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Biden reframes the purpose of reopening primary schools

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Biden reframes the purpose of reopening primary schools

President Joe Biden hopes that by the end of his first 100 days in office, a majority of elementary schools would be open five days a week, restating his target after his administration came under fire when aides suggested schools would be deemed open if they had only one day a week of in-person instruction.

During a CNN town hall in Milwaukee, Biden’s remarks marked his clearest stance yet on school reopenings. In December, Biden had vowed to reopen “most of our schools” in his first 100 days, but since then, with school districts functioning under a patchwork of various virtual and in-person learning arrangements nationally, he has faced increasing questions about how he can define and accomplish that goal.

“I said that most schools in K are open through eighth grade, because they are the easiest to open, the most necessary to be open in terms of the impact on children and families who have to stay home,” Biden said.

“He said White House press secretary Jen Psaki’s comments earlier this month that one day a week of in-person learning would fulfil his goal was “a communication error.

Asked when the nation will see kindergarten back to in-person learning five days a week through eighth grades, Biden said, “At the end of the first 100 days, we will be close to that.” He said he believed that several schools would strive to remain open during the summer, but suggested that reopening might take longer for high schools due to a higher chance of older students becoming infectious.

The town hall focused on a number of coronavirus-related topics, from protections for small businesses to vaccination plans for the administration. Biden said 600 million doses of the vaccine would be available by the end of July, enough to vaccinate every American.

But he sought to highlight the need for funding to accomplish his goals in several of his responses. The purpose of the town hall was to market his $1.9 trillion coronavirus aid package directly to the American people, part of an initiative partly designed to place pressure on Republican lawmakers and refocus Congress on swift passage of the bill now that the impeachment trial of his predecessor is behind him.

On Tuesday night, Biden underlined how much he wants to step past Donald Trump, constantly refusing to talk about the former president and at one point saying, ‘I’m tired of talking about Donald Trump.’

“All that’s been in the news for four years is Trump. I want to make sure all the coverage is about the American people for the next four years,’ he said, to the audience’s applause.

Biden also gave a glimpse of the centrist position during the town hall that helped win him purple states like Wisconsin in 2020. He rejected the proposal of a questioner for his administration to accept the radical aim of forgiving student loan debt of $50,000, reiterating his commitment to forgiving only $10,000. One of the ways he suggested to improve policing was to provide police departments with more funding, countering calls from some progressives to defund the police. He also said that he was optimistic about legislation being passed to study police reforms.

He also weighed in on the immigration bill that is expected to be unveiled this week by his administration. Biden claimed that for any bill he would support, a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants was essential, but also suggested that he would be open to a piecemeal approach to immigration reform rather than a comprehensive bill, if necessary.

There are things I’d do on my own, but not at the expense of saying that I’m never going to do something else,” he said.”

Since the inauguration, Biden appeared to revel in his first opportunity for extended interaction with ordinary Americans. Biden told the girl that kids are less likely to get infected by a second-grader who was unable to go to school and was worried about getting the virus, adding, “I wouldn’t worry about it, baby, I promise you.”

He also provided an intimate account of living in the White House, expressing his discomfort with being tended to by employees. “With the White House living under his belt for about a month, Biden joked that he would wake up in the morning, look at his wife, Jill, and ask, “Where the fuck are we? ”

Biden stressed that there is already wide public support for his massive virus aid bill, and noted that some analysts have argued in favour of significant government spending to help boost the economy.

‘Now is the time we ought to spend,’ said Biden.

It is expected that the House will vote next week on the measure.

About 90 minutes before the evening programme, Biden landed on a slick, snow-covered asphalt in below-freezing weather. He took questions from a small audience of Democrats, Republicans and independents invited to the historic Pabst Theater for a small, socially remote gathering.

A political battleground state he narrowly won last November, Biden’s trip to Wisconsin comes as coronavirus infection rates and deaths are declining after the country experienced the two deadliest months of the pandemic so far. After a slow start, the White House is also reporting an increase in vaccine administration throughout the country.

But Biden has emphasised that as thousands of Americans die each day in the worst U.S. public health epidemic in a century, the country still has a long path ahead. The virus has killed more than 485,000 people, and the response effort is complicated by newly emerging strains.

In order to achieve “herd immunity,” the Biden administration is trying to get enough Americans vaccinated and allow life to return to a semblance of normalcy. But when the vaccine will be widely available to Americans, it’s unknown.

