Connect with us

News

Mass anti-coup protests as the UN warns of crackdowns in Myanmar

Published

on

Mass anti-coup protests as the UN warns of crackdowns in Myanmar

 

Thousands of protesters flooded the streets of Myanmar’s largest city on Wednesday, despite U.N. warnings, in one of the largest protests yet, a coup. Recent troop movements could indicate that the military was planning a violent crackdown on human rights experts.

In Yangon, protesters marched carrying signs calling for the release from detention of ousted leader Aung San Suu Kyi, while others feigned car trouble, abandoning their vehicles strategically and leaving the hoods up to prevent security forces from accessing the demonstrations easily. In defiance of an order prohibiting gatherings of five or more people, large rallies were also held in the country’s second-largest city, Mandalay, and the capital of Naypyitaw.

“One motorist, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he feared being targeted, explained tongue-in-cheek that “due to the suffering our people are now experiencing, his car had broken down. We just stopped the cars on the road here to show we don’t want a military regime.

The protests came a day after the U.N. Reporter Tom Andrews expressed alarm at reports of soldiers being transported to Yangon, noting that killings, disappearances and mass arrests had previously preceded such movements.

“I am terrified that we could be on the precipice of the military committing even greater crimes against the people of Myanmar, given the confluence of these two developments, planned mass protests and forces converging,” he said in a statement issued by the U.N. Office of Human Rights in Geneva.

There had been no reports of major violence by Wednesday evening.

On Feb. 1, the day that newly elected parliamentarians were supposed to take their seats, the military seized power, a shocking backslide for a country that had taken tentative steps towards democracy. The junta said the takeover was necessary because the government of Suu Kyi had failed to investigate fraud claims in elections won by her party in a landslide; those claims have been dismissed by the election commission.

A day after junta leaders declared that the demonstrations were dying down, the high protest turnout came, and Kyi Pyar, a former Suu Kyi party lawmaker, said that dismissal only served to spur the resistance.

“That made people angry,” she said. We are not weak. In the fight against the military regime, we will never step back. So we are back again on the street.

In Naypyitaw, thousands of people marched down the city’s wide boulevards, including private bank employees and engineers, chanting for the release of Suu Kyi and President Win Myint.

Protesters also poured into Mandalay streets, where security forces pointed guns at protesters earlier in the week and assaulted them with slingshots and sticks. Local media reported that several individuals were wounded.

The marches, spearheaded by medical workers and supported by many civil servants, were organised as part of a civil disobedience movement.

As her lawyer said Tuesday, police filed a new charge against Suu Kyi, a move likely to keep her under house arrest and further fuel public anger. It was the second charge against Suu Kyi, the first for illegally possessing walkie-talkies, the second for an alleged breach of the restrictions on coronavirus, both obvious attempts to provide her detention with a legal veneer.

A strong denunciation of the legal manoeuvre was issued by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

“The Myanmar military’s new charges against Aung San Suu Kyi are a clear violation of her human rights,” he tweeted. “We stand with the people of Myanmar and will ensure that those responsible are held to account for this coup.”

On Tuesday night, the military ordered an internet blackout for a third day in a row, almost entirely blocking online access from 1 a.m. Towards 9 a.m.

While the army did not say why the internet was blocked, there is widespread speculation that a firewall system is being installed by the government to allow it to monitor or block online activity.

My self Eswar, I am Creative Head at RecentlyHeard. I Will cover informative content related to political and local news from the United Nations and Canada.

News

Schumer joins push to ‘close loopholes’ for organic dairy farmers

Published

on

Schumer joins push to ‘close loopholes’ for organic dairy farmers

WASHINGTON (WWTI) — The county’s top Democratic leader has joined the push to support organic dairy farmers in the Northeast.

Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer announced that he is urging Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to close “loopholes” for dairy farmers following the termination of 89 organic dairy farm contracts with Horizon Organics. The Senators are requesting that Vilsack close the loopholes around the term “organic,” strengthen enforcement, and support both small and mid-sized organic dairy farmers. According to Senator Schumer, organic dairy farmers, especially those in New York, are important to New York economies and rural communities.

“New York’s dairy farmers are the lifeblood of the Upstate economy and after years of being wrung dry by a system that disadvantages them, they’re now at the edge of an economic precipice,” Senator Schumer said in a press release. “For an industry that has razor-thin margins as it is and saw historic losses during the COVID crisis, for many family-owned organic dairy farms, losing their contracts with Horizon Organics will be the final pull on the rug under them.”

