn’t have the documents.”

While people should be preparing for the upcoming 2021 tax season, there are still some people who have yet to file their taxes for 2020.

The IRS is reminding taxpayers that the deadline for 2020 tax returns is less than a month away on Oct. 15. This particular deadline is for those who asked for an extension to file, and it is not an extension to pay your 2020 taxes.

While the IRS has not yet released the number of taxpayers who took advantage of the extension, Troyer said she and other tax professionals have seen an increase.

If you still have not received your refund for 2020 or 2019, you are not alone. Troyer said she had a client who filed their 2020 taxes in March and has yet to receive a refund because of processing delays caused by the pandemic. For example, when an IRS office has an outbreak of COVID, employees can’t work from home due to the sensitivity of the documents.

If you have any questions about your 2019 or 2020 tax return, go to the IRS website.

Continue Reading

News

The Festival Latino of the Berkshires will celebrate its 25 anniversary

Published

on

The Festival Latino of the Berkshires will celebrate its 25 anniversary

GREAT BARRINGTON, MA (NEWS10) – The Festival Latino of the Berkshires will celebrate its 25th Anniversary on Saturday, September 25, from 12:00 to 6:00 p.m., rain or shine, at the Town Hall Green Park and Saint James Place on Main Street.

The Berkshires Hispanic community continues to grow and thrive in the area, making invaluable contributions. The event takes place during Hispanic Heritage Month, which is one of Berkshire’s most eagerly anticipated cultural events of the year.

The festival provides a sense of pride, inspiration, and education to immigrants and their children, which engages the joy of the Latin arts to students and adults alike.

Kicking off at 12:00 p.m. will be a variety of Latin American cuisine vendors with local Mexican singer Laura Cabrera, and D.J. Bernardino will provide the best Latin music hits for exploring the foods, social services, artists, artisans, and activities present at the festival.

The Latino Festival is free of charge, open to the public, and alcohol-free, committed to maintaining public health by following all Covid-19 safety guidelines as recommended by the CDC.

For further information, visit the festival Latino website or Facebook page.

Continue Reading

News

Aides of former Gov. Cuomo on hook for new legal bills

Published

on

Aides of former Gov. Cuomo on hook for new legal bills

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state has stopped paying legal bills for state employees who worked for former Gov. Andrew Cuomo as he faced ongoing investigations on the state and federal level. Gov. Kathy Hochul’s spokesperson Haley Viccaro said Wednesday that the state stopped paying for those aides’ legal bills after September 2.

Cuomo and his former aides face an ongoing probe by the state attorney general into Cuomo’s use of state employees to help with a book he wrote about his leadership during the pandemic and scrutiny from federal prosecutors who are investigating his administration’s handling of nursing home death data. Cuomo himself is also facing a state ethics commission inquiry.

The Hochul administration is now deciding whether there is a legal basis for the state to pay bills for legal services on or before September 2. Viccaro did not specify how many staffers had legal bills paid for by the state. She also didn’t say whether the state is considering requiring Cuomo aides to reimburse the state for past legal fees.

The state has agreed to pay a maximum of $9.5 million in bills for lawyers representing Cuomo and his administration over sexual harassment allegations and other matters as well as for lawyers investigating the former governor and his administration, according to the Associated Press review of available contracts.

That figure includes up to $5 million for lawyers who have represented Cuomo’s office. It doesn’t include the legal fees of Cuomo’s private attorney, Rita Glavin, whose bills are being paid by his campaign committee. It’s also unknown how much money has been paid to Paul Fishman, whose Washington, D.C.-based firm Arnold & Porter said it was representing Cuomo aides.

Cuomo resigned from office following an investigation overseen by Attorney General Letitia James that concluded he sexually harassed 11 women. Cuomo—who denies touching anyone inappropriately or intending to make suggestive comments—accused the women of exaggerating or misinterpreting his behavior.

A former aide of Cuomo alleged he groped her, according to a criminal complaint that the Albany County district attorney and sheriff are investigating. At least one woman, Lindsey Boylan, has said she intends to sue the ex-governor “and his co-conspirators” over their conduct. The investigation found Cuomo aides retaliated against Boylan.

Meanwhile, Cuomo and aides face the results of an impeachment investigation by the Assembly’s judiciary committee, though Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie has argued the body doesn’t have clear legal authority for impeaching Cuomo to prevent him from running for office again.

Judiciary Committee Chair Chuck Lavine has said the committee will release findings from their months-long investigation, but it’s unclear when it will do so or how comprehensive they will be. The committee has looked at whether Cuomo’s book deal violated ethics laws, sexual misconduct allegations, his administration’s handling of COVID-19 data, and whether members of Cuomo’s family were unlawfully prioritized for COVID-19 testing when tests were scarce.

Lavine, a Democrat, didn’t respond to requests for comment Wednesday.

Continue Reading

News

DOH: State’s school COVID tracker will be back up before October

Published

on

DOH: State’s school COVID tracker will be back up before October

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10)- Since the beginning of the school year, the state’s COVID tracking website for school districts has been unavailable while undergoing maintenance. At the latest, it will be back online by September 27, according to the Department of Health (DOH).

Beginning September 13 New York schools were required to report COVID cases to the DOH on a daily basis, as they were during the 2020-2021 school year.

“All the information will be available when the website update is complete and updated daily during the week.  Local school districts outside of New York City should also have this information readily available on their website,” said DOH Spokesperson, Abigail Barker.

Between a shortage of bus drivers and an increase in COVID cases, the Galway School District had been back from summer vacation a little less than a week when they went to virtual learning. After a week of remote, the school welcomed students back.