Biden’s team hopes that funding included in the coronavirus aid bill would help speed up the development and delivery of vaccine. His team also argues that to help people who struggle economically and to bring the nation back to pre-pandemic job levels, the federal government must keep open the spigot of government relief.

However, many GOP politicians continue to bristle at the price tag of a package that calls for most Americans to send $1,400 checks as well as support for businesses, colleges, homeowners and tenants.

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Annual memorial mass for deceased members of the law enforcement

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Annual memorial mass for deceased members of the law enforcement

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Tuesday, September 28, at 10:30 a.m., the 34th Annual Memorial Mass for deceased community members of the law enforcement, will be held at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, on Eagle Street.

Bishop Edward Scharfenberger will preside the mass to remember those who have died in law enforcement and to commemorate the 20th anniversary of 9/11.

Law enforcement from New York City, Long Island, the Capital Region, and from across New York State will be present, along with local dignitaries.

For more information, contact Mary Poust at (518) 331-0850 or visit the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany webpage.

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Colorado high school football: How CHSAANow Top 10 teams fared in Week 5

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Colorado high school football: How CHSAANow Top 10 teams fared in Week 5

Class 5A

1. Valor Christian (4-0) vs. No. 3 Columbine, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Mountain Vista, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

2. Cherry Creek (3-1) at No. 5 Regis Jesuit, 6:30 p.m. Friday. Next week: at No. 8 Cherokee Trail, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

3. Columbine (4-0) at No. 1 Valor Christian, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: at Arvada West, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

4. Ralston Valley (4-0) at Doherty, 11 a.m. Saturday. Next week: at Mullen, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

5. Regis Jesuit (3-1) vs. No. 2 Cherry Creek, 6:30 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Chaparral, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

6. Grandview (3-1) vs. Horizon, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Smoky Hill, 7 p.m. Sept. 30

7. Legend (3-1) at Westminster, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. 4A No. 2 Pine Creek, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

8. Cherokee Trail (3-1) at Denver East, 11 a.m. Saturday. Next week: vs. No. 2 Cherry Creek, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

9. Douglas County (5-0) won vs. Boulder, 34-7. The Huskies defense returned a fumble for a touchdown, Reed McConnell and A.J. Jackson each had interceptions, and Douglas County won its fifth in a row for the first time since 2008. Next week: vs. Doherty, 1 p.m. Oct. 2

10. Arapahoe (3-1) at Rock Canyon, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Eaglecrest, 7 p.m. Sept. 30

Class 4A

1. Palmer Ridge (4-0) at Lakewood, 7 pm. Friday. Next week: vs. No. 5 Montrose, 6 p.m. Oct. 1

2. Pine Creek (4-0) vs. No. 4 Chatfield, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: at 5A No. 7 Legend, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

3. Dakota Ridge (4-0) at Brighton, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Bear Creek, 7 p.m. Oct. 1

4. Chatfield (4-0) at No. 2 Pine Creek, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Wheat Ridge, 6 p.m. Sept. 30

5. Montrose (4-0) vs. Grand Junction, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: at No. 1 Palmer Ridge, 6 p.m. Oct. 1

6. Loveland (3-1) at Broomfield, 7 p.m. Friday. Next week: vs. Monarch, 6:30 p.m. Sept. 30

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Massachusetts COVID Daily Report: 23 new deaths, 1,885 new cases

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Massachusetts COVID Daily Report: 23 new deaths, 1,885 new cases

BOSTON (WWLP) — State public health officials reported 23 new confirmed deaths and 1,885 new confirmed COVID-19 cases in Massachusetts.

Total COVID cases by age

  • 0-4 years: 1,224
  • 5-9 years: 1,753
  • 10-14 years: 1,632
  • 15-19 years: 1,932
  • 20-29 years: 4,999
  • 30-39 years: 3,616
  • 40-49 years: 2,560
  • 50-59 years: 2,347
  • 60-69 years: 1,665
  • 70-79 years: 963
  • 80+ years: 521

Testing

According to the Department of Public Health, 109,695 new tests were performed with an overall of 28,055,548 molecular tests administered. Antigen Tests: A total of 10,656 new individuals have tested positive with 1,941,886 total tests reported.

The 7-day average of percent positivity is 2.11%

Hospitalizations

There are 606 patients are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 with 165 patients that are in intensive care units and 96 patients intubated. There are 209 patients of the 606 patients that are reportedly fully vaccinated.