Additionally, Senator Schumer discussed the Origin of Livestock Rule, which was initiated in 2015. He said that this would close a loophole that has allowed large-scale producers in some states to rotate animals in-and-out of organic management and sell under an organic label. Senator Schumer said that finalizing the Origin of Livestock rule would “close the loophole in organic dairy farming.”

Schumer joined several other politicians from the region, from Senators—Patrick Leahy, Bernie Sanders, James Welch, Argus King, Maggie Hassan, Kirsten Gillibrand, and Susan Collins—to Congressmembers—Chellie Pingree, Elise Stefanik, Annie Kuster, Chris Pappas, and Jared Golden—in a letter to Secretary Vilsack. The full letter can be read below:

Dear Secretary Vilsack,

We write to you today to request your urgent action to support organic dairy producers in our states that are facing market loss. As you know, Danone, a multinational food company and owner of Horizon Organic, recently notified 89 farmers in Vermont, Maine, New York, and New Hampshire that their milk contracts will be terminated by August 2022, leaving these farmers without buyers and effectively pulling out of New England altogether.

Danone appears to be consolidating their supply to prioritize more concentrated producers for transportation economies and abandoning smaller and more dispersed family farms. We believe this matter further underscores the long overdue need to close existing loopholes in the rules governing how livestock are transitioned to organic and strengthen enforcement of the pasture rule, particularly for large-scale complex dairies. We ask that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) use whatever funding sources and programs necessary to support organic farmers in our region during this period of market upheaval.

The organic dairy industry is an important economic engine in the Northeast and these farms serve as anchor businesses to many of our local rural economies. For years, however, organic dairy farmers in our region have been put at a significant competitive disadvantage that is now threatening their livelihood and shaking consumer confidence in the organic label. The Origin of Livestock Rule, which you first initiated in 2015, would close a loophole that has allowed large-scale producers in some states to expand herd sizes quickly through continual transition of conventional animals in and out of organic management. The USDA’s ongoing delay in finalizing this rule, which continues to enjoy widespread support within the sector, has contributed to the oversupply of organic milk in the market, placed the integrity of the organic label at risk, and kept farmers in our states at a severe financial disadvantage.

After years of inaction by USDA, the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020, which was signed into law on December 20, 2019, included an explicit congressional directive for USDA to finalize the Origin of Livestock Rule by July 17, 2020, a directive still unmet. On July 12, 2021, for the third time in over six years, a comment period on the proposed rule closed, and we strongly urge you to now issue a final rule that reflects the thousands of comments received since 2015, meets the intent of the Organic Foods Production Act, and fulfills consumer expectations, as soon as possible. This action, combined with increased and consistent enforcement of existing organic regulations like the pasture rule, will help restore the level playing field that farmers in our region require.

In addition to restoring and preserving the integrity of the organic seal, we respectfully request that you use any tools at your disposal and work quickly to support the farmers affected by Danone’s decision and work with stakeholders to expand market channels for their products. This includes targeted and increased support through USDA’s Pandemic Assistance for Producers program, targeted investments in processing capacity and transportation efficiencies for businesses that can contract with these farmers, as well as temporary price supports to allow these farmers to transition to new markets.

We appreciate your immediate attention to this matter and for your continued support for our dairy farmers. Working landscapes and family farms are foundational to our region, and a healthy, viable organic dairy market is essential to the economic, environmental, and social fabric of our states. We look forward to working with you and with key stakeholders to mobilize all available resources to protect the livelihood of these farm families and the future of the organic dairy sector.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Voorheesville man arrested after attempting to meet teen for sex

Published

on

Rochester man charged in hatchet murder back in custody after ‘Less is More’ release

MOLINE, Ill. (AP) — An Illinois man unexpectedly won the Quad Cities Marathon this weekend when the two Kenyan runners who had far outpaced him were disqualified after being diverted off the course by a race volunteer bicyclist.

Tyler Pence crossed the finish line in 2 hours, 15 minutes, 6 seconds to become the first U.S. runner since 2001 to win the race through the Quad Cities along the Mississippi River in Illinois and Iowa. Pence, the head track and cross-country coach at the University of Illinois-Springfield, logged his fastest time ever with the win and took the first prize of $3,000.

Continue Reading

News

North Country family seeks support after losing home to ‘devastating’ fire

Published

on

North Country family seeks support after losing home to ‘devastating’ fire

HARRISVILLE, N.Y. (WWTI) — A family from the North Country is asking the community for support.