“We are looking forward to our student’s in-person learning every day for the rest of the year,” said Superintendent Brita Donovan.

The Albany City School District posts COVID updates on its website and also sends them to NEWS10. On Wednesday the school reported eight new cases of COVID. There have been 54 cases since September 1, according to the district’s website.

Barker said opening schools has not impacted the community transmission rate, based on preliminary data. However, the Albany City School District isn’t taking any chances. They’ve cancelled all homecoming events because of COVID.

“We are disappointed to have to take this step. However, COVID-19 cases are continuing to rise in our school district and our region, and we believe cancelling this event is the best decision in our efforts to protect the health and safety of our students, their families, our employees, and the entire community,” the district said Wednesday.

Continue Reading

News

Gabby Petito investigation: Arrest warrant issued for missing Brian Laundrie

Published

on

Gabby Petito investigation: Arrest warrant issued for missing Brian Laundrie

Law enforcement officials issued an arrest warrant for Brian Laundrie, days after he went missing and the body of Gabby Petitio was found, FBI officials said Thursday.

The FBI urged people with information to come forward. Laundrie, without authorization, allegedly used a debit card and PIN to buy more than $1,000 worth of items between Aug. 30 and Sept. 1, according to the indictment.

“While this arrest warrant allows law enforcement to arrest Mr. Laundrie, the FBI and our partners across the country continue to investigate the facts and circumstances of Ms. Petito’s homicide,” the FBI said.

The attorney for Laundrie’s family quickly noted the arrest warrant is not for Petito’s death.

“It is my understanding that the arrest warrant for Brian Laundrie is related to activities occurring after the death of Gabby Petito and not related to her actual demise,” the attorney said. “The FBI is focusing on locating Brian and when that occurs the specifics of the charges covered under the indictment will be addressed in the proper forum.”

Search teams found nothing of note Wednesday at a Florida wilderness park where they have spent days looking for Laundrie.

The search resumed Wednesday morning at the 24,000-acre (9,700-hectare) Carlton Reserve park and ended just before dark, North Port police spokesperson Joshua Taylor said. Investigators say Laundrie’s parents told them he had gone there after returning home without Petito on Sept. 1.

Petito, 22, was reported missing Sept. 11 by her parents after she did not respond to calls and texts for several days while the couple visited parks in the West. Her body was discovered Sunday at Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

Teton County Coroner Brent Blue classified Petito’s death as a homicide — meaning her death was caused by another person — but did not disclose how she was killed pending further autopsy results. Laundrie, 23, is not charged with any crime but is considered a person of interest in the case.

With online sleuths and theories multiplying by the day, the FBI and police have been deluged with tips about possible Laundrie sightings. Taylor, the North Port spokesperson, said none have so far panned out. He also batted down rumors that Laundrie had been captured Tuesday.

“These reports are unfortunately false. Please rest assured that when Brian is found, we will be more than happy to let everyone know,” Taylor said in an email.

Petito and Laundrie grew up together in Long Island, New York, but moved in recent years to North Port, where his parents live. Their home, about 35 miles (55 kilometers) south of Sarasota, was searched by investigators earlier this week and a Ford Mustang driven by Laundrie’s mother was towed from the driveway. Authorities believe Laundrie drove that car to the Carlton Reserve before disappearing.

Continue Reading

News

Goldschmidt homers twice, Cards beat Brewers for 12th in a row

Published

on

Goldschmidt homers twice, Cards beat Brewers for 12th in a row

MILWAUKEE (AP) — Paul Goldschmidt homered twice, and the St. Louis Cardinals overcame a five-run deficit to beat the Milwaukee Brewers 8-5 and extend their longest winning streak in 39 years to 12 games.

On a day Adam Wainwright faltered early, St. Louis trailed 5-0 before rallying with one run in the fifth, four in the seventh, two in the eighth, and one in the ninth.

The Cardinals moved five games ahead of Cincinnati and Philadelphia, who both played later Thursday, for the second NL wild card.

Continue Reading

News

Should I get a flu shot if I’m getting a COVID vaccine booster?

Published

on

Should I get a flu shot if I’m getting a COVID vaccine booster?

ST. LOUIS – COVID-19 booster shots could become more widely available right as doctors recommend that people get their flu shots. But is it okay to get both vaccines at the same time?

The flu season is upon us at a time when the country already is battling a resurgence of the coronavirus. Doctors are urging Americans to avail themselves of any and all vaccines they are eligible for.

An FDA advisory panel is endorsing the Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccines for people 65 and older and those with certain health conditions that compromise their immune systems. The CDC says, yes, you can get the COVID vaccine and the flu shot at the same time and one won’t interfere with the other.

“Flu vaccine influenza vaccine has been co-administered with other vaccines for decades people needed their tetanus or some other vaccine at the same time we always did that we do them in separate arms because if you have redness or a reaction you want to know which one it was,” said Dr. Peter Montgomery, a physician with SSM Health Family Medicine.

Montgomery says the flu shots are available now.

“We want to get people vaccinated hopefully by Thanksgiving and it will take a while to get everybody in to get that done, ideally for the whole population around Halloween, so I would say if you can get it now, get it now,” he said.

The flu season can run from now until spring. SSM Health is reporting zero flu cases throughout its system so far this flu season. Last year, there were few flu cases reported. That is attributed to widespread mask use and social distancing.

Continue Reading

News

Two suspects arrested for shooting death of Denver man in Adams County

Published

on

Two suspects arrested for shooting death of Denver man in Adams County

Two suspects have been arrested in the shooting death of a Denver man in an Adams County apartment complex parking lot.

Continue Reading

Trending