Confirmed COVID cases

  • New Cases: 1,885
  • Total Cases: 747,656
  • New Deaths: 23
  • Total Deaths: 18,141

Probable COVID cases

  • New Cases: 119
  • Total Cases: 53,253
  • New Deaths: 0
  • Total Deaths: 386

Berkshire County

  • New Confirmed Cases: 34
  • Total Confirmed Cases: 7,971
  • New Deaths: 0
  • Total Confirmed and Probable Deaths: 312

Hampden County

  • New Confirmed Cases: 190
  • Total Confirmed Cases: 61,541
  • New Deaths: 5
  • Total Confirmed and Probable Deaths: 1,606

Hampshire County

  • New Confirmed Cases: 49
  • Total Confirmed Cases: 10,991
  • New Deaths: 0
  • Total Confirmed and Probable Deaths: 313

Franklin County

  • New Confirmed Cases: 14
  • Total Confirmed Cases: 3,150
  • New Deaths: 1
  • Total Confirmed and Probable Deaths: 11

Higher education

There are 2,231 new cases in the last week with a total of 22,528 confirmed COVID-19 cases in higher education institutions. In the last week there were 583,922 new tests reported with a total of 9,651,458.

MassDPH COVID-19 Dashboard

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Machete attack in NJ Walmart: Man slashed in head, police say

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Machete attack in NJ Walmart: Man slashed in head, police say

KEARNY, N.J. – A man was attacked with a machete in a New Jersey Walmart during an argument with another shopper Friday morning, according to authorities.

Officers responded around 10:30 a.m. to a 911 call for the attack at the Kearny store, on Harrison Avenue, local police said.

Responding officers found the man inside the store with a deep wound to the back of his head, police said.

Preliminary information indicated the victim was involved in a verbal argument with another man who then struck him in the head with a machete, according to authorities.

Cops said the alleged attacker fled the store before police arrived on the scene.

The victim was rushed by EMS to a local hospital. His condition was not immediately known.

According to one Walmart employee, who did not wish to be identified, managers told workers to leave the store and wait in the parking lot.

Employees remained in the store parking lot over two hours later Friday afternoon as detectives and officers continued their investigation inside.

Markell Wilson of Newark, who came for a quick grocery run, was stunned by the news of the apparent machete attack.

“Oh my God! A machete!?” he told PIX11 News. “Never heard of anything like that happening in my life, it’s actually very scary.”

No arrests had been made as of 12:45 p.m., however police do not believe there is a threat to the community at large.

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Mechanicville man charged with multiple drug, firearm offenses

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Mechanicville man charged with multiple drug, firearm offenses

PHOENIX (AP) — A Republican-backed review of the 2020 presidential election in Arizona’s largest county ended Friday without producing proof to support former President Donald Trump’s false claims of a stolen election.

After six months of searching for evidence of fraud, the firm hired by Republican lawmakers issued a report that experts described as riddled with errors, bias and flawed methodology. Still, even that partisan review came up with a vote tally that would not have altered the outcome, finding that Biden won by 360 more votes than the official results certified last year.

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Glenville announcing public safety agreement with police, schools

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Glenville announcing public safety agreement with police, schools

PHOENIX (AP) — A Republican-backed review of the 2020 presidential election in Arizona’s largest county ended Friday without producing proof to support former President Donald Trump’s false claims of a stolen election.

After six months of searching for evidence of fraud, the firm hired by Republican lawmakers issued a report that experts described as riddled with errors, bias and flawed methodology. Still, even that partisan review came up with a vote tally that would not have altered the outcome, finding that Biden won by 360 more votes than the official results certified last year.

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‘The View’ hosts test COVID-positive minutes before Harris interview

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‘The View’ hosts test COVID-positive minutes before Harris interview

Ana Navarro and Sunny Hostin were instructed to leave the set by an off-camera crew member during Friday’s show. (Getty)

NEW YORK (KRON) — Two hosts of “The View” discovered they tested positive for COVID just minutes before Vice President Kamala Harris was set to come out for a live interview. The incident unfolded in front of the cameras during Friday morning’s live show.

During the broadcast, co-hosts Sunny Hostin and Ana Navarro were instructed to leave the set by an off-camera crew member. “We’re going to bring you back later,” the crew member says, indicating that “more information” would be provided to the audience soon.

Co-host Joy Behar then asks if she should introduce Harris, but is instructed not to do so.