At the end of August, the family of Bob and Laurie Cowles got a call that many dread: their parent’s home in Harrisville was on fire. After an investigation, the incident was deemed an electrical fire that started in the walls and quickly spread throughout the house.

Because the fire was during the day, both Bob and Laurie were able to escape to safety. However, their home and many of their belongings were destroyed. As devastating as this was, the family then found themselves without insurance.

At the same time, Bob has been battling Stage Four Carcinoid Cancer. However, Bob’s treatment has now been put on hold.

“It’s been tough,” Laurie Cowles said. “The stress has had a lot on him. I try to take the impact of a lot of stuff for him. And we’ve been trying to raise money to send him to New York City, to see his carcinoid team down there, which now was on hold because we are living in a camper in the front yard.”

The Cowles’ son recently set up a GoFundMe with a goal of $10,000. However, as of now, most of this has been used to take down the remaining structure. The family is now seeking community donations, both monetary and including building supplies.

Funds raised will specifically be used to hire a company to sanitize and the family’s clothing and bedding. It will also be used to clear debris and start rebuilding a structure ahead of the winter months. But Laurie shared that the amount of support neighbors, businesses, friends and the community has given has been overwhelming.

She said that it’s been bizarre being on the other side as she and her husband are always trying to support their own neighbors. “The people that supported us and stopped by, it’s been great,” Laurie expressed. “It’s really nice to know that. Cause usually we’re the people helping, we’re not the people asking for help. And I don’t like being on the side. But, we’re very appreciative.”

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Monday is the deadline for health care workers to get first COVID-19 vaccine dose

Published

on

Monday is the deadline for health care workers to get first COVID-19 vaccine dose

ALBANY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Monday is the deadline for health care workers in New York State to receive their first vaccine dose. With the health care industry already dealing with staffing shortages, some are uncertain what tomorrow will look like. 

“We are taking all the steps preemptively in anticipation of what I call a preventable staffing shortage,” said Governor Kathy Hochul who is signing an executive order that will allow her to deploy medically trained National Guard members, retired health care workers, recent grads, and those licensed in other states and countries to step in over the health care worker vaccine mandate. 

She’s also working with the federal government to try to “expedite visa requests” for medical workers as well. 

New York State Public Employees Federation President Wayne Spence says while he hopes the Governor’s plan is sufficient, he doesn’t think it will be. “I don’t think there are enough people to go around to plug the holes because a lot of nurses have left New York State as of last year,” Spence said.

United University Professions President Fred Kowal says when it comes to tomorrow’s potential impacts, there are a lot of unknowns. “We support the Governor’s mandate. The vaccine mandate I think is an appropriate step and a necessary one in the fight against COVID. At the same time, what we are looking at is potentially hundreds and hundreds of health care professionals and support staff not being at their workstations starting tomorrow,” Kowal said.

After a legal challenge, a judge put a temporary restraining order on the mandate in place for those claiming a religious exemption. 

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Vermont nonprofit ships bikes, sewing machines to developing countries

Published

on

Vermont nonprofit ships bikes, sewing machines to developing countries

BURLINGTON, Vt. (WFFF) — A Vermont nonprofit is collecting bikes and sewing machines to send to developing countries. Pedals for Progress Vermont has already shipped some 4,200 bikes.

That’s according to volunteer Paul Demers. “Vermont bikes have gone to Tanzania and Nicaragua,” he says. “Sewing machines have gone to Fiji and Albania.” He has volunteered with the group for 20 years, and says the goal of each shipment is “to ship as many as you can.”

“We flip the bike over, turn the handlebars, so they take up as little space as possible,” Demers says. “Tighten the seat, and it’s ready to go.”

Demers said the bikes can help in many ways. “If you are a health care worker—if you are going from a village and you can get on this mountain bike,” Demers said. “Suddenly your capabilities to reach out to people are not doubled, but they are quadrupled.”

Pedals for Progress Vermont also plans to send sewing machines to help provide economic opportunities. “If you can imagine a sewing machine for a struggling family can help provide an income, otherwise they are struggling to feed themselves,” says Bob Thompson, another volunteer and former Peace Corps volunteer.

“I have seen the conditions that they have to live in and transportation is something that we take for granted here,” Thompson said. “And it’s not something that is always available there.”

Demers says it’s fulfilling to know household items we may take for granted will make a difference elsewhere. “Sometimes just doing a little bit over years, really adds up to a lot.”