After a break, Behar and Sara Haines were seated in the center of the desk, where Behar explained that Hostin and Navarro had tested positive for COVID. “No matter how hard we try, these things happen,” Behar explained. “They probably have a breakthrough case and they’ll probably be OK because they’re both vaccinated up the wazoo.”

Harris’ interview was set to be her first live, in-studio appearance since she became VP, according to a promo tweeted by “The View.” The vice president instead conducted her interview from a separate location in the building, while Behar and Haines remained on the set.

“I hope that you’re in a safe spot right now,” Behar told Harris during the interview, which was conducted remotely. “We did everything we could to make sure you were safe because we value you so much.”

Harris thanked the producers, but said the incident speaks to the effectiveness of vaccination. “Sunny and Ana are strong women and I know they’re fine, but it really also does speak to the fact that they’re vaccinated and vaccines really make all the difference. Because otherwise, we would be concerned about hospitalization and worse.”

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Troy man found guilty of beating and robbing local business owners

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Troy man found guilty of beating and robbing local business owners

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) – On Thursday, after a week-long trial by jury found Mark Scott, 57, of Troy guilty of preying upon a business owner for protection money.

On September 10, Scott approached a Lansingburgh business owner and insisted he be paid $150 per week to protect the owners business, Police said, which the owner refused

Scott returned on September 11 and demanded payment, when the store owner again refused Police said
he then robbed the store and beat the owner and his wife.

Scott was found guilty, charged with:

  • Second-Degree Robbery ( Class C Felony)
  • Two-Counts of Third-Degree Assualt ( Class A Misdemeanour)

“This was a senseless act of violence,” District Attorney Mary Donnelly said. “We have no tolerance for those that prey upon the hard-working individuals in our community.

Scott faces a minimum of 5 and 15 years when he is sentenced on November 4.

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Be patient when ordering Colorado’s free at-home COVID tests, state health department says

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Be patient when ordering Colorado’s free at-home COVID tests, state health department says

Because of high demand, Coloradans who order free at-home COVID-19 testing kits through the state might have to wait up to two weeks for confirmation they’re in the program, the state health department said Friday.

On Tuesday, Gov. Jared Polis announced the state will give away 2 million at-home testing kits to any residents who sign up. The rapid tests are designed for regular screening, not as a substitute for lab-based testing if you have symptoms.

Some people who tried to order the tests have taken to social media to complain about delays. A spokeswoman for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment confirmed it can take anywhere from seven to 14 days for people to receive a confirmation email after signing up. The confirmation email includes a link to order the kits, and attempting to order without it will produce an “error” message, she said.

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Denver DA won’t charge Tay Anderson, records show school board spent $190,000 on investigation

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Denver DA won’t charge Tay Anderson, records show school board spent $190,000 on investigation

Denver’s district attorney this week declined to file criminal charges against Tay Anderson as documents show Denver Public Schools spent more than $190,000 on its investigation that did not substantiate sexual assault allegations against the school board member.

The Denver Police Department brought a sexual assault case against Anderson to the district attorney’s office, but after reviewing the facts, prosecutors decided Thursday they would be unable to prove the charges beyond a reasonable doubt to a jury, said Carolyn Tyler, a spokeswoman for District Attorney Beth McCann.

“Today, DPD Detective Curtis Johnson confirmed to me that their investigations into Director Anderson have been presented to the Denver DA’s office, who has declined to file any charges,” Christopher Decker, Anderson’s attorney, said in an email.

Anderson, 23, repeatedly has denied all sexual assault allegations.

Meanwhile, the DPS Board of Directors spent $192,004 on its investigation, which was launched in April, according to documents obtained by The Denver Post through a Colorado Open Records Act request.

The largest amount was paid to Investigations Law Group, the outside firm hired in April to investigate sexual assault and harassment allegations against Anderson. But the board also used a public relations firm and another law firm to help it navigate the crisis, invoices from the three firms show.

The invoices show:

  • Investigations Law Group received $160,365 for its work, which lasted from early April through mid-September
  • Rockford Gray, the PR firm, was paid $25,758, with the largest bill coming in April when the crisis started. That month’s invoice was $13,737.
  • Caplan and Earnest, a Boulder law firm that advises educational institutions, received $5,880

The investigative report, which was released Sept. 15, found that all sexual assault allegations against Anderson were unsubstituted, including claims by a woman who testified before the state legislature that a predator in the school district had preyed on dozens of students. The school board later said she was referring to Anderson, and the investigators concluded the woman was not credible. No victims ever came forward.

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