Pedals for Progress Vermont collected bikes on Friday and Saturday in Montpelier and Burlington. Everyone who donates a bike or sewing machine was asked to give $15 to help pay for shipping.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Cohoes police searching for missing man

Published

on

Cohoes police searching for missing man

COHOES, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Cohoes police are investigating a missing person’s complaint concerning Ronnie Chaput, 51. Police say he was last seen in Cohoes on September 8.

Police say Ronnie is a white male, 6 feet tall, 200 pounds and has brown eyes.

If you know of Ronnie’s whereabouts or you see him, please contact Albany County Dispatch at 911 or (518) 765-2352.

More from NEWS10

More from News10

  • Union demands better protection at youth facility
  • Check your freezer: 14 tons of DiGiorno pizzas recalled over allergy concerns
  • Price Chopper/Market 32 offering COVID-19 booster shots
  • Mic’d up at the AFW Foundation ‘Pack Gives Back’ charity golf outing
  • Albany Firewolves Foundation hosts first annual ‘Pack Gives Back’ charity golf outing

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

Published

on

R. Kelly convicted in sex trafficking trial

NEW YORK (AP) — After decades of allegations about sexual misconduct with minors, R&B star R. Kelly has been found guilty in his latest trial. Jurors in 54-year-old Robert Sylvester Kelly’s sex trafficking trial in New York said they reached a verdict on Monday afternoon.

Kelly, perhaps best known for the 1996 smash hit “I Believe I Can Fly,” had pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges accusing him of sexually abusing women, girls, and boys for more than two decades.

The judge summoned the parties to a Brooklyn courtroom for the verdict to be read. According to the verdict sheet, he was found guilty of racketeering and several Mann Act charges:

  • Transportation
  • Ccoercion and enticement
  • Coercion of a minor
  • Transportation of a minor

The Mann Act makes it illegal to transport anyone across state lines “for any immoral purpose.” The charges were based on an argument that the entourage of managers and aides who helped the singer meet girls—and keep them obedient and quiet—amounted to a criminal enterprise.

The verdict came after a month of emotional testimony accusing Kelly of locking victims in rooms, subjecting them to degrading rules, and filming sexual encounters as a means of control. Several accusers testified in lurid detail during the trial, alleging that Kelly subjected them to perverse and sadistic whims when they were underage.

Prosecutors in the case said there was ample evidence to prove that the R&B star sexually exploited multiple victims over a period of two decades. Assistant U.S. Attorney Nadia Shihata said Kelly “believed the music, the fame, and the celebrity meant he could do whatever he wanted.”

Prosecutors against R. Kelly arrive at the Brooklyn Federal Court House on Monday, Sept. 27, 2021, in New York. A New York City jury resumed deliberations on Monday at the sex trafficking trial of R&B star R. Kelly. Jurors began the day by sending the judge a note asking for transcripts of testimony by two former Kelly employees and for a legal clarification. (AP Photo/Brittainy Newman)

Kelly had continually denied the allegations, and his defense team said Kelly’s accusers were never forced to do anything against their will. Kelly’s defense attorney, Deveraux Cannick, argued that Kelly could not be a predator because of the way he treated his accusers. “He gave them a lavish lifestyle,” he said during closing arguments. “That’s not what a predator is supposed to do.”

The jury resumed deliberations Monday morning, beginning the day by sending the judge a note asking for transcripts of testimony by two former Kelly employees and for a legal clarification. Deliberations first began on Friday at federal court in Brooklyn before the panel of seven men and five women took the weekend off.

The judge set a sentencing date of May 4. Kelly’s next court appearance will be on November 1, when the judge will hear any defense motions in the case. Kelly faces additional sex-related charges in both Illinois and Minnesota.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Rensselaer County preparing legal action against manufacturers of PFOA

Published

on

Meeting in Poestenkill Monday night to discuss PFOA found at local school and homes

RENSSELAER COUNTY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Rensselaer County is preparing legal action against the manufacturers of PFOA after the chemical was found in Algonquin Middle School and local residences in Poestenkill. The county has previously seen a PFOA issue in Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh.

Rensselaer County Executive Steve McLaughlin said he believes the county would have the ability to join with residents in bringing legal action if more PFOA is discovered in Poestenkill or other towns.

“We want to send the very clear message that we take the PFOA issue seriously and will take strong and sustained action to protect the interests of our residents. The health, safety and quality of life for our residents is not up for negotiation,” said McLaughlin.

The county is now working with the New York State Department of Health and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation to conduct a second round of testing of residences. No source of the PFOA in Poestenkill has been discovered yet.

The county hosted a virtual meeting to last week to update Poestenkill residents and give them a chance to respond to the PFOA issue. They are hosting another meeting on September 27 to further discuss the issue.

More from NEWS10

More from News10

  • Union demands better protection at youth facility
  • Check your freezer: 14 tons of DiGiorno pizzas recalled over allergy concerns
  • Price Chopper/Market 32 offering COVID-19 booster shots
  • Mic’d up at the AFW Foundation ‘Pack Gives Back’ charity golf outing
  • Albany Firewolves Foundation hosts first annual ‘Pack Gives Back’ charity golf outing

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

DEA warns of ‘alarming increase’ in fake prescription pills containing fentanyl

Published

on

DEA warns of ‘alarming increase’ in fake prescription pills containing fentanyl

FILE – This photo provided by the U.S. Attorneys Office for Utah and introduced as evidence in a 2019 trial shows fentanyl-laced fake oxycodone pills collected during an investigation. (U.S. Attorneys Office for Utah via AP)

LAS VEGAS (KLAS) – A Public Safety Alert issued Monday in Washington, D.C., warns of the “alarming increase” of fake prescription pills containing fentanyl and methamphetamine. The pills are sometimes deadly, and are being mass-produced by criminal drug networks.

The alert, the first issued by the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in six years, says 9.5 million counterfeit pills have been seized so far this year, which is more than the last two years combined. The agency warns that the pills have been seized in every U.S. state in “unprecedented quantities.”

DEA testing indicates a dramatic rise in the number of counterfeit pills containing at least two milligrams of fentanyl – which is considered a deadly dose and could fit on the tip of a pencil.

“The United States is facing an unprecedented crisis of overdose deaths fueled by illegally manufactured fentanyl and methamphetamine,” said Anne Milgram, Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration. “In fact, DEA lab analyses reveal that two out of every five fake pills with fentanyl contain a potentially lethal dose … Today, we are alerting the public to this danger so that people have the information they need to protect themselves and their children.”

According to the news release, the counterfeit pills often look like real prescription opioid medications such as oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet), hydrocodone (Vicodin), and alprazolam (Xanax); or stimulants like amphetamines (Adderall). Fake prescription pills are widely accessible and often sold on social media and e-commerce platforms – making them available to anyone with a smartphone, including minors.

Most of the counterfeit pills brought into the United States are produced in Mexico, and China is supplying chemicals for the manufacturing of fentanyl in Mexico, according to the DEA.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 93,000 people died of a drug overdose in the United States last year. Fentanyl, the synthetic opioid most commonly found in counterfeit pills, is the primary driver of this alarming increase in overdose deaths. Drug poisonings involving methamphetamine, increasingly found to be pressed into counterfeit pills, also continue to rise as illegal pills containing methamphetamine become more widespread.

Drug trafficking is linked to violence. So far in 2021, DEA has seized more than 2,700 firearms in connection with drug trafficking investigations – a 30% increase since 2019.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

News

Unvaccinated staff at Rensselaer County nursing home no longer working as vaccine mandate goes into effect

Published

on

Unvaccinated staff at Rensselaer County nursing home no longer working as vaccine mandate goes into effect

TROY, N.Y. (NEWS10) — Rensselaer County Executive Steve McLaughlin says employees not vaccinated at Van Rensselaer Manor Nursing Home are no longer scheduled to work as the state vaccine mandate goes into effect September 27. McLaughlin says 29 out of 434 staff members are not vaccinated or do not have an exemption.

Under the state mandate, employees not vaccinated or declaring a religious or medical exemption will be considered as essentially resigned from their position at care facilities. McLaughlin says he expects at least some of those 29 employees will be vaccinated in the coming hours.

McLaughlin says he hopes the state will allow for a two-week period to allow more employees at care facilities to be vaccinated or declare a religious exemption, if it is decided that such exemptions are allowed.

“This mandate from the previous administration is being implemented as there is no firm plan on how to fill vacancies created by the mandate,” said McLaughlin. “There are already staffing shortages at care facilities across the state, and this will make it worse.”

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo announced this state mandate on July 28. The mandate allows for state employees to get regular testing instead of getting vaccinated. However, health care workers do not have a choice. They need to get vaccinated or have an exemption.

More from NEWS10

Follow us on social media

Sign up for our newsletter

Continue Reading

Trending